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Liberal American think tank

  • 1,006PODCASTS
  • 2,091EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 6, 2022LATEST
Brookings Institution

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Best podcasts about Brookings Institution

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Latest podcast episodes about Brookings Institution

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
House Reps Ask Investors: “Where Have All the Houses Gone?”

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 4:54


Members of Congress are taking a deep dive into the single-family housing market to find out “Where Have All the Houses Gone?” In this investigation, they took a close look at the business practices of the nation's largest landlords – the institutional landlords that buy huge lots of homes at one time. Although the results show an adverse impact on certain communities and potential homebuyers, housing experts argue that investor ownership of rental property is more of a symptom than a cause. (1)Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.This investigation began last fall when a subcommittee of the House Committee on Financial Services sent a survey to five of the largest single-family rental companies in the U.S. Asked to participate in this survey were Invitation Homes, American Homes4Rent, FirstKey Homes, Progress Residential and Amherst Residential. The survey dug into things like where they are buying homes, what they are paying, how much rent they are charging, etc. The final analysis used that information along with government data to come up with a few conclusions.Mass Predatory PurchasingThe subcommittee just held a hearing on the results last week. Subcommittee Chair, Representative Al Green, said during the hearing: “We have found that private equity companies have bought up hundreds of thousands of single-family homes and placed them on the rental market.” He referred to this practice as “mass predatory purchasing.” He also said:“These corporate buyers have tended to target lower-priced starter homes requiring limited renovation; these homes would likely have been bought by first-time buyers, low- to middle-income home-buyers, or both.” (2)The investigation also found that a disproportionate number of homes have been purchased in communities of color, and communities with a higher number of single mothers. An examination of the top 20 zip codes where institutional investors have purchased show that about 40% of the population is Black while just 13.4% of the overall population is Black. The number of single mothers is reportedly about 30% higher than average.Other findings include rents that are up 40% over three years from 2018 to 2021, and a doubling of the number of tenants who are behind on their rent. Lawmakers were also critical of automated property management, often used by institutional investors. They say if tenants can't get a hold of someone about a problem, they could be at risk of mismanagement and eviction when problems occur. (3)Investors as a Symptom, Not the CauseEven though the numbers have grown, Representative Tom Emmer sided with landlords, and reminded hearing attendees that 8.6% inflation is having a big impact on housing. He also said that institutional investors still account for a very small percentage of single-family rentals, which appears to mean that they couldn't possibly be a huge part of the problem.Jenny Schuetz of the Brookings Institution also testified that these big investors are not the cause of the housing gap. She says they are a symptom, because of the high demand for rentals and the critically low inventory of affordable homes. She says: “Private equity firms and other institutional investors benefit from tight housing supply, but they did not create the problem. Local governments across the U.S. have adopted policies that make it difficult to build more homes where people want to live.”The Executive Director of the National Rental Home Council, David Howard, also spoke out at the hearing. He answered the question about where all the houses have gone in a similar way – that they were never built. He also says that “single family rental home providers are not influencing local and national housing market dynamics.” In other words, they are “responding” to housing market dynamics. Collaboration to Find a Solution Howard says that these large landlords along with The National Rental Home Council have been working with the committee, and welcome the opportunity to continue with that collaboration to find meaningful solutions to this problem. In the meantime, landlords are needed to help fill the housing gap. You can find out more about the housing market, the rental market, and the economy by listening to one of my recent webinars. You'll find a replay for my Q2 2022 Housing Market Update at newsforinvestors.com under the “Learn” tab. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://financialservices.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=4096112 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/institutional-investors-have-bought-hundreds-of-thousands-of-single-family-homes-many-in-black-communities-critics-say-its-creating-a-generation-of-renters-11656514935 3 - https://nationalmortgageprofessional.com/news/congressional-committee-exploring-where-have-all-houses-gone

Politics in Question
Is it a good idea to require Americans to vote in federal elections?

Politics in Question

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 31:06


In this week's episode of Politics In Question, E.J. Dionne and Miles Rapoport join Lee to discuss their new book, 100% Voting: The Case for Universal Voting. Dionne writes about politics for The Washington Post. He is also a government professor at Georgetown University, a visiting professor at Harvard University, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and a frequent commentator on politics for National Public Radio and MSNBC. Rapoport is Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to his appointment to the Ash Center, Rapoport was president of the independent grassroots organization Common Cause and headed the public policy center Demos.What would happen if everybody voted? How would democracy change? In some countries, voting is mandatory. Should the United States become one of those countries? These are some of the questions E.J., Miles, and Lee ask in this week's episode.

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH Is Going On With the War on Fossil Fuels? Dan Yergin on Restoring America's Energy Dominance

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 45:30


Today's episode with Dan Yergin explores America's shift away from fossil fuels, looking at the very real domestic and geopolitical implications of shuttering coal plants and transitioning to green energy. Pivoting away from U.S. energy independence has not made the country energy progressive; rather, it has set Americans up for reliance on adversarial energy sources, encouraging strategic allies to import from Russia and China instead. Promoting wind and solar alternatives does not dramatically lower resource usage; it simply shifts from a world of big oil to a world of big shovels, as an enormous quantity of rare earths and minerals are required. Then there's the fact that the technology to store wind and solar energy does not yet exist. So, how can we think about climate change, resources, geopolitical strategy, and security… practically? Yergin is the vice-chairman of S&P Global, a director of the Council on Foreign Relations and a trustee of the Brookings Institution. He is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize, for his book The Prize. His newest book is The New Map.  Download the transcript https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Dan-Yergin-Final-Transcript.docx (here).

Morning Shift Podcast
Another White Shooter Apprehended ‘Without Incident'

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 12:45


The Highland Park shooter was arrested “peacefully” despite being heavily armed. Meanwhile, an unarmed Black man in Akron, Ohio, was shot 60 times and killed by officers. Reset checks in an expert who says the two stories help illustrate the fact that Black people are many times more likely than white people to be killed by police in the U.S. GUEST: Rashawn Ray, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution; professor of sociology at the University of Maryland

Press the Button
Chain Reaction: Fiona Hill

Press the Button

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 31:39


On this week's episode, take a listen to Ploughshares Fund President Emma Belcher's conversation with Fiona Hill, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Hill discusses the Russian invasion of Ukraine and Putin's nuclear threats. On Early Warning, Lauren Billet talks with Emma Claire Foley, Senior Associate for Research & Policy at Global Zero. She discusses her new report on the real cost of ICBMs and discusses pathways for moving beyond these dangerous weapons.

All Gallup Webcasts
Why Is the World in a Terrible Emotional State?

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:44


How is the world feeling? According to Gallup's annual Global Emotions report, people across the world are sadder and more stressed, marking a new high in the Negative Experiences Index. Gallup managing editor for world news Julie Ray joins the podcast to discuss where in the world these negative experiences have increased the most. Later, Dr. Carol Graham -- senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and Gallup senior scientist -- talks about the drivers behind negative emotions and the importance of hope.

The Gallup Podcast
Why Is the World in a Terrible Emotional State?

The Gallup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:44


How is the world feeling? According to Gallup's annual Global Emotions report, people across the world are sadder and more stressed, marking a new high in the Negative Experiences Index. Gallup managing editor for world news Julie Ray joins the podcast to discuss where in the world these negative experiences have increased the most. Later, Dr. Carol Graham -- senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and Gallup senior scientist -- talks about the drivers behind negative emotions and the importance of hope.

Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith & Culture
The Great Question (with Os Guinness)

Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 31:49


What are the best steps to find a meaningful life? What can we learn from the most influential thinkers in history about how to find truth and meaning? In this interview, Sean and Scott talk with Os Guinness about his latest book: The Great Quest. Os shares his personal journey to faith and they discuss practical ways for living an examined life.Os Guinness is an author and social critic. He has written more than 30 books. Since moving to the United States in 1984, Os has been a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Studies, a Guest Scholar and Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Senior Fellow at the Trinity Forum and the EastWest Institute in New York.==========Think Biblically: Conversations on Faith and Culture is a podcast from Talbot School of Theology at Biola University, which offers degrees both online and on campus in Southern California.Read a transcript of this episode at: https://www.biola.edu/blogs/think-biblically/2022/the-great-questionFind all episodes of Think Biblically at: https://www.biola.edu/think-biblicallyWatch video episodes at: https://bit.ly/think-biblically-video

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Can I help fight inflation and still have fun?

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 16:46


It’s listener question time! A few weeks ago, Kai Ryssdal said consumers who want to help slow our inflated economy should stop spending money. But now one of our listeners wants to know if there’s anything they can do with their disposable income that helps the economy but is also fun. We offer some advice. Plus, the hosts take more of your questions on what role the dark web might play in a post-Roe era, and more than one question about gas prices! Here’s everything we talked about today: “What the end of Roe v. Wade means for access to abortion pills” from NBC News “With Roe overturned, tech companies will have to weigh big data questions” from Marketplace “Tech companies may surrender abortion-related data” from Axios “5 key takeaways on inflation from the May CPI report” from The Brookings Institution “Biden asks companies “setting those gas prices” to lower them. Can they?” from Marketplace “Biden wants a gas tax holiday. Some economists say that’s a bad idea” from NPR If you have a question about business, tech and the economy, send it our way. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org. You can also leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.”

Marketplace All-in-One
Can I help fight inflation and still have fun?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 16:46


It’s listener question time! A few weeks ago, Kai Ryssdal said consumers who want to help slow our inflated economy should stop spending money. But now one of our listeners wants to know if there’s anything they can do with their disposable income that helps the economy but is also fun. We offer some advice. Plus, the hosts take more of your questions on what role the dark web might play in a post-Roe era, and more than one question about gas prices! Here’s everything we talked about today: “What the end of Roe v. Wade means for access to abortion pills” from NBC News “With Roe overturned, tech companies will have to weigh big data questions” from Marketplace “Tech companies may surrender abortion-related data” from Axios “5 key takeaways on inflation from the May CPI report” from The Brookings Institution “Biden asks companies “setting those gas prices” to lower them. Can they?” from Marketplace “Biden wants a gas tax holiday. Some economists say that’s a bad idea” from NPR If you have a question about business, tech and the economy, send it our way. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org. You can also leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.”

Energi Talks
Clean energy Marshall Plan needed for developing countries

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 26:03


Markham interviews Dr. Homi Kharas, Senior Fellow - Global Economy and Development, Center for Sustainable Development with Brookings Institution based in Washington, DC, about his Brookings policy brief: “A Global Sustainability Program: Lessons from the Marshall Plan for addressing climate change"

EconoFact Chats
Eswar Prasad on China's Economic Rise, and Its Current Economic Challenges

EconoFact Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 23:44


China's economic rise -- which brought hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty, and drove about one quarter of global GDP growth over the past two decades, has been among the most consequential events of the past century. However, like many countries, China's economy today faces deep challenges. To discuss some of these challenges, as well as the drivers of China's growth over the past decades, EconoFact Chats welcomes back Eswar Prasad of Cornell University. Eswar is the Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University and a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution.

News Not Noise
Roe Versus Wade Overturned, What Now?

News Not Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 35:04


In a staggering decision the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, stripping away 50 years of an established right to an abortion for women and girls in America. In this conversation Ben Wittes, editor in chief of Lawfare and a Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, breaks down the ruling. He offers a calm and sober explanation of what it means for pregnant people in states that will ban abortion, and what other rights might fall as a result of this decision. We also discuss what the effort to re-establish abortion rights in America might look like.You can find Ben Wittes' work on lawfareblog.com and The Lawfare Podcast. Please see the News Not Noise letter on Bulletin.com for more details on the laws in each state. And check out our Instagram for ongoing updates on this breaking story.Ben Wittes➤Instagram:➤Twitter: twitter.com/benjaminwittesYou can follow Jessica Yellin here:➤Instagram: instagram.com/jessicayellin​➤Twitter: twitter.com/jessicayellin➤Facebook: facebook.com/newsnotnoise➤YouTube: youtube.com/newsnotnoise➤Website: NewsNotNoise.com➤Newsletter: newsnotnoise.bulletin.comSupport this work:➤patreon.com/NewsNotNoiseJessica Yellin is the founder of News Not Noise, a channel dedicated to giving you news with real experts and providing facts, not panic attacks. Jessica is a veteran of network news, traveling the globe, covering conflict and crisis. A former Chief White House Correspondent for CNN, she reported from around the world and won awards. Now, Yellin uses her voice to break down the news, calmly and clearly for you -- free of punditry, provocation, and yelling.

Just World Podcasts
The Urgency of Banning Nukes: Conversation with William B. Quandt

Just World Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 78:37


This was the sixth conversation in Just World Educational's project to produce and share multimedia resources to inform, educate, and engage new generations of (especially) Americans on the need to Ban All Nuclear Weapons and dismantle all existing nuclear arsenals, including our own.In this convo, co-hosts Helena Cobban and Amelle Zeroug talked to William B. Quandt, an American scholar, author and professor emeritus in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia.  Dr Quandt previously served as senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution and as a member on the National Security Council in the Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter administrations.Support the show

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
The Little January 6ths The Select Committee Is Bringing To Light

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 23:53


At yesterday's Jan. 6 hearing in Congress, we heard evidence around Trump's efforts to target election workers, from secretaries of state to poll workers. On Today's Show:Quinta Jurecic, fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, senior editor at Lawfare and contributing writer at The Atlantic, recaps Tuesday's January 6th House hearing that laid out former President Trump's involvement in the plot to overturn the election by enlisting local state officials.

The Brian Lehrer Show
January 6th Hearing Recap: Trump, Threats and the Plot to Overturn the Election

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:41


Quinta Jurecic, fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, senior editor at Lawfare and contributing writer at The Atlantic, recaps Tuesday's January 6th House hearing that laid out former President Trump's involvement in the plot to overturn the election by enlisting local state officials.

American Prestige
E50 - Thorny Think Tanks w/ Eli Clifton

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 47:21


Danny and Derek welcome Eli Clifton, senior advisor at the Quincy Institute and Investigative-Journalist-at-Large at Responsible Statecraft, for a discussion on Beltway think tanks. They talk about the recent kerfuffle at Brookings Institution, the Foreign Agent Registration Act, dark money, the influence of think tanks on legislation, and much more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.americanprestigepod.com/subscribe

Journey to Transformation
Reparations: Lauren agrees to pay £312/month to Teia

Journey to Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 84:52


Teia and Lauren are not holding back (at this point, would you expect anything less?). We deep dive into reparations. What do we mean by reparations? What do they look like in the non-profit space and beyond? How do we know when we are being reparative or not? Not only that! We have a story tucked inside! Fiona, who we had the privilege of meeting at Camp Quirky, shares how her organisation is taking a reparative approach. Trigger warning: This episode discusses racism and harrowing events such as the Tulsa race massacre. If you need support, these organisations can help:www.blackmindsmatteruk.comwww.rethink.orgwww.mind.org.ukResources: A Reparations Toolkit from The Movement for Black Lives - https://m4bl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Reparations-Now-Toolkit-FINAL.pdf The Cargo Movement - http://www.cargomovement.org/ A report on "The true costs of the Tulsa race massacre, 100 years later" by Andre M. Perry, Anthony Barr, and Carl Romer from the Brookings Institution - https://www.brookings.edu/research/the-true-costs-of-the-tulsa-race-massacre-100-years-later/ The Joseph Rowntree Foundation's approach - https://eachother.org.uk/todays-statement-from-the-joseph-rowntree-foundation-paves-a-path-forward/ https://www.jrf.org.uk/report/evaluation-implementation-and-effectiveness-initiative-restorative-cautioning The Role of Aid in Reparations for the Harm of Colonialism by Equals - https://equalshope.org/index.php/2022/01/13/the-role-of-aid-in-reparations-for-the-harm-of-colonialism/ Black Women Let Loose Theatre company - https://bwlltheatre.co.uk/ Other sources: https://www.alliancemagazine.org/blog/80-per-cent-believe-philanthropy-should-do-more-when-it-comes-to-reparations/https://johnsoncenter.org/blog/philanthropy-and-reparations-righting-the-past/https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/five-times-united-states-officially-apologized-180959254/https://www.history.com/news/tulsa-massacre-black-wall-street-before-and-after-photos Get Premium Content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Midday
Healthwatch: Dr. Leana Wen on the COVID vax for infants & toddlers

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 48:32


Happy Juneteenth! It's another edition of our monthly Midday Healthwatch, with Dr. Leana Wen. The latest surge in the COVID-19 variant known as omicron is beginning to show signs it is receding, but the highly transmissible BA.2 variant has led the CDC to estimate that nearly 60% of Americans have already been infected. For children, the infection rate is even higher: closer to 75%. And help for our youngest children is on the way. On Friday, an advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration emergency use authorization (EUA) to the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccines for children under the age of five. The CDC signed off on the panel's recommendation on Saturday. This comes as a relief to many parents, and it presents a dilemma for many others, who may be vaccinated themselves, but who are hesitant about vaccinating their kids. Dr. Wen is herself the parent of two children under the age of five. She is a former health commissioner of Baltimore, an emergency physician, and she teaches at the George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health. Dr. Wen is also a columnist for the Washington Post,a medical analyst for CNN, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and the author of Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health. Dr. Leana Wen joins us on Zoom… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Taking A Tumble

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 161:23


Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne shares his thoughts on the latest news from the Jan. 6 committee hearing, and violent threats from the alt-right targeting Republicans in Congress. Dionne is a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.” We then open the phone lines, asking listeners if they're holding back on their summer plans due to rising inflation. Michael Curry discusses the legacy of Juneteenth, and the CDC's approval of COVID-19 vaccines for children under 5. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass League of Community Health Centers. Sally Starr reflects on 50 years of Title IX. Starr is the head field hockey coach at Boston University. She has coached women's collegiate sports for over 45 years. Next, we talk with listeners about their experiences in school sports in the 50 years since Title IX was enacted. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on the federal commemoration of Juneteenth, and potential corporatization of the holiday. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together they host the “All Rev'd Up” podcast. Richard Blanco shares his favorite poems for Pride Month. Blanco joins us regularly to lead Village Voice, a conversation about how poetry can help us better understand our lives. He's the fifth presidential inaugural poet in US history. His latest book, “How to Love a Country,” deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. We end the show by asking listeners for their most mortifying stories of falling down.

Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other
Jonathan Rauch (Part 2) - THE CONSTITUTION OF KNOWLEDGE: A DEFENSE OF TRUTH

Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 60:27


In the 2nd part of our conversation with Jonathan Rauch, we do a deeper dive into his timely, ground breaking book THE CONSTITUTION OF KNOWLEDGE: A DEFENSE OF TRUTH. We discuss its goals of peace, freedom and knowledge; why authoritarians hate the Constitution of Knowledge; how to diagnose and resist the ills of disinformation and cancel culture; the effects of cancel culture such as "the spiral of silence"; how, at its center, the MAGA movement is all about disinformation; and how to transform the world by planting the seeds of big ideas. JONATHAN RAUCH, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, is the author of eight books and many articles on public policy, culture, and government. He is a contributing writer for The Atlantic and recipient of the 2005 National Magazine Award, the magazine industry's equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book, The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth is a deep-diving account of how to push back against disinformation, canceling, and other new threats to our fact-based epistemic order. His writing has also appeared in many other publications including The Economist, Time, The New York Times, The New York Daily News, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Post, Slate, and others. Jonathan graduated from Yale University. He is the recipient of numerous national and international awards for his writing and has appeared as a guest on many television and radio programs. But perhaps most remarkably, he does not like shrimp! www.jonathanrauch.com/about.html www.theatlantic.com/author/jonathan-rauch/ www.brookings.edu/experts/jonathan-rauch/ https://www.brookings.edu/book/the-constitution-of-knowledge/

The Rational Reminder Podcast
Understanding Crypto 3: Eswar Prasad: Bitcoin, Banking, and the Future of Money

The Rational Reminder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 48:09


Welcome back to another episode of our series focusing on cryptocurrencies. In this episode, we dive into conceptual complexities surrounding cryptocurrencies and how this might affect the financial system in future. To help us unravel this nuanced subject is Professor Eswar Prasad, a senior professor of trade policy and Professor of Economics at Cornell University, and a senior fellow at Brookings Institution. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and was a former head of the IMF China Division. Besides his wealth of experience regarding traditional economies, he is also an authority on cryptocurrencies, which he explains in detail in his book The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance. In today's conversation, we discuss broad conceptual ideas surrounding money and finance, such as the basic functions of money, the difference between outside and inside money, the limitations on creating wealth, how cryptocurrencies work, how cryptocurrencies may disrupt financial systems, why cryptocurrencies need trust to work, the future of cryptocurrencies, and much more. Tune in today to get insider information on cryptocurrencies with our special guest, Professor Eswar Prasad.   Key Points From This Episode:   A brief outline of Professor Eswar Prasad's professional background. [0:01:14] Professor Prasad explains what the basic functions of money are. [0:01:59] We learn if money is a commodity or a social contract. [0:02:33] The problems associated with fiat currencies. [0:03:00] What the concepts of inside and outside money are. [0:04:12] Factors that constrain the creation of outside money. [0:05:34] Whether mechanically constrained money is good for economies. [0:07:07] Learn whether commercial banks need deposits to make loans. [0:08:46] What the definition of fungibility is. [0:10:24] How and why reserves are usually maintained by a central bank. [0:11:19] What the differences are between physical cash and electronic money. [0:12:25] The anonymity associated with each of the payment methods available. [0:13:28] What the main functions of the financial system are. [0:15:14] Find out what the definition of shadow banking is. [0:17:01] How trust in the financial system is facilitated. [0:18:29] We find out if modern financial systems can be disintermediated by technology. [0:20:33] The potential effects that intermediaries can have on economies. [0:22:59] What Satoshi Nakamoto's 2008 innovation was. [0:25:51] The resilience of the underlying system for Bitcoin is explained. [0:28:12] Learn about the three elements that make Bitcoin decentralized. [0:30:12] How the decentralization of Bitcoin can be overcome. [0:31:39] Learn about the value of blockchain and emerging validation technology. [0:34:07] The key reasons why cryptocurrencies have value. [0:36:14] Ways in which a decentralized system would be beneficial. [0:38:32] Outline of the downsides to decentralized finance. [0:41:01] Why trust is also essential to the long-term viability of cryptocurrencies. [0:43:03] What role unofficial digital currencies will play regarding monetary policy. [0:44:05] The influence that Satoshi's innovation had on the development of a central bank digital currency. [0:45:49]

Government Matters
Deterring Chinese attack on Taiwan, China's third aircraft carrier launch, Shoring up strategic mineral stockpile – June 16, 2022

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 27:10


Deterring Chinese attack on Taiwan Michael O'Hanlon, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, discusses the “dual deterrence” policy and the likelihood that the United States would be able to defend Taiwan from China   China set to launch third aircraft carrier Warren Strobel, national security reporter for The Wall Street Journal, provides updates about satellite imagery of China's new aircraft carrier and explains the significance   Shoring up strategic mineral stockpile Bryant Harris, Congress reporter for Defense News, discusses the drastically dwindling National Defense Stockpile and steps the government is taking to bolster it

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
How the federal government is reorienting its innovation and economic development funding to focus on places

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 10:25


As we discussed yesterday with assistant secretary Alejandra Castillo from the Commerce Department, Congress is considering legislation that would designate economic development funding to new “tech hubs” located all around the country. And according to our next guest, that's part of an emerging trend in how the federal government approaches innovation funding. The National Science Foundation and the Economic Development Administration have already created programs that focus their attention on specific places, rather than individual institutions or research topics. Mark Muro is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and policy director for the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. He joined the Federal Drive to talk more about it.

The Impact Room
Tipping point: why we need new solutions for refugees

The Impact Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 53:50


As the number of forcibly displaced people around the world surpasses 100 million, Filippo Grandi, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, joins Maysa Jalbout in The Impact Room to discuss new pathways to respond to the global displacement crisis.Ukraine alone has generated more than six million refugee movements since the Russian invasion in February, and the knock-on effect that this has had on grain exports has triggered global food shortages, which in turn threaten to lead to widespread unrest, and likely more displacement.The humanitarian system is at breaking point and with global displacement forecast to hit one billion by 2050, there is an urgent need for new and innovative solutions.Have we reached a tipping point? Do we as a world need to rethink our collective conscience regarding freedom of movement and what it means to be a refugee? Is the current system fit-for-purpose or does it need an overhaul?In a special edition of The Impact Room recorded in the run-up to World Refugee Day, host Maysa Jalbout puts these questions and more to the UNHCR chief.  Also interviewed in this episode of The Impact Room is Sasha Chanoff, the founder and CEO of Refuge Point, a non-profit running refugee resettlement programmes and advocating for policy changes for the rights of refugees globally with a focus on long-term solutions.One organisation that is trying to help find long-term answers to displacement is Talent Beyond Boundaries (TBB), a nonprofit that helps to match skilled refugees to job opportunities in new countries to support labour mobility and plug global talent gaps.CEO Steph Cousins, explains to Maysa how TBB has found durable work solutions for hundreds of refugees in private and public sector companies in Australia, Canada, and the UK, and that it has plans to expand into Portugal, Ireland, Belgium, the US, and New Zealand.Also appearing on this episode to give their views on a global system that is supposed to help - but which often makes lives harder - are two young refugees: Amna Abo Zuhair, a Palestinian  living in Jordan, and Jean Marie Ishimwe, a Rwandan in Kenya. Amna, 29, is a monitoring and evaluation project manager at Sitti, a social enterprise employing Palestinian refugee women from Jerash camp in Jordan. She is also the in-country director of Hopes for Women in Education, a language exchange, education, and women's empowerment organisation, as well as a steering committee member of the Refugee Self-Reliance Initiative (RSRI), a global multi-stakeholder collaboration promoting opportunities for refugees to become self-reliant and achieve a better quality of life.Jean Marie Ishimwe, meanwhile, is the chairperson and lead of a refugee led organisation known as Youth Voices Community (YVC), which focuses on giving a voice to refugee and vulnerable local youths in Nairobi, Kenya. The 25-year-old is also the founder of a refugee-led Social Enterprise called Nawezaa, which uses media, mentorship, and technology to create impact in refugee communities.The Impact Room is brought to you by Philanthropy Age and Maysa Jalbout. This episode was produced and edited by Louise Redvers. Maysa Jalbout is a leader in international development and philanthropy. She is a visiting scholar at MIT and ASU, and a non-resident Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Find her on Twitter @MaysaJalbout.

The Lawfare Podcast
Allies: How America Failed its Partners in Afghanistan

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 56:42


On Monday, the Brookings Institution hosted a panel discussion titled, “Allies: How America failed its partners in Afghanistan.” The event featured comments from Lawfare editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes, a preview clip of Episode 6 of the podcast Allies, and a moderated discussion with an all-star panel.Lawfare associate editor Bryce Klehm sat down with Shala Gafary, the managing attorney for Project: Afghan Legal Assistance at Human Rights First; Col. Steven Miska, who serves on the steering committee of the Evacuate Our Allies Coalition; and Matt Zeller, a U.S. Army veteran, co-founder of No One Left Behind, and an advisory board chair of the Association of Wartime Allies. They discussed some of the past failures that led to a situation where tens of thousands of the U.S.'s allies were left behind in Afghanistan. They also discussed current resettlement issues and relocation for those still in Afghanistan or other third countries. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Grand Tamasha
Season Finale: Where is Indian Foreign Policy Going?

Grand Tamasha

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 39:51


This season, in twenty episodes, Grand Tamasha has covered a lot of ground—from the war in Ukraine, to the UP elections, and India's water crisis. We will be taking a little break to recharge our batteries, but we will be back in August with all-new Grand Tamasha content.To bring the curtains down on the seventh season of Grand Tamasha, Milan is joined on the podcast by podcast regulars, Sadanand Dhume of the American Enterprise Institute and Wall Street Journal and Tanvi Madan of the Brookings Institution. The trio discusses the foreign policy crisis which engulfed India last week after two BJP spokespersons made statements criticizing the Prophet Mohammed; the 180-degree turn in popular perceptions of India's stance on the Russian invasion of Ukraine; and how India was received at the annual Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore.Plus, the three offer their summer reading recommendations for India policy enthusiasts. Sadanand Dhume, “Hindu Nationalism Threatens India's Rise as a Nation,” Wall Street Journal, June 9, 2022. Shoaib Daniyal, “The India Fix,” Scroll.in.Carnegie India, “Ideas and Institutions,” Carnegie India.Ananth Krishnan, “The India-China Newsletter.”Suyash Desai, “The PLA Bulletin.”Manoj Kewalramani, “Eye on China,” Takshashila Institution.

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
Brookings Institution President Resigns Amid FBI Probe (news)

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 18:49


Nonprofitnewsfeed.com   Brookings Institution President Resigns Amid FBI Foreign Lobbying Probe   Brookings Institution President John Allen has resigned after national press outlets reported he was under FBI investigation for undisclosed lobbying efforts on behalf of the government of Qatar. While Allen denies any wrongdoing, he was revealed in court filings to be the target of an FBI probe into violations of FARA (Foreign Agent Registration Act), which requires the registration of anyone conducting lobbying activities on behalf of foreign governments. Court documents also show he lied to federal investigators and attempted to withhold evidence saught by a federal subpoena. Allen, a retired four star U.S. Marine Corps general and former commander of NATO and U.S. troops in Afghanistan, publically resigned on Sunday after being placed on administrative leave. This comes amid increasing scrutiny of foreign influence in D.C.-based think tanks, and represents law enforcement efforts to curb illegal lobbying especially by wealthy Gulf countries like Qatar. Most of these policy-based think tanks are registered 501(c)3's and wield enormous influence in shaping federal public policy.     Summary:   Senators reach a bipartisan deal on gun safety legislation : NPR NPR.org Apple Adds iOS Safety Check for People Facing Domestic Violence CNET Jennifer Lopez Partners With Microfinance Nonprofit To Give Latina Entrepreneurs $14 Billion Capital Boost | Forbes Coastal Bend nonprofit offers summer program for students with special needs | KIIITV.com  The Kelsey Ayer Station Groundbreaking Community Celebration | The Kelsey

Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other
JONATHAN RAUCH: Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Contributing Writer for The Atlantic (Part 1)

Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 84:07


This is part 1 of our conversation with Jonathan Rauch. We had to have Jon back for a follow up because, as you'll hear, he's such a genuine, inquisitive fellow, he ended up asking Corey more questions than the other way around. We touch upon a number of big ideas like the existence of God; how the gospel of Jesus contrasts with the way a lot of self-professed Christians act; the trauma gay Americans have had to endure from Christians; Jon also talks about amazing Christians he's gotten to know and the concept of grace; and how we can make religion less stupid.  JONATHAN RAUCH, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, is the author of eight books and many articles on public policy, culture, and government. He is a contributing writer for The Atlantic and recipient of the 2005 National Magazine Award, the magazine industry's equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book, The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth is a deep-diving account of how to push back against disinformation, canceling, and other new threats to our fact-based epistemic order. His writing has also appeared in many other publications including The Economist, Time, The New York Times, The New York Daily News, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Post, Slate, and others. Jonathan graduated from Yale University. He is the recipient of numerous national and international awards for his writing and has appeared as a guest on many television and radio programs. But perhaps most remarkably, he does not like shrimp! www.jonathanrauch.com/about.html www.theatlantic.com/author/jonathan-rauch/ www.brookings.edu/experts/jonathan-rauch/ www.amazon.com/Constitution-Knowledge-Jonathan-Rauch/dp/0815738862/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0 

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Team "Normal's" Word Against Team Giuliani's

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 20:00


This morning, Congress held the second session of open hearings in an investigation into the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. On Today's Show:Quinta Jurecic, a fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution and a senior editor at Lawfare, discusses the evidence presented by the committee, including testimony from former Attorney General William Barr, an elections expert for FOX News, senior Trump campaign officials, and more, about the 'Big Lie' that the former president used to attempt to overturn the 2020 election.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Recapping Monday's January 6th Hearings

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 19:59


Quinta Jurecic, a fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution and a senior editor at Lawfare, recaps today's hearings with Brian.  

The Brian Lehrer Show
January 6th Hearings Preview

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 29:33


Quinta Jurecic, a fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution and a senior editor at Lawfare, previews today's Jan. 6th committee hearing.

The Democracy Group
Can American democracy have nice things? | Democracy Works

The Democracy Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 43:34


In 100% Democracy: The Case for Universal Voting, E.J. Dionne and Miles Rapoport argue that all members of a democracy must participate in elections. Universal voting would be the surest way to protect against voter suppression and the active disenfranchisement of a large share of our citizens. And it would create a system true to the Declaration of Independence's aspirations by calling for a government based on the consent of all of the governed.The system works in Australia, but can it work in the United States? Would it become just another tool in partisan warfare? Can American democracy even handle something like universal voting? We explore those questions this week.Dionne is is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a syndicated columnist for the Washington Post, university professor at Georgetown University, and visiting professor at Harvard University.  He is the author of Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.Rapoport is the Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School. He formerly served in the Connecticut state legislature and as secretary of the state. He also served as president of Demos and of Common Cause.100% Democracy: The Case for Universal VotingAdditional InformationDemocracy Works PodcastMore shows from The Democracy GroupFaith, Nationalism, and the Future of Liberal DemocracyDemocracy and the language of faith - article in Democracy Journal

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Ukraine warns Russia is closing in on key eastern city, control of the Donbas

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 2:29


In our news wrap Sunday, Ukraine warns that Russia could soon encircle a critical eastern city, the FBI are investigating dozens of members of a white supremacist group arrested in Idaho near an LGBTQ pride event, retired Gen. John Allen submitted his resignation as the president of the Brookings Institution, and President Biden says the federal government will pay New Mexico's wildfire costs. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
News Wrap: Ukraine warns Russia is closing in on key eastern city, control of the Donbas

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 2:29


In our news wrap Sunday, Ukraine warns that Russia could soon encircle a critical eastern city, the FBI are investigating dozens of members of a white supremacist group arrested in Idaho near an LGBTQ pride event, retired Gen. John Allen submitted his resignation as the president of the Brookings Institution, and President Biden says the federal government will pay New Mexico's wildfire costs. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Ukraine warns Russia is closing in on key eastern city, control of the Donbas

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 2:29


In our news wrap Sunday, Ukraine warns that Russia could soon encircle a critical eastern city, the FBI are investigating dozens of members of a white supremacist group arrested in Idaho near an LGBTQ pride event, retired Gen. John Allen submitted his resignation as the president of the Brookings Institution, and President Biden says the federal government will pay New Mexico's wildfire costs. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Here & Now
Do police make schools safer?; 'Top Gun: Maverick' and summer movie season

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 42:47


After each school shooting, the call goes up for more police in schools. But research shows police do not make schools safer. Marc Schindler, co-author of a Brookings Institution report on police in schools, joins us. And, "Top Gun: Maverick" has taken in well over $550 million worldwide since it opened Memorial Day weekend. But does that bode well for the summer movie season? KPCC entertainment reporter John Horn weighs in.

The Democracy Group
No Labels, Polarization, and Reform with Bill Galston | Another Way

The Democracy Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 64:26


After a hiatus, Another Way is back! In this episode, Larry Lessig speaks with Bill Galson, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Co-Founder of No Labels. The two discuss the origins of No Labels, the rise of political polarization in Congress and whether democracy reform is needed to combat it, and if and how the filibuster should be reformed. Lessig and Galson also tackle the infamous No Label phone call leak and in what ways reform organizations should spend their money in the political process.Context for the No Labels phone call leak:  https://theintercept.com/2021/06/16/joe-manchin-leaked-billionaire-donors-no-labels/Additional InformationAnother Way PodcastMore shows from The Democracy Group

Skullduggery
Jan. 6th's Primetime Moment (w/ Norm Eisen & Tom LoBianco)

Skullduggery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 55:10


They may be the most anticipated and consequential of congressional hearings in decades. After eleven months of work and over one thousand interviews the committee investigating the January 6th 2021 attack on the US Capitol will premiere this week in primetime on Thursday at 8pm. With all the TV networks except for Fox News of course planning full coverage. The committee is touting evidence of what its members are calling a criminal conspiracy led by Donald Trump to subvert the will of the people and overturn the results of the 2020 election. But as Washington gears up for the extravaganza and outside groups plan watch parties with free ice cream, there are still questions about just how strong the committee's evidence is. And perhaps more importantly whether a public pre-occupied with soaring gas prices, mass shootings, and shortages of baby formula, will tune in. We'll talk to Yahoo News' Tom LoBianco about what to expect from the hearings. And then we'll hear from Norm Eisen of the Brookings Institution on why they matter. GUESTS:Norm Eisen, (@NormEisen), Senior Fellow @brookingsgov, Chair @statesunited, Legal Analyst @cnnTom LoBianco (@tomlobianco), Politics reporter @yahoonewsHOSTS:Michael Isikoff (@Isikoff), Chief Investigative Correspondent, Yahoo NewsDaniel Klaidman (@dklaidman), Editor in Chief, Yahoo NewsVictoria Bassetti (@VBass), fellow, Brennan Center for Justice (contributing co-host)RESOURCES:Yahoo News' "What You Need To Know" about the Jan. 6th Hearings - Here.Follow us on Twitter: @SkullduggeryPodListen and subscribe to "Skullduggery" on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.Email us with feedback, questions or tips: SkullduggeryPod@yahoo.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: And they said 'Speak Now'

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 164:16


Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the state of gun control negotiations in the U.S. Senate and the role of young voters in 2022 midterm elections. Dionne is a columnist for the Washington Post and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. His latest book is “100% Democracy: The Case for Universal Voting.” Then we ask listeners their thoughts on Elon Musk requiring his employees to return to the office 40 hours a week. Alexandra Drane talks about the burden unpaid caretakers face, and what needs to change to better support people serving in such roles. Drane is the co-founder and CEO of Archangels, a group aimed at supporting unpaid caretakers.  Charlie Sennott updates listeners on the latest news from Ukraine following 100 days of Russia's invasion, and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson facing a vote of no-confidence. Sennott is a news analyst for GBH, where he also heads up the GroundTruth Project. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson weigh in on Boston's plan to open more streets this summer, and the poetry of the MBTA. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. Meredith Goldstein shares relationship advice, including on professing feelings for a carpool buddy and when to ask for a second date. Goldstein is an advice columnist and features writer for the Boston Globe. Her advice column, “Love Letters,” is a daily dispatch of wisdom for the lovelorn that has been running for more than a decade. She also hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. We end the show by asking listeners what to do if they know a friend is marrying the wrong person.

Signal Boost
James Kirchick!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 26:59


Award-winning journalist and author James Kirchick joins Zerlina on the show to discuss his new book, Secret City: The Hidden History of Gay Washington, out now! ABOUT THE BOOKWashington, D.C., has always been a city of secrets. Few have been more dramatic than the ones revealed in James Kirchick's Secret City.For decades, the specter of homosexuality haunted Washington. The mere suggestion that a person might be gay destroyed reputations, ended careers, and ruined lives. At the height of the Cold War, fear of homosexuality became intertwined with the growing threat of international communism, leading to a purge of gay men and lesbians from the federal government. In the fevered atmosphere of political Washington, the secret “too loathsome to mention” paradoxically held enormous, terrifying power.Utilizing thousands of pages of declassified documents, interviews with over one hundred people, and material unearthed from presidential libraries and archives around the country, Secret City: The Hidden History of Gay Washington is a chronicle of American politics like no other. Beginning with the tragic story of Sumner Welles, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's brilliant diplomatic advisor and the man at the center of “the greatest national scandal since the existence of the United States,” award-winning journalist and author James Kirchick illuminates how the idea of homosexuality shaped each successive presidential administration, impacting everything from the creation of America's earliest civilian intelligence agency to the rise and fall of McCarthyism, the struggle for African American civil rights, and the conservative movement.Celebrating the men and women who courageously decided that the source of their private shame could instead be galvanized for public pride, Kirchick offers a reinterpretation of American history told from the perspective of the citizens who lived in its shadows.Sweeping in scope and intimate in detail, Secret City will forever transform our understanding of American history. ABOUT THE AUTHORJames Kirchick is an award-winning journalist and author of The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues and the Coming Dark Age. A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, he has reported from over 40 countries and is a columnist for Tablet magazine. Kirchick has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Atlantic, the New York Review of Books, and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung among many other publications, and lives in Washington, D.C. 

Desert Island Discs
Fiona Hill, foreign affairs specialist

Desert Island Discs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 35:22


Fiona Hill is a foreign affairs specialist who advised Presidents George W Bush, Barack Obama and Donald Trump. She came to wider public attention in 2019 when she testified against President Trump during his first impeachment. Fiona was born in Bishop Auckland, County Durham. Her father was a former coal miner who worked as a hospital porter and her mother was a midwife. After graduating in Russian and History from St Andrews University, she won a scholarship to read Soviet Studies at Harvard. She spent the next three decades establishing herself as a policy expert on Russia. In 2017 she joined the National Security Council at the White House as deputy assistant to President Trump and senior director for Europe and Russia. She left the administration in 2019 and later that year she testified to the US Congress as a witness in the hearings which led up to Donald Trump's first impeachment trial in 2020. Fiona's performance and North East accent caused a stir and her personal story was discussed in American newspapers and on television. Strangers in the street thanked her, but she also received death threats from people who opposed the observations she recounted during her testimony. Fiona is a senior research fellow at the Brookings Institution, a think tank based in Washington DC. She became an American citizen in 2002. DISC ONE: Message in a Bottle by The Police DISC TWO: It's only a Paper Moon by Ella Fitzgerald DISC THREE: Ghost Town by The Specials DISC FOUR: The Passenger by Iggy Pop DISC FIVE: Goodbye America by Nautilus Pompilius DISC SIX: On Top of the World by Imagine Dragons DISC SEVEN: Hypersonic Missiles by Sam Fender DISC EIGHT: This is the Day by The The BOOK CHOICE: Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Fiona writes about how her dad saved up to buy the Encyclopaedia Britannica – you'll find the story in the Background section. LUXURY ITEM: Crystallised ginger CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: This is the Day by The The Presenter: Lauren Laverne Producer: Paula McGinley

Dear Asian Americans
150 // Neil Ruiz // Associate Director of Race and Ethnicity Research at Pew Research Center // More Data, More Answers

Dear Asian Americans

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 39:14


Jerry welcomes back Neil Ruiz, Associate Director of Race and Ethnicity Research at Pew Research Center, to discuss the latest data from Pew and what it says about the violence being directed at Asian Americans. Listen in as Jerry and Neil break down why this work is so important as well as how it helps to affirm our experiences to those outside our community.Meet NeilNeil G. Ruiz is associate director of race and ethnicity research at the Pew Research Center. He studies the international movement of people across borders, high-skilled immigration to the U.S. and around the world, demographic analysis of Asian Americans, and comparative legal immigration systems.Prior to joining the Center, Ruiz was the executive director of the Center for Law, Economics & Finance at George Washington University, and he has also worked as a migration and economic development expert at the Brookings Institution, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank.He is a political economist with a doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a master's degree from Oxford University, and a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley. Ruiz regularly speaks about U.S. immigration and international migration research with major print and broadcast media.(Source: pewresearch.org)Connect with NeilTwitter: @Neil_ruizLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/neilruiz/Read this research:Key facts about Asian Americans, a diverse and growing population (Pew Research Center)About a third of Asian Americans say they have changed their daily routine due to concerns over threats, attacksMore of Neil's Research at PewEpisode 150 with Neil Ruiz is #4 is a 10 part special series with Stand with Asian Americans entitled "Dear Asian Americans, What Now?" exploring what we are going through as a community during the past two+ years amidst the rising anti-Asian violence and hate crimes. We thank our friends at SwAA for their support of Dear Asian Americans.// Support Dear Asian Americans:Merch: https://www.bonfire.com/store/dearasianamericans/Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jerrywonLearn more about DAA Creator and Host Jerry Won:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jerrywon/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jerryjwon/// Listen to Dear Asian Americans on all major platforms:Transistor.fm: http://www.dearasianamericans.comApple: https://apple.dearasianamericans.comSpotify: https://spotify.dearasianamericans.comStitcher: https://stitcher.dearasianamericans.comGoogle: https://google.dearasianamericans.com  Follow us on Instagram:  http://www.instagram.com/dearasianamericans Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dearasianamericans Subscribe to our YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/dearasianamericans // Join the Asian Podcast Network:Web: https://asianpodcastnetwork.com/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/asianpodcastnetwork/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/asianpodcastnetwork/Dear Asian Americans is produced by Just Like Media:Web: http://www.justlikemedia.comInstagram.com: http://www.instagram.com/justlikemedia

Democracy Works
Can American democracy have nice things?

Democracy Works

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 42:51


In 100% Democracy: The Case for Universal Voting, E.J. Dionne and Miles Rapoport argue that all members of a democracy must participate in elections. Universal voting would be the surest way to protect against voter suppression and the active disenfranchisement of a large share of our citizens. And it would create a system true to the Declaration of Independence's aspirations by calling for a government based on the consent of all of the governed.The system works in Australia, but can it work in the United States? Would it become just another tool in partisan warfare? Can American democracy even handle something like universal voting? We explore those questions this week.Dionne is is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a syndicated columnist for the Washington Post, university professor at Georgetown University, and visiting professor at Harvard University.  He is the author of Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.Rapoport is the Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School. He formerly served in the Connecticut state legislature and as secretary of the state. He also served as president of Demos and of Common Cause.Additional Information100% Democracy: The Case for Universal VotingRelated EpisodesDanielle Allen on achieving democracy's idealsHow national parties are breaking state politicsE.J. Dionne on empathy and democracy - E.J.'s first appearance on the show in April 2019 

New Books in History
Ehud Olmert, "Searching for Peace: A Memoir of Israel" (Brookings Institution, 2022) Part 2 of 2

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 57:56


NB: This is part 2 of a two part interview with Ehud Olert. Part 1 is here. Written almost entirely from inside a prison cell, Searching for Peace: A Memoir of Israel (Brookings Institution, 2022) is the compelling memoir of former Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert. The child of parents who were members of the Irgun, the paramilitary group that fought for the establishment of Israel, Olmert became the youngest member of the Israeli Knesset in 1973, serving in the right-wing Likud party. He rose quickly in the party, serving in national government before being elected mayor of Jerusalem in 1993. As mayor he overcame decades of municipal malaise, inertia, and waves of terror attacks to bring huge improvements in the city's infrastructure, education, and welfare. Although a child of the Israeli right, it was during his mayoralty that he realized the inevitability of compromise and the need to divide the city in any future peace agreement with the Palestinians. Olmert rejoined the national government in 2003 as a top aide to then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. After Sharon suffered a debilitating stroke in 2006, Olmert took over as acting prime minister, then led Sharon's new centrist party Kadima to victory in elections. Heading a coalition government, Olmert led Israel through the war with Lebanon in July 2006 and approved the dramatic strike on Syria's nuclear reactor the following year. From late 2006 through 2008, Olmert engaged in some three dozen negotiations with Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas. The talks, Olmert says, came "within a hair's breadth" of reaching a comprehensive peace deal. At the same time, Olmert was fighting allegations that he had illegally accepted large sums of money from a well-connected American businessman. He was acquitted of all but a minor charge against him, but in 2014 he was convicted on charges of taking $15,000 in bribes involving the construction of an industrial park while he served as Minister of Industry and Trade. He served 16 months in prison, using his time to write these memoirs. Searching for Peace offers a riveting political story and an unparalleled window into Israeli history, peacemaking, politics, U.S.-Israel relations, and the future of the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Ehud Olmert, "Searching for Peace: A Memoir of Israel" (Brookings Institution, 2022) Part 2 of 2

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 57:56


NB: This is part 2 of a two part interview with Ehud Olert. Part 1 is here. Written almost entirely from inside a prison cell, Searching for Peace: A Memoir of Israel (Brookings Institution, 2022) is the compelling memoir of former Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert. The child of parents who were members of the Irgun, the paramilitary group that fought for the establishment of Israel, Olmert became the youngest member of the Israeli Knesset in 1973, serving in the right-wing Likud party. He rose quickly in the party, serving in national government before being elected mayor of Jerusalem in 1993. As mayor he overcame decades of municipal malaise, inertia, and waves of terror attacks to bring huge improvements in the city's infrastructure, education, and welfare. Although a child of the Israeli right, it was during his mayoralty that he realized the inevitability of compromise and the need to divide the city in any future peace agreement with the Palestinians. Olmert rejoined the national government in 2003 as a top aide to then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. After Sharon suffered a debilitating stroke in 2006, Olmert took over as acting prime minister, then led Sharon's new centrist party Kadima to victory in elections. Heading a coalition government, Olmert led Israel through the war with Lebanon in July 2006 and approved the dramatic strike on Syria's nuclear reactor the following year. From late 2006 through 2008, Olmert engaged in some three dozen negotiations with Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas. The talks, Olmert says, came "within a hair's breadth" of reaching a comprehensive peace deal. At the same time, Olmert was fighting allegations that he had illegally accepted large sums of money from a well-connected American businessman. He was acquitted of all but a minor charge against him, but in 2014 he was convicted on charges of taking $15,000 in bribes involving the construction of an industrial park while he served as Minister of Industry and Trade. He served 16 months in prison, using his time to write these memoirs. Searching for Peace offers a riveting political story and an unparalleled window into Israeli history, peacemaking, politics, U.S.-Israel relations, and the future of the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Veteran and Author Phil Klay and Historian and Author Kenneth C David on Memorial Day Episode 612

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 67:47


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more  Kenneth C. Davis is the bestselling author of Don't Know Much About® History and other books in the Don't Know Much About® series. He also wrote the acclaimed In the Shadow of Liberty. For 30 years, Kenneth C. Davis has proven that Americans don't hate history — just the dull version they slept through in class. Davis's approach is to refresh us on the subjects we should have learned in school. He does it by busting myths, setting the record straight, and making history human. If your school, library or learning community would like to speak with Kenneth C. Davis about American history, click on   Classroom Skypes or Custom Virtual Visits to learn more. Phil Klay is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. His short story collection Redeployment won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction and the National Book Critics' Circle John Leonard Prize for best debut work in any genre, and was selected as one of the 10 Best Books of 2014 by The New York Times. His nonfiction work won the George W. Hunt, S.J., Prize for Journalism, Arts & Letters in the category of Cultural & Historical Criticism in 2018. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, and the Brookings Institution's Brookings Essay series. He currently teaches fiction at Fairfield University. His debut novel, Missionaries, was released in October 2020 with Penguin Press. Pete on YouTube  Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Biden Announces a Military Withdrawal from Afghanistan

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 52:54


From April 16, 2021: On Wednesday, President Biden announced a full withdrawal of all U.S. military personnel from Afghanistan by September 11, 2021, an announcement that comes as the U.S. and Afghan governments have been trying to reach a power sharing agreement with the Taliban. Prior to the withdrawal announcement, Bryce Klehm spoke with Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a New York Times correspondent based in the Kabul bureau and a former Marine infantryman, who walked us through the situation on the ground in Afghanistan over the last year. Following Biden's announcement, Bryce spoke with Madiha Afzal, the David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution, who talked about the broader implications of a U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.In May 2022, Lawfare and Goat Rodeo will debut their latest podcast, Allies, a series about America's eyes and ears over 20 years of war in Afghanistan. Thousands of Afghans who worked with the American soldiers as translators, interpreters and partners made it onto U.S. military planes. But despite the decades-long efforts of veterans, lawmakers and senior leaders in the military, even more were left behind. This show will take you from the frontlines of the war to the halls of Congress to find out: How did this happen? Learn more and subscribe to Allies at https://pod.link/1619035873.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pantsuit Politics
Now What? How to Move Forward When We're Divided (About Basically Everything)

Pantsuit Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 51:20


TOPICS DISCUSSEDFred Dews from the Brookings Institution interviews Sarah and Beth about their new book Now What? How to Move Forward When We're Divided (About Basically Everything)Outside Politics: Sarah and Beth reflect on their live show with Clint Harp in WacoUPCOMING EXCITING PROJECTS AT PANTSUIT POLITICSSarah and Beth were featured as GMA3's podcast of the monthPre-Order our new book Now What?The Audiobook for Now What? is now available for pre-orderPlease visit our website for full show notes and episode resources. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
What the War in Ukraine Means for China's Global Strategy

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 53:22


Russia's war of aggression in Ukraine is putting one of its closest partners, China, in a difficult position. Just weeks before the conflict began, China and Russia announced a new partnership without limits that was seen as a shared bulwark against pressure by the United States and its allies. But Russia's choice to attack its neighbor Ukraine is an awkward tension with China's long-standing position against the use of force between states, and some cracks may be showing in the new relationship as China has so far not proven willing to come as wholeheartedly to Russia's support as its pre-war declaration might have suggested.To better understand how the war in Ukraine is impacting China's strategy toward the rest of the world, Scott R. Anderson sat down with two legal experts: Dr. Patricia Kim, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow at the Brookings Institution who specializes in China policy, and Professor Julian Ku, a professor at Hofstra University School of Law who has studied China's approach to the international system. They discussed the new relationship between China and Russia, China's role in the Ukraine conflict and what lessons it is taking away from the Western response, including for its own interests in Taiwan. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.