Podcasts about critiques

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Overpriced JPEGs
OpenSea Execs Talk Royalties, Plus the FTX Crash and More with Zeneca33 & Amber Vittoria | Overpriced JPEGs Recap #45

Overpriced JPEGs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 77:31


Super Moscato Show
Le cri de Gueule : Critiques des arbitres, y a-t-il des circonstances atténuantes ? - 10/11

Super Moscato Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 7:55


Entouré de toute sa bande, Vincent Moscato offre tous les jours des moments de franche rigolade en traitant l'actualité sportive sous l'angle de la dérision ! Cette année, le « Super Moscato Show », c'est 3 heures : de 15h à 18h ! Plus de sports, plus de débats, plus d'infos, et surtout encore plus de rires ! Live, résultats, interviews, analyses, ... Toute l'actualité sportive et l'ensemble des consultants de la Dream Team RMC Sport sont à l'antenne de RMC à partir de 15h.

Written, Spoken with Dave Ursillo
Tables, turned! Dave critiques his journey in a 10-year retrospective

Written, Spoken with Dave Ursillo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:33


The tables are turned on host, Dave Ursillo, as he is interviewed by fellow podcaster, former radio DJ, longtime friend, and creative entrepreneur Greg Berg of the Life on Purpose, in a special 10-year retrospective that marked the anniversary of their first interview, so long ago.In this interview, Dave is asked to relitigate his personal and professional journeys across 10 years, reflect on the social and cultural forces that inspired creative and career endeavors, and question "personal development" as a construct. You'll hear about...The counter-cultural moment of the early 2010s in light of the Great RecessionHow certain values around work-as-purpose are being corrected todayThe privilege embedded in "doing what you love for a living," and more!A big thank you to Greg for allowing us to republish this episode! We'll be back with new interviews soon.Email us at Hello@TheNewStory.is to share your feedback, concerns, and questions, or just to say hello.Visit us at TheNewStory.is to learn about The New Story Company or to listen to our full catalog of interviews.Please rate and review our show on Apple Podcasts and Spotify to help other listeners find our work!Support our partners and affiliates for exclusive discounts:Acorns: Easily save money and invest in your future, starting with a free $5 investmentBookshop.org: Buy cheap books at this Amazon competitor that supports local and independent bookstores with every purchaseFathom Analytics: Get beautiful, secure website data without trading your customers' private browsing data to Google and FacebookFlywheel: Seamless, secure WordPress website hostingHover: Safe, secure domain registration. Save $2 on your first purchase.MailerLite: Make the switch to a lite, powerful, affordable email marketing platform, with premium plans starting at just $9/mo.Sanebox: Make your inbox a sane place again with an invisible, machine-learning tool that learns how to organize your emails. Save $5 when you join.Trint: An innovative transcription service that uses AI technology to improve transcription quality with 99% accuracy.Affiliate Disclosure: Our show is listener supported, including through affiliate and partner links. By clicking one of the above links and registering or making a purchase, we may earn a small commission, which helps pay for the costs of our show. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bravo Critics
BC's Critiques of the Week: SLC and Fall Line-Up Catch-up

Bravo Critics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 48:19


Arielle and Ricky discuss the latest season of Real Housewives of Salt Lake City and catch up on the first few episodes as well as a quick catch up on what else they are watching. -We kick off the episode chatting about all of the great shows we have been watching - we touch on Below Deck, Below Deck Med, Winter House, Kardashians, Real Girlfriends in Paris and so much more -Season 3 of RHOSLC is already off to a fiery start and relationships are feeling icy. -We talk about how the proximity to filming the season 2 reunion has impacted the cast relationships as they are still watching the previous season play out as they start filming -Meredith and Lisa are still in a really bad place after Lisa's hot mic moment - will they ever come back together? -It's looking like the weather might be clearing up and we are seeing the end of bad weather. Which side are you on? -We also discuss the impact of Jen Shah's guilty plea on the viewers and what it could mean for her cast relationships. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bravo-critics/support

Bernstein & McKnight Show
Big Ant Herron critiques more than just Bears games (Hour 2)

Bernstein & McKnight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 41:29


In the second hour, Dan Bernstein and Laurence Holmes were joined by Score football analyst Anthony Herron to break down Bears quarterback Justin Fields' historic rushing performance in Chicago's 35-32 loss to Miami on Sunday. Later, Bernstein and Holmes reacted to the breaking news that Colts coach Frank Reich has been fired.

Le masque et la plume
Les critiques sont allés voir "Mascarade", "Close", "Amsterdam", "Bowling Saturne"…

Le masque et la plume

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 53:56


durée : 00:53:56 - Le masque et la plume - par : Jérôme Garcin - Faut-il aller au cinéma pour regarder "Mascarade" de Nicolas Bedos, "Close" de Lukas Dhont, "Amsterdam" de David O. Russell, "La Conspiration du Caire" de Tarik Saleh, "Bowling Saturne" de Patricia Mazuy et "Les Repentis" de Icíar Bollaín ? - réalisé par : Xavier PESTUGGIA

Breakthrough Marketing Secrets
Becoming One of the World's Best Copywriters with David Garfinkel [A-List Copywriter Coach]

Breakthrough Marketing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 55:27


Bravo Critics
BC's Critiques of the Week: Potomac Blossom Season is HERE!

Bravo Critics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 35:23


Arielle and Ricky discuss the latest season of Real Housewives of Potomac and catch up on the first few episodes. -Gizelle is already starting out the season messy as ever and we are bored. -We discuss how we are continuing to stan Candiace more and more as the season goes on -Rumors are swirling about Mia and her health journey and about Chris Bassett - where do the Critics believe the truth is? -There is a reason why Karen Huger is the Grande Dame of Potomac and we discuss it all! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bravo-critics/support

Canyon Creek Christian Fellowship
When Followers of Jesus Miss the Mark

Canyon Creek Christian Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 31:04


The current church finds itself in a challenging space. Critiques from the outside and breakdowns in community, love, and care on the inside can make us feel discouraged. However, God never leaves the community of faith to its own devices but arrives to save and help through His Son. In the familiar stories of "the lost" and "the found" in Luke 15, we find a God so good we can barely stand it. Brace yourselves!

New Heart Theology
Addressing the Critiques of a Popular Influencer & Exciting Things Ahead

New Heart Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 55:19


In this episode, we address the critiques of a popular Instagram influencer and podcaster. She wanted to interview us a few months ago but then decided not to publish the episode because her pastor disagreed with us. We walk through each of her criticisms and address them biblically.We close the episode with a look at the exciting additions to New Heart Theology in the coming weeks. We are pumped!Instagram: @NewHeartTheologyFacebook: /NewHeartTheologyTwitter: @NewHeartPodcastWebsite: newhearttheology.comContact: info@newhearttheology.comGeneral Recommended Reading:Justification and RegenerationBody, Soul, and Life EverlastingSanctification and CounselingBirthrightSanctification and CounselingMLJ Exposition of Romans 6Romans 1-8 Macarthur CommentaryRecording Equipment:Rode ProcasterZoom LiveTrak L-8 RecorderRode PSM1 Shock MountRode PSA1 Swivel Boom Arm Mount

Regenerative Revolution Podcast
Ethical Entrepreneurship & Regeneration as True Success with John Roulac, Founder of Nutiva & Executive Producer of Kiss the Ground

Regenerative Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 55:31


Founder of Nutiva and Executive Producer of Kiss the Ground, John Roulac, was catalyzed into environmental activism and entrepreneurship at a young age when nuclear waste was dumped just miles from where he grew up. This led him on his life path of learning to honor nature, creating a hugely successful superfood company, and now actively promoting regeneration of the planet through several nonprofits, including Agroforestry Regeneration Communities (ARC), which has facilitated the planting of 2 million trees and 5,000 food forests. We talk all things ethical entrepreurship, the importance of not succumbing to divisive narratives in the media, techniques for regenerating the planet and resource recommendations from John for people looking to walk this path. This is a broad-reaching episode with one of the most successful entrepreneurs in this movement, and I'm honored to have hosted this interview! Agroforestry Regeneration Communities Join the email list Join the Regenerative Rituals Course + Community waitlist Book a 1:1 Green Guidance session Recommended books: The Ecology of Commerce by Paul Hawken and The Way of the Wyrd by Ryan Bates Show Notes: There's 500 million farmers in the global south that can plant 500 billion trees with basic empowerment. This is what John helps to facilitate with Agroforestry Regeneration Communities; he firmly believes in being of service brings value to our own lives. Ethical entrepreneurship: the importance of focusing on culture for their supply chain and their team - if toxic things get put into a petri dish, when things multiply in that, they're unhealthy. Recognizing intelligence in employees, no matter their qualifications or background, and promoting and advancing especially women. Also helping provide productive trees and other resources for producers. Acknowledging our privilege and using it to try to make things better & be active catalysts for positive change. Critiques of Kiss the Ground's erasure of the indigenous practices/indigenous knowledge base. Current issues of losing 70% of winged insects, 60% of plankton in the ocean (and losing 1-2% per year due to pesticides and acidification of the oceans eating their shells, respectively), it's key to focus on regeneration & restoring the water cycle. The distinction between harm reduction & active regeneration - they get mixed by sources that greenwash. There's no product to buy that can fix the systemic issues that we have. Rotational grazing as an option for regenerating landscapes & increasing soil health & rainfall, as well as partnering with beavers and using check dams, and intentional burning - the importance of ACTING instead of blaming people. Collapse may be what will finally wake people up to the importance of drastic change - and being open to it. Generational and economic difficulties for millennials and younger - returning to communal living, living in more rural areas, working remotely - our economic system is not designed for success. His experiences meeting people with the least amount of money, and them having the most warmth, happiness, connection, openness, being more dynamic and alive - true wealth! & so much more!

The Counter Culture Mom Show with Tina Griffin Podcast
Angela Sauer Critiques the Corrupt Standard American Diet and Offers Nutritious Food Solutions

The Counter Culture Mom Show with Tina Griffin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 27:00


Certified nutritional counselor Angela Sauer pulls no punches when it comes to unveiling the truth behind the average American diet: most people are addicted to food. The culprit behind this problem is based on the blood sugar spike that is linked to high glycemic carbohydrates, particularly when it comes to foods made with wheat. There's overeating, undereating, and high-glycemic food disorders, Angela says. Bread, for example, that is made with modern wheat can be stored by the body as fat. Proteins and healthy fats, however, are lower-glycemic and don't spike your blood sugar. Angela also explains the reality that unhealthy food is actually the most prevalent drug in America today. She is excited to share how Jesus freed her from her eating disorder and loves baking healthy goodies at her beloved Healthy Body Bakery in Tennessee.   TAKEAWAYS Angela was a “food addict” for 30 years and credits her relationship with Christ as the source of strength that helped her find freedom Most supermarkets are packed with unhealthy processed foods, but the outside aisles are usually packed with the most nutritious options Wheat facilitates a high glycemic response in the body that spikes both blood glucose and insulin The body's response to high glycemic carbs is very similar to any other addictive drug  

Let's Talk Creation
Ep. 44 Creationists Review: Rate Project, Unsolved Problems and Critiques

Let's Talk Creation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 64:20


RATE was an important step in creationist understanding of radiometric dating, but it raised a lot of new questions. Join Paul and Todd in this episode as they talk about some of the most important unanswered questions from the RATE project. These questions form the basis of ongoing creation research on radiometric dating. Email us with comments or questions at: podcast@coresci.org Show notes: Papers and Books mentioned in the Podcast Vardiman, Snelling et al. Radioisotopes and the Age of the Earth Volume I https://tinyurl.com/937f4jv4 Vardiman, Snelling et al. Radioisotopes and the Age of the Earth Volume II https://tinyurl.com/4r8u2nw2 Essay Review by Randy Isaac https://www.asa3.org/ASA/education/origins/rate-ri.htm Check us out on social media and consider donating to support this podcast Core Academy of Science Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coresci.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coreacademyofscience/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoreacadInfo Website: https://coresci.org/ Biblical Creation Trust Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/biblicalcreationtrust Twitter: https://twitter.com/bct_origins Website: https://www.biblicalcreationtrust.org/ For questions and comments email podcast@coresci.org Please consider supporting this work by going to https://coresci.org/connect or https://biblicalcreationtrust.org *Disclaimer: Things mentioned in the Show Nates are not endorsements of people, places, or things discussed in the podcast, but rather a record of what was spoken about and helpful links to material for our listeners.

Overpriced JPEGs
Project to Watch: R Planet w/ Geeta Sankappanavar and Ashley Vickers | Overpriced JPEGs #59

Overpriced JPEGs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 77:50


AGS LIVE
GOW Raganrok Weird Critiques | RE Showcase | Silent Hill Showcase | Xbox Series S - AGSLIVE Ep.113

AGS LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 217:31


Cash App Donations $h8times Social Media Twitter: @hard8_times Instagram: xhard8times PS5 Hard7times Xbox Live Hard8times Steam ID Hard8times Tower Gamers facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/52040.... https://www.g2a.com/r/hard8times --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shawn-williams22/support

Unforgettable Presentations
Ep. 165 PART 3 - 2022 World Championship Speech Critiques-Cyril

Unforgettable Presentations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 28:03


In this final installment of a three-part series, Mark and Darren are joined by guest coach Mike Davis to review the presentation of the 2022 World Champion of Public Speaking Cyril Junior Dim. With a live webinar audience bearing witness, they discuss all aspects of this winning speech and point out techniques that can make any presentation unforgettable. SNIPPETS: ‘Own' the physical stage confidently Use references with which the entire audience is familiar Audience participation and interaction are assets Emotional shifts magnify your audience connection When portraying characters, show their emotions When using a metaphor, callback later Movement must be congruent with words Stand still when delivering key points Claim center stage for your closing Look at the camera in a hybrid environment

Elton Jim Turano's Captain Pod-tastic on WGN Plus
‘Elton Jim' critiques Rolling Stone's new ‘100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time' list

Elton Jim Turano's Captain Pod-tastic on WGN Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022


In this 334th episode of “Elton Jim” Turano's “CAPTAIN POD-TASTIC,” Jim Turano reviews Rolling Stone magazine’s new “Greatest TV Show Of All Time” list and finds many surprising choices.

Les grands entretiens
Philippe Cassard, pianiste (2/5) :"On écoutait la Tribune des critiques comme la messe"

Les grands entretiens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 25:09


durée : 00:25:09 - Philippe Cassard, pianiste (2/5) - par : Judith Chaine - Le pianiste Philippe Cassard, également homme de radio bien connu de nos auditeurs, fêtera cette année ses 60 ans ! Grand interprète de l'oeuvre de Schubert et Debussy, il nous a ouvert les portes de son appartement parisien. Retour sur son parcours musical et personnel avec Judith Chaine. - réalisé par : Françoise Cordey

Rational Boomer Podcast
EMAILS. CRITIQUES & FBI FAILURES - RB562 - RATIONAL BOOMER PODCAST

Rational Boomer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 62:55


We start the show up with several emails and a couple of critiques. We look at some of the many failures of the FBI and it's debate season and it is hilarious. Let's get into it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rational-boomer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rational-boomer/support

Unforgettable Presentations
Ep. 164 PART 2 - 2022 World Championship Speech Critiques-Alexandre

Unforgettable Presentations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 33:30


The Toastmasters International Speech Contest draws the interest of thousands each year, and in this second episode of a three-part podcast series, Darren, Mark, and guest coach Mike Davis review the virtual presentation of 2022 First Runner-Up Alexandre Matte. They identify his many strengths and make suggestions that will help any presenter to be unforgettable. SNIPPETS: Answer the question in the audience's minds early Establish characters by their location in your speaking area Portray characters using voice and mannerisms Be naturally conversational Use camera proximity to maximize microexpressions Genuine emotion resonates with your audience An accent can be an asset When speaking online, use camera proximity that serves your audience best Props are powerful when used effectively

Decent Humans
Critiques, Criticism, Constructive Criticism and How the F To DEAL. Ep. 12

Decent Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 40:57


Welcome back to another episode of the Decent Humans Podcast! We have a very important question. Critiques, criticism and constructive criticism. Are they the same thing? Is the difference between them the intent behind the feedback? How do you internalize someone's criticism? How do you receive someone's critiques? Taking it even further, who you surround yourself matters - how often do we re-evaluate who we allow into our inner circle? Are they adding to your life in a positive way? We dive in and discuss each topics and share our insights on the ways each of us handles and copes with being on the receiving end of negative (and positive) feedback. If you enjoyed this episode share it with a friend, share it with your mom, share it with your co-worker that sits at the desk across from you, and don't forget to hit us with that like and subscribe and send us your questions in the DMs on Instagram! We want to hear from you! Tune in for more episodes every Thursday! Socials: https://www.instagram.com/decenthumanspod/ https://twitter.com/DecentHumansPod https://www.tiktok.com/@decenthumanspod

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Responding to recent critiques of iron fortification in India by e19brendan

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 21:10


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Responding to recent critiques of iron fortification in India, published by e19brendan on October 12, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Two recent EA Forum posts offered critiques on iron fortification in India and particularly the work of Fortify Health, given its relationship with EA: Targeted Treatment of Anemia in Adolescents in India as a Cause Area and Cost-effectiveness of iron fortification in India is lower than GiveWell's estimates, both authored by Akash Kulgod. We heartily welcome the inquiry and critique, and Fortify Health will remain open minded in pursuit of understanding the true impact of its work and in adjusting course accordingly. I am one of the co-founders of Fortify Health, and although I have since stepped back from day-to-day operations, I offered to address the concerns raised so that the active core team can continue to focus on their implementation and partnership work. In this post, I intend to provide initial responses to key points made in Kulgod's articles: Is iron fortification expected to increase diabetes prevalence in India? Short answer: This should not be inferred from available evidence. Is the proportion of anemia in India attributable to iron deficiency lower than we thought? Short answer: At first glance, more recent estimates of iron deficiency among children cited are on average roughly similar to those incorporated in GiveWell's 2019 CEA, and state and age specific prevalence could be incorporated into future models. Givewell's 2019 model largely relies on iron deficiency prevalence rather than iron deficiency anemia prevalence, but I'm uncertain as to whether or for what outcomes use of one or both parameters would lead to the most accurate model. Should hemoglobin cutoff values be changed, and how does this affect the expected impact of fortification efforts? Short answer: The distribution of hemoglobin levels among the Indian sample cited does not support the inference that outcomes associated with anemia are equivalent between populations at different threshold hemoglobin levels. The new information presented by the cited study does not weaken the expected impact of fortification. Is a targeted intervention preferable to widespread fortification? Short answer: Targeted screening and treatment should be available as part of comprehensive primary care and possibly school-based programs, but does not preclude rapidly scaling up fortification efforts. Further exploration of this intervention would be worthwhile. Is micronutrient fortification ethical? Short answer: Extending the benefits of fortification is one part of an ethical imperative for health equity, and absence of fortification does not provide greater autonomy. I recognize that this post only scratches the surface of complex issues, and it does not provide a comprehensive review of all available arguments and evidence that may be relevant. Its scope is substantially more limited, merely contributing to an evolving conversation started by Kulgod's posts. I'm eager to get feedback from Kulgod and other readers, and hope we can collaboratively advance our own understanding and the EA community's understanding of fortification efforts. I. Is 10mg/day per capita iron fortification expected to raise prevalence of diabetes by 2-14% as apparently suggested by Ghosh et al. (preprint 2021)? Initial reaction: the cited study's conclusion does not seem to be supported by its results. Claims of correlation between high fasting blood sugar with discrete elevation in serum ferritin are supported by only a small effect size in a subgroup analysis of the highest wealth quintile, which is sharply discontinuous from the next wealth quintile. Furthermore, their model of marginal increase in fasting blood sugar by serum ferritin levels demonstrates minimal effect size, even in ...

The Grid: Photography Podcast(Audio-Only)
The Grid - Blind Photo Critiques with Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna - Episode 531

The Grid: Photography Podcast(Audio-Only)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 83:11


The Grid: Photography Podcast
The Grid - Blind Photo Critiques with Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna - Episode 531

The Grid: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 83:11


The Connor Happer Show
October 10 – Segment 11 – Dan Patrick Critiques Nebraska

The Connor Happer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 7:56


The radio host reacts to Nebraska's celebratory dance after the win at Rutgers Friday night, Connor and Josh collectively roll their eyes

Revolutionary Lumpen Radio
Who Critiques The Critics? - Critical Theory by Thumblesteen

Revolutionary Lumpen Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 13:52


In this episode we have a robot read "Critical Theory" from Thumblesteens Medium articles. This is a great piece of writing that came from a converstation Shibby had with Thumblesteen, so as usual, our comrade wrote down their thoughts for us all to understand and I have to agree! Thumblesteens Medium Is Here Press Me  Patreon: Patreon.com/LumpenPodcast Paypal: https://www.paypal.me/LumpenS Twitter: https://twitter.com/Lumpen_Radio Discord: https://discord.gg/43AA3tt Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shibbysig/ Podbean:  https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detai... Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/revolutionary... Reddit: https://reddit.com/r/LateStageImperialism Twitch: Twitch.tv/RevolutionaryLumpenRadio Telegram: https://www.t.me/LateStage 

Rothen s'enflamme
Faites entrer l'accusé : Les anti-Messi, accusés d'être allés trop loin dans leurs critiques – 06/10

Rothen s'enflamme

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 9:20


Les footballeurs parlent aux footballeurs ! « Rothen s'enflamme », le rendez-vous des passionnés du ballon rond revient pour une deuxième saison ! Jérôme Rothen animera des débats enflammés avec sa Dream Team d'anciens joueurs composée d'Emmanuel Petit, Lionel Charbonnier, Éric Di Meco, Mathieu Bodmer, Mathieu Valbuena et Jean-Michel Larqué. Julien Cazarre sortira cette saison encore, des infos exclusives toujours avec son humour et sa plume acérée. En cette année de Coupe du Monde de football, Jérôme Rothen et Jean-Louis Tourre s'entourent d'un casting 5 étoiles avec le grand retour de Juninho (déjà présent lors de la Coupe du Monde au Brésil en 2014), et les arrivées de Patrice Evra, Steven Nzonzi, Mamadou Niang et Jérémy Ménez.

Ravens Vault: A Baltimore Ravens podcast
71. Mike Florio Responds To Ravens Fans' Critiques

Ravens Vault: A Baltimore Ravens podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 45:30


The polarizing (at least in Ravens Twitter circles) Mike Florio makes his debut on the Vault ahead of Sunday's Week 5 primetime matchup between the Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals Sarah & Bobby dive into that topic with Mike and more: Mike's early, yet honest, impressions of the 2022 Ravens Is Baltimore lacking an identity? Mike doubles down on Lamar Jackson, agent talk And more... Interested in reaching out to the show? Hit us up: BaltimoreRavensVault@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Unforgettable Presentations
Ep. 163 PART 1 - 2022 World Championship Speech Critiques-Mas

Unforgettable Presentations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 35:02


Each year, 35,000 people enter the Toastmasters International Speech Contest with the dream of becoming the World Champion of Public Speaking. For this special three-part podcast series, World Champions Mark and Darren are joined by guest coach Mike Davis and a live webinar audience as they review the speeches of the top 3 winners in 2022. In this episode, they review the in-person presentation of the second runner-up, Mas Mahathir Bin Mohamad, highlighting what he did well and offering recommendations for enhancing his presentation. Unique but tasteful attire is an asset Dialogue enhances the audience's experience In dialogue, characters communicate with each other, not the audience Consistent portrayal of characters makes them more real A foundational phrase makes the message memorable Identify scenes in your speaking area and remain consistent Couplets like UNCONVENTIONAL/UNCONDITIONAL are very effective Be very clear with your main message The camera is another person in the room

Les histoires de 28 Minutes
Chants pygmées / Stades critiques

Les histoires de 28 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 46:16


L'émission 28 Minutes du 05/10/2022 Au programme de l'émission du 5 octobre 2022 ⬇ Au congo, l'ode à la forêt des pygmées Aka Après de multiples aller-retours entre Brazzaville et la forêt où vivent les pygmées, l'ethnologue congolais Sorel Eta, parle mieux aka que sa langue natale. Manager du groupe de chant polyphonique “Ndima” dont fait partie la chanteuse pygmée aka Angélique Manongo, il souhaite faire découvrir des traditions méconnues mais aussi mettre en garde face à la disparition de la culture aka. Dans son livre “L'université de la forêt”, publié aux éditions Presses Universitaires de France, il raconte l'histoire d'une amitié, d'une rencontre entre deux cultures surpassant tous les préjugés. Sorel Eta et Angélique Manongo sont nos invités.  Faut-il revoir les conditions d'attribution des grandes compétitions sportives ? La liste des villes françaises ayant fait le choix de ne pas diffuser la Coupe du monde de football au Qatar dans l'espace public s'allonge : après Strasbourg, Bordeaux ou Lille, les villes symboliques de Marseille et de Paris, où le PSG est depuis 2012 la propriété du pays du Golfe, viennent aussi d'interdire les fan zones. Cette décision tient surtout des conditions d'organisation du Mondial : selon le journal britannique “The Guardian”, 6 500 ouvriers immigrés seraient morts sur le chantier depuis le début des travaux. Sur le plan écologique, si la FIFA assure que la compétition atteindra la neutralité carbone, la construction d'enceintes climatisées est perçue comme une aberration. Alors que l'organisation des Jeux asiatiques d'hiver de 2029 viennent d'être attribués à l'Arabie saoudite, faut-il revoir les conditions d'attribution des grandes compétitions ? Nos invités en débattent.  Enfin, retrouvez également les chroniques de Xavier Mauduit et d'Alix Van Pée.   28 Minutes est le magazine d'actualité d'ARTE, présenté par Elisabeth Quin du lundi au jeudi à 20h05. Renaud Dély est aux commandes de l'émission le vendredi et le samedi. Ce podcast est coproduit par KM et ARTE Radio. Enregistrement : 5 octobre 2022 - Présentation : Elisabeth Quin - Production : KM, ARTE Radio

Pouvoirs cachés
89. Relations entre femmes, jugement, jalousie et critiques

Pouvoirs cachés

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 22:52


Hola les ami.es ! Je vous retrouve dans cet épisode afin de vous parler des relations entre femmes, du jugement, de la méchanceté gratuite, de la jalousie et de la critique encore bien trop présentes. Une invitation à prendre du recul sur nos manière de nous comporter en présence d'autres femmes et à essayer d'avancer ensemble avec plus d'empathie.  J'espère que cet épisode vous plaira. Si c'est le cas, je serais ravie d'avoir votre retour. Un immense merci pour votre soutiens ! Pour me retrouver sur instagram : @noelliesalgueira  Les services que je propose : https://noelliesalgueira.podia.com/ 

Partagez vos experiences de vie - Olivier Delacroix
Après avoir lancé une cagnotte pour aider un auditeur, Lou a subi des critiques sur notre groupe Facebook

Partagez vos experiences de vie - Olivier Delacroix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 18:39


Chaque soir, Olivier Delacroix vous ouvre la Libre antenne. Pas de jugements ni de tabous, une conversation franche, mais aussi des réponses aux questions que les auditeurs se posent. Un moment d'échange et de partage propice à la confidence pour repartir le cœur plus léger.

La libre antenne
Après avoir lancé une cagnotte pour aider un auditeur, Lou a subi des critiques sur notre groupe Facebook

La libre antenne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 18:39


Chaque soir, Olivier Delacroix vous ouvre la Libre antenne. Pas de jugements ni de tabous, une conversation franche, mais aussi des réponses aux questions que les auditeurs se posent. Un moment d'échange et de partage propice à la confidence pour repartir le cœur plus léger.

Tout un monde - La 1ere
Le sabotage du gazoduc montre la vulnérabilité des infrasctures critiques de l'Europe

Tout un monde - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:39


Houston Sports Talk
Fixing TEXANS Run Defense? | Old School ALTUVE? | CASERIO Critiques

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 36:50


Sports Radio 610's Shaun Bijani & Host Robert Land hit on the issues with the Texans run Defense and what could fix it, if anything. We discuss why there's no Dameon Pierce good backups and see how the Texans' 2021 Draft Class is looking. Plus, we relish in Altuve's turn back the clock season and wonder if Yordan Alvarez at DH is a good or bad thing.Subscribe on Youtube, Spotify, Google & Apple. Follow on Tiktok (HoustonSportsTalkRobert) & Twitter @HSTPodcast @ShaunBijani#Texans #Astros #Chargers #RexBurkhead #NickCaserio #DameonPierce #GarretWallow #ChristianHarris #LovieSmith #DavisMills #BrevinJordan #NicoCollins #RoyLopez #BrandinCooks #josealtuve #yordanalvarez #houstonsportstalk #robertland #shaunbijani #sportsradio610 #podcast

L'After Foot
Sommaire et "Pour l'Angleterre, malgré les critiques et les mauvais choix, il n'y a pas d'alternatives à Southgate", déplore Julien Laurens – 26/09

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 12:56


L'émission qui dit tout haut ce que le monde du foot pense tout bas ! Cette année, l' « After Foot » fête ses 16 ans et propose un choc des générations ! Composée de ceux qui ont grandi avec l'After, la « Génération After » prendra les commandes de l'émission entre 20h et 22h. Avec Nicolas Jamain aux manettes, entouré de Kévin Diaz, Mathieu Bodmer, Walid Acherchour, Simon Dutin, Romain Canuti et Sofiane Zouaoui, cette nouvelle génération débattra avec passion, mais toujours en conservant les convictions et les codes de l'After. De 22h à minuit, place à la version originelle et historique de l'After autour de Gilbert Brisbois, Daniel Riolo, Stéphane Guy, et Florent Gautreau. Les soirs de Ligue des Champions, Jérôme Rothen rejoindra la bande pour les matchs du PSG et Mamadou Niang pour les matchs de l'OM. Nicolas Vilas sera aux commandes pour faire vivre les matchs dans l'After Live. Cette année, Thibaut Giangrande pilotera l' « After Foot » le vendredi et samedi. RMC est une radio généraliste, essentiellement axée sur l'actualité et sur l'interactivité avec les auditeurs, dans un format 100% parlé, inédit en France. La grille des programmes de RMC s'articule autour de rendez-vous phares comme Apolline Matin (6h30-8h30), les Grandes Gueules (9h-12h), Estelle Midi (12h-15h), Super Moscato Show (15h-18h), Rothen s'enflamme (18h-20h), l'After Foot (20h-minuit).

The Reformed Financial Advisor
Responding to Peter Mallouk's Bitcoin Critiques

The Reformed Financial Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 46:11 Transcription Available


Andy Flattery & Zach from Casa respond to the bitcoin comments of Creative Planning's Peter Mallouk:- BTC is "Palm or Blackberry..." but blockchain will revolutionize everything?- "Too speculative" to be a currency? - But "anyone can create their own cryptocurrency?"- Investors in the S&P 500 will benefit anyway (from companies who hold it on the balance sheet)? Show Notes: https://simplewealthkc.com/responding-to-peter-mallouks-bitcoin-critiques/Interlude & Outro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9qsDgA1q8YIntro music is Ryan O'Connor'sFollow Andy Flattery on TwitterSend an email to andy@simplewealthkc.comSubscribe to the newsletter at reformedfinancialadvisor.com

FreshEd
FreshEd #294 – SEL Critiques and Alternatives (You Yun)

FreshEd

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 33:39


Today You Yun joins me to talk about Social-Emotional Learning (SEL). She critiques the approach to SEL advocated by western organizations by showing how conceptions of the self, other, and emotions are not universal. By exploring these concepts from Confucian and Daoist philosophies, she begins to show alternative ways to think about SEL. You Yun is an Associate Professor in the department of Education at the East China Normal University. Her new article is "Learn to become a unique interrelated person: An alternative of social-emotional learning drawing on Confucianism and Daoism," which was published in Educational Philosophy and Theory. freshedpodcast.com/you -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/support/

Psychology In Seattle Podcast
Attachment Theory Critiques and other Patron Questions

Psychology In Seattle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 93:02 Very Popular


Dr Kirk answers patron emails. 00:00 Attachment Theory Critiques and other Patron Questions00:03 Reacting to 'Has Attachment Theory Gone Too Far' on Refinery29 38:29 Secure attachment42:21 PIS website redesign43:59 Diagnosing a community47:23 Children's mental health59:15 Dr. Kirk's approach to Attachment Theory 1:06:21 Psychologists prescribing medications1:13:33 Feeling like a loserFrom our sponsor, BetterHelp: Need a therapist? Try BetterHelp! https://www.betterhelp.com/kirkGet started today and enjoy 10% off your first month. Discount code “KIRK" will be automatically applied.Become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/PsychologyInSeattleEmail: https://www.psychologyinseattle.com/contactMerch: https://teespring.com/stores/psychology-in-seattleCameo: https://www.cameo.com/kirkhondaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/psychologyinseattle/Facebook Official Page: https://www.facebook.com/PsychologyInSeattle/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@kirk.hondaThe Psychology In Seattle Podcast ®Trigger Warning: This episode may include topics such as assault, trauma, and discrimination. If necessary, listeners are encouraged to refrain from listening and care for their safety and well-being.Disclaimer: The content provided is for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only. Nothing here constitutes personal or professional consultation, therapy, diagnosis, or creates a counselor-client relationship. Topics discussed may generate differing points of view. If you participate (by being a guest, submitting a question, or commenting) you must do so with the knowledge that we cannot control reactions or responses from others, which may not agree with you or feel unfair. Your participation on this site is at your own risk, accepting full responsibility for any liability or harm that may result. Anything you write here may be used for discussion or endorsement of the podcast. Opinions and views expressed by the host and guest hosts are personal views. Although, we take precautions and fact check, they should not be considered facts and the opinions may change. Opinions posted by participants (such as comments) are not those of the hosts. Readers should not rely on any information found here and should perform due diligence before taking any action. For a more extensive description of factors for you to consider, please see www.psychologyinseattle.com

Bravo Critics
BC's Critiques of the Week: Bravo Fall Preview Review and RHOBH Deep Dive

Bravo Critics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 77:55


Arielle and Ricky discuss the latest news in the Bravo world and recap the week's episodes! -SLC and Potomac and Winterhouse, Oh My! Arielle and Ricky discuss Bravo's upcoming fall shows and why we are SO excited to see some of our favorite housewives return to our screens. -We talk about our thoughts on the season of Real Housewives of Atlanta and where we are standing with things after the first part of the reunion -Vive la France! Real Girlfriends of Paris has started and we give our feelings on the show so far and why we are looking forward to getting to know the girls of the City of Light! -Finally, we roll up our pants and get into the muck that is Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Aspen, the reunion, the earrings... we discuss and break it all down for you guys!

Bookmakers
Mohamed Mbougar Sarr (3/3)

Bookmakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 51:02


Sa mémoire n'est plus un secret Bookmakers #20 - L'auteur du mois : Mohamed Mbougar SarrNé à Dakar en 1990, Mohamed Mbougar Sarr est devenu – en 2021 et à 31 ans – le premier écrivain d'Afrique subsaharienne consacré par le plus prestigieux des prix littéraires français, le Goncourt, pour « La plus secrète mémoire des hommes », enquête au long cours et labyrinthe narratif enivrant, inspiré par le destin tragique du Malien Yambo Ouologuem (éditions Jimsaan / Philippe Rey). Mais avant le succès, ce wonderboy des lettres africaines était déjà l'auteur de trois romans diablement maîtrisés, aux sujets casse-gueule : « Terre ceinte » (2015, sur les milices djihadistes), « Silence du chœur » (2017, sur l'accueil de 72 migrants en Sicile) et « De purs hommes » (2018, sur l'homophobie au Sénégal). Il vit et travaille aujourd'hui à Beauvais (Oise). En partenariat avec Babelio. Sa mémoire n'est plus un secret (3/3)« Je vais te donner un conseil : n'essaie jamais de dire de quoi parle un grand livre. Ou, si tu le fais, voici la seule réponse possible : rien. Un grand livre ne parle jamais que de rien, et pourtant tout y est. » Dans « La plus secrète mémoire des hommes », un jeune écrivain sénégalais, Diégane Latyr Faye, « doctorant fainéant écrasé par ses modèles », découvre à Paris, à la faveur d'une rencontre érotique, un roman légendaire « qui tient de la cathédrale et de l'arène ». Ce livre dans le livre s'intitule « Le Labyrinthe de l'inhumain », signé dans les années 30 par l'énigmatique T. C. Elimane qui, vite épuisé par les scandales que son chef-d'œuvre suscite, choisit d'arrêter d'écrire puis de « s'enfoncer dans la nuit » en disparaissant, purement mais pas du tout simplement. D'Amsterdam à Buenos Aires, de Dakar à Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Diégane mène l'enquête – quitte à se perdre dans une toile d'araignée existentielle. À charge pour lui « d'élucider » le secret de la comète Elimane, accusé de plagiat. Conjointement publié à la rentrée 2021 par deux éditeurs indépendants, les Sénégalais de Jimsaan et le Français Philippe Rey, ce roman d'initiation de 500 pages rédigées sans plan, d'une originalité folle, héritier des dédales de Borges, Gombrowicz ou Bolaño (auquel il emprunte son titre), convoque plusieurs genres : « la geste griotique, le récit historique, le rapport ethnologique, mêlés dans un plaisir très gourmand de la narration ». Joyeux ou graves, pleins de mystique et d'ironie, les récits s'enchâssent, du journal intime aux articles universitaires, à coups de « frottements » ou de phrases qui courent parfois sur huit pages. Critiques et libraires sont unanimes. « La plus secrète mémoire des hommes » décroche le Goncourt et s'écoule à près de 500 000 exemplaires. Gloire à Mbougar Sarr, dont l'art paraît déjà si sûr. Dans ce troisième et dernier épisode, écoutons l'auteur raviver sa mémoire, lui pour qui l'écrivain « est un navigateur du Temps », lui qui semble bien là pour durer. Enregistrement : mai 22 - Texte, voix, entretien, découpage : Richard Gaitet - Prise de son, montage : Sara Monimart - Réalisation, mixage : Charlie Marcelet - Musiques originales : Samuel Hirsch - Illustration : Sylvain Cabot - Remerciements : Gloria Saltel, Clarisse Le Gardien - Production : ARTE Radio - Samuel Hirsch

Mad Radio
P&P - Based on Past Week 1 Critiques this is the BEST Texans Draft Class Ever

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 55:52


HOUR 2 - Seth and Sean look back at what some high and mighty media members had to say about the Texans draft class after week 1 and compare it to what we're all saying this season, explore which show they'd want to see less than the Rex Burkhead Show, and go through the Headlines.

The Lunar Society
Charles C. Mann - Americas Before Columbus & Scientific Wizardry

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:03


Charles C. Mann is the author of three of my favorite history books: 1491. 1493, and The Wizard and the Prophet. We discuss:why Native American civilizations collapsed and why they failed to make more technological progresswhy he disagrees with Will MacAskill about longtermismwhy there aren't any successful slave revoltshow geoengineering can help us solve climate changewhy Bitcoin is like the Chinese Silver Tradeand much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Some really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy my interviews of Will MacAskill (about longtermism), Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection), and David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.Timestamps(0:00:00) -Epidemically Alternate Realities(0:00:25) -Weak Points in Empires(0:03:28) -Slave Revolts(0:08:43) -Slavery Ban(0:12:46) - Contingency & The Pyramids(0:18:13) - Teotihuacan(0:20:02) - New Book Thesis(0:25:20) - Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley(0:31:15) - Technological Stupidity in the New World(0:41:24) - Religious Demoralization(0:44:00) - Critiques of Civilization Collapse Theories(0:49:05) - Virginia Company + Hubris(0:53:30) - China's Silver Trade(1:03:03) - Wizards vs. Prophets(1:07:55) - In Defense of Regulatory Delays(0:12:26) -Geoengineering(0:16:51) -Finding New Wizards(0:18:46) -Agroforestry is Underrated(1:18:46) -Longtermism & Free MarketsTranscriptDwarkesh Patel   Okay! Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Charles Mann, who is the author of three of my favorite books, including 1491: New Revelations of America before Columbus. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, and The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World. Charles, welcome to the Lunar Society.Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be here.Epidemically Alternate RealitiesDwarkesh Patel   My first question is: How much of the New World was basically baked into the cake? So at some point, people from Eurasia were going to travel to the New World, bringing their diseases. Considering disparities and where they would survive, if the Acemoglu theory that you cited is correct, then some of these places were bound to have good institutions and some of them were bound to have bad institutions. Plus, because of malaria, there were going to be shortages in labor that people would try to fix with African slaves. So how much of all this was just bound to happen? If Columbus hadn't done it, then maybe 50 years down the line, would someone from Italy have done it? What is the contingency here?Charles C. Mann   Well, I think that some of it was baked into the cake. It was pretty clear that at some point, people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere were going to come into contact with each other. I mean, how could that not happen, right? There was a huge epidemiological disparity between the two hemispheres––largely because by a quirk of evolutionary history, there were many more domesticable animals in Eurasia and the Eastern hemisphere. This leads almost inevitably to the creation of zoonotic diseases: diseases that start off in animals and jump the species barrier and become human diseases. Most of the great killers in human history are zoonotic diseases. When people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere meet, there are going to be those kinds of diseases. But if you wanted to, it's possible to imagine alternative histories. There's a wonderful book by Laurent Binet called Civilizations that, in fact, does just that. It's a great alternative history book. He imagines that some of the Vikings came and extended further into North America, bringing all these diseases, and by the time of Columbus and so forth, the epidemiological balance was different. So when Columbus and those guys came, these societies killed him, grabbed his boats, and went and conquered Europe. It's far-fetched, but it does say that this encounter would've happened and that the diseases would've happened, but it didn't have to happen in exactly the way that it did. It's also perfectly possible to imagine that Europeans didn't engage in wholesale slavery. There was a huge debate when this began about whether or not slavery was a good idea. There were a lot of reservations, particularly among the Catholic monarchy asking the Pope “Is it okay that we do this?” You could imagine the penny dropping in a slightly different way. So, I think some of it was bound to happen, but how exactly it happened was really up to chance, contingency, and human agency,Weak Points in EmpiresDwarkesh Patel   When the Spanish first arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries, were the Incas and the Aztecs at a particularly weak point or particularly decadent? Or was this just how well you should have expected this civilization to be functioning at any given time period?Charles C. Mann   Well, typically, empires are much more jumbly and fragile entities than we imagine. There's always fighting at the top. What Hernán Cortés was able to do, for instance, with the Aztecs––who are better called The Triple Alliance (the term “Aztec” is an invention from the 19th century). The Triple Alliance was comprised of three groups of people in central Mexico, the largest of which were the Mexica, who had the great city of Tenochtitlan. The other two guys really resented them and so what Cortes was able to do was foment a civil war within the Aztec empire: taking some enemies of the Aztec, some members of the Aztec empire, and creating an entirely new order. There's a fascinating set of history that hasn't really emerged into the popular consciousness. I didn't include it in 1491 or 1493 because it was so new that I didn't know anything about it; everything was largely from Spanish and Mexican scholars about the conquest within the conquest. The allies of the Spaniards actually sent armies out and conquered big swaths of northern and southern Mexico and Central America. So there's a far more complex picture than we realized even 15 or 20 years ago when I first published 1491. However, the conquest wasn't as complete as we think. I talk a bit about this in 1493 but what happens is Cortes moves in and he marries his lieutenants to these indigenous people, creating this hybrid nobility that then extended on to the Incas. The Incas were a very powerful but unstable empire and Pizarro had the luck to walk in right after a civil war. When he did that right after a civil war and massive epidemic, he got them at a very vulnerable point. Without that, it all would have been impossible. Pizarro cleverly allied with the losing side (or the apparently losing side in this in the Civil War), and was able to create a new rallying point and then attack the winning side. So yes, they came in at weak points, but empires typically have these weak points because of fratricidal stuff going on in the leadership.Dwarkesh Patel   It does also remind me of the East India Trading Company.Charles C. Mann   And the Mughal empire, yeah. Some of those guys in Bengal invited Clive and his people in. In fact, I was struck by this. I had just been reading this book, maybe you've heard of it: The Anarchy by William Dalrymple.Dwarkesh Patel   I've started reading it, yeah but I haven't made much progress.Charles C. Mann   It's an amazing book! It's so oddly similar to what happened. There was this fratricidal stuff going on in the Mughal empire, and one side thought, “Oh, we'll get these foreigners to come in, and we'll use them.” That turned out to be a big mistake.Dwarkesh Patel   Yes. What's also interestingly similar is the efficiency of the bureaucracy. Niall Ferguson has a good book on the British Empire and one thing he points out is that in India, the ratio between an actual English civil servant and the Indian population was about 1: 3,000,000 at the peak of the ratio. Which obviously is only possible if you have the cooperation of at least the elites, right? So it sounds similar to what you were saying about Cortes marrying his underlings to the nobility. Charles C. Mann   Something that isn't stressed enough in history is how often the elites recognize each other. They join up in arrangements that increase both of their power and exploit the poor schmucks down below. It's exactly what happened with the East India Company, and it's exactly what happened with Spain. It's not so much that there was this amazing efficiency, but rather, it was a mutually beneficial arrangement for Xcalack, which is now a Mexican state. It had its rights, and the people kept their integrity, but they weren't really a part of the Spanish Empire. They also weren't really wasn't part of Mexico until around 1857. It was a good deal for them. The same thing was true for the Bengalis, especially the elites who made out like bandits from the British Empire.Slave Revolts Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super interesting. Why was there only one successful slave revolt in the new world in Haiti? In many of these cases, the ratios between slaves and the owners are just huge. So why weren't more of them successful?Charles C. Mann   Well, you would first have to define ‘successful'. Haiti wasn't successful if you meant ‘creating a prosperous state that would last for a long time.' Haiti was and is (to no small extent because of the incredible blockade that was put on it by all the other nations) in terrible shape. Whereas in the case of Paul Maurice, you had people who were self-governing for more than 100 years.. Eventually, they were incorporated into the larger project of Brazil. There's a great Brazilian classic that's equivalent to what Moby Dick or Huck Finn is to us called Os Sertões by a guy named Cunha. And it's good! It's been translated into this amazing translation in English called ​​Rebellion in the Backlands. It's set in the 1880s, and it's about the creation of a hybrid state of runaway slaves, and so forth, and how they had essentially kept their independence and lack of supervision informally, from the time of colonialism. Now the new Brazilian state is trying to take control, and they fight them to the last person. So you have these effectively independent areas in de facto, if not de jure, that existed in the Americas for a very long time. There are some in the US, too, in the great dismal swamp, and you hear about those marooned communities in North Carolina, in Mexico, where everybody just agreed “these places aren't actually under our control, but we're not going to say anything.”  If they don't mess with us too much, we won't mess with them too much. Is that successful or not? I don't know.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, but it seems like these are temporary successes..Charles C. Mann   I mean, how long did nations last? Like Genghis Khan! How long did the Khan age last? But basically, they had overwhelming odds against them. There's an entire colonial system that was threatened by their existence. Similar to the reasons that rebellions in South Asia were suppressed with incredible brutality–– these were seen as so profoundly threatening to this entire colonial order that people exerted a lot more force against them than you would think would be worthwhile.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. It reminds me of James Scott's Against the Grain. He pointed out that if you look at the history of agriculture, there're many examples where people choose to run away as foragers in the forest, and then the state tries to bring them back into the fold.Charles C. Mann   Right. And so this is exactly part of that dynamic. I mean, who wants to be a slave, right? So as many people as possible ended up leaving. It's easier in some places than others.. it's very easy in Brazil. There are 20 million people in the Brazilian Amazon and the great bulk of them are the descendants of people who left slavery. They're still Brazilians and so forth, but, you know, they ended up not being slaves.Slavery BanDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super fascinating. What is the explanation for why slavery went from being historically ever-present to ending at a particular time when it was at its peak in terms of value and usefulness? What's the explanation for why, when Britain banned the slave trade, within 100 or 200 years, there ended up being basically no legal sanction for slavery anywhere in the world?Charles C. Mann   This is a really good question and the real answer is that historians have been arguing about this forever. I mean, not forever, but you know, for decades, and there's a bunch of different explanations. I think the reason it's so hard to pin down is… kind of amazing. I mean, if you think about it, in 1800, if you were to have a black and white map of the world and put red in countries in which slavery was illegal and socially accepted, there would be no red anywhere on the planet. It's the most ancient human institution that there is. The Code of Hammurabi is still the oldest complete legal code that we have, and about a third of it is about rules for when you can buy slaves, when you can sell slaves, how you can mistreat them, and how you can't–– all that stuff. About a third of it is about buying, selling, and working other human beings. So this has been going on for a very, very long time. And then in a century and a half, it suddenly changes. So there's some explanation, and it's that machinery gets better. But the reason to have people is that you have these intelligent autonomous workers, who are like the world's best robots. From the point of view of the owner, they're fantastically good, except they're incredibly obstreperous and when they're caught, you're constantly afraid they're going to kill you. So if you have a chance to replace them with machinery, or to create a wage where you can run wage people, pay wage workers who are kept in bad conditions but somewhat have more legal rights, then maybe that's a better deal for you. Another one is that industrialization produced different kinds of commodities that became more and more valuable, and slavery was typically associated with the agricultural laborer. So as agriculture diminished as a part of the economy, slavery become less and less important and it became easier to get rid of them. Another one has to do with the beginning of the collapse of the colonial order. Part of it has to do with.. (at least in the West, I don't know enough about the East) the rise of a serious abolition movement with people like Wilberforce and various Darwins and so forth. And they're incredibly influential, so to some extent, I think people started saying, “Wow, this is really bad.”  I suspect that if you looked at South Asia and Africa, you might see similar things having to do with a social moment, but I just don't know enough about that. I know there's an anti-slavery movement and anti-caste movement in which we're all tangled up in South Asia, but I just don't know enough about it to say anything intelligent.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, the social aspect of it is really interesting. The things you mentioned about automation, industrialization, and ending slavery… Obviously, with time, that might have actually been why it expanded, but its original inception in Britain happened before the Industrial Revolution took off. So that was purely them just taking a huge loss because this movement took hold. Charles C. Mann   And the same thing is true for Bartolome de Las Casas. I mean, Las Casas, you know, in the 1540s just comes out of nowhere and starts saying, “Hey! This is bad.” He is the predecessor of the modern human rights movement. He's an absolutely extraordinary figure, and he has huge amounts of influence. He causes Spain's king in the 1540s to pass what they call The New Laws which says no more slavery, which is a devastating blow enacted to the colonial economy in Spain because they depended on having slaves to work in the silver mines in the northern half of Mexico and in Bolivia, which was the most important part of not only the Spanish colonial economy but the entire Spanish empire. It was all slave labor. And they actually tried to ban it. Now, you can say they came to their senses and found a workaround in which it wasn't banned. But it's still… this actually happened in the 1540s. Largely because people like Las Casas said, “This is bad! you're going to hell doing this.”Contingency & The Pyramids Dwarkesh Patel   Right. I'm super interested in getting into The Wizard and the Prophet section with you. Discussing how movements like environmentalism, for example, have been hugely effective. Again, even though it probably goes against the naked self-interest of many countries. So I'm very interested in discussing that point about why these movements have been so influential!But let me continue asking you about globalization in the world. I'm really interested in how you think about contingency in history, especially given that you have these two groups of people that have been independently evolving and separated for tens of thousands of years. What things turn out to be contingent? What I find really interesting from the book was how both of them developed pyramids––  who would have thought that structure would be within our extended phenotype or something?Charles C. Mann    It's also geometry! I mean, there's only a certain limited number of ways you can pile up stone blocks in a stable way. And pyramids are certainly one of them. It's harder to have a very long-lasting monument that's a cylinder. Pyramids are also easier to build: if you get a cylinder, you have to have scaffolding around it and it gets harder and harder.With pyramids, you can use each lower step to put the next one, on and on, and so forth. So pyramids seem kind of natural to me. Now the material you make them up of is going to be partly determined by what there is. In Cahokia and in the Mississippi Valley, there isn't a lot of stone. So people are going to make these earthen pyramids and if you want them to stay on for a long time, there's going to be certain things you have to do for the structure which people figured out. For some pyramids, you had all this marble around them so you could make these giant slabs of marble, which seems, from today's perspective, incredibly wasteful. So you're going to have some things that are universal like that, along with the apparently universal, or near-universal idea that people who are really powerful like to identify themselves as supernatural and therefore want to be commemorated. Dwarkesh Patel   Yes, I visited Mexico City recently.Charles C. Mann Beautiful city!TeotihuacanDwarkesh Patel Yeah, the pyramids there… I think I was reading your book at the time or already had read your book. What struck me was that if I remember correctly, they didn't have the wheel and they didn't have domesticated animals. So if you really think about it, that's a really huge amount of human misery and toil it must have taken to put this thing together as basically a vanity project. It's like a huge negative connotation if you think about what it took to construct it.Charles C. Mann   Sure, but there are lots of really interesting things about Teotihuacan. This is just one of those things where you can only say so much in one book. If I was writing the two-thousand-page version of 1491, I would have included this. So Tehuácan pretty much starts out as a standard Imperial project, and they build all these huge castles and temples and so forth. There's no reason to suppose it was anything other than an awful experience (like building the pyramids), but then something happened to Teotihuacan that we don't understand. All these new buildings started springing up during the next couple of 100 years, and they're all very very similar. They're like apartment blocks and there doesn't seem to be a great separation between rich and poor. It's really quite striking how egalitarian the architecture is because that's usually thought to be a reflection of social status. So based on the way it looks, could there have been a political revolution of some sort? Where they created something much more egalitarian, probably with a bunch of good guy kings who weren't interested in elevating themselves so much? There's a whole chapter in the book by David Wingrove and David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything about this, and they make this argument that Tehuácan is an example that we can look at as an ancient society that was much more socially egalitarian than we think. Now, in my view, they go a little overboard–– it was also an aggressive imperial power and it was conquering much of the Maya world at the same time. But it is absolutely true that something that started out one way can start looking very differently quite quickly. You see this lots of times in the Americas in the Southwest–– I don't know if you've ever been to Chaco Canyon or any of those places, but you should absolutely go! Unfortunately, it's hard to get there because of the roads terrible but overall, it's totally worth it. It's an amazing place. Mesa Verde right north of it is incredible, it's just really a fantastic thing to see. There are these enormous structures in Chaco Canyon, that we would call castles if they were anywhere else because they're huge. The biggest one, Pueblo Bonito, is like 800 rooms or some insane number like that. And it's clearly an imperial venture, we know that because it's in this canyon and one side is getting all the good light and good sun–– a whole line of these huge castles. And then on the other side is where the peons lived. We also know that starting around 1100, everybody just left! And then their descendants start the Puebla, who are these sort of intensely socially egalitarian type of people. It looks like a political revolution took place. In fact, in the book I'm now writing, I'm arguing (in a sort of tongue-in-cheek manner but also seriously) that this is the first American Revolution! They got rid of these “kings” and created these very different and much more egalitarian societies in which ordinary people had a much larger voice about what went on.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. I think I got a chance to see the Teotihuacan apartments when I was there, but I wonder if we're just looking at the buildings that survived. Maybe the buildings that survived were better constructed because they were for the elites? The way everybody else lived might have just washed away over the years.Charles C. Mann   So what's happened in the last 20 years is basically much more sophisticated surveys of what is there. I mean, what you're saying is absolutely the right question to ask. Are the rich guys the only people with things that survived while the ordinary people didn't? You can never be absolutely sure, but what they did is they had these ground penetrating radar surveys, and it looks like this egalitarian construction extends for a huge distance. So it's possible that there are more really, really poor people. But at least you'd see an aggressively large “middle class” getting there, which is very, very different from the picture you have of the ancient world where there's the sun priest and then all the peasants around them.New Book ThesisDwarkesh Patel   Yeah. By the way, is the thesis of the new book something you're willing to disclose at this point? It's okay if you're not––Charles C. Mann   Sure sure, it's okay! This is a sort of weird thing, it's like a sequel or offshoot of 1491. That book, I'm embarrassed to say, was supposed to end with another chapter. The chapter was going to be about the American West, which is where I grew up, and I'm very fond of it. And apparently, I had a lot to say because when I outlined the chapter; the outline was way longer than the actual completed chapters of the rest of the book. So I sort of tried to chop it up and so forth, and it just was awful. So I just cut it. If you carefully look at 1491, it doesn't really have an ending. At the end, the author sort of goes, “Hey! I'm ending, look at how great this is!” So this has been bothering me for 15 years. During the pandemic, when I was stuck at home like so many other people, I held out what I had since I've been saving string and tossing articles that I came across into a folder, and I thought, “Okay, I'm gonna write this out more seriously now.” 15 or 20 years later. And then it was pretty long so I thought “Maybe this could be an e-book.” then I showed it to my editor. And he said, “That is not an e-book. That's an actual book.” So I take a chapter and hope I haven't just padded it, and it's about the North American West. My kids like the West, and at various times, they've questioned what it would be like to move out there because I'm in Massachusetts, where they grew up. So I started thinking “What is the West going to be like, tomorrow? When I'm not around 30 or 50 years from now?”It seems to be that you won't know who's president or who's governor or anything, but there are some things we can know. It'd be hotter and drier than it is now or has been in the recent past, like that wouldn't really be a surprise. So I think we can say that it's very likely to be like that. All the projections are that something like 40% of the people in the area between the Mississippi and the Pacific will be of Latino descent–– from the south, so to speak. And there's a whole lot of people from Asia along the Pacific coast, so it's going to be a real ethnic mixing ground. There's going to be an epicenter of energy, sort of no matter what happens. Whether it's solar, whether it's wind, whether it's petroleum, or hydroelectric, the West is going to be economically extremely powerful, because energy is a fundamental industry.And the last thing is (and this is the iffiest of the whole thing), but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the ongoing recuperation of sovereignty by the 294 federally recognized Native nations in the West is going to continue. That's been going in this very jagged way, but definitely for the last 50 or 60 years, as long as I've been around, the overall trend is in a very clear direction. So then you think, okay, this West is going to be wildly ethnically diverse, full of competing sovereignties and overlapping sovereignties. Nature is also going to really be in kind of a terminal. Well, that actually sounds like the 1200s! And the conventional history starts with Lewis and Clark and so forth. There's this breakpoint in history when people who looked like me came in and sort of rolled in from the East and kind of took over everything. And the West disappears! That separate entity, the native people disappear, and nature is tamed. That's pretty much what was in the textbooks when I was a kid. Do you know who Frederick Jackson Turner is? Dwarkesh Patel  No.Charles C. Mann So he's like one of these guys where nobody knows who he is. But he was incredibly influential in setting intellectual ideas. He wrote this article in 1893, called The Significance of the Frontier. It was what established this idea that there's this frontier moving from East to West and on this side was savagery and barbarism, and on this other side of civilization was team nature and wilderness and all that. Then it goes to the Pacific, and that's the end of the West. That's still in the textbooks but in a different form: we don't call native people “lurking savages” as he did. But it's in my kids' textbooks. If you have kids, it'll very likely be in their textbook because it's such a bedrock. What I'm saying is that's actually not a useful way to look at it, given what's coming up. A wonderful Texas writer, Bruce Sterling, says, “To know the past, you first have to understand the future.”It's funny, right? But what he means is that all of us have an idea of where the trajectory of history is going. A whole lot of history is about asking, “How did we get here? How do we get there?” To get that, you have to have an idea of what the “there” is. So I'm saying, I'm writing a history of the West with that West that I talked about in mind. Which gives you a very different picture: a lot more about indigenous fire management, the way the Hohokam survived the drought of the 1200s, and a little bit less about Billy the Kid. Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley Dwarkesh Patel   I love that quote hahaha. Speaking of the frontier, maybe it's a mistaken concept, but I remember that in a chapter of 1493, you talk about these rowdy adventurer men who outnumber the women in the silver mines and the kind of trouble that they cause. I wonder if there's some sort of distant analogy to the technology world or Silicon Valley, where you have the same kind of gender ratio and you have the same kind of frontier spirit? Maybe not the same physical violence––– more sociologically. Is there any similarity there?Charles C. Mann   I think it's funny, I hadn't thought about it. But it's certainly funny to think about. So let me do this off the top of my head. I like the idea that at the end of it, I can say, “wait, wait, that's ridiculous.“ Both of them would attract people who either didn't have much to lose, or were oblivious about what they had to lose, and had a resilience towards failure. I mean, it's amazing, the number of people in Silicon Valley who have completely failed at numbers of things! They just get up and keep‌ trying and have a kind of real obliviousness to social norms. It's pretty clear they are very much interested in making a mark and making their fortunes themselves. So there's at least a sort of shallow comparison, there are some certain similarities. I don't think this is entirely flattering to either group. It's absolutely true that those silver miners in Bolivia, and in northern‌ Mexico, created to a large extent, the modern world. But it's also true that they created these cesspools of violence and exploitation that had consequences we're still living with today. So you have to kind of take the bitter with the sweet. And I think that's true of Silicon Valley and its products *chuckles* I use them every day, and I curse them every day.Dwarkesh Patel   Right.Charles C. Mann   I want to give you an example. The internet has made it possible for me to do something like write a Twitter thread, get millions of people to read it, and have a discussion that's really amazing at the same time. Yet today, The Washington Post has an article about how every book in Texas (it's one of the states) a child checks out of the school library goes into a central state databank. They can see and look for patterns of people taking out “bad books” and this sort of stuff. And I think “whoa, that's really bad! That's not so good.” It's really the same technology that brings this dissemination and collection of vast amounts of information with relative ease. So with all these things, you take the bitter with the sweet. Technological Stupidity in the New WorldDwarkesh Patel   I want to ask you again about contingency because there are so many other examples where things you thought would be universal actually don't turn out to be. I think you talked about how the natives had different forms of metallurgy, with gold and copper, but then they didn't do iron or steel. You would think that given their “warring nature”, iron would be such a huge help. There's a clear incentive to build it. Millions of people living there could have built or developed this technology. Same with the steel, same with the wheel. What's the explanation for why these things you think anybody would have come up with didn't happen?Charles C. Mann   I know. It's just amazing to me! I don't know. This is one of those things I think about all the time. A few weeks ago, it rained, and I went out to walk the dog. I'm always amazed that there are literal glistening drops of water on the crabgrass and when you pick it up, sometimes there are little holes eaten by insects in the crabgrass. Every now and then, if you look carefully, you'll see a drop of water in one of those holes and it forms a lens. And you can look through it! You can see that it's not a very powerful lens by any means, but you can see that things are magnified. So you think “How long has there been crabgrass? Or leaves? And water?”  Just forever! We've had glass forever! So how is it that we had to wait for whoever it was to create lenses? I just don't get it. In book 1491, I mentioned the moldboard plow, which is the one with a curving blade that allows you to go through the soil much more easily. It was invented in China thousands of years ago, but not around in Europe until the 1400s. Like, come on, guys! What was it? And so, you know, there's this mysterious sort of mass stupidity. One of the wonderful things about globalization and trade and contact is that maybe not everybody is as blind as you and you can learn from them. I mean, that's the most wonderful thing about trade. So in the case of the wheel, the more amazing thing is that in Mesoamerica, they had the wheel on child's toys. Why didn't they develop it? The best explanation I can get is they didn't have domestic animals. A cart then would have to be pulled by people. That would imply that to make the cart work, you'd have to cut a really good road. Whereas they had these travois, which are these things that you hold and they have these skids that are shaped kind of like an upside-down V. You can drag them across rough ground, you don't need a road for them. That's what people used in the Great Plains and so forth. So you look at this, and you think “maybe this was the ultimate way to save labor. I mean, this was good enough. And you didn't have to build and maintain these roads to make this work”  so maybe it was rational or just maybe they're just blinkered. I don't know. As for assembly with steel, I think there's some values involved in that. I don't know if you've ever seen one of those things they had in Mesoamerica called Macuahuitl. They're wooden clubs with obsidian blades on them and they are sharp as hell. You don't run your finger along the edge because they just slice it open. An obsidian blade is pretty much sharper than any iron or steel blade and it doesn't rust. Nice. But it's much more brittle. So okay, they're there, and the Spaniards were really afraid of them. Because a single blow from these heavy sharp blades could kill a horse. They saw people whack off the head of a horse carrying a big strong guy with a single blow! So they're really dangerous, but they're not long-lasting. Part of the deal was that the values around conflict were different in the sense that conflict in Mesoamerica wasn't a matter of sending out foot soldiers in grunts, it was a chance for soldiers to get individual glory and prestige. This was associated with having these very elaborately beautiful weapons that you killed people with. So maybe not having steel worked better for their values and what they were trying to do at war. That would've lasted for years and I mean, that's just a guess. But you can imagine a scenario where they're not just blinkered but instead expressive on the basis of their different values. This is hugely speculative. There's a wonderful book by Ross Hassig about old Aztec warfare. It's an amazing book which is about the military history of The Aztecs and it's really quite interesting. He talks about this a little bit but he finally just says we don't know why they didn't develop all these technologies, but this worked for them.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. Yeah, it's kind of similar to China not developing gunpowder into an actual ballistic material––Charles C. Mann   Or Japan giving up the gun! They actually banned guns during the Edo period. The Portuguese introduced guns and the Japanese used them, and they said “Ahhh nope! Don't want them.” and they banned them. This turned out to be a terrible idea when Perry came in the 1860s. But for a long time, supposedly under the Edo period, Japan had the longest period of any nation ever without a foreign war. Dwarkesh Patel   Hmm. Interesting. Yeah, it's concerning when you think the lack of war might make you vulnerable in certain ways. Charles C. Mann   Yeah, that's a depressing thought.Religious DemoralizationDwarkesh Patel   Right. In Fukuyama's The End of History, he's obviously arguing that liberal democracy will be the final form of government everywhere. But there's this point he makes at the end where he's like, “Yeah, but maybe we need a small war every 50 years or so just to make sure people remember how bad it can get and how to deal with it.” Anyway, when the epidemic started in the New World, surely the Indians must have had some story or superstitious explanation–– some way of explaining what was happening. What was it?Charles C. Mann   You have to remember, the germ theory of disease didn't exist at the time. So neither the Spaniards, or the English, or the native people, had a clear idea of what was going on. In fact, both of them thought of it as essentially a spiritual event, a religious event. You went into areas that were bad, and the air was bad. That was malaria, right? That was an example. To them, it was God that was in control of the whole business. There's a line from my distant ancestor––the Governor Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who's my umpteenth, umpteenth grandfather, that's how waspy I am, he's actually my ancestor––about how God saw fit to clear the natives for us. So they see all of this in really religious terms, and more or less native people did too! So they thought over and over again that “we must have done something bad for this to have happened.” And that's a very powerful demoralizing thing. Your God either punished you or failed you. And this was it. This is one of the reasons that Christianity was able to make inroads. People thought “Their god is coming in and they seem to be less harmed by these diseases than people with our God.” Now, both of them are completely misinterpreting what's going on! But if you have that kind of spiritual explanation, it makes sense for you to say, “Well, maybe I should hit up their God.”Critiques of Civilization Collapse TheoriesDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, super fascinating. There's been a lot of books written in the last few decades about why civilizations collapse. There's Joseph Tainter's book, there's Jared Diamond's book. Do you feel like any of them actually do a good job of explaining how these different Indian societies collapsed over time?Charles C. Mann   No. Well not the ones that I've read. And there are two reasons for that. One is that it's not really a mystery. If you have a society that's epidemiologically naive, and smallpox sweeps in and kills 30% of you, measles kills 10% of you, and this all happens in a short period of time, that's really tough! I mean COVID killed one million people in the United States. That's 1/330th of the population. And it wasn't even particularly the most economically vital part of the population. It wasn't kids, it was elderly people like my aunt–– I hope I'm not sounding callous when I'm describing it like a demographer. Because I don't mean it that way. But it caused enormous economic damage and social conflict and so forth. Now, imagine something that's 30 or 40 times worse than that, and you have no explanation for it at all. It's kind of not a surprise to me that this is a super challenge. What's actually amazing is the number of nations that survived and came up with ways to deal with this incredible loss.That relates to the second issue, which is that it's sort of weird to talk about collapse in the ways that they sometimes do. Like both of them talk about the Mayan collapse. But there are 30 million Mayan people still there. They were never really conquered by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were still waging giant wars in Yucatan in the 1590s. In the early 21st century, I went with my son to Chiapas, which is the southernmost exit province. And that is where the Commandante Cero and the rebellions were going on. We were looking at some Mayan ruins, and they were too beautiful, and I stayed too long, and we were driving back through the night on these terrible roads. And we got stopped by some of these guys with guns. I was like, “Oh God, not only have I got myself into this, I got my son into this.” And the guy comes and looks at us and says, “Who are you?” And I say that we're American tourists. And he just gets this disgusted look, and he says, “Go on.” And you know, the journalist in me takes over and I ask, “What do you mean, just go on?” And he says, “We're hunting for Mexicans.” And as I'm driving I'm like “Wait a minute, I'm in Mexico.” And that those were Mayans. All those guys were Maya people still fighting against the Spaniards. So it's kind of funny to say that their society collapsed when there are Mayan radio stations, there are Maya schools, and they're speaking Mayan in their home. It's true, they don't have giant castles anymore. But, it's odd to think of that as collapse. They seem like highly successful people who have dealt pretty well with a lot of foreign incursions. So there's this whole aspect of “What do you mean collapse?” And you see that in Against the Grain, the James Scott book, where you think, “What do you mean barbarians?” If you're an average Maya person, working as a farmer under the purview of these elites in the big cities probably wasn't all that great. So after the collapse, you're probably better off. So all of that I feel is important in this discussion of collapse. I think it's hard to point to collapses that either have very clear exterior causes or are really collapses of the environment. Particularly the environmental sort that are pictured in books like Diamond has, where he talks about Easter Island. The striking thing about that is we know pretty much what happened to all those trees. Easter Island is this little speck of land, in the middle of the ocean, and Dutch guys come there and it's the only wood around for forever, so they cut down all the trees to use it for boat repair, ship repair, and they enslave most of the people who are living there. And we know pretty much what happened. There's no mystery about it.Virginia Company + HubrisDwarkesh Patel   Why did the British government and the king keep subsidizing and giving sanctions to the Virginia Company, even after it was clear that this is not especially profitable and half the people that go die? Why didn't they just stop?Charles C. Mann   That's a really good question. It's a super good question. I don't really know if we have a satisfactory answer, because it was so stupid for them to keep doing that. It was such a loss for so long. So you have to say, they were thinking, not purely economically. Part of it is that the backers of the Virginia Company, in sort of classic VC style, when things were going bad, they lied about it. They're burning through their cash, they did these rosy presentations, and they said, “It's gonna be great! We just need this extra money.” Kind of the way that Uber did. There's this tremendous burn rate and now the company says you're in tremendous trouble because it turns out that it's really expensive to provide all these calves and do all this stuff. The cheaper prices that made people like me really happy about it are vanishing. So, you know, I think future business studies will look at those rosy presentations and see that they have a kind of analogy to the ones that were done with the Virginia Company. A second thing is that there was this dog-headed belief kind of based on the inability to understand longitude and so forth, that the Americas were far narrower than they actually are. I reproduced this in 1493. There were all kinds of maps in Britain at the time showing these little skinny Philippines-like islands. So there's the thought that you just go up the Chesapeake, go a couple 100 miles, and you're gonna get to the Pacific into China. So there's this constant searching for a passage to China through this thought to be very narrow path. Sir Francis Drake and some other people had shown that there was a West Coast so they thought the whole thing was this narrow, Panama-like landform. So there's this geographical confusion. Finally, there's the fact that the Spaniards had found all this gold and silver, which is an ideal commodity, because it's not perishable: it's small, you can put it on your ship and bring it back, and it's just great in every way. It's money, essentially. Basically, you dig up money in the hills and there's this long-standing belief that there's got to be more of that in the Americas, we just need to find out where. So there's always that hope. Lastly, there's the Imperial bragging rights. You know, we can't be the only guys with a colony. You see that later in the 19th century when Germany became a nation and one of the first things the Dutch said was “Let's look for pieces of Africa that the rest of Europe hasn't claimed,” and they set up their own mini colonial empire. So there's this kind of “Keeping Up with the Joneses” aspect, it just seems to be sort of deep in the European ruling class. So then you got to have an empire that in this weird way, seems very culturally part of it. I guess it's the same for many other places. As soon as you feel like you have a state together, you want to index other things. You see that over and over again, all over the world. So that's part of it. All those things, I think, contributed to this. Outright lying, this delusion, other various delusions, plus hubris.Dwarkesh Patel   It seems that colonial envy has today probably spread to China. I don't know too much about it, but I hear that the Silk Road stuff they're doing is not especially economically wise. Is this kind of like when you have the impulse where if you're a nation trying to rise, you have that “I gotta go here, I gotta go over there––Charles C. Mann   Yeah and “Show what a big guy I am. Yeah,––China's Silver TradeDwarkesh Patel   Exactly. So speaking of China, I want to ask you about the silver trade. Excuse another tortured analogy, but when I was reading that chapter where you're describing how the Spanish silver was ending up with China and how the Ming Dynasty caused too much inflation. They needed more reliable mediums of exchange, so they had to give up real goods from China, just in order to get silver, which is just a medium of exchange––but it's not creating more apples, right? I was thinking about how this sounds a bit like Bitcoin today, (obviously to a much smaller magnitude) but in the sense that you're using up goods. It's a small amount of electricity, all things considered, but you're having to use up real energy in order to construct this medium of exchange. Maybe somebody can claim that this is necessary because of inflation or some other policy mistake and you can compare it to the Ming Dynasty. But what do you think about this analogy? Is there a similar situation where real goods are being exchanged for just a medium of exchange?Charles C. Mann   That's really interesting. I mean, on some level, that's the way money works, right? I go into a store, like a Starbucks and I buy a coffee, then I hand them a piece of paper with some drawings on it, and they hand me an actual coffee in return for a piece of paper. So the mysteriousness of money is kind of amazing. History is of course replete with examples of things that people took very seriously as money. Things that to us seem very silly like the cowry shell or in the island of Yap where they had giant stones! Those were money and nobody ever carried them around. You transferred the ownership of the stone from one person to another person to buy something. I would get some coconuts or gourds or whatever, and now you own that stone on the hill. So there's a tremendous sort of mysteriousness about the human willingness to assign value to arbitrary things such as (in Bitcoin's case) strings of zeros and ones. That part of it makes sense to me. What's extraordinary is when the effort to create a medium of exchange ends up costing you significantly–– which is what you're talking about in China where people had a medium of exchange, but they had to work hugely to get that money. I don't have to work hugely to get a $1 bill, right? It's not like I'm cutting down a tree and smashing the papers to pulp and printing. But you're right, that's what they're kind of doing in China. And that's, to a lesser extent, what you're doing in Bitcoin. So I hadn't thought about this, but Bitcoin in this case is using computer cycles and energy. To me, it's absolutely extraordinary the degree to which people who are Bitcoin miners are willing to upend their lives to get cheap energy. A guy I know is talking about setting up small nuclear plants as part of his idea for climate change and he wants to set them up in really weird remote areas. And I was asking “Well who would be your customers?” and he says Bitcoin people would move to these nowhere places so they could have these pocket nukes to privately supply their Bitcoin habits. And that's really crazy! To completely upend your life to create something that you hope is a medium of exchange that will allow you to buy the things that you're giving up. So there's a kind of funny aspect to this. That was partly what was happening in China. Unfortunately, China's very large, so they were able to send off all this stuff to Mexico so that they could get the silver to pay their taxes, but it definitely weakened the country.Wizards vs. ProphetsDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, and that story you were talking about, El Salvador actually tried it. They were trying to set up a Bitcoin city next to this volcano and use the geothermal energy from the volcano to incentivize people to come there and mine cheap Bitcoin. Staying on the theme of China, do you think the prophets were more correct, or the wizards were more correct for that given time period? Because we have the introduction of potato, corn, maize, sweet potatoes, and this drastically increases the population until it reaches a carrying capacity. Obviously, what follows is the other kinds of ecological problems this causes and you describe these in the book. Is this evidence of the wizard worldview that potatoes appear and populations balloon? Or are the prophets like “No, no, carrying capacity will catch up to us eventually.”Charles C. Mann   Okay, so let me interject here. For those members of your audience who don't know what we're talking about. I wrote this book, The Wizard and the Prophet. And it's about these two camps that have been around for a long time who have differing views regarding how we think about energy resources, the environment, and all those issues. The wizards, that's my name for them––Stuart Brand called them druids and, in fact, originally, the title was going to involve the word druid but my editor said, “Nobody knows what a Druid is” so I changed it into wizards–– and anyway the wizards would say that science and technology properly applied can allow you to produce your way out of these environmental dilemmas. You turn on the science machine, essentially, and then we can escape these kinds of dilemmas. The prophets say “No. Natural systems are governed by laws and there's an inherent carrying capacity or limit or planetary boundary.” there are a bunch of different names for them that say you can't do more than so much.So what happened in China is that European crops came over. One of China's basic geographical conditions is that it's 20% of the Earth's habitable surface area, or it has 20% of the world's population, but only has seven or 8% of the world's above-ground freshwater. There are no big giant lakes like we have in the Great Lakes. And there are only a couple of big rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River. The main staple crop in China has to be grown in swimming pools, and that's you know, rice. So there's this paradox, which is “How do you keep people fed with rice in a country that has very little water?” If you want a shorthand history of China, that's it. So prophets believe that there are these planetary boundaries. In history, these are typically called Malthusian Limits after Malthus and the question is: With the available technology at a certain time, how many people can you feed before there's misery?The great thing about history is it provides evidence for both sides. Because in the short run, what happened when American crops came in is that the potato, sweet potato, and maize corn were the first staple crops that were dryland crops that could be grown in the western half of China, which is very, very dry and hot and mountainous with very little water. Population soars immediately afterward, but so does social unrest, misery, and so forth. In the long run, that becomes adaptable when China becomes a wealthy and powerful nation. In the short run, which is not so short (it's a couple of centuries), it really causes tremendous chaos and suffering. So, this provides evidence for both sides. One increases human capacity, and the second unquestionably increases human numbers and that leads to tremendous erosion, land degradation, and human suffering.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's a thick coin with two sides. By the way, I realized I haven't gotten to all the Wizard and Prophet questions, and there are a lot of them. So I––Charles C. Mann   I certainly have time! I'm enjoying the conversation. One of the weird things about podcasts is that, as far as I can tell, the average podcast interviewer is far more knowledgeable and thoughtful than the average sort of mainstream journalist interviewer and I just find that amazing. I don't understand it. So I think you guys should be hired. You know, they should make you switch roles or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, maybe. Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be asked these interesting questions about subjects I find fascinating.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, it's my pleasure to get to talk to you and to get to ask these questions. So let me ask about the Wizard and the Prophet. I just interviewed WIll McCaskill, and we were talking about what ends up mattering most in history. I asked him about Norman Borlaug and said that he's saved a billion lives. But then McCaskill pointed out, “Well, that's an exceptional result” and he doesn't think the technology is that contingent. So if Borlaug hadn't existed, somebody else would have discovered what he discovered about short wheat stalks anyways. So counterfactually, in a world where Ebola doesn't exist, it's not like a billion people die, maybe a couple million more die until the next guy comes around. That was his view. Do you agree? What is your response?Charles C. Mann   To some extent, I agree. It's very likely that in the absence of one scientist, some other scientist would have discovered this, and I mentioned in the book, in fact, that there's a guy named Swaminathan, a remarkable Indian scientist, who's a step behind him and did much of the same work. At the same time, the individual qualities of Borlaug are really quite remarkable. The insane amount of work and dedication that he did.. it's really hard to imagine. The fact is that he was going against many of the breeding plant breeding dogmas of his day, that all matters! His insistence on feeding the poor… he did remarkable things. Yes, I think some of those same things would have been discovered but it would have been a huge deal if it had taken 20 years later. I mean, that would have been a lot of people who would have been hurt in the interim! Because at the same time, things like the end of colonialism, the discovery of antibiotics, and so forth, were leading to a real population rise, and the amount of human misery that would have occurred, it's really frightening to think about. So, in some sense, I think he's (Will McCaskill) right. But I wouldn't be so glib about those couple of million people.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And another thing you might be concerned about is that given the hostile attitude that people had towards the green revolution right after, if the actual implementation of these different strains of biochar sent in India, if that hadn't been delayed, it's not that weird to imagine a scenario where the governments there are just totally won over by the prophets and they decide to not implant this technology at all. If you think about what happened to nuclear power in the 70s, in many different countries, maybe something similar could have happened to the Green Revolution. So it's important to beat the Prophet. Maybe that's not the correct way to say it. But one way you could put it is: It's important to beat the prophets before the policies are passed. You have to get a good bit of technology in there.Charles C. Mann   This is just my personal opinion, but you want to listen to the prophets about what the problems are. They're incredible at diagnosing problems, and very frequently, they're right about those things. The social issues about the Green Revolution… they were dead right, they were completely right. I don't know if you then adopt their solutions. It's a little bit like how I feel about my editors–– my editors will often point out problems and I almost never agree with their solutions. The fact is that Borlaug did develop this wheat that came into India, but it probably wouldn't have been nearly as successful if Swaminathan hadn't changed that wheat to make it more acceptable to the culture of India. That was one of the most important parts for me in this book. When I went to Tamil Nadu, I listened to this and I thought, “Oh! I never heard about this part where they took Mexican wheat, and they made it into Indian wheat.” You know, I don't even know if Borlaug ever knew or really grasped that they really had done that! By the way, a person for you to interview is Marci Baranski–– she's got a forthcoming book about the history of the Green Revolution and she sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it. So here's a plug for her.In Defense of Regulatory DelaysDwarkesh Patel   So if we applied that particular story to today, let's say that we had regulatory agencies like the FDA back then that were as powerful back then as they are now. Do you think it's possible that these new advances would have just dithered in some approval process that took years or decades to complete? If you just backtest our current process for implementing technological solutions, are you concerned that something like the green revolution could not have happened or that it would have taken way too long or something?Charles C. Mann   It's possible. Bureaucracies can always go rogue, and the government is faced with this kind of impossible problem. There's a current big political argument about whether former President Trump should have taken these top-secret documents to his house in Florida and done whatever he wanted to? Just for the moment, let's accept the argument that these were like super secret toxic documents and should not have been in a basement. Let's just say that's true. Whatever the President says is declassified is declassified. Let us say that's true.  Obviously, that would be bad. You would not want to have that kind of informal process because you can imagine all kinds of things–– you wouldn't want to have that kind of informal process in place. But nobody has ever imagined that you would do that because it's sort of nutty in that scenario.Now say you write a law and you create a bureaucracy for declassification and immediately add more delay, you make things harder, you add in the problems of the bureaucrats getting too much power, you know–– all the things that you do. So you have this problem with the government, which is that people occasionally do things that you would never imagine. It's completely screwy. So you put in regulatory mechanisms to stop them from doing that and that impedes everybody else. In the case of the FDA, it was founded in the 30 when some person produced this thing called elixir sulfonamides. They killed hundreds of people! It was a flat-out poison! And, you know, hundreds of people died. You think like who would do that? But somebody did that. So they created this entire review mechanism to make sure it never happened again, which introduced delay, and then something was solidified. Which they did start here because the people who invented that didn't even do the most cursory kind of check. So you have this constant problem. I'm sympathetic to the dilemma faced by the government here in which you either let through really bad things done by occasional people, or you screw up everything for everybody else. I was tracing it crudely, but I think you see the trade-off. So the question is, how well can you manage this trade-off? I would argue that sometimes it's well managed. It's kind of remarkable that we got vaccines produced by an entirely new mechanism, in record time, and they passed pretty rigorous safety reviews and were given to millions and millions and millions of people with very, very few negative effects. I mean, that's a real regulatory triumph there, right?So that would be the counter-example: you have this new thing that you can feed people and so forth. They let it through very quickly. On the other hand, you have things like genetically modified salmon and trees, which as far as I can tell, especially for the chestnuts, they've made extraordinary efforts to test. I'm sure that those are going to be in regulatory hell for years to come. *chuckles* You know, I just feel that there's this great problem. These flaws that you identified, I would like to back off and say that this is a problem sort of inherent to government. They're always protecting us against the edge case. The edge case sets the rules, and that ends up, unless you're very careful, making it very difficult for everybody else.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And the vaccines are an interesting example here. Because one of the things you talked about in the book–– one of the possible solutions to climate change is that you can have some kind of geoengineering. Right? I think you mentioned in the book that as long as even one country tries this, then they can effectively (for relatively modest amounts of money), change the atmosphere. But then I look at the failure of every government to approve human challenge trials. This is something that seems like an obvious thing to do and we would have potentially saved hundreds of thousands of lives during COVID by speeding up the vaccine approval. So I wonder, maybe the international collaboration is strong enough that something like geoengineering actually couldn't happen because something like human challenge trials didn't happen.Geoengineering Charles C. Mann   So let me give a plug here for a fun novel by my friend, Neal Stephenson, called Termination Shock. Which is about some rich person just doing it. Just doing geoengineering. The fact is that it's actually not actually against the law to fire off rockets into the stratosphere. In his case, it's a giant gun that shoots shells full of sulfur into the upper atmosphere. So I guess the question is, what timescale do you think is appropriate for all this? I feel quite confident that there will be geoengineering trials within the next 10 years. Is that fast enough? That's a real judgment call. I think people like David Keith and the other advocates for geoengineering would have said it should have happened already and that it's way, way too slow. People who are super anxious about moral hazard and precautionary principles say that that's way, way too fast. So you have these different constituencies. It's hard for me to think off the top of my head of an example where these regulatory agencies have actually totally throttled something in a long-lasting way as opposed to delaying it for 10 years. I don't mean to imply that 10 years is nothing. But it's really killing off something. Is there an example you can think of?Dwarkesh Patel   Well, it's very dependent on where you think it would have been otherwise, like people say maybe it was just bound to be the state. Charles C. Mann   I think that was a very successful case of regulatory capture, in which the proponents of the technology successfully created this crazy…. One of the weird things I really wanted to explain about nuclear stuff is not actually in the book.

covid-19 god united states america american spotify texas history world president donald trump english europe china earth japan water mexico british speaking west germany food africa ai christianity nature european italy japanese spanish north carolina ireland north america spain staying brazil african irish uber east indian bitcoin mexican massachusetts natural code silicon valley britain catholic washington post helps starbucks mississippi civil war millions dutch philippines native americans columbus prophet west coast pleasure wizard pacific vikings haiti fda diamond brazilian americas rebellions latino native prophets edinburgh new world excuse significance nuclear vc wizards similar khan indians portuguese panama scientific underrated el salvador mexico city population bolivia uncovering anarchy central america west africa grain ebola frontier imperial keeping up american revolution empires great lakes mayan south asia cort british empire clive pyramids cortes industrial revolution american west moby dick silk road puebla adam smith aztec joneses oh god cunha bengal druid critiques bureaucracy largely aztecs eurasia edo chiapas c4 undo in defense civilizations mayans chesapeake western hemisphere brazilians wizardry great plains tamil nadu yap geoengineering pizarro easter island new laws incas yucatan spaniards david graeber your god neal stephenson jared diamond niall ferguson green revolution outright new revelations las casas mesoamerica mughal east india company teotihuacan agriculture organization hammurabi tenochtitlan huck finn paul maurice james scott mexica mccaskill wilberforce malthus brazilian amazon william powell agroforestry yangtze sir francis drake ming dynasty spanish empire darwins david keith mesa verde david deutsch william dalrymple northern mexico yellow river plymouth colony bartolome chaco canyon norman borlaug bruce sterling charles c mann laurent binet mississippi valley charles mann bengalis acemoglu borlaug triple alliance will macaskill americas before columbus virginia company frederick jackson turner joseph tainter east india trading company murray gell mann north american west hohokam shape tomorrow prophet two remarkable scientists
News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Senior royals stand guard over Queens coffin Ukraine war What will Russias losses mean for Putin DOJ Accepts Trump Recommended Judge for Special Master to Vet Mar a Lago Documents Over 30 Trump associates subpoenaed by grand jury over alleged efforts to influence 2020 election results Armenia Azerbaijan Dozens dead in overnight clashes Queen Elizabeth II Your tributes to UKs longest reigning monarch Trumps lawyers respond to DOJs picks for special master CBS News Emmys TV awards kick off in Hollywood Canada Who is new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre Australian man killed by kangaroo he kept as pet, police say Russia Ukraine war latest what we know on day 202 of the invasion Channeling JFK in Boston visit, Biden breathes new life into cancer moonshot The Boston Globe Canada has its first Michelin guide. Does it matter Jean Luc Godard Legendary French film director dies at 91 NYC mom suspected of drowning her 3 kids was facing eviction, battling custody issues Seattle cancels classes for another day amid negotiations as teachers union strike delays school year start Critiques mount around popular annual college rankings Ukraine war We retook 6,000 sq km from Russia in September, says Zelensky Alabama woman, New York City man plead guilty after trying to board ship to Yemen to fight for ISIS DOJ US man survives violent alligator attack

Platemark
s3e8 Dave Cloutier

Platemark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 61:14


In s3e8, Ann Shafer talks with Dave Cloutier who recently opened up Center Arts and Studios in Baltimore. CAS offers classes, equipment, critiques, and studio spaces to second-career artists. Dave has been a faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art for sixteen years. He earned his MFA from the LeRoy E. Hoffberger School of Painting in 2005, and has a BFA in painting and art therapy from the University of The Arts in Philadelphia (1991). Prior to MICA, Dave taught in community arts throughout Baltimore for Clayworks and Towson University's Community Arts program. Dave has taught adults and kids in community arts centers and in therapeutic after-school programs in and around Boston. Dave has worked with teens, adults, and older adults in psychiatric settings as an activities therapist and in direct patient care, continuing this work as a CNA in nursing facilities specializing in caring for residents with Alzheimer's and dementia. Dave has an active studio practice and recently opened his passion project, Center Arts and Studios, in Hampden, a neighborhood in Baltimore, MD. Episode image of Dave Cloutier by Elizabeth English.

Révélez votre Pouvoir Intérieur
131. Comment se protéger des critiques ?

Révélez votre Pouvoir Intérieur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 26:14


Connaissez-vous la fable de Jean de la Fontaine : “Le renard et les raisins ?” C'est l'histoire d'un renard affamé qui tombe sur des vignes aux grappes de raisins bien mûres. Malheureusement pour lui, les vignes sont trop hautes et il ne peut les atteindre. Le renard se persuade alors que les grains de raisins sont trop verts et ne méritent donc pas qu'il se donne la peine de les attraper. En fait, le renard méprise les raisins quand il comprend leur inaccessibilité. Et ce qui est extraordinaire, c'est que le comportement du renard, décrit en 1668, est toujours aussi criant de vérité aujourd'hui ! Parce que peu importe ce que vous faites, ce que vous dites ou ce que vous avez, vous aurez toujours des personnes, autour de vous, qui désireront profondément tout cela et qui préfèreront vous méprisez lorsqu'elles comprendront qu'elles ne peuvent atteindre votre hauteur. Pour me protéger de la critique, je mets en pratique 2 stratégies très efficaces que je vous explique en détail dans cet podcast de podcast pour vous apprendre à vous protéger des critiques quel que soit le domaine, la situation ou le sujet. Je vous souhaite une belle écoute. Amélie Vous souhaitez lancer votre activité sur le web ? Télécharger le guide des 8 erreurs qui m'ont fait perdre du temps, de l'énergie et de l'argent : https://formation.famille-epanouie.fr... Alors si toi aussi, tu souhaites ouvrir les yeux et redonner du sens à ton quotidien, retrouve-nous sur nos réseaux sociaux, juste ici ↓   ★ Sur INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/famille_epa... et https://www.instagram.com/fabien_blot/ ★ Sur FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/famille.epan... ★ Sur YOUTUBE : http://www.famille-epanouie.fr/youtube ★ Sur LE BLOG : https://www.famille-epanouie.fr   “C'est en vous que vous devez investir pour être libre et profiter de votre vie de famille”  

The Remnant Radio's Podcast
Dr. Michael Brown Responds: Can We Lock Arms With NAR Critiques

The Remnant Radio's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 63:43


Dr. Michael Brown Responds: Can We Lock Arms With NAR CritiquesAs many of you know Remnant Radio has taken a mediated position on the New Apostolic Reformation. Witch Is odd because we are proud practitioners of spiritual gifts and many In the pentecostal charismatic space have a visceral reaction to NAR language. We did a bit of research on the NAR, with the assumption that we would agree with the vast majority of Charismatics. However, in our research, we came across a book called "A New Apostolic Reformation?: A Biblical Response to a Worldwide Movement" by Doug Geivett and Holly Pivec. Doug and Holly changed our minds on the subject. They identified a group of charismatic doctrines that we also wished to condemn. Though we disagreed with them on a few minor points, we found that their research shed necessary light on Charismatic abuses. So over a year ago, we interviewed both Doug and Holly in order to give them a chance to share their research with us. Today we are proud to be interviewing one of the world's foremost apostolic teachers and prominent voice In the New Apostolic Reformation.I jest, I jest!For real though, Dr. Michael Bron will be with us today to discuss the NAR. We have the utmost respect for Dr. Brown and his work in the charismatic community. For those who do not know, Dr. Brown has been one of the loudest dissenting voices against the vocabulary of "New Apostolic Reformation" calling It "the boogie man" and "a conspiratorial witch hunt". Today we are giving Dr. Brown the opportunity to speak about this often hotly contested subject. We hope in our discussion today we can find some middle ground that will help both charismatics and cessationists lock arms in policing the rare, yet frequently publicized charismatic excesses. Donate (Paypal)https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=GC2Z86XHHG4X6___________________________________________________________________________________Exclusive Content (Patreon)https://www.patreon.com/TheRemnantRadio__________________________________________________________________________________We're social! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRemnantRadioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theremnantradio/___________________________________________________________________________________Our Favorite Bookshttps://www.amazon.com/shop/theremnantradio___________________________________________________________________________________Michael Rowntree's Church Bridgewayhttps://www.bridgewaychurch.com/___________________________________________________________________________________Michael Miller's Church Reclamation Churchhttps://reclamationdenver.com/___________________________________________________________________________________Kairos Classroom: Use Promo Code Remnant for 10% offhttps://kairosclKairos Classroom: Use Promo Code "Remnant" for 10% offhttps://kairosclassroom.com/classes Kairos Classroom: Use Promo Code Remnant for 10% offhttps://kairosclassroom.com/classesSupport the show

The Grid: Photography Podcast
The Grid - Photography Website Critiques with Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna - Episode 527

The Grid: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 81:10


Etsy Success podcast
2022 Holiday Trends and Shop Trend Critiques

Etsy Success podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 21:55


From magical forest themes to posh pearlcore looks, find out what trends are rising to the top for the busy shopping season. We'll be doing things a little differently from our usual trend episodes this time around: Etsy Trend Expert Dayna Isom Johnson and Community Education Manager Isabella Diaz will chat about key holiday trends, then share their thoughts on which categories and items are most relevant for each one. Then in our trend critiques segment, they'll give shop owners tips on how to incorporate the holiday trends into their work.For more on 2022 holiday trends, check out our Marketplace Insights report: etsy.me/3dCt4NDHere are links to the shops Dayna and Isabella critiqued in today's episode, in chronological order:CoiledUpCreations: etsy.com/shop/coiledupcreationsHerStoriedHome: etsy.com/shop/HerStoriedHomeKlikKlakBlocks: etsy.com/shop/KlikKlakBlocksJewelGarage: etsy.com/shop/JewelGarage

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton
Episode 113: How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Fast with Joseph Jones

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 57:33


Welcome to Protecting Your Nest with Dr. Tony Hampton. Joseph Jones is a patient of Dr. Hampton's who was able to heal in a very short amount of time from type 2 diabetes. In this discussion, Dr. Tony and Joesph talk about: (05:12) Joseph's health journey (17:35) The importance of relationships for dietary success (21:18) How Joseph became aware of the path to health (26:46) Joseph's diet before and after he started his low-carb diet (33:38) Metformin (37:04) The prevalence of sugar in high carb foods (40:35) Sharing the low-carb message with others (45:42) Critiques of the health care system Thank you for listening to Protecting Your Nest. For additional resources and information, please see the links below.    Links:   Dr. Tony Hampton: Linktree Instagram Account LinkedIn Account Ritmos Negros Podcast