Podcasts about Canto

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  • 1,236PODCASTS
  • 5,243EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 16, 2022LATEST
Canto

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Best podcasts about Canto

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Latest podcast episodes about Canto

Walking With Dante
Working Together To Make A Mess: Inferno, Canto XXI, Lines 46 - 63

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 26:33


The demon has thrown this sinner into the pitch, headed off to collect more in Lucca, and caused the whole horde of demons under the bridge to start their low-comedy, high-violence act. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore more of Canto XXI, more from the fifth evil pouch in the eighth circle of fraud, the longest and more complex part of INFERNO. We're among the the sinners on the political take. We've got a proletarian idyll for a contrast and maybe even some Augustinian allegory in tow. It's a lot for a crazy passage. But this is Dante, after all. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:25] My English translation of the passage: INFERNO, Canto XXI, lines 46 - 63. If you'd like to read along, you can find this translation on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:01] There's a lingering question left over from the last passage: Whatever happened to Minos and his tail? [04:39] How do you make blasphemy funny? A look at the first nine lines of this passage. [12:50] Chef's and their kitchen help: Dante's explanation for what the demons do to the damned in the pitch. It's 1) more food metaphor and 2) more proletarian idyll. [14:52] A detour to Saint Augustine and a question of the allegory of boiling pitch. [17:06] Virgil's confidence. Because he's passed by here before on his mission for Erichtho? Or because he and the pilgrim have faced this sort of thing already in front of the walls of Dis? [21:36] A moment when we can step away from Virgil as symbol, Virgil as allegory, Virgil as literary device, and simply see Virgil as the human character Dante the poet is crafting. Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
Virgil To The Rescue, A Demon On The Run: Inferno, Canto XXI, Lines 22 - 45

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 22:06


Dante the poet has gotten caught up in his own simile, which is long, complicated, and unwieldy, enough so that it brings the plot to a standstill. But Virgil to the rescue! The classical poet gets us back to the plot. And what a plot it is! Here comes the first old-school demon we've fully seen, the old medieval morality play demon, the one that's probably lurking under your bed. He's got a grifter by the hoof and he's going up to Lucca back for more. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore the fifth evil pouch (among the "malebolge") in the eighth circle of fraud, here in Canto XXI of INFERNO. It's fun, maybe funny, and stuffed with Dante's brilliant craft and personal history. Here are the segments of this episode of WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:43] My English translation of this passage. If you'd like to read along, you can find it on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:44] Virgil calls out "watch out!" Is it an actual warning? Or a literary one? Maybe both, because Virgil gets the plot moving again. [06:07] A little about Dante-the-pilgrim's fear in these episodes from the fifth evil pouch. This podcast segment is just an introduction to a much larger problem. Why is our pilgrim so afraid when he knows his journey is willed by Beatrice and those above her in heaven? [08:17] The black demon appears! There may be autobiographical details here because Dante-the-poet was exiled for, yep, barratry. [13:58] A who's who in the demon's speech: the Malebrance, Saint Zita, the unnamed sinner held by the tendon, and this Luccan boss Bonturo. Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
Metaphors, Tautologies, And Pitch: Inferno, Canto XXI, Lines 1 - 21

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 28:42


WALKING WITH DANTE has been on a holiday hiatus. Now we're back at it, descending to Canto XXI of INFERNO, to the next malebolge, the fifth evil pouch among the sins of fraud. The opening of Canto XXI is as self-conscious as most of these in the sub-circles of fraud. This time, however, the poet names his work (for the second and last time), turns super coy, and offers a lot of metaphoric blather that seems to bring the (comedic?) plot of a standstill. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore this wild and woolly opening bit about the first glimpses of the fifth pouch of fraud, complete with one of the ganglier similes in INFERNO. Here are the segments of this episode of WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:08] The passage itself in my English translation: Inferno, Canto XXI, lines 1 - 21. If you'd like to see this passage, you can find it on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:04] From bridge to bridge, not ridge to ridge. The circles of fraud are moving from metaphor to realism, from geology to architecture. [06:15] Naming the poem again: COMEDY. That is, in contrast to Virgil's last statement about his own poem, a "high tragedy." You know, the one he corrected when he called himself untrustworthy in Canto XX. [08:15] The early commentators were very uncomfortable with the title of Dante's poem. Here's why? And hey, it's a discomfort we share! [13:58] The opening lines of the canto imply a silence or a gap, something we readers can't know. What's going on? [16:32] The fifth evil pouch is dark, unlike the fourth (apparently). [18:04] Part one on the simile about Venetian ship-building. Is it unhinged? Maybe. Tautological? Definitely. A = A. Is that even a simile? [22:16] Part two on the simile about Venetian ship-builing. The sin punished in this pouch is barratry (aka graft), but this simile is a proletarian idyll about a properly organized city. [26:15] The simile finishes up at the place where the plot was when it started twelve lines ago. What's more, it brings the plot to a dead halt. So much for the fireworks of poetics! Support this podcast

ISKCON of DC
SB 8.2.1 - 8.2.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 8 Chapter 2

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 77:48


SB 8.2.1 - 8.2.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 8 Chapter 2 by ISKCON of DC

The Comic Source Podcast
Talking Canto, Rain & More with David Booher

The Comic Source Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 56:20


Canto - Co-Creator & Writer - David M. Booher, Co-Creator & Artist - Drew Zucker, Color Artist - Vittorio Astone, Letterer - Deron Bennett Jace and a special co-host welcome writer David Booher to the show, they talk about the all-ages smash hit Canto. From it's earliest beginnings with the faith David & co-creator Drew Zucker had in the project to the upcoming fourth volume, there's plenty of talk about the themes & world of Canto. Plus David talks about his recently concluded Dark Horse series, Killer Queens, as well as the upcoming adaptation of Joe Hill's Rain & a Firefly series from Boom!

The Comic Source Podcast
Canto Volume 1: If I Only Had a Heart Review

The Comic Source Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 33:39


Canto Volume #1 - Writer - David M. Booher, Art - Drew Zucker, Colors - Vittorio Astone, Letters - Deron Bennett Jace and a special guest discuss the first six issues of Canto, which comprise volume #1. This is a fantastic all ages tale with spirit, adventures and some great life lessons for younger readers.

Les matins
État d'urgence : concilier droit, santé et libertés. Avec Dominique Rousseau et Monique Canto-Sperber

Les matins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 120:42


durée : 02:00:42 - Les Matins - par : Guillaume Erner - .

ISKCON of DC
SB 8.1.1 - 8.1.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 8 Chapter 1

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 76:05


SB 8.1.1 - 8.1.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 8 Chapter 1 by ISKCON of DC

Wisdom of the Sages
619: Devahuti Achieves Samadhi!

Wisdom of the Sages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 54:39


Devahuti's prayers to her son Kapiladeva / spiritual status is based on merit not birth / the Vedic teachings conclude in the chanting of the Holy Name & one who chants the Name is glorious / Kapiladeva's final instructions / Devahuti achives samadhi / the conclusion of Canto 3 - one who speaks or hears this achieves devotion to Bhagavan 3.33.1-37

Pamela Cerdeira
Ellas sonando: Vaioflow, un canto feminista desde Argentina

Pamela Cerdeira

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 1:26


En su sección para el programa de Pamela Cerdeira en MVS Noticias, Audry Funk presentó su recomendación musical hecha por mujeres.

Mercado Abierto
Situación Mercado|Mercado Abierto [29.12.2021]

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 1:53


Analizamos el mercado y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto de Merisa Patrimonios

Mercado Abierto
Consultorio bolsa | Mercado Abierto 29.12.21

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 51:38


Analizamos el mercado y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto de Merisa Patrimonios

Mercado Abierto
Hermes, una compañía de un sector imbatible

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 0:51


Analizamos el mercado y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto de Merisa Patrimonios

Mercado Abierto
Niveles para Amadeus

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 1:33


Analizamos el mercado y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto de Merisa Patrimonios.

Mercado Abierto
¿Oportunidad de entrada en el sector turismo?

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 1:31


Analizamos el mercado y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto de Merisa Patrimonios.

Radio 24 Podcast
Musica maestro - La magia del canto polifonico di Winchester

Radio 24 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021


"Musica Maestro" è il programma di Radio 24 dedicato alla musica classica: lirica, sinfonica, d'epoca, strumentale e da camera commentata dai protagonisti del momento. Il programma affronta la musica sotto molteplici sfaccettature, indagando e portando alla luce anche i rapporti con la cultura, la filosofia, la scienza e la società, ponendo un'attenzione particolare all'attualità: ogni settimana la segnalazione di un libro o un disco appena uscito, un esecutore o un giovane musicista, un anniversario o un avvenimento di rilievo.

ISKCON of DC
SB 7.15.40 - 7.15.80 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 80:40


SB 7.15.40 - 7.15.80 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15 by ISKCON of DC

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA
La lección de canto, de Katherine Mansfield

CUENTOS DE LA CASA DE LA BRUJA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 21:33


"Desesperada, con una desesperación gélida e hiriente que se le clavaba en el corazón como una navaja traidora, la señorita Meadows, con toga y birrete y portando una pequeña batuta, avanzó rápidamente por los fríos pasillos que conducían a la sala de música". Texto original: https://lecturia.org/cuentos-y-relatos/katherine-mansfield-la-leccion-de-canto/6433/ Narración: Sonia Chaves. Contacto: soniadubbing@gmail.com / www.soniachaves.es Estudio de locución: - Micrófono: Neumann TLM-103 - Interfaz: Universal Audio Apollo Twin - Cabina: Demvox ECO100 - Plugins: Universal Audio Estoy en Twitter: @VengadorT Te ofrezco mi voz como locutor online profesional, con estudio propio. Si crees que mi voz encajaría con tu proyecto o negocio contacta conmigo en info@locucioneshablandoclaro.com Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Podcast on Fire (Podcast on Fire Network)
Podcast On Fire 314: 2021 Christmas Special

Podcast on Fire (Podcast on Fire Network)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 97:12


It’s the annual Podcast On Fire Trivia Night disguised as our Christmas Special. Kenny B is this year’s Lord Quizmaster and Stewart Sutherland and Tom K-W (of The Lager Logs) along with East Screen West Screen’s Paul Fox compete for a sweet Canto-pop prize. Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook […]

Podcast On Fire Network
Podcast On Fire 314: 2021 Christmas Special

Podcast On Fire Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 97:12


It's the annual Podcast On Fire Trivia Night disguised as our Christmas Special. Kenny B is this year's Lord Quizmaster and Stewart Sutherland and Tom K-W (of The Lager Logs) along with East Screen West Screen's Paul Fox compete for a sweet Canto-pop prize. Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook […]

Capital
Capital Intereconomía 9:00 a 10:00 Mercados: Análisis + Consultorio

Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:59


Momento para mirar a los mercados europeos en la apertura de las bolsas del viejo continente. Analizamos los movimientos del mercado y los resultados corporativos con Jorge del Canto, Responsable de formación de Merisa patrimonios y con Rafael Peña, gestor de Olea Neutral junto Hernán Cortés. Eduardo Vicho, Analista Independiente resuelve las dudas de los oyentes en el Consultorio de Bolsa.

Walking With Dante
Breaking Every Text, Even Your Own: Inferno, Canto XX, Lines 100 - 130

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 22:48


We come to the end of the fourth evil pouch, the fourth of the malebolge, in the eighth circle of Inferno, the circle of fraud. And we go out with a bang! Dante disses Virgil (who has already dissed Dante). Virgil rewrites yet one more classical story. We get a load of contemporary, sad-sack fortunetellers. And then Dante quotes himself to let us know that every text can be broken, even his own. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, in the literary fun and games that mark the end of Canto XX of Inferno. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:21] My English translation of the passage. If you'd like to read along, you can find it on my website, markscarbrough.com, under the header tab for Walking With Dante. [03:26] The pilgrim's final bit of snark toward Virgil (in this canto). [06:07] More sinners in the pouch: Eurypylus (along with one more rewriting of a classical figure) and Michael Scot (who only helped cause the Renaissance). [07:42] Virgil defines his own work (the one that could be considered fraudulent in the logic of Canto XX) as "high tragedy." [10:39] Other more sad-sack sinners in the pouch: the run-of-the-mill charlatans. [15:32] Virgil's last bit of astrological knowledge--because how else would you end a canto about soothsaying? [18:45] And the last word, which is the very one Dante has already proscribed. Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
Virgil And His Fraudulent Poem The Aeneid: Inferno, Canto XX, Lines 52 - 99

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 29:43


Virgil--and/or Dante, our poet--has already rewritten Ovid, Statius, and Lucan's poems. Now in a bit of insane daring, Virgil takes on this own poem, THE AENEID. He retells the story of the founding of Mantua, rewriting the version he tells in his own poem inside of Dante's poem, and then daring us then to call his own poem fraudulent. This passage may be one of the most striking smacks against Virgil in COMEDY. But maybe it has to be so. Maybe writers have to decide that the texts of other writers are up for grabs. Maybe it's the only way you can write into the predictive space of storytelling and find your own voice to diagnose the human condition. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, in an exploration of the end of Virgil's longest speech in COMEDY and a bit of fresh air and open fields in a canticle about doom and suffering. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:13] My English translation of the passage: INFERNO, Canto XX, lines 52 - 99. If you'd like to read along, you can find this passage on my website, markscarbrough.com. [05:03] An overall impression of the passage: We've left hell and entered open, airy, beautiful, green space in the real world. [07:23] Virgil tells the story of the founding of his hometown, Mantua. Except it's not the same story he tells in THE AENEID. Here are some of the differences. [11:58] What's going on here? One interpretive possibility is that Dante the poet is trying to save Virgil, who was often seen a magician or a practitioner of the dark arts in medieval folklore. [13:30] Another interpretive possibility is that Dante the poet is smacking his master, Virgil, by forcing him to call THE AENEID fraudulent. [15:11] Maybe there's a third understanding of this passage: every writer has to figure out how to use the texts of the past and of his contemporaries to write what she or he wants to say about the human condition. [18:43] The emotional center of the passage: "beautiful Italy." Maybe there's a hope here expressed for a peaceful and even united Italy. [22:11] Which way are these sinners walking? Don't answer too quickly. It's more difficult a question than you might think. [25:51] There's a contemporary moment in the passage, a reference to the Guelph and Ghibelline struggles in Mantua. If "beautiful Italy" is the hope, the peninsula is still a bloodbath. Support this podcast

Sri Aurobindo
Savitri Book Two, Canto 3, The Glory and Fall of Life

Sri Aurobindo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 45:33


Read by Amal Kiran

ISKCON of DC
SB 7.15.22 - 7.15.39 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 81:56


SB 7.15.22 - 7.15.39 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15 by ISKCON of DC

Mercado Abierto
Situación Mercados | Jorge Del Canto [17.12.2021]

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 2:58


Analizamos la situación de los mercados y sus valores protagonistas en el Consultorio Capital de Mercado Abierto con Jorge Del Canto, responsable de formación de Merisa Patrimonios.

Walking With Dante
For A Guy So Hard On Dante, Virgil Sure Doesn't Know His Classical Sources: Inferno, Canto XX, Lines 25 - 51

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 24:05


Our pilgrim Dante is crying at the distorted forms coming along in the fourth evil pouch (one of the malebolge) of the eighth circle of INFERNO. Or maybe he's crying because he knows the future: Classical texts are about to get wrecked. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore this difficult passage in which Virgil is super hard on Dante, the pilgrim, and then Virgil himself misquotes his classical sources to turn everything on its head. It's poet against poet, poetry against poetry, in a shattering irony that leaps up to the question of who is the ultimate fraudster among so many poets. Here are the segments of this episode of WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:32] My English translation of this passage: Inferno, Canto XX, lines 25 - 51. If you'd like to read along, you can find this translation on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:48] Virgil is unbelievably hard on our pilgrim, Dante. Why? And why is Dante crying? [08:09] We're at the start of the longest uninterrupted speech Virgil gives in COMEDY--all about Amphiaraus, Tiresias, and Aruns--or more likely, about Statius, Ovid, and Lucan, the poets who wrote about these figures. [14:49] Virgil may have cited these figures, but he's warped his classical sources. Here's how. [19:16] In my interpretation, it's important to remember that it is Virgil who is changing the classical references, as well as the poet Dante behind him. None of these three characters were fraudsters in the original sources. So who is the real fraudster here? Support this podcast

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música
Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música - Camino del sol - 14/12/21

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 58:42


Del disco instrumental 'Jobim forever', del pianista Antonio Adolfo, obras del maestro soberano como 'The girl from Ipanema', 'Wave', 'Insensatez', 'Agua de beber', 'Amparo' y 'Estrada do sol'. Del también brasileño, Zé Manoel, y su disco 'Do meu coração nu', las canciones 'História antiga', 'Notre histoire', 'Não negue ternura' y 'Canto pra subir'. Y otro pianista brasileño, Amaro Freitas, con 'Sankofa', para la despedida. Escuchar audio

Walking With Dante
Poets, The Biggest Fraudsters Of All: Inferno, Canto XX, Lines 1 - 24

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 26:03


Canto XX of INFERNO is one that many skip. it's just too hard or too discursive or too long-winded. But others spend careers on. After Canto I, Canto XX stirs some of the most in-depth commentary of any in INFERNO. What gives? We should probably take our cue from our poet: we're about to enter the meta space of a canto about poetry, all among the fraudsters, with Dante and even Virgil out in front, leading the way. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we begin our exploration of Inferno's Canto XX, this deep pit of metapoetics and savage irony. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:49] My English translation of INFERNO, Canto XX, lines 1 - 24. If you'd like to read along, you can find these on my website, markscarbrough.com. [04:16] The damned arrive at line 7 of the canto. They're the fortune tellers, the soothsayers. We don't know that except we have to know it to understand the emotional landscape of the lines. Which means we, too, have to be prognosticators. [08:16] A discussion of contrapasso--that is, the punishment fits the crime. And my thesis that the notion of contrapasso develops over the course of writing INFERNO. [13:39] You know what soothsayers are: They're poets. Like Dante, whose poem is one big future-telling event. [15:02] The poet may tip his hat to us in the final lines of the passage: don't believe what I say; just focus on how I felt. [18:55] The opening lines of Canto XX. So self-conscious, so awkward that some have wanted to strike them from the text. [22:42] My overall thesis for this canto: It's about the problems with and craft of poetry, and the savage irony that metapoetics entail. Support this podcast

ISKCON of DC
SB 7.15.7 - 7.15.21 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 82:25


SB 7.15.7 - 7.15.21 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 15 by ISKCON of DC

VSM: Mp3 audio files
A Perfect Day for mezzo soprano and piano (cello optional) - Mp3 audio file

VSM: Mp3 audio files

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 1:00


Mercado Abierto
Consultorio Capital | IBEX 35 [Técnico]

Mercado Abierto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 24:23


Miramos desde el punto de vista técnico al mercado español en Mercado Abierto con Jorge del Canto, responsable de Formación de Merisa Patrimonios.

Oggi Parliamo - Learn Italian with
308. Q&A: Giorgio de Chirico

Oggi Parliamo - Learn Italian with

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 12:33


Oggi parliamo di Giorgio de Chirico, un pittore italiano, esponente del movimento artistico della Pittura metafisica. Durante il lockdown molti giornalisti hanno paragonato le città vuote ai suoi quadri. Grazie a Milena per la domanda!Contenuti⏱️ 00:46 La domanda di Milena⏱️ 02:31 Chi è Giorgio de Chirico?⏱️ 03:07 Il Futurismo e la Pittura metafisica⏱️ 05:10 Metafisica: oltre la fisica⏱️ 08:26 Il periodo barocco⏱️ 10:13 L'ironia di de ChiricoFoto

El Explicador Sitio Oficial
Pinzón Zebra : Canto y Metabolismo 2021/12/08. El Explicador. Cápsula.

El Explicador Sitio Oficial

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 33:05


El canto de algunas aves no solo sirve para delimitar su territorio y para atraer a una pareja... también puede servir para ajustar el funcionamiento molecular de los polluelos dentro del cascarón. Este descubrimiento podría revelar aspectos desconocidos del funcionamiento molecular de todos los organismos avanzados. Gracias por sus comentarios, interacciones, apoyo económico y suscripción. Escuche y descargue gratuitamente en MP3 2021/12/08 Pinzón Zebra : Canto y Metabolismo. Gracias por su apoyo a El Explicador en: Patreon, https://www.patreon.com/elexplicador_enriqueganem, PayPal, elexplicadorpatrocinio@gmail.com, SoundCloud, https://soundcloud.com/el-explicador, Spotify, https://open.spotify.com/show/01PwWfs1wV9JrXWGQ2MrbY, iTunes, https://podcasts.apple.com/mx/podcast/el-explicador-sitio-oficial/id1562019070 y YouTube, https://youtube.com/c/ElExplicadorSitioOficial. Twitter @enrique_ganem. Lo invitamos a suscribirse a estos canales para recibir avisos de nuestras publicaciones y a visitar nuestra página http://www.elexplicador.net. En el título de nuestros trabajos aparece la fecha año/mes/día de grabación, lo que facilita su consulta cronológica, ya sabe usted que el conocimiento cambia a lo largo del tiempo. Siempre leemos sus comentarios, muchas veces no tenemos tiempo para reponder a cada uno personalmente pero todos son leídos y tomados en cuenta. Este es un espacio de divulgación científica en el que nos interesa informar de forma clara y amena, que le invite a Ud. a investigar sobre los temas tratados y a que Ud. forme su propia opinión. Serán borrados todos los comentarios que promuevan la desinformación, charlatanería, odio, bullying, violencia verbal o incluyan enlaces a páginas que no sean de revistas científicas arbitradas, que sean ofensivos hacia cualquier persona o promuevan alguna tendencia política o religiosa ya sea en el comentario o en la fotografía de perfil. Aclaramos que no somos apolíticos, nos reservamos el derecho de no expresar nuestra opinión política, ya que éste es un canal cuya finalidad es la divulgación científica. ¡Gracias por su preferencia!

Walking With Dante
A Look Back At The Structure, Beauty, And Engineering Of Inferno, Canto XIX

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 32:14


Inferno, Canto XIX, is a one crazy canto, so gorgeously constructed, as thick as fine tapestry, woven with Biblical allusions, historical references, structural idiosyncrasies, and even one glaring fault. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as I look back over Inferno, Canto XIX, one of the finest Dante wrote for this part of Comedy. I'll offer some general assessments, goad you on to think more deeply about the canto, and even raise one ethical question about its overall thinking. These are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:51] A reading of all of Inferno, Canto XIX. No text here. Just sit back and listen to it. [09:51] The first question: Is the third evil pouch of the 8th circle of hell only filled with popes? The answer is a little harder than you might expect. [12:20] How many popes are or will be in hell? Four by my count. But more perhaps. And the real question is this: How many clerics are in hell? Countless hordes. [15:26] The savage irony of Canto XIX--which then reveals to us its structural complexities, its engineering feat. [19:35] The linguistic range of Canto XIX: from the common, simple speech to the heights of allegorical language and back down to the depths of vulgarity. [20:35] The direct address to Constantine the Great that ends the rant to end all rants. What does that direct address do for the passage? [23:31] Questions about the "horizontal" (that is, linear) and "vertical" (that is, revisionary) strategies of Inferno. [27:13] A larger ethical question that arises as you stand back from Canto XIX: Just how much does apocalyptic thinking distort clear thinking? Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
Out Of Rage And Into Virgil's Arms: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 118 - 133

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 14:32


Our pilgrim, Dante, has finished his righteous rant. And after rage comes Virgil. More importantly, Virgil's embrace. The pilgrim ends the canto in the arms of his poetic master. A curious ending to a curious canto. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we finish off Inferno, Canto XIX, ready to move on with the next steps of our pilgrim. Here are the segments of this podcast episode of WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:21] My English translation of the passage: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 118 - 133. If you'd like to read along, check out this passage on my website: markscarbrough.com. [02:39] The rant is surrounded by words about music--and thus, about poetry. What does that tell us about Dante-the-poet's attitude toward this passage? [06:24] Why is Virgil so pleased with Dante? Because Comedy completes the work of The Aeneid. [11:42] One last passing slap at the popes in hell: "goats." Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
The Rant To End All Rants (Also, The World): Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 88 - 117

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:46


Our pilgrim, Dante, has been talking to Pope Nicholas III, stuck upside-down in a hole in the third evil pocket of the eighth circle of Inferno, the vast landscape of the fraudulent. He's learned that Nicholas III was a master of nepotism and is eagerly awaiting the arrival of other popes, even ones from Avignon. And our pilgrim can take it no more! Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we explore the longest speech from our pilgrim yet, a diatribe about church corruption that sees the end of the world in the offing. The popes go whoring and the world just might go smash. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:45] My English translation of the passage: INFERNO, Canto XIX, lines 88 - 117. If you'd like to read along, you can find this translation on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:44] Some introductory remarks about this podcast episode. [05:15] The Biblical references in the pilgrim Dante's rant: the keys to the kingdom (Matthew 16: 13 - 20), the apostles' choosing Matthias after Judas Iscariot dies (The Acts Of The Apostles 1: 21 - 26), and the whore of Babylon (The Apocalypse of St. John [aka "Revelations"] 17: 1 - 5). [16:38] The historical references in the rant: Charles of Anjou, King of Sicily and Naples; and Emperor Constantine The Great with his infamous "donation." [24:23] The thematic echoes in the rant: back to the fourth circle of avarice in INFERNO, Canto VII; and even further back to the question of "folly" from INFERNO, Canto II. [30:37] The folly of the rant: There are all sorts of garbled bits in this passage, including corrupted passages from the Bible's New Testament. Is this the folly of the pilgrim or of the poet? [34:17] Reading the passage one more time, now that you know the details. Support this podcast

Rádio Comercial - Momentos da Manhã

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Walking With Dante
Just When You Think You Have Comedy Figured Out, It Breaks You: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 64 - 87

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 26:49


In this passage, we get a clearer picture of the guy stuck upside-down in this hole in the third evil pouch, the third of the malebolge, in the eighth circle of Inferno, stuffed with the fraudsters. It's Pope Nicholas III. But I also want to explore my unspoken assumptions about the poem that COMEDY breaks in this passage. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we talk through a particularly fraught bit of INFERNO, one that seems to argue for a different dating of Dante's writing of COMEDY and helps us better understand the poem's construction, all while damning popes to hell. In other words, there's a lot to unpack! Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:22] My English translation of the passage: Inferno, Canto XIX, lines 64 - 87. If you'd like to see this passage, you can find it under the "Walking With Dante" header on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:09] The revelation of Pope Nicholas III in the hole--and a curious little problem without a good answer: How does Nicholas know our pilgrim (and his guide) have come down the slope to learn his name? [06:17] Who was Pope Nicholas III? And why is Dante is harshest critic? [10:16] The sin of this pouch is finally named: simony. [12:50] The problem of the math in the passage. How many years does a pope's feet get cooked? [14:25] A third pope is on the way: Clement V, the guy who took the papacy to Avignon. [16:46] Unpacking a difficult passage based on the story in II Maccabees 4: 7 - 26. [18:46] How my unspoken and even unconsidered assumptions about COMEDY got broken. Support this podcast

ISKCON of DC
SB 7.14.34 – 7.15.6 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 14 and 15

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 78:23


SB 7.14.34 – 7.15.6 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 14 and 15 by ISKCON of DC

Audio Devocional

«Y todo lo que hagan, ya sea de palabra o de hecho, háganlo en el nombre del Señor Jesús, dando gracias a Dios el Padre por medio de él» (Colosenses 3:17) ¿Sabías que tu nombre ha cambiado? Tu nombre ya no es más el nombre que tenías antes de que nacieras de nuevo. Te deshiciste del primer nombre cuando celebraste el pacto con Jesucristo. Para apreciar completamente lo que ese cambio significa, tienes que pensarlo a la luz de lo que sabemos del pacto de sangre. Cuando alguien hace un pacto de sangre, se entrega por completo, deja de ser dueño de sí mismo. Y sus posesiones y deudas, así como sus virtudes y defectos, le pertenecen para siempre a la persona (hermano de sangre) con quien hace el pacto. Cuando estableces un pacto de sangre con alguien, adquieres el nombre de esa persona; éste se convierte en tu nombre para siempre. No puedes escaparle―bueno o malo―es tuyo. Cuando recibiste a Jesucristo como Señor y Salvador, Él tomó tu nombre; el cual era pecado, debilidad, temor, pobreza y todo lo que heredaste de Adán. Jesús te quitó esos nombres y te dio Su Nombre a cambio. ¡Eso es cierto! En Efesios 3:15, dice que todo el Cuerpo de Cristo ha sido llamado en el en el cielo y en la Tierra. Eso significa que ahora tienes el nombre de Jesús y la autoridad que conlleva ese nombre. Tan solo piensa de quién has tomado tu nombre nuevo: Jesús, Dios Fuerte, Sabiduría, Libertador, León de la tribu de Judá, Palabra de Vida, Abogado, Proveedor, Yo Soy, Consolador, Salvador, Príncipe de Paz, Admirable, Consejero, Cordero de Dios, Jehová de los ejércitos, Raíz de David, Autor y Consumador de nuestra fe, Camino, Sanador, Hijo de Dios, Verdad, Piedra angular, Rey de reyes, Luz del mundo, Gran Pastor, mi Fortaleza y mi Canto, Juez Justo, Sol de Justicia, Resurrección y Vida, Alfa y Omega. ¡Alabado sea Dios! Esos nombres abarcan toda necesidad que puedas tener, y el poder de Dios se encuentra en el Nombre de Jesús para hacer de ese nombre una realidad en tu vida (Hechos 3:16). Ya no puedes llamarte a ti mismo “desanimado”. No debes responder cuando el diablo te diga: “Oye, pobre hombre”; ése no es tu nombre. Jesús te ha despojado de esos antiguos nombres. Medita en los nombres del Señor; todos y cada uno de ellos están incluidos en el nombre de Jesús, el Nombre sobre todo nombre, y a ti te ha sido dado ese nombre ¡con todo el poder y la autoridad que éste conlleva! Lectura bíblica: Efesios 3:16-21   © 1997 – 2019 Eagle Mountain International Church Inc., también conocida como Ministerios Kenneth Copeland / Kenneth Copeland Ministries. Todos los derechos reservados.

Walking With Dante
Popes In Hell: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 46 - 63

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:50


Now we come to it: the daring part, the audacious part, and (dare we say it?) the funny part. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as we stand with our pilgrim, Dante, and his guide, Virgil, on the floor of the third evil pouch, the third of the malebolge, in the eighth circle of Inferno with its many rings of fraud. We know we're in for a condemnation of the church. But nothing could prepare the reader--or the pilgrim!--for the notion that a Holy Father can end up in hell. What a passage this is, full of interiority and bravado, all woven in a fine tapestry with ever so many threads! Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:14] My English translation of this passage: Inferno, Canto XIX, lines 46 - 63. If you'd like to read along, you can find this translation under the "Walking With Dante" header on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:09] The first address to the damned soul upside down in the hole. He's still an unknown figure--and it's important that we keep him that way. [05:52] But he does mention Pope Boniface VIII. In fact, he's expecting his arrival. Who was Boniface VIII. A historical summary. [12:59] Dante the pilgrim acts as the confessor--which indicates lay authority, the very thing Boniface VIII was so intent on stamping out. [15:33] Don't miss the humor in this passage! And don't miss its audacity. [21:22] Here's how tightly constructed this passage is: more Ovid, more metamorphoses, a reference to the opening allusion in Canto XIX, and a reference back to the sexual sins of Canto XVIII, all woven together in a few lines. [23:21] A moment of the pilgrim's interiority. [27:28] Virgil to the rescue! (Along with some savage irony tucked into the lines.) Why does Virgil need to rescue our pilgrim at this moment? Support this podcast

Walking With Dante
Let's Go Down Into The Third Evil Pouch: Inferno, Canto XIX, Lines 31 - 45

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 24:48


Dante the pilgrim and Virgil, his guide, have been walking along the ridge line of the eighth circle of Inferno. But Dante wants a closer look at the figures kicking their thighs and feet out of the holes in the ground in the third evil pouch. So down they go! Except Virgil the shade carries our corporeal pilgrim. And perhaps even more is afoot in the poetics. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as I explore some problems in this rather "simple" narrative passage from COMEDY. But you know Dante. Nothing's as simple as it seems. Even this passage brings up larger questions about Dante's poetics and the problems of biting the hand that (at least indirectly) feeds you: the church. Here are the segments of this episode of the podcast WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:31] My English translation of this passage: Inferno, Canto XIX, lines 31 - 45. If you'd like to read along, you can find this passage on my website, markscarbrough.com. [03:00] A packed segment: the colors of hell, the metaphoric space's fusion with the narrative space in the best of Dante's poetics, and questions about the geography of the eighth circle of hell, the circle of fraud. [10:46] The pilgrim and his guide are so simpatico! What's up? [12:08] The first descent into one of the evil pouches. [14:01] Virgil carries Dante the pilgrim down. Yes, the corporeal v. incorporeal problem we've been over before. But maybe there's more to this passage. Maybe Virgil carries Dante the poet down. [19:18] A speculative question for Canto XIX: Why does Dante need to descend into this pouch, since he doesn't go down into the first two pouches we've encountered? What calls Dante to this pouch? Support this podcast

ISKCON of DC
SB 7.14.8 – 7.14.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 14

ISKCON of DC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 82:45


SB 7.14.8 – 7.14.33 Lecture: Srimad Bhagavatam Canto 7 Chapter 14 by ISKCON of DC