Podcasts about Fahrenheit

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Temperature scale used in the U.S.

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Fahrenheit

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Best podcasts about Fahrenheit

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Latest podcast episodes about Fahrenheit

Survival Medicine
Survival Medicine Podcast: Hypothermia, Off-Grid Nursing, Pt. 1

Survival Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 39:00


The environment plays a large role in your success as medic in survival settings. If you don't take weather conditions and other factors into account, you have made the environment your enemy, and it's a formidable one. One major issue is cold-related illness, otherwise known as hypothermia. Normally, the body core ranges from 97.5 to 99.5 degrees Fahrenheit (36.5-37.5 degrees Celsius) when taken orally or rectally. Rectal temps tend to be slightly higher than oral, and oral temps slightly higher than skin readings, such as those taken in the armpit. Hypothermia begins when the body core drops below 95 degrees. Dr. Joe Alton discusses what to do when the family medic is faced with someone struck by cold exposure. Also, Nurse Amy Alton begins a series on nursing care off the grid. While not as sensational as emergency trauma care, the daily maintenance of the bedridden group member is so important that you're bound to lose people if you don't know how to properly care for them all the way to recovery. Amy discusses what you need to know in part 1... Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad, Joe and Amy Alton Hey, have you gotten your copy of the brand new, greatly expanded 4th edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook? You should check it out here! You'll be glad you did!.

Escape This Podcast
Season 9 - Episode 11: John Beatty and the Phoenix Brigade ft. Jesse Birnstihl

Escape This Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 84:51


Guest GM Jesse Birnstihl brings us a room based on classic novel Fahrenheit 451. Neither Dani nor Bill has read the book, but will that stop them solving the puzzles?    Check out the write-up and images for this Escape Room below to follow along, or play yourself! https://www.consumethismedia.com/season-8-notes/#phoenix    And for a new TTRPG's created by Bill, check out our itch page at: https://consumethismedia.itch.io/    For everything Escape This Podcast, head to https://www.consumethismedia.com/escape-this-podcast To hang out with us and other fans, join our discord here: https://discord.gg/AH9MZqM  Check out our second podcast, Solve This Murder! Website || iTunes || Twitter || Instagram || Facebook || RSS Follow us on Twitch! We have bonus episodes and playtests up on our Patreon! So if you have the ability to support the show, we would love to see you there. And in return we have blog posts, bonus audio, badges, and more! Plus all our patrons have the chance to appear in our rooms as NPC's. Have questions, comments, puzzles, or anything else? Send us an email, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Below Freezing
1001 by 1 - I, Daniel Blake

Below Freezing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 71:43


32 – I, Daniel Blake (Ian rec “River's Edge” – Adam rec “Fahrenheit 11/9”) Want to suggest a film for us to review on the show? You can support us at patreon.com/1001by1. You can listen to us on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, & Google Play. You can find us on Facebook at facebook.com/1001by1. You can find us on Twitter at twitter.com/1001by1. You can send us an email at 1001by1@gmail.com. Intro/Outro music is “Bouncy Gypsy Beats” by John Bartmann. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Christian Landmark
Jerry Dickinson – Fahrenheit 451

Christian Landmark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:25


Fahrenheit 451 is a 1953 dystopian novel by American writer Ray Bradbury. Bradbury presents a future where books are outlawed and “firemen” burn any that are found. In this sermon evangelist Jerry Dickinson preaches about a Biblical “book burning” and some things that we need to learn from it. Jerry Dickinson – Fahrenheit 451 MP3 Link

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 75 - Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:15


Episode 75: Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C).  Dr Schlaerth explains the signs, symptoms, and basic management of MIS-C. Lam explain the role of anti-obesity medications in weight management. Introduction: The Role of Drugs in Weight Loss Management    By Lam Chau, MS3, Ross University School of Medicine     Today about 70% of adult Americans are overweight or obese. Obesity is associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, among many other diseases. Studies have shown losing 5-10% of your body weight can substantially reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.  Traditional belief is that weight loss can only be attributed to diet and exercise. While there are certainly elements of truth to that statement, medication is a safe and proven method for weight management that is often overlooked. The fact of the matter is that weight loss is an ongoing field of study with constant new research and innovations.  In June of this year, a medication named Wegovy was approved for weight loss management by the FDA. This drug is indicated for chronic weight management in patients with a BMI of 27 or greater with an accompanying weight-related ailment or in a patient with a BMI of 30 or greater. Rachel Batterham, PhD, of the Centre for Obesity Research at University College London, shared: "The findings of this study represent a major breakthrough for improving the health of people with obesity. No other drug has come close to producing this level of weight loss — this really is a game changer.” Despite breakthroughs like these, the use of medication for weight loss is still relatively low. Dr. Erin Bohula, a cardiologist and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, believes “there are probably a few reasons for this, including cost, if not covered by insurance, and a perception these agents are not safe in light of the history with weight loss agents.” A study from 2019 examined the medical records from eight geographically dispersed healthcare organizations. They found that out of 2.2 million patients who were eligible for weight loss medication, only 1.3% filled at least 1 prescription. Weight loss is a dynamic process with many different variables. While it may not necessarily be for everyone, medication can help tremendously and is an option you should consider if you are interested in weight loss[1,2]. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home.  ___________________________Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C).   By Katherine Schlaerth, MD, and Hector Arreaza, MD. History and epidemiologyMost children who get COVID-19 have either no symptoms or very mild symptoms. However, about 18 months ago, a new pediatric complication of COVID-19, possibly postinfectious, was described.  The eight children who were initially described had a clinical presentation which was similar to either Kawasaki Disease or perhaps toxic shock syndrome, and since these children had signs of a hyperinflammatory state coupled with shock, the new syndrome was named Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C for short. By midsummer of 2021, the United States had about two thousand cases and 30 deaths in children under 21.  Other name for this condition is Pediatric Hyperinflammatory Shock. DiagnosisWhat are the criteria for a diagnosis of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome? They include:Age below 21Fever above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees centigrade for 24 hours (a subjective fever for more than 24 hours counts too). Laboratory evidence of inflammation which should include at least two of the following tests: elevated CRP, elevated ESR, elevated fibrinogen level, procalcitonin, D-dimer, ferritin, lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), interleukin-6, and neutrophil counts, low lymphocyte count and low albumin.Severe disease necessitating hospitalization with multisystem organs affected. The systems affected include cardiac, renal, respiratory, hematologic, gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and neurologic (at least three systems need to be involved). No creditable other diagnosis. Other symptoms include:GI complaints (diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain)Skin rashConjunctivitisHeadacheLethargyConfusionRespiratory distressSore throatMyalgiasSwollen hands/feetLymphadenopathyCardiac signs and symptoms include troponin/BNP elevation and arrhythmia. Findings on ECHO may include depressed LVEF, coronary artery abnormalities, including dilation or aneurysm, mitral regurgitation, and pericardial effusion. There also must be a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 and this test can be either a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), serologic, or antigen testing. Exposure to someone who has had or is suspected of having had COVID-19 within the last 4 weeks also counts.  Patients with MIS-C may have predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, mucocutaneous findings, and may be hypotensive or “shocky” on presentation. Up to 80% require ICU admission. Thrombocytopenia and /or elevated transaminase levels can also be seen.  MIS-C vs Kawasaki DiseaseThe big issue in diagnosing MIS-C is the overlap with Kawasaki's disease and with toxic shock syndrome. Patients with Kawasaki Disease in their second week of illness often will have thrombosis, not thrombocytopenia. Whereas MIS-C usually affects school age children or adolescents, Kawasaki Disease is more commonly a problem in younger children, who have an average age of 2 years.  Kawasaki Disease is also more common in Asian children and MIS-C disproportionately seems to affect Black and Hispanic children.  Obesity seems to be another risk factor for MIS-C.  Kawasaki's Disease also has different cardiac manifestations from MIS-C. Coronary artery dilatation is common in Kawasaki's disease and left ventricular dysfunction in MIS-C, although sometimes coronary artery dilatation and rarely aneurisms can be noted on echocardiogram in putative MIS-C, which is why differentiation from Kawasaki's Disease is an issue.  PathophysiologyThe cause of MIS-C is probably postinfectious immune dysregulation. Only a minority of MIS-C patients are identified as having COVID-19 by RT-PCR, but most have positive tests for immunoglobulin G.  Statistically, there is a lag of 4-6 weeks between peak community cases of COVID-19 and the time at which children present with MIS-C.   Although research is being done on MIS-C, and theories abound about etiology, there is no clear-cut answer to why some children get MIS-C and the vast majority do not. In a review of the literature on MIS-C using literature from December 2019 through May 2020, gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, and abdominal pain were 4-5 times more common than cough and respiratory distress.  There was a slight preponderance of male patients and mean age was 8 ½ years. ICU admission was common and 2/3 required inotropic support, over ¼ needed respiratory help with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation warranted in 31 children. The death rate was 1.5 % of these very sick children treated in hospital.  In another smaller study, 80% had mild, but 44% had moderate to severe EKG abnormalities including coronary involvement. The good news was that coronary arteries were normal in all children after a month, and at 4-9 months, only 2-4% had mild heart abnormalities. Unfortunately, mechanisms of MIS-C as well as universal treatment is still being worked out. Published articles may be delayed due to time constraints in publishing. Other immunologic interventions do not have sufficient data. TreatmentWhat about the treatment of children diagnosed with MIS-C?Usually, a variety of specialists become involved initially. These can include pediatric rheumatology, infectious disease, cardiology, and hematology. If children with MIS-C meet criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease as well, regardless of COVID-19 testing results, IVIG and aspirin are reasonable.  Corticosteroid use must be individualized, and if used it may require a taper.  An echocardiogram can be done initially looking for coronary aneurisms and repeated in a week.  In severe cases, shock may be a presenting factor needing urgent attention. Generally, the treatments used are decided by the aforementioned consults and may consist of immunomodulating therapy, including possibly IVIG (2g/kg), and/or corticosteroids methylprednisolone (30mg/kg).  AntiviralsThe role of antiviral therapy is unclear and remdesivir should be reserved for children with acute COVID-19.  COVID-19 vaccination-associated myocarditisAnother entity which needs further evaluation is COVID-19 vaccination-associated myocarditis in adolescents. This problem is more common in young males and may occur after the administration of mRNA based COVID-19 vaccines. The presentation occurs within 2 weeks of COVID-19 vaccination, and clinical presentation can include chest pressure, abnormal biomarkers (elevated troponins), and cardiac imaging findings. It is unknown if subclinical cases occur.  COVID-19 infection in children, while usually benign, has the potential to become serious, and the association between some mRNA vaccines and the occurrence of myocarditis has yet to be thoroughly studied. We look forward to more and better data to guide the care of children and young adults in these spheres. The risk of having myocarditis is still higher with the actual COVID-19 than the COVID-19 vaccine. The incidence of myocarditis after BioNtech/Pfizer vaccine was 2.13 cases per 100,000 persons in a large study done in a large health care organization in Israel where more than 2 million people were vaccinated (that represents 0.00213%). Another US study showed that there were 77 cases per million doses of vaccines in young male, in contrast, there were 450 cases of myocarditis per million COVID-19 cases in the same age group.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 74 “Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children.” Dr. Schlaerth explained that MIS-C is a work in progress in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease are very similar, but, for example, GI symptoms, cardiac dysfunction, shock and multisystem dysfunction are more prominent in MIS-C than Kawasaki Disease. Whereas coronary artery aneurysms are more common in Kawasaki disease than MIS-C. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Katherine Schlaerth, and Lam Chau. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References:FDA Approves New Drug Treatment for Chronic Weight Management, First Since 2014, June 04, 2021, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-new-drug-treatment-chronic-weight-management-first-2014. Saxon DR, Iwamoto SJ, Mettenbrink CJ, et al. Antiobesity Medication Use in 2.2 Million Adults Across Eight Large Health Care Organizations: 2009-2015. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019;27(12):1975-1981. doi:10.1002/oby.22581. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6868321/.  Carroll, Linda, Weight-loss pills can help. So why don't more people use them? NBC News Health Care, September 2, 2018.  https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-care/weight-loss-pills-can-help-so-why-don-t-more-n905211 World Health Organization, WHO recommends groundbreaking malaria vaccine for children at risk, October 6, 2021. https://www.who.int/news/item/06-10-2021-who-recommends-groundbreaking-malaria-vaccine-for-children-at-risk Lee, Min-Sheng et. al, Similarities and Differences Between COVID-19-Related Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children and Kawasaki Disease, Front. Pediatr., 18 June 2021, https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.640118.  Gail F. Shust, Vijaya L. Soma, Philip Kahn and Adam J. Ratner, Pediatrics in Review July 2021, 42 (7) 399-401; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.2020-004770. Jain SS, Steele JM, Fonseca B, et al. COVID-19 vaccination-associated myocarditis in adolescents. Pediatrics. 2021; doi:10.1542/peds.2021-053427.  https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2021/08/12/peds.2021-053427.full.pdf.  Wilson, Clare, Myocarditis is more common after covid-19 infection than vaccination,  New Scientist, 4 August 2021, https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25133462-800-myocarditis-is-more-common-after-covid-19-infection-than-vaccination/#ixzz79JPn2E47. Son, Mary Beth F, MD, and Kevin Friedman, MD, COVID-19: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis, Up to Date, September 2021, https://www.uptodate.com/contents/covid-19-multisystem-inflammatory-syndrome-in-children-mis-c-clinical-features-evaluation-and-diagnosis?search=kawasaki%20vs%20misc&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1  

Lingthusiasm - A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics
62: Cool things about scales and implicature

Lingthusiasm - A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:20


We can plot the words we use to describe temperature on a scale: cold, cool, warm, hot. It's not as precise as a temperature scale like Celsius or Fahrenheit, but we all generally agree on where these words sit in relation to each other. We can also do the same with other sets of words that don't necessarily have an equivalent scientific scale, such as the relationship between “some", "a few" and “many“ or even words like "suppose”, “believe” and “know”. In this episode, your hosts Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne get enthusiastic about the things that get implied when we use words that involve scales, aka scalar implicature. Why can we revise our description of a warm coffee by saying “actually, it's hot” but not “actually, it's cold”? What happens when your language breaks up the scale differently to another language (spoiler: everyone can still agree that a warm spring day is different to a scorching hot one in the height of summer). And how can implied scales be used for humorous purposes, as in the Whale Fact™ that many whales were never taught how to drive manual stick shift? Announcements: It's our 5 year anniversary! We've loved sharing the Lingthusiasm with you all these year, and as we do every year for our anniversary celebrations, we're asking you to share it too! Share your favourite episode or moment on social media (and don't forget to tag us!), or just tell a friend who you think could use a little more linguistics in their life. Then go forth and enjoy the warm fuzzies of having spread the linguistic joy! In this month's bonus episode we're getting enthusiastic about linguistic illusions! We talk about the where the Yanny/Laurel illusion that became popular on social media a while back came from, the McGurk Effect, using the Stroop Test to find spies, hallucinating words from musical instruments, the Comparative Illusion (aka "More people have been to Russia than I have"), and making our own speech to song illusion to infect you with (sorry) (no but seriously). Join us on Patreon to listen to this and 56 other bonus episodes. You'll also get access to the Lingthusiasm Discord server where you can discuss your favourite linguistically interesting fiction with other language nerds! https://www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm For links to everything in this episode:

Blind Abilities
iPhone101 QuickByte: Adding Locations to the Weather App. How's Your Weather? How about Montreal, Jacksonville and Colorado Springs?

Blind Abilities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:19


In this iPhone101 QuickByte, Jeff Thompson takes us through the native Weather App and demonstrates how to add locations such as cities or airports to the location list. How to arrange the locations in a preferred order and how to change from Fahrenheit to Celsius or Celsius to Fahrenheit. Join in and learn how to add family, friends and points of interests to your location list in the native Weather App. Adding and Arranging locations in the native Weather App Open the Weather App, Hey Siri,, “Open Weather App”. Or single finger double tap on the Weather icon. Note: By default the opening screen will be of the location that holds the top position on the Location List. And, if the Weather App remains in your App Switcher, you will return to the last screen you were previously on. This demo is conducted as if the Weather App was not in the App Switcher, thus, opening to the default landing screen. 4 finger tap to go to the very bottom to “Location List”, single finger double tap. To add a new city, single finger swipe left to right twice to, “Search for a city or airport” search field, single finger double tap. Enter your city or airport by typing or dictation. You can use the 2 finger double tap to activate dictation or use the “dictate” button in the bottom right hand side of the keyboard. A list will populate just below and with a couple single finger swipes left to right, single finger double tap on the location you want. A new screen opens with your choice and can be added to your saved list of locations by single finger double tapping on, “Add”, in the upper right hand of the screen. You can choose, “Cancel”, and return to the search list and continue searching. To remove a location from your list: Open the Weather App, Hey Siri,, “Open Weather App”. Or single finger double tap on the Weather icon. 4 finger tap to go to the very bottom to “Location List”, single finger double tap. Swipe down through your list and flick up to the delete choice  and single finger double tap. Note: ensure that your Rotor setting is set to, “Actions” for these choices to appear. Moving Locations in the list While on the Location List page, go to the location you want to move and flick up until you have the desired, Move Up or Move Down, single finger double tap. OR Drag and drop by going to the location you want to move and then single finger swipe left to right to, “Reorder Button, Draggable”. Do a single finger double tap and hold, then slide your finger up or down, listening and let go when the desired location is achieved. Changing from Fahrenheit to Celsius or Celsius to Fahrenheit. Open the Weather App, Hey Siri,, “Open Weather App”. Or single finger double tap on the Weather icon. 4 finger tap near the top of the screen  and single finger swipe left to right to the, “More”, button, single finger double tap. Single finger swipe left to right down to Fahrenheit or Celsius and Choose by Single Finger Double Tapping on either one.   Contact Your State Services If you reside in Minnesota, and you would like to know more about Transition Services from State Services contact Transition Coordinator Sheila Koenig by email or contact her via phone at 651-539-2361. Contact: You can follow us on Twitter @BlindAbilities On the web at www.BlindAbilities.com Send us an email Get the Free Blind Abilities App on the App Storeand Google Play Store. Give us a call and leave us some feedback at 612-367-9063 we would love to hear from you! Check out the Blind Abilities Communityon Facebook, the Blind Abilities Page, and the Career Resources for the Blind and Visually Impaired group

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 284: Resident Evil 4 (part four)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:31


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we continue our series on Resident Evil 4. We talk about the ecology of the monsters, defense sequences, and bobbing and weaving. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Up to the end of 3-4 Issues covered: sagacity and gardens, finding the PS4 to be a slightly easier platform, the enemy count, the easier tram ride as a setpiece, running out of ammo in the town on replay, being thoughtful of ammo use and switching to the knife, the suplex, the retinal scanner, Mendez taking the stylized symbol shape, the ecology of the parasite, the dev-evolution of the parasites, feeling like a cohesive setting, a place that used to be a place, Saddler's insectoid form under the robes and his cosmic horror staff, the creep Salazar, gunning and running, taking advantage of AI slowness, higher breeds of hybrids, using the sandbox in interesting ways, having to defend Ashley when separated, having the final exam with Ashley and changing up the challenges, Brett discovers that Tim didn't get the turret gunner, getting a lot out of spaces, the back and forth with Ada Wong, localization issues, another test of the player, Ashley's contextual attacks, the camera closing in and Ashley sticking super close, avoiding the hard thing, noticing the weirdness, poor localization choices, investing in decisions you make (especially when it comes to cultural sensitivity), justifying the investment, othering and foreignness, screaming at Leon, playing RE4 more as a strategy game, pacing and a strategic spectrum, using games to do games stuff. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: PS4, Zach, Dungeons & Dragons, James Bond, Alien, Benjamin Button, Tomorrow Never Dies, Michelle Yeoh, Kumail Nanjiani, Call of Duty, David Cage, Fahrenheit, Heavy Rain, Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker, Max, Guillermo del Toro, Akira Kurosawa, Ghosts of Tsushima, The Seven Samurai, Sony, Stephen, Xbox, X-COM, Alien: Isolation, DOOM (1993), Control, Alan Wake, Reed Knight, Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Next time: All of Ch 4 Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs
Specifically About Heat - Short 131

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 12:20


In this short podcast, Bryan goes over energy transfer and heat, specifically specific heat.   BTUs per ton is a common measurement; a BTU (British thermal unit) is the amount of heat it takes to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. 12,000 BTUs per hour is equal to one ton in heating or cooling technology. It takes one “ton” of heat to melt a ton of ice, but we kept the measurement and terminology as we moved away from using ice in industrial refrigeration.   When it comes to specific heat, we have to remember that one BTU has a different heating or cooling impact on different substances. Most fluids have a specific heat lower than water, meaning that one BTU of heat will result in more heat transfer in that substance than water. Air is one such fluid that has a lower specific heat than water (0.24 vs. 1); it's easier to heat air than water. However, the specific heat of vapors can change with temperature and pressure.   When we change a refrigerant from a liquid to a vapor in the evaporator coil, it will reach saturation before boiling. As the refrigerant boils, the temperature will stay the same because the absorbed heat will all contribute to the phase change as latent heat. Even though most refrigerants have low specific heat, direct expansion systems can still move a lot of heat because it takes a lot of latent heat to complete a phase change.   In other systems that don't use direct expansion (using glycol or water instead), specific heat is more integral to the effectiveness of heat transfer because latent heat isn't a factor in heat capacity.   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.   Check out our handy calculators HERE. Check out information on the 2022 HVACR Training Symposium at https://hvacrschool.com/symposium/.

Escuchando Documentales
Los Oscuros Secretos del Sol #documental #ciencia #universo #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:09


Contiene el 99,9 por ciento de toda la materia de nuestro sistema solar y arroja plasma caliente a casi un millón de millas por hora. La temperatura en su núcleo es de unos asombrosos 27 millones de grados Fahrenheit. Convulsiona, arde, canta. Lo conoces como el sol. Los científicos lo conocen como uno de los laboratorios de física más asombrosos del universo. Ahora, con la ayuda de nuevas naves espaciales y telescopios terrestres, los científicos están viendo el sol como nunca antes e incluso recrean en los laboratorios lo que sucede en el centro mismo del sol. Su trabajo nos ayudará a comprender aspectos del sol que han desconcertado a los científicos durante décadas.

It Goes Both Ways The Podcast
Why Do American Use Fahrenheit and Not ....

It Goes Both Ways The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 34:34


This podcast is a year old and we appreciate all of your support. In this episode, "ducks in a row" how you need to be prepared, Steve admits to doing something as a young man that has Kristy horrified and WHO KNEW Instagram could give such helpful advice.

Strange Animals Podcast
Episode 249: Strange Seals

Strange Animals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:28


Sign up for our mailing list! We also have t-shirts and mugs with our logo! Thanks to Richard from NC for his suggestion that leads us to learn about some interesting seals! Further reading: Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations Further listening/watching: Rarely-heard Weddell Seal Sounds in Antarctica The bearded seal Wikipedia page with audio so you can listen over and over and over The Baikal seal, the world's only fully fresh water seal species: Baikal seal, round boi: The Baikal seal's teeth have teeth: A Weddell seal mama with her pup who seems to be practicing singing: Look ma, no ears! The bearded seal. Can you tell where its name comes from? (Moustachioed seal might be more accurate.) (Also, note the ear opening with no external ear flap.) Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I'm your host, Kate Shaw. This week let's learn about some interesting seals. Thanks to Richard from NC who suggested freshwater seals, which is where we'll start. Most seals live on the coast and spend most of the time in the ocean. But there's one species of seal that lives exclusively in fresh water. That's the Baikal [bay-CALL] seal, and the only place it lives is a big lake in Siberia called Lake Baikal. Lake Baikal formed where two sections of the earth's crust are being pulled apart by continental drift. That's called a rift lake or rift valley lake. The lake gets bigger every year, but only by a tiny amount—just under an inch, or 2 cm. Since this has been going on for an estimated 25 to 30 million years, though, it's an extremely big, deep lake. It is, in fact, the deepest lake on earth, and is also the oldest lake on earth. It's more than twice as old as Lake Tanganyika in East Africa, which is also a large, deep rift lake but only about 12 million years old at the most. Lake Baikal is almost 400 miles long, or 636 km, and nearly 50 miles wide, or 80 km. At its deepest point, it's 3,893 feet deep, or 1,186.5 meters. That's from the surface of the water to the muddy bottom. But that mud and sediment on the bottom has been building up for a very long time and there's a lot of it—4.3 miles of it, in fact, or 7 km. The water is very clear and very oxygenated, but the surface freezes for several months out of the year. Then again, there are some hydrothermal vents, especially in the deepest areas, that heat the water around them to 122 degrees Fahrenheit, or 50 Celsius. Because Lake Baikal is so deep, so big, so oxygenated, and so old, lots of species of animal live in and around it that live nowhere else in the world. That includes the Baikal seal. The Baikal seal is related to the Arctic ringed seal but has lived in the lake exclusively for probably two million years. It only grows five and a half feet long at most, or 1.65 meters, and is usually closer to four feet long, or 1.2 meters. It's gray in color and has no external ears, so that its head appears smooth. It can still hear, but because it doesn't have ears sticking out of its head, it's more streamlined than seals with external ears. It has large eyes, a pair of front flippers that it uses to maneuver in the water and on land, and a pair of hind flippers that act like a tail instead of legs. That's actually the main difference between earless and eared seals. Earless seals are more streamlined in general and more adapted for life in the water and for deep diving, but they're awkward on land because they can't use their hind limbs for walking. Eared seals have little flaps of external ears and while their hind flippers act as a tail in the water, the seal can turn its hind flippers over to walk on them on land. The Baikal seal is quite small for a seal, which keeps it from needing as much food as a bigger animal. For a long time people thought the Baikal seal mostly ate fish,

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1267: Emergency Gas Cans For EVs Become Real | 05 Nov 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:41


Show #1268 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Friday 5th November. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. RIVIAN PLANS ON DELIVERING 1,000 R1T MODELS BY THE END OF 2021 - Only last week it had been revealed that Rivian's production was going at a snail's pace with it just managing to manufacture two cars per day on an average. But now it is slowly ramping up. As of the end of October, it has produced 180 R1T electric pickup trucks and delivered 156 of them. - Rivian says that production ramp-up will happen in December. By the end of this year, it wants to make a total of 1,135 vehicles. - It wants to make 1,200 R1T models, while it will slowly start production of the R1S SUV and make 25 units of it as well. On top of this, it will even manufacture 10 units of an electric delivery van it has to make for Amazon.  Overall, the plan is to deliver 1,000 R1T models, 15 R1S models,s and all 10 EDV's it makes for Amazon in December itself. - Rivian believes it will have a backlog of orders all the way into 2023 and so far, it seems like production of the current orders alone will take two years to complete. Rivian however also notes that it has the capacity to make 150,000 vehicles annually but this level will be reached only in 2024. After updates, its plant will also be able to handle up to 200,000 vehicles. Original Source : https://www.carandbike.com/news/rivian-plans-on-delivering-1-000-r1t-models-by-the-end-of-2021-2598195 ELECTRIC CARS ACCOUNT FOR UNDER 5% OF MILES DRIVEN BY UBER IN EUROPE - Electric cars are used for fewer than one in every 20 miles driven by Uber drivers in major European cities, according to data that suggest the taxi app company must drastically accelerate its drivers' take-up of zero-emissions vehicles to meet its environmental targets. - Uber pledged last year that 50% of miles driven in seven European capitals by the end of 2025 will be in battery electric cars - The usage of electric cars ranged from 9% of miles driven in Lisbon, to 6% in London and Amsterdam, and only 0.01% in Brussels, according to internal Uber data shared with Transport & Environment (T&E), a thinktank. The other laggards were Madrid, at only 0.15% of miles, Berlin at 0.55% and Paris at 1%. - On Wednesday it announced that London Uber drivers could put money raised via the app's clean air fee towards buying Tesla electric cars, adding to similar programmes giving discounts on Nissan, Kia and Hyundai electric cars. Original Source : https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/nov/03/electric-cars-under-5-per-cent-miles-driven-uber-europe HYUNDAI TO BEGIN EV MANUFACTURING IN THE US WITH HOPES SUBSIDY BILL PASSES - Hyundai Motor Group recently shared plans to begin manufacturing its Genesis GV70 EV in the US beginning in 2022. The electrified GV70 will be produced at Hyundai's Alabama plant, and will mark the first EV manufactured in the US by the Korean automotive umbrella. With this decision, Hyundai looks to make a larger impact on the growing EV market in the US, and take advantage proposed subsidies for electric vehicles produced on US soil. - According to a report from Business Korea, Hyundai Motor shared its decision to begin US manufacturing with its labor union during a job security committee meeting at its Asan plant in South Korea. - The company is planning to begin manufacturing early next year at its US facility in Montgomery, Alabama. This plant currently manufacturers several different ICE Hyundai models, as well as various combustion engines, but will now shift toward EV manufacturing beginning with the GV70 EV. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/11/05/hyundai-to-begin-ev-manufacturing-in-the-us-with-hopes-subsidy-bill-passes THESE BATTERIES CAN'T POWER A CAR—BUT THEY CAN LIGHT UP A CITY - On a barren field in Lancaster, California, where the temperature often tops 100 degrees Fahrenheit in summer, sit eight white boxes that might be a key to a greener future. Each 10 x 22-foot rectangle holds 20 battery packs that once powered Nissan Leafs. But they've lost some of their juice. Inside a car, they can no longer power speedy accelerations, and their 85-mile ranges have been reduced to about 55 miles. - But the batteries still work. Research suggests they may retain two-thirds or more of their original capacity. So for the past 18 months, these batteries have been living a second act: storing energy from nearby rows of solar panels. Their owner, B2U Storage Solutions, wants to know how effectively, and for how long, they can do that. - By 2030, retired EV batteries could provide 200 gigawatt-hours of energy storage globally each year, according to analysis from the consulting firm McKinsey—roughly 50 times the annual output of the Hoover Dam. B2U wants to be a part of that. - One question: Who owns the reused batteries, and who's responsible if something goes wrong? Automakers know they may be blamed if one of their old batteries is involved in a fire. - B2U's Lancaster project looks promising. The company says its solar panels generate up to 1.65 megawatts of power, while its retired Nissan Leaf batteries can retain 10 megawatt-hours of storage—about as much as the average US home uses in a year. Freeman says the company is profitable, and planning expansions. Original Source : https://www.wired.com/story/batteries-cant-power-car-light-city/ STOREDOT SECURES CONSISTENT DRIVING RANGE OF ALL ELECTRIC VEHICLES - New StoreDot technology allows electric vehicle owners to have the same driving range through the life of a vehicle, improving ownership experience and protecting future values - All-new system developed by StoreDot will be open-source, available to any other technology provider - StoreDot is a pioneer and leader of extreme fast charging battery technologies, allowing a 50% reduction in charging time for the same cost - Until this StoreDot innovation, battery capacity, and therefore driving range, degrades over the life of the vehicle, making it one of the major frustrations of EV ownership. The certainty and consistency that this advancement provides could also improve residual values of vehicles, lowering leasing costs and further benefitting both consumers and global automotive manufacturers utilizing the technology. - StoreDot is now making rapid advancements in extreme fast charging lithium-ion batteries for use in the automotive sector, increasing the number of miles per minute of charge. It is currently shipping samples to global car makers for real-world testing and remains firmly on track to deliver mass-produced XFC batteries, which deliver a 50% reduction in charging times at the same cost, by 2024. Original Source : https://finance.yahoo.com/news/storedot-extreme-fast-charging-battery-090000881.html TESLA'S LATEST MODEL X COMES WITH HIGHER BATTERY DENSITY AND MORE POWERFUL MOTORS - Tesla's recently refreshed Model X has a higher battery energy dendsity and more powerful motors, according to an EPA specification sheet that wasn't previously available. - While we knew that changes had been made to the latest Model X, Tesla had been less than clear on what had really changed. - First off, it shows an important improvement in battery pack-level energy density from 165 Wh/kg to 186.21 Wh/kg. - The overall energy capacity went down from 103 kWh to 100 kWh. - The voltage for the Tesla Model X battery pack has also increased from 360 volts to 410 volts, the report notes. In terms of motors, Tesla has switched to “AC permanent magnet motors and increased the power to 243 kW in the front motor and 248 kW in the rear motor.” Original Source : https://www.redmondpie.com/teslas-latest-model-x-comes-with-higher-battery-density-and-more-powerful-motors/ ZIPCHARGE GO IS LIKE AN EMERGENCY GAS CAN FOR YOUR TESLA - ZipCharge is a new U.K.-based startup that has unveiled the Go. It's a suitcase-sized battery pack that weighs in at about 50 pounds. With a 4 kWh capacity, it can charge an EV at 7.2 kW. A single charge can add 12 to 20 miles of range, depending on the EV. - Not only could drivers keep a ZipCharge Go in their trunk, it's possible for hotels or service stations to have units available in case a car needs a bit more charge to make it home. - Powering the Go are high-energy-density lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt-oxide  (NMC) battery cells. - has a bi-directional AC-DC inverter, which enables charging from the grid to the Go and from the Go to the grid. Yes, the Go can actually store energy during off-peak hours and sell energy back to the grid. Original Source : https://www.tomsguide.com/news/zipcharge-go-is-like-an-emergency-gas-can-for-your-tesla NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM With the COP26 climate summit now underway in Scotland, what would you like to tell the politicians or the rule makers about electric cars? Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

MovieByte Podcast
The Island | Ewan McGregor | Scarlett Johansson | Michael Clarke Duncan | Michael Bay | [2005]

MovieByte Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 67:23


The Island | Ewan McGregor | Scarlett Johansson | Michael Clarke Duncan | Michael Bay | [2005] Join Ruben and The Russian as they digest this 2005 Sci-Fi classic, directed by Michael Bay and starring Ewan McGregor and Scarlett Johansson. The Island is a 2005 American science fiction thriller film directed and co-produced by Michael Bay. It stars Ewan McGregor, Scarlett Johansson, Djimon Hounsou, Sean Bean, Michael Clarke Duncan, and Steve Buscemi. The film is about Lincoln Six Echo (Ewan McGregor), who struggles to fit into the highly structured world in which he lives, isolated in a compound, and the series of events that unfold when he questions how truthful that world is. After Lincoln learns the compound inhabitants are clones used for organ harvesting as well as surrogates for wealthy people in the outside world, he attempts to escape with Jordan Two Delta (Scarlett Johansson) and expose the illegal cloning movement. Principal photography for The Island began on Sunday, October 24, 2004. The ruined buildings where Jordan and Lincoln sleep after leaving the subterranean compound are in Rhyolite, Nevada. The city parts were shot in Detroit, Michigan, with Michigan Central Station one of the notable locations. Other portions of the film were shot in the Coachella Valley, California The Island has been described as a pastiche of "escape-from-dystopia" science fiction films of the 1960s and 1970s, such as Fahrenheit 451, THX 1138, Parts: The Clonus Horror, and Logan's Run. The Island cost $126 million to produce. The original score was composed by Steve Jablonsky, who went on to score Bay's further works. It opened on July 22, 2005, by DreamWorks Pictures in North America and internationally by Warner Bros. Pictures, to mixed reviews, earning $36 million at the United States box office and $127 million overseas for a $162 million worldwide total. #TheIsland #ScarlettJohansson #EwanMcGregor #MichaelBay #DjimonHounsou #SeanBean #MichaelClarkeDuncan #SteveBuscemi #KimCoates #EthanPhillips #TheIsland2005 #MauroFiore #PaulRubell #ChristianWagner #RogerBarton #JohnMurray #SteveJablonsky #AlexKurtzman #RobertoOrci #CaspianTredwellOwen #IanBryce #WalterParkes #DreamWorksPictures #WarnerBrosPictures #ParkesMacDonaldProductions #MovieByte #MovieBytePodcast #JustChillinEntertainment --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Follow Us: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/moviebytepod... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/movie.byte/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/byte_movie Podcast: https://anchor.fm/moviebyte A Just Chillin' Entertainment original production Follow Them: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/justchillinent​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/justchillinentertainment Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/JustChillingEn1​ --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This Podcast is a critique of the movie which falls within "fair use" under Section 107 of the US Copyright Act of 1976. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show
1986 - The Year I Was Born

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:00


On Friday I celebrate my 35th birthday. To mark the occasion today, I want to delve into some interesting trivia about where and when I come from. What follows is my origin story. I was born at the Glendive Medical Center on November 5th, 1986 in Glendive, Montana to Byron Doyle Mullet, a native of Eastern Montana, and Alice Ann Mullet, maiden name Ranew, originally from Milton, Florida, near Pensacola in the panhandle of that state. You will forgive me for not remembering, but the Weather Underground tells me the historic average for that day of the year is 36 degrees Fahrenheit, with the record high and low being 72 and -6 respectively. The history of the naming of my hometown is that Sir George Gore, a wealthy Irish sportsman, named his favorite hunting area in 1855. "Gleanndubh" was at some point anglicized after a combination of two Irish words meaning 'valley' and 'black.' Thus I come from a town named after "the black valley" nestled on both banks of the Yellowstone River on the outskirts of Makoshika State Park, said park named after the Lakota Sioux phrase meaning "bad land," or "bad spirits." The local high school sports mascot is the Red Devil. Interestingly enough, my wife's maiden name is Duff, a Scottish name which my research has concluded comes from that same Gaelic word 'Dubh' which helped form the name of my hometown. The day I was born being November 5th, the people of the United Kingdom across the waters celebrate every year as 'Guy Fawkes Day' to reflect on the famed and failed Gunpowder Plot, an attempt in 1605 to blow Parliament to retake the country for Roman Catholicism. But the year I was born in being 1986, the United Nations designated the 'International Year of Peace.' A decent number of famous movie stars, musicians, and athletes were born the same year as me. And now I am officially old enough to run for President of the United States. But what does all of this really mean or matter? Can anything be gleaned about who I am as an individual from pulling on all these diverse and eccentric threads? "Vanity of vanities" the Preacher says in Ecclesiastes. "All is vanity." And while my rehearsing these factoids may be interesting in its way, it may also be chasing after wind. Nevertheless, it is interesting to ponder. Where we are from, what family we are born into, when we reach certain stages of development and what is going on in the wider world when we do - all of these have some kind of bearing and influence, even if only God knows precisely to what extent and end. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/support

Growing the Valley
Walnut Freeze with Janine Hasey

Growing the Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 23:25


Janine Hasey (UC ANR Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor Emerita) discusses sudden freeze events, their effects on walnut, and necessary steps to mitigate future freeze damage. We encourage you to take our survey on walnut freeze, which is available until Dec 1, 2021. The purpose of this survey is to gain greater understanding of freeze damage in walnuts. For the purposes of this survey, freeze damage is defined as damage observed in spring yet incurred during the previous fall from cold temperatures below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. The results from this survey may be used to develop further surveys and research projects regarding freeze damage in walnuts, and will be shared via peer-review publications, extension talks and articles, and/or conference presentations. No personal information will be shared.Thank you to the Almond, Pistachio, Prune, and Walnut Boards of California for their kind donations. Thank you to Muriel Gordon for the music.The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed are the speaker's own and do not represent the views, thoughts, and opinions of the University of California. The material and information presented here is for general information purposes only. The "University of California" name and all forms and abbreviations are the property of its owner and its use does not imply endorsement of or opposition to any specific organization, product, or service. Follow us on Twitter! @SacOrchards

Third Eye Cinema / Weird Scenes Inside the Goldmine podcast
Weird Scenes Week 83: SF with a message - the dystopic visions of the counterculture era

Third Eye Cinema / Weird Scenes Inside the Goldmine podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 137:21


It's hard to believe in the modern age of sheer bombast and explosion filled CG lightshows for their own sake, but not that long ago, the world of science fiction, yes, even that of the American cinema, tended to be devoted to a very different purpose and aesthetic. Like their low paid visionary scribes from the likes of Welles and Verne in the 1800s to the pulps of the 20's and 30's and the edge of current science devotees and aspirationists of the 1950s, the science fiction authors of the 1960s and early 70's had far more in mind than a cheap hour or two of mindless escapism from an increasingly dreary corporatocratic nightmare world we've all come to accept as if it were predestined master rather than an out of control dog to be brought to heel. For a few decades in particular, a hard SF mix of utopian aspiration and dystopian commentary and warning about then-new trends arising in contemporary society informed nearly every instance of same, from the lowest of budget to the highest of the highbrow, from the critically feted to the mocked and hated.   Many of these names have gone on into legend: Orwell, Bradbury, Ellison, Ballard, Dick, Zelazny.  And many films built off or inspired by such literary works have held their place in pop culture circles: The Planet of the Apes films, 2001: A Space Odyssey...and many of the otherwise unrelated films we'll be discussing this evening, like Fahrenheit 451, The Illustrated Man, The Omega Man, Soylent Green, Silent Running, A Boy and His Dog and Damnation Alley. So join us tonight as we speak of those hoary days before Spielberg and Lucas turned cinema into a wasteland of brainless popcorn fare, and realize just how many of the horrors warned against may already have come into being in our day and age, begging the question: why didn't we listen?  Come and see what answers await, as we talk the thought provoking dystopias of the counterculture era, right here on Weird Scenes! Week 83: SF with a message - the dystopic visions of the counterculture era    https://weirdscenes1.wordpress.com/ https://www.facebook.com/WeirdScenes1 https://twitter.com/WeirdScenes1 (@weirdscenes1) https://thirdeyecinema.podbean.com/ https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/third-eye-cinema-weird-scenes-inside-the-goldmine-podcast/id553402044 https:// (open.spotify.com) /show/4s8QkoE6PnAfh65C5on5ZS?nd=1 https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/09456286-8956-4b80-a158-f750f525f246/Third-Eye-Cinema-Weird-Scenes-Inside-the-Goldmine-podcast  

Living Outside The Box
LOTB 071: Fahrenheit 451 Book Discussion

Living Outside The Box

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 61:39


In this episode, we talk about the themes in the book Fahrenheit 451 and how they can be applied to the world we are living in today. SPOILERS and Content that may not be safe to hear for children. Resources mentioned in this episode: Buy a copy of Fahrenheit 451 on Amazon Our Coffee Coffee Coffee Show This podcast is brought to you by: The Laid Back Guide to Intermittent Fasting by Kayla Cox Get your copy of Kayla's audio book, The Laid Back Guide to Intermittent Fasting for FREE when you sign up for a 30 day trial of Audible.

Poured Over
Alice Hoffman on THE BOOK OF MAGIC

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 34:37


"And I had a great, great professor named Albert Guerard when I was starting out, and he said to me, 'Some people will tell you to write what you know. But I'm going to tell you write what you can imagine.' And that was such a gift." Words are magic (and truth and love and power) in Alice Hoffman's newest novel, The Book of Magic. It's the fourth in a series that started with Practical Magic in 1995, and features three generations of the fabulous (and sometimes prickly) Owens family, as it cuts between Essex, Massachusetts and Essex, England. The Book of Magic delivers a truly satisfying, emotional read about familial love, and Alice Hoffman joins us on the show for a spoiler-free conversation about turning a beloved stand-alone novel into a series, writing about sisters and mothers, her favorite books of all time, Amelia Bassano (and those rumors), and more. Featured books: The Book of Magic, The Rules of Magic, Magic Lessons, Practical Magic, The Dove Keepers and The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Frankenstein by Mary Shelly and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Produced/hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

The Innovative Mindset
Climate activist and award-winning actor Aria McKenna on the crucial story of our time

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 65:06


Aria McKenna on storytelling and world-changing for the climate and the environment This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. I've used these techniques to get featured in magazines, newspapers, and podcasts. They work! https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Aria McKenna is an actress, writer and producer turned climate advocate. She founded Global Cooling Productions and is in development with several mission-driven projects. She trained with Al Gore as part of his Climate Reality Leadership Corps and has studied, worked, and presented with organizations such as The American Sustainable Business Council, Citizens Climate Lobby, American Renewable Energy DAY, EarthX, and the Cooperative Impact Social Innovation Conference. She is currently working with the Healthy Climate Alliance and the Planetary Restoration Action Group to advocate for an emergency three-pronged approach to restore the climate to safe levels. Connect with Aria Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/revolutionearth/ Website: https://www.ariamckenna.com/index.html Petition on Climate change  Global Cooling Productions' Patreon  Episode transcript [00:00:00] Aria McKenna: I feel like there is an incredible power in storytelling and that the media can be used to help pull people along and to engage them long enough to get them to have a deeper understanding of the situation. And to care deeply about changing it. [00:00:29] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:49] I love it and have been using it to write, create, and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative [00:01:00] mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word, and now let's get to the show. [00:01:13] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg, I'm your host, and I'm thrilled that you're here. I'm also thrilled and honored and think this is so important. So you need to know that to welcome my guests this week. Aria McKenna is an actress writer and producer turned climate. [00:01:32] Catnip to me, as you know, she founded global cooling productions and is in development with several mission-driven projects. She trained with Al gore as part of his climate reality leadership core and a studied work and presented with organizations such as the American sustainable business council. [00:01:49] Citizens' climate lobby, American renewable energy day, earth X, and the cooperative impact social innovation conference. She's currently working with the healthy climate Alliance and the [00:02:00] planetary restoration action group to advocate for an emergency three pronged approach to restore the climate to safe levels, such important work aria. [00:02:09] I'm so glad that you're here. I'm so glad that you're doing the work that you're doing. Welcome. [00:02:14] Aria McKenna: Thank you so much. It is great to be here. I have really been enjoying doing my research on you and seeing what amazing work you're doing and the commonalities we have with the voiceover background as well. I really love your, oh, [00:02:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: thank you so much. [00:02:32] And we have another commonality. I worked for years for the globe program, which was a, it's a joint NASA NOAA NSF program. K through 12, designed to teach students all about, uh, the environment, the earth. And it was, the idea was started by Al gore in his book earth in the balance. So we sort of have Al gore in common as well. [00:02:53] Oh, [00:02:53] Aria McKenna: wow. I love that. Yeah. I know you've been doing some education. I also did some educational outreach [00:03:00] with the Cleo Institute. Ah, fabulous. [00:03:04] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It's such important work. It really is. And, and, you know, I want to just, I want to jump right in and I mean, obviously this is important work and we know that the G 20 summit is happening at the end of the week in Rome. [00:03:19] So I want to talk to you about what, what importance you think the these countries can play in bringing the climate back to safe level. [00:03:31] Aria McKenna: Yeah, no, thank you. Um, it is absolutely huge and so important that we get countries on the same page together to create a collective action plan that actually has the power to restore the current. [00:03:53] Um, as part of a healthy climate Alliance and the political, the planetary [00:04:00] restoration action group, we are working to help forward the mission of educating people about the difference between climate restoration and reducing climate change to less than two degrees, which right now is what the United nations has agreed to. [00:04:21] So we know that there has been some work in, in this direction. It's wonderful to get countries on board, agreeing to a goal, to deal with the climate. First of all, you know, let's just say that first. Um, but right now their goal is to reach net zero by 2050. And we know that carbon dioxide and methane do not just automatically disappear from the atmosphere on their own. [00:04:55] So we are continuing to put greenhouse gases [00:05:00] in the atmosphere. And so it's going to keep on warming and we know that warming is leading to extreme weather. Uh, what happened with hurricane Ida caused $95 billion. Just that one. So we need investments in turning this around. So what we're advocating for is a three-pronged approach to restoring the climate to safe levels. [00:05:31] Those are levels that are pre-industrial levels that humans have lived safely within for, for some time. So if we actually brought carbon dioxide down to 300 parts per million, then that is actually known to be safe. Uh, right now we've got, uh, three 50 has been a goal where we know that if you go [00:06:00] beyond three 50, it's not safe. [00:06:03] So we actually have the power, not only to reduce our carbon footprint and to reduce the amount of methane we put in the atmosphere, but we actually have the power to draw those greenhouse gases down. And as we draw them down, we help reduce warming. So those are two major steps that need to happen to move us toward climate restoration. [00:06:30] And then the planetary restoration action group has introduced the third step, which is the emergency mitigation that we need to do in response to how quickly the Arctic is melting. So right now we're looking at massive sea level rise, which is a serious environmental injustice situation, especially when it comes to small [00:07:00] nations of Florida is, is, you know, half of Florida is going to be gone. [00:07:05] So we need to deal with sea level rise as well. So if we just have goals to reduce warming, we are not doing anything to reverse sea level rise or to. Or to deal with the, uh, massive injustice that is thrust upon small countries around the world. So we are advocating for a three pronged approach that deals with the emergency situation of an escalating crisis that has completely disrupted our weather systems and led to flooding, uh, droughts, fires, uh, all around the world. [00:07:51] So, um, you know, we really need to change that goal, create a positive vision for the future and to really pull, [00:08:00] pull ourselves up by the bootstraps and create a plan to turn the situation around so that we can have a safe planet for our children. [00:08:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. Um, I'm taking all this in. Cause it's it. And here's the thing I've worked in earth science when I worked at NASA for years. [00:08:24] And so I understand all of this and I, and I get it and yet it's still, it's still overwhelming. And so the thing that I come up against, whenever I'm talking to anybody about climate change and the climate crisis is how do we get people to think long-term about this? Because we can look at today's weather and go, oh, it rained today, but it didn't rain yesterday and it's not going to rain tomorrow. [00:08:50] Those changes are easy. But when we're looking at the climate, we're looking at long-term trends and patterns and how do, how do we come up with, and, [00:09:00] and what are your thoughts on this? How do we come up with innovative ways? To get people to understand the causality there that the climate changing is what's causing some of these extreme weather events and, and wildfires and all of these other catastrophes that you mentioned just a minute ago, how do we get that causality to connect in people's minds? [00:09:27] Aria McKenna: I think that's an excellent question. And I have so many different things that pop into my mind in response to that. Uh, one of them is the importance of keeping these things in people's mind, because exactly what you say. We have these disasters and when it's on the news, people go, oh my God. Wow. Oh, I can't believe that. [00:09:53] And of course, if you're personally affected by it, that that's, that's, uh, affecting you on a whole nother level. Right. [00:10:00] But once it goes away, You go on to other things, you start thinking about other things you think about, you know, what am I going to eat? How am I going to take care of my kids? What am I going to do about these immediate things that are right in front of me? [00:10:16] So we need that kind of long-term engagement that helps to educate people and emotionally charged them to take the kinds of actions that will actually make a difference in the world. Right? So for me, personally, my personal approach to this is that I feel like there is an incredible power in storytelling and that the media can be used to help pull people along and to engage them. [00:10:58] Long enough to [00:11:00] get them to have a deeper understanding of the situation and to care deeply about changing it. So, you know, I've got some projects that I'm working on. I'm not going to go into full detail, but I do want to say that I think that when we tell stories, people, people care about people and they care about their children. [00:11:29] And, and so many people care about the planet that we live on. Right. And that's across political divides. Unfortunately, the issue of climate has absolutely been politicized. There has been a lot of misinformation propagated by the fossil fuel industry and, and other industries that, that gain to profit. [00:11:55] Right? So we're fighting a lot when it comes [00:12:00] to focusing on climate, some people are gonna hop a board, they're gonna get the connections and they're going to take action in response to those connections. But there are other people who might not get the connection ever, honestly, It might take them a lot longer. [00:12:23] And the good news is that I think there are multiple ways in because the same things that are affecting the climate are also affecting our drinking water. They're affecting the air that we breathe. They're creating childhood cancer. They are, uh, affecting people's breathing asthma emphysema. There are so many direct causalities and environmental injustices tied to [00:13:00] the fossil fuel industry. [00:13:02] That I do think that when we educate people about these issues as well, we end up getting double benefits. So I think that the, one of the things that's difficult with us when it comes to the news cycle is you talk about how many people are affected when it's a statistic. And when it's an overwhelming statistic, we shy away from it. [00:13:26] It feels overwhelming. There's nothing we can do about it. But if you tell a story about one person and how they're affected, and people care about that person and they can make connections to their own lives and how they're being affected that I think has more power when it comes to. Energizing people and inspiring people to make personal changes. [00:13:55] Does that make sense? [00:13:57] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It does. It does. Absolutely. It's [00:14:00] just the thing that, the thing that I'm concerned about as I think about what you're saying, and as I take it in is, again, that notion of, if somebody is going through surviving through a hurricane, are they going, oh, well this is due to climate change or are they going, oh, let me get to higher ground or lower ground or whatever it is I need to do to protect myself and my family. [00:14:24] Right. And then later that connection that you're talking about has to be restated or reinforced because they might not know. And so what do we do? Oh, hold on one sec. [00:14:44] I had to cough there for a second. Didn't want to cough. What do we do? To, I don't want to say befriend, but to align with these industries that traditionally either don't [00:15:00] care or don't see that, that the work that they're doing is causing. These grave and big changes on a planetary scale, right? The fossil fuel industry, isn't going anywhere for the foreseeable future. [00:15:15] Is there a way in your mind to get them to change their practices? I mean, I know farmers who are stopping doing dairy production, cow, you know, keeping cows and cows are some of the biggest methane producers. And there've been new farmers in the news recently that have said, you know what, I'm going completely vegan. [00:15:37] I'm just going to go to plant farming, things like that are happening. Do you think it is possible for the fossil fuel industry to pivot? And if so, what would it take for them to start looking at new ways, more sustainable ways of treating our home planet? Kind of. [00:15:56] Aria McKenna: Well, I think that's where the [00:16:00] international community comes in for one thing right now. [00:16:04] So many governments are subsidizing the fossil fuel industry to the tune of billions and billions of dollars. Right? [00:16:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: So, [00:16:14] Aria McKenna: and they're not giving the same kinds of funds to clean energy in general, you know, at least in this country, it's not par or it hasn't been in the past. So those are things that we need to change. [00:16:29] And fortunately, the cost for electric, uh, you know, uh, solar energy, wind, energy, electrification, all of these things, the costs have gone down so much that right now, there is so much financial incentive to actually change their ways. So it's actually, I'm trying to remember where I had read this. Oh shoot. [00:16:58] There was, um, [00:17:00] a recent, there was, there was a meeting and it had to do with the fossil fuel industry and they actually ended up coming to the conclusion. There were some, oh, I don't know if I tell the story properly. I'm sorry. Um, but, but the bottom line, I'll just say that they had come to the conclusion. [00:17:21] They realized that it was no longer in their financial benefit to continue business as usual. And there were some stakeholders who actually drew a line and said, no, we have to change. [00:17:35] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that I, that gives me some hope. It really does, you know, and you know, it's interesting what you were saying about, I have so many questions. [00:17:43] Uh, well, you were saying about storytelling is so true that if that, if we talk about, uh, climate change on a, on a global scale, or even on a city scale, when I work with kids and we'll talk about, uh, Cape town and then breaching getting very close to date day zero, where they [00:18:00] have no more water supplies and they, they keep pushing it back because the rain comes just enough. [00:18:07] The kids themselves, I was working. Remember I was working with a bunch of sixth graders. They got it. And then they went, can we ship water to. And it was a really interesting question, because then we talked about what it would take, the, the resources it would take to ship water from at this point, this was Washington DC to Cape town, South Africa. [00:18:28] And could we ship enough and all of that. And, and so talking about these stories, got the kids really interested in what they could do. They're tomorrow's decision makers. And I know that you, as you said, love stories and you started as an actor and you've transformed your mission. It sounds like to tell stories about the planet about climate. [00:18:52] And I'm just wondering, how did that happen? What made you go from I'm a performer [00:19:00] on stage or screen to I'm an advocate and an activist on behalf of the planet and the. [00:19:07] Aria McKenna: Yeah. No, thank you. Um, I'm I'm glad you asked that. Um, I'll just say to, to start off, I'll say that I grew up in Florida and Florida is absolutely beautiful. [00:19:24] I'm I'm I'm partial. Okay. We've got these incredible beautiful crystal clear Springs. We've got these incredible lakes. It's, it's a water place. Obviously we're a peninsula. I grew up in the water, swimming in the Gulf of Mexico. Uh, so these things are really important to me. I've always loved nature. Uh, it it's been a solace to me, so I actually was, you know, play, uh, down in key west. [00:19:54] I was playing Betty in summers in, in, uh, Betty summer vacation [00:20:00] and I was Snoopy diving. Um, and a, a diving, Snoopy diving. It's amazing. You don't have to get a scuba diving certificate. All you, you can be in your bathing suit and you put a snorkel on and the snorkel goes all the way up and it connects to a boat that's filled with oxygen. [00:20:25] So you just breathe the air and the boat just, it's like a little raft and it floats above you. So you can go way down. And I was exploring, uh, the world's third largest coral reef there. It was so beautiful. It was one of the most incredible experiences of my life to be down there and to feel like a fish. [00:20:47] It was, it was incredible. And I was down for about a half an hour. And when I came up, I just was like, oh my God, I'm so affected by this. This was so beautiful. [00:21:00] So incredible. And the guy. Told me that the water, her warming, he's the first person who told me about global warming. And he said that those coral reefs were dying because of the warming oceans. [00:21:20] And it just devastated me. I couldn't believe that something like this was going to be wiped out and I'd always wanted to have a daughter. It was just one of those things that was in me. And I remember that was one of my first thoughts was someday when I do have a daughter, is she going to be able to experience this? [00:21:46] This is something I would love to share with my kids, but this, this could be gone by that. So that just affected me a lot. And, but I, I went on, I did the [00:22:00] play, I moved to New York city. I started my career and moved there right before September 11th, which was a pretty intense time. Um, but the entire time I was up in New York and I remember there was the Gulf oil spill that happened, and that was absolutely devastating. [00:22:22] And meanwhile, being up in Brooklyn, I found I was having a lot of difficulty breathing, uh, because of all the traffic and, uh, you know, just the, the air pollution. And there was an oil spill up in the Queens area and I was living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and every time I went over to the water, I struggled to breathe just because of that. [00:22:47] So I had health repercussions and. I also simultaneously was seeing the Gulf of Mexico be absolutely devastated and destroyed. And that was my childhood [00:23:00] playground, you know, so just seeing so much, you know, my health being robbed by the fossil fuel industry, uh, the devastation and the goal, knowing, you know, seeing sea turtles that I knew were, were being devastated by, uh, the, the horrible oil spill. [00:23:20] So just the passion kept building in me. And, you know, after I moved to New York, I also had my daughter, my daughter Phoenix was, was born, um, after I moved to New York. So of course, as a mom, your sense of responsibility for the world that they're living in. Just becomes so much greater. So it, you know, it was a struggle back and forth for some time. [00:23:51] And I just, it just, I was getting work in TV and [00:24:00] I just started feeling like, what is the impact of the work that I'm doing? This is not having the impact that I want to have. I felt like I was being cast in things that just perpetuated fear in people and that didn't really have lasting redeeming value. [00:24:20] And then what was most important to me was to have a safe planet for my daughter into the future. And I felt like I just needed to stop standing on the sideline and I needed to get involved and I needed to figure out what it was that I could do. And so in that process, that's when I had this epiphany and I was like, you know, what, what if I created a TV series that. [00:24:48] Uh, dug into these issues that focus on the issues that matter to me and give me that opportunity to create work that I could [00:25:00] really be proud of. And so, but I didn't know nearly as much as I know now then. And so that started a process of, okay, I've got a research, I've got to learn a lot in order to be able to create the series. [00:25:16] And the series that I was working on is, is very much focused on what could that beautiful future world look like if we could turn this around. And so I had to do research into what would it take in order to. Transform this horrible trajectory that we're on right now and turn it into a much more positive trajectory. [00:25:47] So that's when I started, uh, trained with Al gore, I did the climate reality leadership Corps and that just led to all kinds of other things. And I think one of the things that has been, [00:26:00] uh, really inspiring and taught me a lot is working with the American renewable energy day. It's like a week long summit. [00:26:09] Uh, I went there, I had been invited to be on a panel, um, and. There are so many people they're doing incredible work. People who really need to be supported as well. And that's really where I learned what it would actually take technologically scientifically all the fat. Um, and then of course, we've got the cultural and the society, uh, aspects as well in order to support the types of leadership decisions that we need. [00:26:43] Um, and the industrial decisions that we need. Um, you know, sorry. So I've learned a lot in the process, so that's, that's basically where that started. [00:26:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. I, you know, those kinds of things, [00:27:00] those kinds of epiphany's obviously it changed, it changed the trajectory of your life and it's changed how, how you're working in the world, which I, which I think is incredible and amazing. [00:27:13] And I love and. I keep coming back to this. How do we do it? You know, you're a storyteller. What, what role do you see? Art storytelling, music playing in change, opening minds, changing minds. I'm not sure exactly what the right way of asking the question is, but I mean, music makes me cry on a regular basis. [00:27:39] It can also inspire me. How can, how can music do it? How can storytelling do it? How can art do it? How can we use them to inspire people, to look at the earth and the climate in a different way than they otherwise might? [00:27:59] Aria McKenna: I think the [00:28:00] important part of it is that they help us to reconnect with our humanity and that ultimately caring about the planet, caring about the next generations, caring about other people on the planet. [00:28:16] You know, we need to be connected to our humanity, to our hearts in order to care enough, to do some lifting, you know, to understand that, you know, honestly, our, our personal choices are connected to this, but also what's really important is who we vote for. Um, You know, we, we need leadership. That's going to take us in the right direction and we need an educated populace in, in that. [00:28:53] So, you know, my, my part of it, when it comes to storytelling, um, I'll just talk about, without going into too [00:29:00] many details, I'll say that I have a character in, um, one of the main stories that I'm really looking for, that I, that I started working on back then, that I'm in development process with, uh, that character, first of all, is a conservative. [00:29:19] So that is, you know, a party that, uh, unfortunately there are some people within the conservative party who have been spreading a lot of climate denial. And so she starts the story off this as being really uncertain. She doesn't know what to believe and, and what to think, but she's an intelligent, compassionate, human being. [00:29:44] And so as that character gets educated, that also educates the public. Um, and I'm, I'm hoping that we've created a character that a lot of people are going to be able to identify with as [00:30:00] well and care about. Um, I think when people can see themselves in somebody else, then that helps open their heart up to another way of thinking and having some compassion, uh, getting over their prejudgments. [00:30:22] And so. I feel like that's really important to me in the storytelling as well is to create characters that both sides can identify with and not to paint people of the conservative party, for instance, in a bad light to, to understand that we're all human beings and that we all have our strengths. We all have our weaknesses and we all have room to grow. [00:30:59] You know, [00:31:00] we have opportunities for redemption. And so, so, so that's, that's one way in that I really personally identify with, and that I'm really looking forward to getting out there and being able to move to fruition where I can have some, some deeper, more public conversations about the details of the story that I've, that I've been building. [00:31:26] But I do think that also on a personal level, the more individuals start having those conversations about their own experiences, the way they're effected by the climate prices, the way they are affected by pollution, et cetera, and the things that they are personally doing in order to turn this around, hopefully that also will help give people that impetus and help bring people together at a time where people are unfortunately incredibly divided. [00:31:58] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, absolutely. [00:32:00] They, they, they, there is this incredible division. Among, uh, people who believe one way, people who believe in other way, but, but the sort of looking at it, it's funny coming back to Al gore and inconvenient truth, looking at the objective truth, we can look at the numbers and save things have been happening. [00:32:18] They've been happening, especially in the last 50 years. Looking at the global mean temperature change since 1870 to today is that it's the numbers tell a very stark story. And yet if you say to me that, uh, the UN or the G 20, whoever it is said, oh, we're going to be okay with a two degree, uh, rise in temperatures where we're looking at it for that. [00:32:48] Then how, because I, if I'm, if I'm somebody who doesn't know two degrees doesn't seem a lot, but it is right. It changed so much changes even with that two degrees. [00:33:00] So how do we get that? Notion across that, that any change going up is going to make a lot of difference, not only to us, but to the plants and, and the animals and all of the ecosystems on the planet. [00:33:21] Aria McKenna: That is an excellent question. I really appreciate that. I think that, well, for one thing, you know, let's be clear, it's not two degrees Fahrenheit. It's two degrees Celsius, which is a bigger number, but also unfortunately there have been. So many natural disasters that we've been seeing lately. And fortunately, they are finally starting to talk about it on the news. [00:33:55] It has taken so long to get them to this point where they're [00:34:00] actually speaking about it in solid terms for so long, we've had, you know, 98% consensus on manmade, global warming, and yet they've been presenting it as if it's a 50 50 concept. And we're really not sure let's talk someone who thinks this and someone who thinks that and give them equal weight in the discussion. [00:34:22] And, and of course they don't have equal weight. So we know that. Um, so fortunately some of the mainstream news narrative is finally starting to change. I really wish they had done this a long time ago. Sure. But I am hoping that that does make an impact. I think that the awareness and the concern about these issues definitely is on the rise. [00:34:49] And as more people are affected by it, and mainstream news media is starting to have more conversations about this. Hopefully that's definitely going to help people [00:35:00] understand, okay, we're starting to experience this right now. You know, I have a crop. This crop is dying because it's not getting enough water. [00:35:08] Or I have a crop it's completely devastated because we experienced this flooding. I mean, the flooding up in New York city that happened recently, I could not believe how quickly that came back came, came down. Hmm. I mean, it was insane to watch a video of someone who started filming outside their window, just as it kind of started. [00:35:38] And within a matter of minutes, they had cars just starting to float away on the street right next to them and bang into houses next to them. So I think that unfortunately it is taking a real life, wake up call in order to get people to pay attention. [00:36:00] So they're going to need to start connecting the dots with who they vote for the policies that they support and start taking some more responsibility in how people show up to the voting polls in order to make a difference for their children's future for one thing. [00:36:16] But, you know, let's be clear. It's not just our children's future. Our future, it's our present. It's our, now it's everything. It's our food systems. It's our health. It's, [00:36:29] Izolda Trakhtenberg: uh, [00:36:31] Aria McKenna: you know, when you have people, you have, you know, I read some time ago about a bacteria that because of the warming started affecting these cows and they just keeled over. [00:36:48] I mean, just, I will check it, remember the exact number. It was like hundreds or thousands of cows that just died because of the heat. So these types of things are happening. [00:37:00] And we just need to shine more of a light on it. My friend, Betsy Rosenberg, uh, actually has something that she's working on called green TV. [00:37:12] Uh, just wanna throw that out there too, because she's been trying for years and years to get the mainstream news media to pay more attention and start covering climate on more of a regular basis. And now she's having the opportunity to have those conversations to start shining a light on the things that are happening and on the. [00:37:32] Solutions that we have at our fingertips and the people and the companies who are working to forward those solutions. So you may just need to put a lot more support behind those solutions, stop funding and fueling and supporting all of the things that are contributing to the problem. Start voting for politicians who are actually gonna make a difference. [00:37:53] And then people who are into agriculture. This is one of the things that I love so much [00:38:00] is that regenerative farming and getting rid of industrial agriculture has. Enormous potential for being able to draw down carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. And then it has the by-product of making the soil healthier, making them more resilient to droughts and floods, uh, helping to regulate our weather systems. [00:38:32] I mean, it's, it's like a miracle, but the other thing that it does is when you're not using the industrial fertilizers, then you don't have this, this runoff with. So what happens is with industrialized agriculture, they're using. These chemicals that actually contribute to global warming just through the creation of produce even is [00:39:00] contributing to global warming because of industrial agriculture. [00:39:03] But if you have regenerative farming techniques, then when we are growing our produce, not only are we reducing our carbon footprint, but when it rains, we don't have as much runoff. And the runoff that occurs is not putting fertilizers into our waterways. Those, the fertilizers that go into our waterways, then go down into the oceans. [00:39:25] The Gulf of Mexico right now has fish kills thousands of miles long. Because of industrial fertilizers that have made its way from agricultural systems into the waterways and created massive algae blooms that have absorbed all the oxygen and killed our wildlife, killed our fish. So that affects fishing industry. [00:39:50] Which affects the economy, which affects people's food supplies. So it's a big circle. And the more we understand that circle [00:40:00] and we understand what the solutions are, the more people will get on board and say, yes, of course, I'm going to switch my farm to being a regenerative farm system. That's more compassionate, more humane creating food that has more vitamins, more nutrients in it. [00:40:19] And that basically makes me happier because it's, it's a system that's more respectful of nature and its systems, and that can take care of itself better. It's it's wonderful. Really, the more we learn. [00:40:39] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. Before we started, before we started recording this episode, I said that to you didn't I was like, yeah, I'm going to be saying yes. Yes, yes, yes, yes, absolutely. To pretty much everything you say. It's interesting though, the soil is a carbon sink and we get that. I understand the soil as a carbon sink and certainly global climate [00:41:00] change with the permafrost melting. [00:41:02] There's a lot more methane and CO2 being released back up into the atmosphere. So there, there, there, I, your point is well taken that it's a cycle we can look at. Uh, animals versus plants breathing, right? Plants breathe in CO2, breathe out oxygen. We breathe in oxygen and breathe out CO2. So there's a lot of, there are a lot of these systems, these cycles that go on and I make no secret of the fact that I'm vegan. [00:41:25] So thinking about the notion of the fish in the ocean, I want to leave the fish in the ocean there. And I understand that there are that there are industries that, that, um, that slaughter animals and, and have animals as part of the food and eating process. And yet when we're talking about some of these processes, like regenerative, agriculture, and planting for the soil that you have, rather than the soil that you want so that you don't need fertilizer, we're talking about [00:42:00] a real shift. [00:42:01] Right. We, in order, in order to shift our awareness and our focus to looking at the biome, looking at the bias, fear, the whole planet and seeing what needs to happen, what we need to do to make these changes. It takes, it takes a, it takes a massive shift in the minds of everybody, people who farm and people who eat. [00:42:24] And if we're not farmers, we're all eaters. So how do we do that? Right? What can, what can an average person do? And you said vote and that's great. But today, right now, if I am Jane Q public, and I want to start doing something, what's your thought, what, what can I do right now today to make a difference? [00:42:47] Aria McKenna: That's an excellent question. Um, I mean, for me personally, I think the biggest difference you can make is that if you can, uh, switch to solar panels, if you can. [00:43:00] Get off your gas, guzzler and switch to an electric vehicle. Uh, those are the types of things that of course make a really big impact. Uh, you get to dramatically cut your carbon footprint, and I've certainly heard people out there say, oh, but you know, there's problems with, with battery storage. [00:43:23] And there is, there are, it's not perfect. There, there are costs to mining. There are issues, but on the whole, you are still making a dramatic impact, not only on your carbon footprint, but you're also reducing dependence on something that is constantly polluting. So to create that initial device, there can be some costs to that, but then once you've got it made, it's just constantly generating electricity without continuing.[00:44:00] [00:44:00] To add to the problem while that electricity is being generated. So it's a, it's a huge shift in the right direction. Um, I do, I'm going to be perfectly transparent here. I was vegan for seven years and I created, I developed, created, I developed some. Issues. And so I had to stop being vegan. So for me personally, I think they're just, people have different bodies and need different things. [00:44:28] And I hated it so much when I was told I had to start eating meat again, and I, and I fought against it, but I did start feeling better after I made that switch. So that's for me. And so, because of that, I'm so supportive of regenerative agriculture as well, because not only is it much more compassionate to the animals, but it also drastically reduces the carbon [00:45:00] footprint of those animals. [00:45:02] When you do eat. If, if you are a mediator, so you can reduce your consumption and you can also be really conscious of where that food comes from, whether it's produce or whether it is animal and, uh, how that food is treated. It's not, uh, easy necessarily to find all those sources, but grass fed for instance, is definitely better than something that isn't grass fed. [00:45:32] Uh, you know, so that those are the personal choices that I, that I've had to make. Um, so yeah, uh, and also of course, recycling makes a difference. It's not being utilized at the scale that it really should be utilized at. But you definitely just want to have that consciousness, you know, the whole reduce, reuse, recycle, uh, that does make a [00:46:00] difference. [00:46:00] And I'm not sure what else to say there right now. [00:46:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It is interesting. Isn't it? When, when, when someone says, Hey, what do you think puts you on the spot? It can be a little bit challenging, but at the same time, if we were to make some of these things habits, it would change today, but it would also change in the longterm. [00:46:21] And one of the things that I advocate for is very simple. When you wash your hands, get your hands wet. Turn off the faucet. Don't keep the water running, you know, simple things like that. Every, I think it's every minute the water runs down the sink. It's eight, it's eight gallons of water. That's crazy to me. [00:46:39] I know it's crazy. We can, we can do the same when we're brushing our teeth. We can water our plants, uh, in the evening or in the early morning before the water will evaporate because of the sunshine. There's a lot of, there's a lot of stuff that you can do today right now. Yeah. That won't make that won't make a, [00:47:00] a huge dent in your time, but will make a huge dent in saving water, for example. [00:47:07] Aria McKenna: Yeah, definitely. Definitely. It's it's that thing or the more, you know, the more you're able to do, and there are so many different areas that are affected by this. So in general, like one of the areas I think is really important is just being a conscious consumer, learning about the companies that. Bye from. [00:47:27] There are some companies that are, you know, have zero waste facilities that are powered a hundred percent by clean electricity when they are operating. Uh, you know, so things like that make a, make a huge difference. Just reading, reading, reading, uh, and buying glass containers instead of plastic, whenever possible, those types of [00:48:00] choices make it make a big difference. [00:48:02] Not wasting papers. You know, things [00:48:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: like that. Absolutely. There, I mean, there are things, you know, maybe what I'll do is put together a list of certain things and put them in the, in the show notes. So that if you're interested in knowing more about the things you can do right now today to start making a difference, you'll have them in the show notes. [00:48:22] If you're listening to this, I do want to ask you something aria that I, that you mentioned something that I was like, oh, this is so cool because I don't tend to have a very I'm, I'm an optimist, but I don't tend to have a very positive vision for the future, unless things change drastically. And you said that a positive visit vision of the future is something that you want to promote that it's possible. [00:48:43] And so I was wondering how. Can that happen? How can a positive vision, because I don't know if you know who Wendy Hapgood is. She is the co-founder and director of the wild tomorrow fund. And she was on the podcast a few weeks ago, and she was talking about the same thing that, that we want to be [00:49:00] looking at a positive vision for the future, as a way of, of bringing more people into awareness about, about where we are with wildlife and the planet and, and the environment and climate. [00:49:13] What do you think that a positive vision for the future can do to mobilize people and, and to, to sort of bring all of us out of a certain sense of apathy and hopelessness? Excellent [00:49:27] Aria McKenna: question. [00:49:28] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Um, [00:49:31] Aria McKenna: um, well, I mean, I, you, you said it for, at first, I mean, whenever you're feeling hopelessness, that obviously does create a sense of apathy, which disempowered. [00:49:44] Right. And unfortunately the environmental movement for some time in order to make people aware of what a serious situation we're in, the environmental movement has painted some pretty dire pictures of the [00:50:00] direction we're heading, because unfortunately that has been the direction that we're heading. So they've been perfectly honest and they've been trying to mobilize people through fear. [00:50:09] And I think that's very understandable, but unfortunately it hasn't been yet. And I think it's done more to turn people away from the movement because people don't want to be bombed out. We're we're living in a very overwhelming world right now. There are a lot of things to be concerned about and to be afraid of. [00:50:32] I hate to say that, but, but it's true. So when you add one more thing to it, and it's something that seems a little far down the road, it's, it's not going to be as important to you, or you're going to turn away from it because you're trying to protect your health. You know, you're trying to protect your mental health. [00:50:50] So I it's, it's a shame, but I think that has been the direction we have gone. And that's been the reason why we haven't been as successful as we [00:51:00] absolutely need to be. So. It does take some concerted effort to change that dynamic. And so there were two things I'm involved with that I think are helping to move things in the right direction. [00:51:14] And one is the work with the healthy climate Alliance and with the planetary restoration action group, because they are focused on changing the goal of the United nations from let's reduce the devastating warming that we're experienced to something that might be survivable. If we're lucky to let's actually restore the planet, let's restore the climate. [00:51:38] Let's create something that we can be proud of to hand down to our next generation. We have to focus on what we want when we're creating those goals. And fortunately they have enough scientists. They have enough technology to have enough understanding to create a strategy. To actually deal with that. [00:51:59] [00:52:00] And to be honest with what kind of strategy it is that we need in order to turn this thing around. So, you know, so that's, that's one thing, um, I just wanted to say really quickly, uh, Peter for Koski has been such an inspiration to me. He's the one who brought me into the healthy climate Alliance. And he founded the foundation for climate restoration and he's one of the most optimistic, hopeful guys that I know who happens to be in the environmental movement. [00:52:31] And so that's been incredibly helpful to me because I think that being an environmentalist can be incredibly difficult. Sometimes there have definitely been times I've felt that kind of apathy and futility and frustration and fear about the direction we're heading. Yeah. So, um, so, so that's one thing I just wanted to say that I think that the work that they're [00:53:00] doing is incredibly important to it adequately understands the danger of the situation that we're in while also creating a vision for the future by changing our goals. [00:53:12] To let's reduce it from less, let's reduce damage to let's prevent let's restore let's regenerate. Let's get our ecosystems back. Let's focus on the natural systems, the technological systems, everything it is that we can do to help turn this situation around and respect the earth and protect our environment. [00:53:36] So I think that's incredibly important. And then the other thing is that through storytelling, that's what I'm focused on with, with revolution earth, with my TV series is to, uh, have an equal recognition of the dangerous situation we are currently in while also creating a beautiful, hopeful vision [00:54:00] for the future that we can all work [00:54:01] Izolda Trakhtenberg: toward. [00:54:06] I feel like going and seen. Wow. Yes, yes, absolutely. I that's just lovely and I can't wait. I can't wait to, uh, to, to watch revolution earth when it comes out. That's going to be amazing. Uh, thank you, aria. I'm so, so grateful that you took the time to. Beyond the show and to talk about what, obviously to me is a very crucial and critically important subject climate change and, and saving the planet. [00:54:37] Let's face it let's, you know, and, and actually, you know, it's interesting to me is that it's not saving the planet. The planet will be fine for another four and a half to 5 billion years. It's not the planet we're saving. The planet has gone through lots of changes. It's the plants and the animals that live on the planet, including us, that we are working to save. [00:54:55] And that's something that we need to keep in mind. Whenever we say, save the earth. Now the [00:55:00] earth will be fine. I'm selfish. I want the planet for, for me, for my cats, for the elephants, for the tigers, for the dolphins, for the birds, for the plants, for all of us. And, and I want it to be healthy for that. [00:55:14] Cause the planet, the earth will be fine for billions more years. So it's interesting to me that we think about it in those terms and it's important and I'm so glad that you're doing. To tell these stories, aria it's. So it's crucial. And, and I think it's going to be critical to our survival. So I'm, I'm grateful to you. [00:55:34] And I, I, I wanted to, if you wouldn't mind, uh, people learn differently and I know all of the information about where people can find you is going to be in the show notes, but I'd love it. If you would just list where people can find Arya, McKenna, and the incredible work that she's done. [00:55:49] Aria McKenna: Uh, thank you so much is older. [00:55:52] Uh, first of all, really great to be on the show. I'm so happy to meet you so impressed with the work that you are doing. [00:56:00] And, um, so yeah, I would say, please go to global cooling productions.com. You can learn more about the production company that I am launching in order to, uh, produce these projects that I'm working on. [00:56:18] And I would really appreciate it. If you went and supported my. Patrion page as well, which is going to be in the show notes and, uh, yeah. And, and reach out to me on Facebook, uh, you know, just all those links that will be below. Please do I appreciate the follows, uh, any contributions that that can be made would be greatly appreciated to help continue the work and, uh, yeah, just thank you so much for having me on the show and we will be putting together and open. [00:56:59] [00:57:00] As well, we don't have the site up point yet. Uh, but by the time this episode airs, there probably should be an open letter online, uh, to support, uh, that would go to members of the and also, uh, various world leaders at cop 26. So we really would love to get some, some public support for changing the international goals from less reduced, dangerous warming. [00:57:32] To less actually restore the climate and utilize the technology and the organizations that are already out there that are already existing, that are doing amazing work to restore the soil, restore the oceans, uh, through ocean permaculture, to reduce ocean acidification and help draw down downward carbon dioxide there. [00:57:53] Um, you know, there's so much that can be done that is being done by amazing people and [00:58:00] going there and supporting means so much to, to all of us and to our children. [00:58:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And that is that. Yes, absolutely. And there's, this is something that you and I talked about before. I feel a little bit like I'm about to shill for you, but I'm going to do it anyway. [00:58:18] You and I talked about this before we started recording the episode and that is that people who do the work that you're doing on behalf of the climate, or about, uh, on behalf of wildlife or on behalf of the plants or whatever it is trying to restore, trying to save, trying to nourish and nurture. A lot of people think, oh yeah, I'm doing it for the love of the game. [00:58:41] And other people will say, yes, you're doing it for the love of the game. Good for you. But honestly, let's, let's be very real. You still have to pay your rent, even if you're doing it for the love of the game, you still got to buy Catlett or at least I do. So, uh, I feel a little bit like this is a telethon, but it isn't so seriously if [00:59:00] it, you know, when you, if you're listening to this and you're kind of going, oh, should I have that latte? [00:59:06] That that latte could go to, uh, to some, to some activists, somewhere who was doing the work that will help all of us. That's something to think about. And, uh, I'm gonna, I'm going to shut my mouth on that now, but it's something that I really I've been thinking a lot more about recently that notion of, for the love of the game does not mean you are independently wealthy. [00:59:27] So anyway, [00:59:29] Aria McKenna: thank you. I absolutely. Yes, this is [00:59:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: true. Absolutely. I mean, it, it just is we're, you know, those of us, uh, who shine the light, like me and, and other people I know who are in the podcasting space, for example, you know, we ha I have an opportunity to talk to people like you who are doing this incredible work, but I always feel like. [00:59:47] Yay. And you know, you aria and I, and in so many of us, uh, so many other activists in one way or another, still have to buy cat food. Uh, so anyway, uh, but I, I have just [01:00:00] one more question cause, cause you and I could keep talking and talking and talking to you and you'll have to come back after the launch of the whole global cooling productions or maybe when, when revolution earth comes out. [01:00:10] I'd love to have you back to talk about it some more. I have. Oh good. Yay. I have one more question that I ask everybody who comes on the show and it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some profound answers. And the question is this. If you had an airplane, a, an, uh, an environmentally friendly airplane, uh, that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say. [01:00:36] Oh, [01:00:37] Aria McKenna: bye. That is a fantastic question. How to answer that? Oh my goodness. Um, geez and environmentally friendly airplane. First of all, that would be fantastic. I'm looking forward to that. Um, you know, it's, [01:01:00] it's interesting. This is going to sound, I feel like this is going to really sound [01:01:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: hokey. I love hope. [01:01:08] Aria McKenna: I just, I feel like what connects all of this, the work that we're doing is, is just fueled by, by love, you know, love for self love for others. [01:01:24] Love for the planet, the, you know, the animals, the ecosystems. If there was a way to just kind of spread that and, and connect people more deeply to, uh, uh, a constant sense of love and appreciation. I don't know if there are three words, you know, words that I could put up there that would just make that magically happen. [01:01:51] Um, but you know, love yourself and, and, and love others, you know, and the more [01:02:00] we can connect with that, I think the more compassionate we are and the more we can hear each other, uh, the more, hopefully we'll be able to come together and start working together again to make the world a better place. I don't know if there are words that magically make that happen, but I do feel like that's what connects all of this. [01:02:23] And hopefully something that everyone can agree on. [01:02:27] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Totally. I, I agree with you and the words that came to me when you were talking were two words and it was just, they were just spread love, spread love, man. Oh yeah. I love that though. That's what I, when, when you were talking, I'm like, oh, I think she's talking about spreading love. [01:02:43] I think that's great. Thank you. Yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Normally I don't, I don't come up with these answers, but there are times when they pop me on the head when Edna, the librarian who lives in my head, pops me on the head goes, this is what you were thinking. Okay, great. Thanks Edna. [01:02:59] Aria McKenna: So anyway, [01:03:00] thank you. [01:03:00] All right. So [01:03:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: REO, once again, thank you so much. I appreciate you being on the show. [01:03:08] Aria McKenna: Oh, thanks. Thank you so much for having such a pleasure to speak with you and also to explore all your wonderful resources that you have. Yeah. Thank you. I [01:03:21] Izolda Trakhtenberg: appreciate that. I, yes, I have many resources go to the website is all the t.com. [01:03:26] You will find them all. This is the innovative mindset podcast. If you've enjoyed the episode and I am sure you have, first of all, remember to turn off your water while you're washing your hands. That's very important. Get involved and. Much more involved and really pay attention to the work that aria is doing. [01:03:46] She's doing some incredible work. She, and those like her are doing some incredible work. So please get involved with that. If you're enjoying the show, tell a friend, subscribe to it, have them subscribe. Let's all. Talk about how we can be innovative [01:04:00] to move into this new and uncertain future stronger and better together until next time. [01:04:06] This is Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast, reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [01:04:19] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [01:04:37] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg in his copyright 2021 as always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.[01:05:00]

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Civic Engagement in Higher Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Brian Mateo, associate dean of civic engagement and director of strategic partnerships in Bard College's Globalization and International Affairs Program and security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, discusses how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to reference after today's discussion. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. So with that, I'm delighted to have the pleasure of introducing Brian Mateo to talk about how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues. We've shared his bio with you, so I'll just give you a few highlights. Mr. Mateo serves as associate dean of civic engagement at Bard College, where he works with faculty and students across the Open Society University Network on experiential learning and civic engagement opportunities. Previously he worked with public diplomacy programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs on U.S. foreign policy and engagement. He's also a security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a trained climate reality leader under former Vice President Al Gore. So, Brian, thank you very much for being with us. If we could just dive right in to talk about what is the role of higher education in civic engagement? How do you define it, and how do you encourage administrators and students to get more involved? MATEO: Thank you very much for having me here today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Irina. I'm very excited for this opportunity. So, yes, what is the role of higher education institutions when it comes to civic engagement? So the American Psychological Association defines civic engagement as individuals and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern. At the core of Bard's mission is to be a private college in the public interest. And how we do that is by providing access and education, especially for students that are underrepresented or may not have access to a liberal arts education. This is evidenced by our Bard Early Colleges, which are high school—which are for high school aged students that can take up to a year or two years of free college credit to be able to accelerate their college career. It's also evidenced by our Bard Prison Initiative, which is the largest prison education program for incarcerated individuals in the nation. So when we think about how do we do this, I see—I can't help but think about Astin's model of student development, which says that for students that are hyper-involved in their institutions, they get to be more engaged and involved, and the quality of their involvement goes up. And if we provide high level of programs and resources, students are more likely to be engaged. And then Astin also encourages us to make sure that we are providing resources and programmatic efforts that are meeting the needs of the students today. And I will begin to talk about how we do this from the student level, the faculty/staff level, institutionally, and also talk about how we work with communities. And before I begin, Bard also is a founding member of the Open Society University Network, which is comprised of over forty academic and research institutions. So not only are we also collaborating with our local communities, we also have a transnational network that we're working with. So how do you engage students? We do this by making sure that we're merging the curricular and co-curricular learning. This is also evidenced by our Certificate of Civic Engagement Program, which is a structured path for undergraduate students that are interested in deepening their knowledge and understanding of civic engagement and community engagement. And students are able to participate in this program and also earn a certificate that will also be added to their transcript. We also provide students with grants and opportunities to pursue internships that are unpaid, which are—which are called Community Act Awards. So students that find unpaid internships related to civic engagement and also social justice issues can apply for a grant to be able to supplement that, and making it more equitable for our students. We also provide what are called microgrants, which are seed funding for students that want to be able to do community-based projects. For faculty and staff, we encourage them to teach courses on experiential learning. And these courses enable students to not only work with the community but bring the community also into our classroom. And looking at David Kolb's experiential learning cycle, where students need—where students start with concrete experience, work on reflection, and also thinking about the experience while then planning and learning what they've—and executing what they've learned, is very important when it comes to civic engagement work because students are—students are introduced to some of these issues in the classroom, and then they have the ability to work through those issues with a professor and community members as well. And some example of these courses are—I teach a course on civic engagement myself, where the course is historical, theoretical, and experiential. And we look at social movements in America that help effect change. And we look at the civil rights movement, women rights, LGBT rights, climate activism and climate action, as well as the role of the media and what is misinformation and disinformation. And in this course, students also have to conduct what's called the Community Needs Assessment. And the Community Needs Assessment, students come with a research question and then work to interview community members to see what are the issues that are happening there. For faculty that also want to learn more about how to create courses on experiential learning, we also offer an experiential leaning institute where faculty from the OSUN network can participate. And then students—examples of work that faculty have done with students have been implementing a digital platform to assist with teaching or tutoring practices, historical tours and workshops, and also storytelling and interviews of community partners as well. Faculty that teach experiential learning, students say that about 89 percent of them say that engagement this way has helped their awareness to social justice and community issues. And in 2020 we had over eight hundred students that participated in about eighty courses. And those courses worked with ninety-five community agencies or organizations. We also help faculty and graduate students on conducting engaged research and scholarship practice. So some of examples of these are looking at LGBT issues in South Africa, the intersection of how music supports education with people—with people with disabilities, and also peacebuilding and storytelling as well. And we also help staff and faculty create civic action plans, which help colleges around the OSUN network institutionalize civic engagement and strategically think of how these four pillars can work together. While working with community partners, we're also very intentional in making sure that we have equitable practices. We developed what's called the Principles of Equity, where faculty/staff and community members can read on our website on how we work with the community, and making sure that it's reciprocal, making sure that it's—that we're deepening and creating sustainable partnerships while also engaging community with resources and developing shared resources as well that can benefit both the community and students and the institution. When it comes to institutional engagement, I gave examples of the Bard Early Colleges and Bard Prison Initiative. Bard has also been able to work with student-led—with other student-led initiatives that have become part of the institution. Examples of these as well are Brothers At, which is a mentoring and college-readiness program nationwide for young men of color, as well as Sister to Sister, that does similar work but with young women of color. And recently, Bard also has worked with trying to evacuate nearly two hundred Afghan students and helping them get an education throughout our network as well. So those are some examples of institutional engagement at Bard—at Bard as well. And I constantly think to myself: What is it that we want our students to gain when they participate in our—in our program, or engage with our network? And looking back at Astin's theory of student involvement, we see that Astin talks about inputs, which are what students come with, the environment, what is it that we're providing for our students, and the outputs. As a result of a student attending our universities, what is it that we want them to get out of this, aside from just, you know, the academic knowledge. But how do we want them to be involved? And in my opinion, I feel like there's a few outputs that we would want, as higher education administrators. And I'll state them and then conclude my presentation. So I strongly believe that, you know, we want them to be critical thinkers. We want them to understand and practice equity, be strategic problem solvers, understand the power of reflection and active listening, community builders, practice empathy, be lifelong learners, and also ultimately be engaged individuals. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Brian, thank you very much. Let's go to all of you now. (Gives queuing instructions.)  So I'm going to go first go to Manuel Montoya. Please unmute yourself and tell us your institution. Q: Yeah. Hello. My name's Manuel Montoya and I am from the University of New Mexico. Thank you, Irina, for setting this up. I think this is an important discussion. And thank you, Mr. Mateo, for your presentation. I'm pleased to hear all the work that you're doing. That's inspiring. I will, I guess, do two parts. I will share some of the work that I've done and then share a question that I think is germane to this particular issue. We recently set up a global experiential learning curriculum at the university that is designed to get students to merge theory with practice and some sort of practical impact in terms of the global economy and other things. And we have a—we have a group of students that work with the largest folk art market in the world, which is based in Santa Fe. And we're trying to get them to work with indigenous communities throughout the world to try to have a larger platform for market entry. And we're—we've been in talks for the past four years to try to get the Olympic games to have some sort of mini pop-up folk art market that represents these types of market activities. And inside of that there is a lot of issues about human rights, but also about the value of crafting economy. There's all sorts of things that students are trying to engage with that require a liberal arts education. My question, or my frustration, often happens at places that aren't like Bard College, places that don't necessarily see community-engaged learning as having some sort of incentive structure for faculty. I'm one of many faculty members that does that, likely because I care about the issues and also because I think that it does make research and other forms of academic and intellectual contributions valuable. So my question to Mr. Mateo, or just generally to whoever's participating, is how are we creating an incentive structure for faculty and for other people who are engaged within the university system to make this transition to do the kind of work that Mr. Mateo is talking about? And what is that—what is that going to take in places that are embedded a little bit more traditionally in the way that higher education either incentivizes or evaluates faculty and stuff in more traditional ways? MATEO: Yes. Thank you so much for your question. And it's a question that we're all grappling with, right, as well. Some of us—some of us are doing the work deeper and, you know, sometimes taking risks, and others are in the inception piece. So I'll elaborate by saying this: Students more and more are asking how do I apply what I'm learning in the classroom to a job? How do I make sure that, as a result of me attending this institution, I'm also going to be competitive or be able to contribute to society, right? So I think that—I think that more and more institutions and faculty are thinking about this, because you—you know, students are less inclined to go be taught something and not be able to apply it. At the same time, students also want to see themselves, their history, and also what's going on in the community into the curriculum too. So this is also driving the conversation. It is not easy to teach courses on experiential learning. It takes a lot of time. It also takes resources. And you have to embed reflection and community engagement into the syllabus. And sometimes when you're teaching two days a week for an hour or an hour and a half—you know, fifteen-week curriculum for the semester, that can be difficult to do. So what we've done is that we've developed an experiential learning institute to help faculty understand how to bring this thing into it, how to work with community, how to start that timeline. Because it's very different to develop a syllabus than to bring in community, because you sometimes have to start setting that up earlier. And also, we provide grants to support them to be able to do either—to buy resources for transportation, if they need to hire a student intern to help them with this work as well. So those are some of the ways that we have tried to do this. I also want to talk about data and assessment, because I can't stress enough how much—how important that is. Because when you're measuring students' learning and you see that their learning has grown exponentially from an experiential based course, you cannot argue with that, right? So we try to do our best to make sure that we are—that we're also assessing learning and making sure that when—that when we are asking for funding or that when we are trying to create new programs and initiatives, that we are doing this not only evidence-based in theory and practice, but also on the data that proves that this is something that is of a benefit to the community, to our students, and our institution. Q: Thank you, Mr. Mateo. I guess I have one follow-up question, if it's permissible, Irina. FASKIANOS: Sure. Go ahead, Manuel. Q: Yeah, yeah. So I think you're entirely right. I think that assessment at the student level and the student engagement level, being able to see how this connects to the vocational and even their social destinies is a really, really important factor. I've noted that many institutions across the country are having a great difficulty trying to incorporate or embed community engagement as how they evaluate their faculty. And I'm a tenured faculty at the university, and it's a research one institution. It's not a liberal arts institution. But, you know, publish or perish becomes still one of the ways in which I'm evaluated. So I have to—I have to attend to this kind of master of publishing in peer-reviewed journals, while at the same time my heart and really the most effective work that I do is during community engagement work. So I guess my question is also fundamentally about how we're—how we're transforming institutions to be able to adapt and really incorporate the type of community engagement work that you're talking about, Mr. Mateo, while at the same time valuing and validating its value with the assessment of faculty every year. Because I would say that you'd get a ton of faculty who'd be really good at doing this kind of work, but they're disincentivized to do it because they're only evaluated by their peer-reviewed journal work. So how does one connect the two? What is the frontier for that in higher education that you guys have seen? And I'd really, really like to know, because I think that's going to be a really important part of the frontier of what higher education is dealing with. MATEO: Well, yes, thank you. And, you know, as a field of higher education we're here not only teach, but provide knowledge, and hopefully that that knowledge helps better communities or help create an awareness, right? So that's something that needs to—that needs to be a driving source and conversation because, you know, what we try to do is to incentivize faculty whenever they aren't conducting research, and also students as well, when they want to do community-based work, to see who they can partner with, how they can go about and do that. And making sure that we're amplifying voices and showing the level of work that people are doing so, like, that their work can be recognized and that it also shows that there's a value to this as well. So that's what I would say there. It's still something that I think institutions grapple with, but more and more I believe that as institutions begin to see the value of being civically engaged, because at the end of the day, you know, we all also exist in the community. Our colleges and our campuses are within our community, within a community, within a domestic national and international realm. And, you know, what is it that we want to do? We want to contribute. And that's one of the reasons why we also provide engaged research grants for faculty too. So I hope that that answers your question, Manuel, and I'm happy to elaborate more. Q: I'll yield to other questions. But thank you very much. I appreciate it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Laila Bichara, who has a raised hand. And if you could unmute and identify your institution. Q: Hi. Well, I work for SUNY Farmingdale. And generally speaking, I teach with experiential learning. I use all kinds of newspapers and case studies and current affairs to make sure that the theory we cover in global business, you know, management and all other courses are, you know, applied and showing the results and what's going on. That said, I am currently serving on an adjunct staff to work on couple of issues. One is social mobility and the second is community engagement, and I see a lot of interrelation between this and experiential learning. And I just wanted to see if there is any work done or papers done in the social mobility, because our students are typically first-generation college students. They don't have role models at home and they rely heavily on us to guide them, and they're usually kids or, you know, students in their twenties that have two or three jobs to pay for their education. So any ideas, any links, any guidance for me to start to make advancement in that project and help my students. MATEO: Great. Thank you. So what I hear you say is that looking at the linkages between social mobility, community engagement, and which one was the third one? Q: Experiential learning as well. MATEO: Experiential learning. Yes. Q: Yeah. It's all a kind of, like, spiral to me. You know, that's how I see it. MATEO: Yes. So when allowing students to do experiential learning into the classroom and bringing into the classroom, you're also helping them get applied skills, and yes, so there is at times a level of—a disadvantage when a student is working three jobs while also studying and then you're telling them like, oh, go volunteer, or go do this, right. By embedding experiential learning into the curriculum, you're still teaching students with some of these applicable skills that they can use as a part of a resume and also can speak to in an interview and saying, like, this is how I was able to do this as evidenced by that, right. And that, in turn, helps students to be able to find other opportunities as well. In terms of links, so we do have resources at our Center for Civic Engagement website, which is cce.bard.edu, and there's a resource link there, and then we also have resources as well on our OSUN website, osun.bard.edu. So those are—those are places that you that you can find some of these resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And we'll send out after this a link to this webinar as well as with those URLs so that people—websites so people can go back and dig deeper. So I'm going to go next to David Kim's written question. He's an assistant professor at UCLA. Thank you for this discussion. I'd like to hear more about insights into community engagement on an international or global level. What are some best practices when faculty, communities, and students work across borders—international borders? How are they different from community engagement at a local or national level? MATEO: Thank you. So we have to be aware of, you know, what we can provide and also what is it—what are some of the needs or how it can be reciprocal. So a lot of listening and intentionality has to be brought into it because sometimes, you know, we can come in with our own mindset of, oh, this is how we do it and we do it well, and then you meet other counterparts and then they're, like, well, but this is also another way of doing it. So there has to be a collaborative and reciprocal way or a mutual, respectful, reciprocal way of engaging, and, typically, you know, how we've done that is that we've partnered with other universities. We've also seen who are the community partners that are there in the international realm and how we can work around that, too. So I would say being intentional, making sure that you have capacity for what you are doing so, like, that you can deliver and also having a mutual reciprocal approach as well as active listening, and be willing to learn also from our international partners, too. FASKIANOS: I think, Brian, you mentioned that you were looking at LGBTQ+ issues in South Africa. Do you have any partnerships? Can you sort of give us examples of how you're doing that? MATEO: Yes. That's one of the research grants that we have provided to someone to be able to do that research. So the individual there is partnered with organizations and are conducting that research, and once that research is done we will make sure to publish it. FASKIANOS: Great. OK. I'm going to go next to Isaac Castellano from Boise State University. Our career center just landed a grant to pilot a program to pay students for their internship experiences. For us, a lot of students—our students have to work and this is another way beyond embedding experiential learning into their coursework. So I think he's sharing more than asking a question, but maybe you have a reaction to that. MATEO: Yes, and thank you so much, Isaac. So yeah. So we piloted this a couple of years ago and it's been very successful, and the way that it—the way that it works is it's for summer internships and students can request up to $3,000 for any unpaid internship. And we have them submit an application as well as a supervisor form and an agreement of what the students will be doing for that organization. And then, in return, the students will write one to two reflection papers on their experience, and then when they come back to campus the next semester they get to present about their experience and what they've done for that internship. So that's how we—that's how we run our community action awards, and it's been super successful. It has been able to provide access to students that wouldn't otherwise be able to do an unpaid internship, and the students submit a budget of up to $2,000 and then we see how we can—how we can help fund that. So I highly encourage you to definitely do that pilot, and if you do want any other insight or how to be able to do that, I'm happy to share my email as well with Irina when she sends out the resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And Isaac has a follow-up. Where does the money come from, that paid summer program that you're talking about? MATEO: It could—grants. We also try to fund—try to find funding and resources as well. So it comes through various sources, and so that's how we try to support our students. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. OK. So the next question is another written question. And people can ask their questions, too, but this is from Chip Pitts at Stanford University. Have you encountered obstacles in this environment characterized by major demographic changes and increasing polarization, e.g., mandates against critical race theory, based on the perceived political nature, even leftist nature of, quote/unquote, “social justice” and “human rights” or “environmental community engagement efforts”? And if so, or for those in places where there are more conservative values, what have you seen or would you suggest to shore up and spur more courage and leadership among the reluctant or shy faculty and administrators and overcome and avoid such blockages? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Thank you. So you have to meet communities where they're at, right, and making sure that they also understand that we're here to work with them, too, and this is why active listening and making sure that there is a reciprocal approach to this is important. And it's not—sometimes it can be fairly easy to be able to say, hey, we want to collaborate with you, and other times it can be extremely difficult and tenuous. But continuing to demonstrate and show the level of learning or how that community is continuously being engaged is something that's very important because, in my opinion, I think that sometimes, you know, we have a hard time of showing all the great work that we're doing, and in order for us to be able to partner and work more with community members we also have to show the research and demonstrate and be able to present this so people understand what we are trying to do. So there are times that it is challenging, and there are some things that will work with some communities and some things that will not. So where then are you able to then find what can work and how you can make it happen, and then from there be able to build up from there—from the ground up. So yeah, so there are some communities where you can do, like, one to ten things and then other communities that you can do one to three things and, hopefully, that you can start to do four or five, but then how do you still provide that access and education and equity as well. FASKIANOS: Brian, what would you say are the—in your opinion, the global issues students are most interested in? And, you know, if a college can only take on or faculty can only take on one issue that they're trying to push, you know, what would be the one, or to drive a—foster more civic engagement? What do you think would be a viable and a good starting—steppingstone to sort of expand this into their community and both on campus and off? MATEO: Wow. That's a great question, Irina. I would say that students are very interested in gender equity, LGBT. They're also very interested in making sure that underrepresented populations are included in conversations, as well as awareness in disability. An all-encompassing issue that students are also passionate about because most of them experience this globally every day is climate change, and making sure that, you know, how we can engage students through there. So that—so out of everything that I mentioned, this also encompasses these issues as a major one, and Bard, through the Open Society University Network, is actually having a global teach-in, which is—you can find this in the Solve Climate by '30 and I can send the link to Irina as well—where all colleges and universities can come in and do a global teach-in and as well get resources, and we're providing opportunities for students around the world to also be able to receive opportunity to get engaged, too. So we're doing this in March, and we're trying to get a robust number of institutions to participate in this because climate doesn't only affect, you know, our living environment, but it also affects students' educational pursuits. Harvard conducted a study called Heat and Learning that showed that for every degree Fahrenheit that goes up student learning goes down by 1 percent. It's also shown disparities that—you know, climate change also has, you know, a disproportionate effect on young people of color because of regions where people live in cold and hot environments, as well as disparities when it comes to gender. Women are more likely to be taken out of the classroom when there are climate change disasters to be caretakers, and we're also seeing a rise in child marriages because of that, too. You know, it also—you also talk about sanitation when it comes to climate change and educational environments. You know, if you start to—if your building starts to get moldy and also if students start to get sick because of the infrastructure or it gets too hot, you're going to see an increased rate of students showing up—not showing up and being absent or dropout rates as well. So climate change exacerbates or, as it's called, a threat multiplier, and this is something that as higher education administrators we have to also make sure that we are—that we're constantly thinking and showing how can we, based on students' interests, can help to solve climate as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So if others have questions—Manuel, I don't know if you had a follow-on. You said you would cede the floor but you can come back on. You can raise your hand or write—type your question in the Q&A box, or I could ask more. Just waiting to see if Manuel wanted to come back in. OK. There is a—oh, Manuel said his question was answered. OK. Great. So—sorry, I'm just looking—toggling a lot of things. All right. So my next question would be—you did talk about this earlier—you know, there has been a lot written about what is a college education worth, and I think this connection of the critical thinking and the internships and the experiential learning. But could you talk a little bit more about students' educational performance and career path and how they can leverage these—you know, what they're doing, civic engagement, into their future career plans? MATEO: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: And then I have another random question. Mmm hmm. MATEO: Yes. So helping students to understand that some of the work that they do outside of a classroom could also translate both inside as well because when I have—when I see students when they're thinking about their career path, they're like, oh, but I've never done an internship before, or, oh, but I've never actually had a job here or there. But then when you start to look at the classes that they're taking and the application piece in those courses, you can sort of say, yes, but you also in this course did storytelling of a community and also created a podcast. So this is also an application piece where you can add to your resume, too. So helping students to think and link experiential learning to application, and demonstrating that is definitely an added plus, and this is why a lot of these courses are also very popular and very highly rated for students because they're starting—they start to see that they're also gaining transferable skills while engaging in these courses, too, that they can then add to their resume and be able to speak to at an interview as well. Like, I'll give you the example of the community needs assessment that the students that I work with conduct. You know, they can talk about research. They can talk about, you know, being able to work with communities. They also have to interview a leader in that community, whether that be a politician or a school leader or anyone. You know, so there are skills that they can then say here are some tangible outcomes as a result of this assignment, and that's why experiential learning can also help when it comes to merging career paths for students. FASKIANOS: Great. So a few more questions in the chat. Jim Zaffiro, who is at Central College, has asked what recommendations would you have for incorporating civic engagement into a common first-year experience course? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Yes. So looking back at Astin's model of input-environment-outputs, right, so we need to figure out, like, you know, how can we create a baseline for students to best understand what it means to be civically engaged and the environments piece of it. So what I would say, making sure that they understand the community they're a part of, what are some of the issues and needs, providing reflection for them to talk about how they have been engaged, how do they see themselves as engaged citizens and providing opportunities for them to get exposure to working with community members and working outside of the community as well. So we do this starting from our orientational language and thinking, where we start to not only provide articles and readings on this but we're also getting students to volunteer and get—and having students to think about how they want—how they want to be involved, and showing them a lot of the student-led initiatives that we offer that they can either get involved or start on their own. And then throughout the first year they also have what's called the Citizen Science Program, which is a January term, where students start to see how science and citizenship come together and work together. And during that time, we also have our MLK Day of Engagement, which is a day for students to also go out and volunteer into the community and reflect on their volunteer work as well. So that's kind of how we've embedded a lot of engagement for our first-years to making sure that we're providing them with engagement, adding courses for them to think about what does it mean to be engaged in either a civic engagement course or experiential learning courses and opportunities throughout the year for them to be involved, which, ultimately, we were then promoting for them how they can—how they can apply for these community action awards and also for the summer, but also what are ways for them to get engaged through the broader OSUN network. FASKIANOS: Great. How has the pandemic exacerbated preexisting community needs? How have you at Bard deepened students' civic engagement in order to help alleviate the pandemic-related effects that we are seeing in our communities? MATEO: Yes, and as we all know, when it comes to community-based work in civic engagement, you know, we all had to, you know, come indoors, and we had this notion that we had to be there to be able to engage with the community. So we developed—and this is also part of our civic engagement website—a tool kit on how to do engagement virtually, how to be able to do blended learning as well, and making sure that we still had a commitment to our community leaders. And our community partners also were able to come into our classes via Zoom and engage with students as well, and we helped students find virtual engagement, whether it be tutoring, whether it be, you know, helping to analyze something and sending it back. So these were some of the ways. But it did definitely create a halt, though we quickly found ways to not only build and provide resources but also pivot and making sure that we provide opportunities for students that were online and making sure that we showed a commitment to our partners as well. FASKIANOS: So John Dietrich at Bryant University asks for examples, more examples in practice of bringing experiential learning into the classroom, so if you could put some— MATEO: Yes. Yeah, so we have a course that's called All Politics is Local and what we do in that—and what the faculty members do in that course is that they're able to pair students with local internships in different government organizations, so not only are students learning about local government in the class but they're actually interning at the same time in different local governments. Another example of a professor that teaches studio arts is a class called Portraits and Community where they get to talk to community members and identify the history of that community, also talk with Congress—with a member of Congress while painting these community members and learning their stories, learning how to tell their stories but using art as a way of engagement. Another example is being able to develop tool kits, so, for example, looking at, you know, if you're a professor in biology or in chemistry and you have a local river or you have, you know, an ecosystem or environment, you know, how has that changed throughout the years and how can students create experiments and be able to then provide knowledge for local leaders or community members to see if there has been change that has been happening there? So I hope that this gives you some examples of community-based learning and education when it comes to doing it in the classroom. Podcasts have also been something that have been very important because students not only learn the skill on how to run a podcast and how to do a podcast, but then they also get to interview community members and do it—and be able to speak and provide the opportunity for storytelling as well. FASKIANOS: Can you talk a little bit about the role civic engagement plays in international students' educational experience? I mean, a lot of campuses have international students, and what does it mean for them and what are they taking back to their countries? MATEO: Yeah, so working with the OSUN network I've learned a lot about what other campuses have been doing and how they do civic engagement, and at some campuses civic engagement is embedded from the beginning. They are taking courses, they have to graduate with a certain amount of hours to be able to get their degree, you know, and some institutions in the United States do that, some don't per se, you know, so—and then also thinking about what—so for them also thinking about what does it mean to be engaged in their communities, and what are some of the work that they are doing as well? So civic engagement can look differently, so some of it can be tutoring. Some of it can be, you know, mostly youth engagement. A lot of it can be gender equity and working to raise awareness on gender issues. So there has been a great sense of education knowledge on my part on seeing how other institutions work on civic engagement. At the same time, it's also great because we're able to talk about civic engagement and develop that baseline and learn how we can grow together, and what are some things that they're doing that we can do and vice versa? So that—so I would say that in some institutions globally, civic engagement is embedded from the beginning and students have to make sure that they are taking courses on engagement. Some of them have, like, first-year sophomore-, junior-, senior-level seminars on engagement, and then others, you have to have a requirement of graduation for a certain amount of hours. So that's how, kind of, it's worked. FASKIANOS: Brian, you talked about inputs and outputs and metrics, so have you measured how civic engagement, the programs that you're doing are affecting students' perspectives on diversity, equity, and inclusion? MATEO: Yes, we have, actually, and—I have this here in my notes—yes, and 89 percent of them say that it has created an awareness of social justice issues and it has also enhanced their learning. So we're seeing that this is something that is showing and demonstrating that by engaging, and also at times engaging with difference, it has helped their learning. And over 90 percent of students say that they would continue to engage our—engage with arts and science courses or experiential courses as a result of that. FASKIANOS: Do you do that survey after each semester or is it at the end of the academic year? How are you doing that? MATEO: Yeah, so we do that survey at the end of each semester when it comes to faculty courses. When it comes to the engagement that students are doing outside of the classroom we also try to assess that, too, which I do midway and also at the end, and some students also do culminating projects, as well, that they are incorporating—at the end of their academic career they are talking about how civic engagement has helped them. So an example of that is—and this is the certificate in civic engagement that we've recently launched. You know, students will be able to apply for what's called an engaged senior project grant that they can get funding to be able to add civic engagement into their final project too, so that's—we're measuring and seeing how many students are interested and want to be able to engage in that. So I would say all together we are doing—you know, and sometimes, you know, we capture a lot of data and sometimes, you know, so we try to make sure that we're doing it as holistic as possible but we do it at the end, so at the end of each semester if a course qualifies as experiential learning, we are doing—so it's a separate evaluation outside of the normal class evaluation, and then we start to see and look at the metrics and what students have learned and, like, now we can start to gather and tell stories behind, you know, what these courses are doing. FASKIANOS: Great. So we have a follow-up question from Manuel Montoya: How does experiential learning and community engagement avoid essentializing the communities you engage with? On a related note, how does one navigate who gets to represent community needs when working on issues of engagement? MATEO: Yeah, this is a very, very, very, like, a thin line. Right? And it comes, again, with mutual respect, reciprocity, active listening. Some of the time community partners come to us and say, hey, we have a need and then we evaluate it and see how we can help that need. Other times, faculty or even students are like, hey, here is something that we should be working on and then we do that. Right? So an example of that is the Bard Prison Initiative. A student came and said, hey, look, we should be working on this and then it became an institutional part of Bard and now it's one of the largest prison education programs for incarcerated individuals across the nation. You know, so—and it takes a lot of reflecting and making sure that the community's needs are also in the forefront, because we don't want to usurp or take on, you know, or say, like, oh, this is ours now. No, this is “in collaboration with.” This is not a “we do this” per se. So that's why we have developed the principles of equity, and I'll share that, as well, with Irina so you can get a sense—that talks about this is, how can we make this equitable? How can we acknowledge and reflect on the work that we're doing? How do we—how are we not making sure that we're showing up and saying, like, oh, look, we're here, as like, you know, how—saving a community. But no, we're here to help enhance a community while they're enhancing our learning and providing assistance for us as well. So it has to be reciprocal in order for you to maintain a deep and sustained relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. And I'm just going to flag—I don't know if people are looking at the Q&A but Chip Pitts was building on what you talked about the importance of climate as a health issue. There's a study that's worth looking at, www.thelancet.com/countdown-health-climate, so you can look there. MATEO: Thank you, Chip. FASKIANOS: We do have another comment. I've benefited immensely from this discussion, bringing to fore the relevance of community engagement for students and faculty. I'm seeing new areas I can suggest for experiential learning to my institution. Terrific. That's great. MATEO: Thank you. I'm glad. FASKIANOS: Really appreciate that from NenpoSarah Gowon—and the last name is cut off. All right, so I wanted to ask you about—in your view, do you—I mean, you've been doing this for a long time. What do you see as the challenges that you've faced in sort of bringing this along in your community? And what have been the unexpected surprises and the receptivity to this approach of experiential learning and critical thinking, et cetera? MATEO: Thank you. That's an excellent question and here's reflection, you know, as we talk about experiential learning. Right? So I would say that my—so I was—so I'm fortunate enough to be able to work with the OSUN network to be in—and become a lifelong learner myself and learn how other institutions have been doing this. And going back to what Manuel was alluding to is that when something is new it's hard to bring in change. Right? So when asking people, hey, do you want to teach a course on experiential learning or asking a student, hey, do you want to also do this type of civic engagement work, what sometimes is heard is, oh, this is more work; this is going to be too hard. Right? So how do you show those benefits, right? And in the beginning, initial stages, it's going to be an uphill battle. But once you have one or two or a group of people doing it and talking about how great it is and how their students are engaged—like, in some of the assessments students are asking for more time in those courses because they're like, this is so—this is great, that we want to make sure that we meet more or we want to make sure we have more time to do—to engage in these courses, so now we're seeing that students want more of these courses and not just of the courses in general but maybe adding a third section instead of just meeting two times a week per se. You know? And then—and funding can also be something that's very—that can be challenging because, you know, you need to make this a commitment in saying, like, yes, we are going to fund, let's say, for example, thirty student internships over the summer because we believe that this is going to help engage their learning. We believe this is going to create an opportunity for them moving forward. Right? So—and researcher—sometimes, you know, if you're in a metropolitan area, it's easier for you to say, yeah, we're going to go to a museum or we're going to go to this community because we can all just take public transportation. But if you're in a rural environment, you're relying on vans and buses and so on and so forth, and that can sometimes run you $500 to $2,000 per visit, you know. So you also have to think really strategically and think smarter, not harder, and how are you engaging? Right? Because one of the detriments is that great, we went to one community once and as a result of that, like, what would happen—because, again, it goes back to sustained, deepening relationships, so those are some of the things that can be some of the challenges. Some of the breakthroughs for me is when you start to see the learning connect, when a student's like, you know—you know, I once had someone from the New York City's mayor's office come speak to the students in my class and it really warmed my heart when a student was like, I didn't know that I had access; I didn't realize that someone like me could be able to speak to someone from the mayor's office. And I'm like, but you're also a citizen of New York City and this is what—you know, so there was that disconnect for the student; it was like, wow, I can do this. Another student wants to—is pursuing, you know, a degree in political science and stuff like that. You know, or even when a student did a research project on the tolls of the taxi in New York City because that student felt they had a personal connection to this, and then they were able to see how, you know, some stories were similar to what—to the narrative that they had and be able to then share some possible solutions and show that they can also be active citizens and engage and be empowered. That is the other piece that, like, once you see that people start to be empowered, they want to continue doing this work and it's, you know, my job and the job of others at other higher education institutions to continue to empower and continue to provide opportunities and shed light, you know, because some of this is also exposure. You know, thinking about outputs; it's like sometimes you know what you know, but then when you meet a professor that's doing some type of research that you're just like, wow, this is so intriguing; I never knew I could do this. That's something that is also very influential for the student. And I'll give you a personal anecdote about myself. I myself have been an experiential learner. You know, I went to college and I got my master's in higher ed administration, but all of a sudden I'm working with international communities, I'm also part of the Council on Foreign Relations doing research on climate, and teaching experiential learning. And that is as evidenced by Bard being a private college for public interest, and also enabling us to be a part of the system that we ourselves can be experiential learners and be able to do different things and sometimes, you know, like, not necessarily shift our careers but find new interests, because this is what we want to do and develop the system that can be reciprocal for our students, faculty, staff, and community. FASKIANOS: Well, with that, we've reached the end of our hour. Brain Mateo, thank you very much for sharing what you're doing at Bard, your stories, and we will circulate to everybody the resources that you mentioned, and, you know, just want to thank you for your dedication. And to everybody on this call, I mean, it really has brought home for me the important work that you all are doing to raise the next generation of leaders, and we need them and you all are role models for young adults who, as somebody said, their parents have never gone to college and really need some guidance on next steps. So thank you to you, Brian, and to everybody on this call for what you're doing in your communities. We will share Brian's email address and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianmateo. So I encourage you to follow him there. Our next Higher Education Webinar will be in November, and we will send the topic speaker and date under separate cover. And so I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic on Twitter, and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. And of course, as always, you can email cfracademic@cfr.org, with suggestions of future topics or speakers you would like to hear from. We're trying to be a resource for all of you and support you and the important work that you are doing. So Brian, thank you again. MATEO: Thank you. And I'll make sure to share resources with you. Have a great day. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. (END)

Developing Classical Thinkers
Dystopia Myopia

Developing Classical Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:17


What's a dystopia, and why have dystopian novels become so popular in recent years? The word “dystopian” in “dystopian novels” comes from two Greek words: “topos,” meaning “place” and “dys,” meaning “bad.” Thus, a dystopian novel is a novel set in a bad place--specifically, a bad future where a large, oppressive, and omnicompetent state controls all aspects of human life and stamps out all instances of human freedom. The word "dystopia" was coined as a response to the word "utopia,” a place so “good” it cannot exist. In both cases, the word refers to a fictional world that's designed to reflect on the real world by emphasizing the differences and the similarities between our world and that of the novel.Oddly enough, there has been a lot of interest in reading dystopian literature in prior years at Thales Academy. In this episode, Winston Brady, Josh Herring, Will Begley, Jessie Gillooly, and Sydney Harper discuss dystopian literature and how these works fit into the literature curriculum at Thales Academy. Great examples of dystopian literature include Aldous Huxley's “Brave New World,” George Orwell's “1984,” Walter M. Miller Jr.'s “A Canticle for Leibowitz,” and Ray Bradbury's “Fahrenheit 451.”The works referenced on today's episode include: George Orwell's “1984”: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/nineteen-eighty-four_george-orwell/247716/?resultid=2183b4b4-d411-4767-992f-92481c254c08#edition=2400521&idiq=4326807Aldous Huxley's “Brave New World”: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/brave-new-world_aldous-huxley_david-rogers/245736/?resultid=662b919e-f38b-4405-b0c5-28cdef45d290#edition=4283982&idiq=444123Walter M. Miller Jr.'s “A Canticle for Leibowitz”: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/a-canticle-for-leibowitz-by-walter-m-miller-jr/252725/?resultid=010cc772-bf1e-4c6c-a22e-bb132fdc0493#edition=2226066&idiq=3464580Ray Bradbury's “Fahrenheit 451”: https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/fahrenheit-451_ray-bradbury/248594/?resultid=cb723a21-f16f-477d-84b0-2a3e180c75c2#edition=6426608&idiq=3872736

Sci-Fi 5
Fahrenheit 451 - October 19, 1953

Sci-Fi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:01


One of the best-known works of dystopian science-fiction, Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451," was first published on October 19, 1953. While Bradbury predicted things like earbuds, flat-screen TVs and ATMs, it's a relief he was so far off about censorship and anti-intellectualism. Right? Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Ryan Myers Hosted by Jessica Lynn Verdi Music by Devin Curry

The Roddenberry Podcast Network
SciFi5: Fahrenheit 451 - October 19, 1953

The Roddenberry Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:01


One of the best-known works of dystopian science-fiction, Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451," was first published on October 19, 1953. While Bradbury predicted things like earbuds, flat-screen TVs and ATMs, it's a relief he was so far off about censorship and anti-intellectualism. Right? Follow Sci-Fi 5 for your daily dose of science-fiction history. Written by Ryan Myers Hosted by Jessica Lynn Verdi Music by Devin Curry

Broca's Area
Broken Area - Episode 404 - Podcast Not Found

Broca's Area

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 58:43


It is a weird weather day, low teens and rain and sun and rain and sun. Isabelle has a studio visit today. We still. haven't turned on the. heat! You want to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit? Double it and add 30. The sign was back one message, meaning it was sexual and could be offensive to some…. Bag, though I didn't mention it. I'm still biking like crazy.

Reel Britannia
Episode 105 - Goldfinger (1964)

Reel Britannia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 70:46


Welcome to Reel Britannia-a very British podcast about very British movies ...with just a hint of professionalism. This week, Scott and Steven and Tony continue their tribute to the legendary Sean Connery with, of course, a Bond film. Join us we chat about painted ladies, pernicious headwear and Pussy Galore in Goldfinger (1964) James Bond (Sir Sean Connery) is back and his next mission takes him to Fort Knox, where Auric Goldfinger (Gert Fröbe) and his henchman are planning to raid Fort Knox and obliterate the world economy. To save the world once again, Bond will need to become friends with Goldfinger, dodge killer hats, and avoid Goldfinger's personal pilot, the sexy Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman). She might not have feelings for Bond, but will 007 help her change her mind? “My dear girl, there are some things that just aren't done, such as drinking Dom Perignon '53 above the temperature of 38 degrees Fahrenheit. That's just as bad as listening to the Beatles without earmuffs!” You can find this and all our previous episodes at: Amazon Music Apple Podcasts Libsyn Player FM Podtail Owltail ListenNotes Follow us on Twitter @rbritanniapod Join us over at our Facebook Group ….we'd love to chat with you email: reelbritannia@gmail.com #007movies #seanconnery #jamesbond #britmovie #podcast Thanks for listening Scott and Steven

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Motivate Your Monday: All It Takes Is a Reframe.

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 2:04


Hello to you listening in Placitas, New Mexico!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is 60 Seconds, your daily dose of hope, imagination, wisdom, stories, practical tips, and general riffing on this and that.As I walked higher into the mountains and deeper into October the warm weather on the Camino de Santiago shifted to cold. Imagine having to leave your snug sleeping bag, dress in all your gear and pack up your belongings in the dark, maybe get a coffee and bread with cheese before setting out for another 15 miles or more of walking in the cold.You've been here, too: wanting only to snuggle back down where it's warm and shut out the world. But on the Camino everyone is booted out of the albergue at first light. So you have to go.What if I could reframe how I thought about the cold? I converted European Celsius to the more familiar American Fahrenheit. What looked like a 4 degree Celsius morning actually became a 40 degree Fahrenheit morning. 36 degrees warmer - just because of a reframe.Question: When you've had an uncomfortable situation to deal with, how did you turn it around? What was your reframe?  This is the place to thrive together. Come for the stories - stay for the magic. Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, including Android, and join us next time! You're invited to stop by the website and subscribe to stay current with Diane, her journeys, her guests, as well as creativity, imagination, walking, stories, camaraderie, and so much more: Quarter Moon Story ArtsProduction Team: Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 - Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

WPL Book Drop
Episode 22: Waterloo Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Bill Beck Talks Fire Prevention and Books

WPL Book Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:20


In this episode, Waterloo Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Bill Beck talks with Becky about fire prevention, his career, and books.  Recommended reads: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury    Firefighters by Norma Simon   Report from Engine Co. 82 by Dennis Smith  

Beekeeping - Short and Sweet
Episode 177: Early Autumn Heatwave

Beekeeping - Short and Sweet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:20


In this week's Podcast: It's a scorcher! Temperatures have been hitting the high 20's Celsius, that's up in the 80's Fahrenheit. It's a great time for continued inspections to make sure colonies are Queen right.Hi, I'm Stewart Spinks and welcome to Episode 177 of my podcast, Beekeeping Short and Sweet.Sponsorship: I'm delighted to say that our podcast is now sponsored in part by Simon The Beekeeper - 'Making beekeeping an affordable hobby for everyone, Simon the Beekeeper provides the best value beekeeping equipment possible, along with a super-fast delivery service. The bees won't wait, so their customers don't have to either. Visit the website at www.simonthebeekeeper.co.uk'Apimix 75 Syrup and other feed available from Modern BeekeepingJoin Our Beekeeping Community in the following ways:Early Release & Additional Video and Podcast Content - Access HereStewart's Beekeeping Basics Facebook Private Group - Click HereTwitter - @NorfolkHoneyCo - Check Out Our FeedInstagram - @norfolkhoneyco - View Our Great PhotographsSign Up for my email updates by visiting my website here

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 597 (10-4-21): Anticipating Frost as Fall Settles In

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-1-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 4, 2021.  This week, we pause our series of episodes on water connections to the human body, to revisit an episode from fall 2017 that explores one of the hallmarks of the autumn season. MUSIC – ~ 11 sec – instrumental.Following the astronomical start of fall on September 22, this episode features a fiddle tune named for a water-related weather event that will mark a meteorological fall turning point when it occurs across the Commonwealth in October or November.  Have a listen to the music for about 25 more seconds. MUSIC - ~26 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to part of “Cold Frosty Morn',” performed here by the western Virginia band New Standard.  One of the consequences of fall's arrival is frost in the mornings and, eventually, a significant enough freeze to end of the growing season, when temperatures fall to about 28 degrees Fahrenheit or below.  That temperature typically occurs for the first time each fall in mid-to-late October in western Virginia, early-to-mid November east of the Blue Ridge, and mid-to-late November in some Virginia coastal areas.  Those predicted periods are based on historical records through 2010; the typical frost and freeze dates may be shifting as Virginia experiences climate change.Generally, frost forms when water vapor in the air contacts plants, windows, cars, or other solid surfaces that are at or below water's freezing point of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.  Some specific kinds of frost include radiationfrost, occurring when surface objects are cooled by radiating their heat; advection frost, occurring when surfaces are cooled by winds; and rime, a dense type of frost that forms when super-cooled liquid water in fog or clouds contacts solid surfaces, such as trees, radio towers, or ships on winter seas. Frost may seem far away on Virginia's often mild, early October days.   But to paraphrase a comment about truth from the poem “Birches,” by RobertFrost, frost-producing weather will soon break in with all of its matter-of-fact. Thanks to New Standard for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of “Cold Frosty Morn'.” MUSIC - ~12 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode repeats and replaces Episode 387, 9-25-17. The performance of “Cold Frosty Morn'” heard here is copyright by New Standard, from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” used with permission. More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 501, 12-2-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Maps showing frost/freeze dates in the continental United States, based on data from 1980 to 2010.  Upper map: ranges of earliest dates of first 32°F freeze; middle map: range of median dates of first 32°F freeze; lower map: range of median dates of first 28°F freeze.  Images from the National Weather Service/Northern Indiana Forecast Office, “Frost and Freeze Information,” online at http://www.weather.gov/iwx/fallfrostinfo, accessed 10-4-21. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Deborah Byrd, “Equinox Sun is Over Earth's Equator on September 22,” EarthSky, Sept. 22, 2021. Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost, Edward Connery Lathem, ed., Holt, Rineheart and Winston, New York, 1969.  The quote to which this episode refers, from “Birches” on page 121, is the following: “But I was going to say when Truth broke inWith all her matter of fact about the ice storm….” Kenneth G. Libbrecht, “Guide to Frost,” online at http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/frost/frost.htm. National Weather Service, “Ice Storms,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter-ice-frost.National Geographic Society, “Frost,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/frost/. National Geographic Society, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/rime-ancient-mariner/. National Weather Service, Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office, “Watch/Warning/Advisory Definitions,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lwx/WarningsDefined. Isaac W. Park et al., “Advancing frost dates have reduced frost risk among most North American angiosperms since 1980,” Global Change Biology 2021, 27: pages 165–176, accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15380. Sarah Vogelsong, “Autumn's first frost is falling later. For farmers, the consequences are wide-ranging,” Virginia Mercury, Nov. 3, 2020. WeatherOnline, “Rime,” online at http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/reports/wxfacts/Rime.htm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See particularly the “Science” and “Weather” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes on frozen or freezing precipitation.Freezing rain, sleet, and snow – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Hail – Episode 362, 4-3-17.Ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18;  Episode 404, 1-22-18; Episode 406, 2-5-18; Episode 556, 12-21-20.Snow – Episode 300, 1-25-16; Episode 407, 2-12-18. Following are links to some other episodes related to fall. Fall migratory birds – Episode 183, 10-14-13; Episode 281, 9-14-15; Episode 335, 9-26-16.Tree colors and changes in fall – Episode 285, 10/9/15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.2.3 – Matter can exist in different phases. Grades K-5: Earth and Space SystemsK.9 – There are patterns in nature.1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes; including that changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.2.6 – There are different types of weather on Earth.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.4.4 – Weather conditions and climate effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 66.3 – There is a relationship between the sun, Earth, and the moon. Key ideas include6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic. Life ScienceLS.8 – Change in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Earth ScienceES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

new york science bay university agency truth guide music ice robert frost natural earth state poetry audio college frost change accent dark north american tech water web air index fall rain united states pond research maps ocean weather government education park tree chesapeake snow environment images rime ancient mariner msonormal commonwealth generally stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hail fahrenheit shenandoah bluegrass upper holt grade colorful signature national weather service blue ridge freezing watershed transcript earth sciences virginia tech ls anticipating atlantic ocean natural resources equator grades k national geographic society name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table cosgrove msohyperlink advancing birches earthsky sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tmdl virginia standards settles water center kenneth g space systems audio notes
Pulp Today w/ David Avallone
Episode 37: FAHRENHEIT 451, with Mageina Tovah

Pulp Today w/ David Avallone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


The talented and lovely Mageina Tovah joins David Avallone to talk about a book that meant a lot to both of them growing up: Ray Bradbury's dystopian classic FAHRENHEIT 451! You might remember her from Sam Raimi's SPIDER-MAN movies or SyFy's THE MAGICIANS... but Mageina also has a long history with Bradbury, which she talks about here... and we read a little section of the book together. --Please leave us a rating on Apple Podcasts/iTunes!-- Website: pendantaudio.com Twitter: @pendantweb Facebook: facebook.com/pendantaudio Tumblr: pendantaudio.tumblr.com YouTube: youtube.com/pendantproductions

Tcast
Our Concrete Jungles Are Slowly Killing Us

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 16:54


Concrete has become synonymous with urban development and progress. It's responsible for creating shelters, protecting manmade infrastructures from natural disasters, making transportation easy, and more. However, the environmental cost of creating concrete is often understated. It's a convoluted process with plenty of extraction involved. As a finished product, concrete also makes cities hotter because it absorbs the heat of the sun, and traps gases from car exhausts and air conditioning units. In addition, it separates us from our natural environment without providing an alternative for so many important ecological functions. The cost of creating concrete jungles is the loss of fertile soil, animal habitats, river systems, and lush greenery.   Is it time to reinvent the concrete wheel?   What We Can Do With Concrete: One solution that is currently in the works is using concrete to store greenhouse gases back in the bedrock. “If it's getting released from the ice, earth naturally in its own chemistry and set up, has these pockets. So if we put it back in the porous nature of the bedrock, we can store that and prevent it from being up in the atmosphere; so send it back down where it needs to go,” Alex explained. Historical records indicate that the Romans were the first to deal with concrete. Despite the test of time, plenty of infrastructures remain standing today. One notable achievement was the creation of concrete that could withstand the test of coastal regions, where saltwater speeds up the process of degradation. This wasn't the case for Roman concrete, which even benefited from the microorganisms carried by the seawater. Alex described it as “a symbiotic relationship between the saltwater, the organisms, and the concrete itself.”   Process of Making Concrete: Is concrete worth the environmental trade-off? The process of manufacturing and maintaining it makes up around eight percent of the world's annual carbon emissions. Components that go into the creation of concrete include silica, alumina, iron, limestone, and gypsum —- materials that are extracted from the Earth's crust by diesel-powered machines and then processed in kilns that generate heat by burning coal or fossil fuels.  The current strategy for producing concrete is incredibly complex and involves plenty of anaerobic processes. Convincing corporations to make changes to the way they create concrete will be a challenge because these entities are already accustomed to this traditional method. This means that they have invested time, money, labor, and effort into maintaining all the machinery and manpower needed to keep these environmentally degrading practices alive.  It's commodifying inefficiency, normalized and understated to avoid public clamor. Some companies are already looking into making concrete a more environmentally friendly substance. A company based in Halifax, Canada named CarbonCure discovered a process that takes liquified CO2 from ammonia and ethanol plants, and injects it into wet concrete while it is being mixed. This increases the concrete's compressive strength and replaces some of the cement used in the process. It's an opportunity to repurpose the waste product of other industrial plants while minimizing the amount of time used to form concrete in a kiln, which requires high amounts of heat and pressure — around 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit. Since the system is simple and easy to deploy, CarbonCure has a strong selling point. Concrete manufacturers do not need to implement massive shifts in their processes just to become more eco-friendly; this strategy only requires a little extra hardware.   It's All Dirty Work — In More Ways Than One: Convincing the concrete industry to clean itself up won't be easy work. Alexander and Jason brush on how concrete plays a pivotal role in funding and facilitating criminal activity, pointing out the challenges in convincing malicious actors to invest in ecologically friendly alternatives; but the problem runs deeper than that as well. Prominent websites such as Taylor & Francis Online, The Guardian, the World Economic Forum have released stories on the seedy underbelly of concrete and construction, labeling the material as “the most destructive material on earth” and “the dirtiest business.”  It's disheartening to think that even after this podcast, concrete isn't a standalone villain we can all gang up against. We've got an entire industry to hold accountable and demand transparency from.   How TARTLE Can Help: Climate stability is one of TARTLE's Big 7. While calling for action won't be an easy feat, every small act we can generate towards this cause is a small step forward in the right direction. With the TARTLE platform, you have the opportunity to support groups, not-for-profits, or charitable organizations that work towards scientific research and development in this niche. How much is your data worth? www.tartle.co   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!

The Bryan Hyde Show
2021 September 30 The Bryan Hyde Show hour two

The Bryan Hyde Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 42:26


  Has there ever been a time when the people burning books were on the right side of history? I only ask because YouTube is aggressively engaging in the outright censorship of any dissenting viewpoint on the Covid vaccine. Someone doesn't trust us to sort these ideas out and decide for ourselves. It sure seems as though many First World nations are combining the worst elements of "1984" with "Brave New World" with just a dash of "Fahrenheit 451" thrown in for fun. Doug Casey suggests 3 ways you can opt out of the rising insanity. They're well worth considering. A little humor makes it possible to get through tough times. JP Sears to the rescue! His latest video on 12 reasons NOT to speak up is well worth a few minutes of your time. Sponsors: Monticello College Lifesaving Food (use the coupon code "HYDE" at checkout for a 20% discount) The Heather Turner Team at Patriot Home Mortgage Leave me a voice message with your feedback

Loving Liberty Radio Network
2021 September 30 The Bryan Hyde Show

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 85:19


It's not uncommon to hear people describe our current overlapping crises as being part of a massive psy-op being orchestrated by the people in power. Given how many of us are feeling the strain on our mental health lately, that raises some interesting questions. Robert Freudenthal warns that psychiatry will not save us from lockdown harm. In fact, it may become a useful tool for isolating the non-compliant. The videos and images coming out of Australia don't bode well for the future of freedom there. James Bolt says Zero Covid has torn Australia apart. He says the writing is on the wall for anyone who has the courage to raise their eyes: This isn't about learning how to safely live with a particular virus, it's about learning how to live under authoritarian rule. What trait do many of the greatest human beings who have ever lived have in common? All of them discovered who they were by running away for a time. Paul Rosenberg explains how facing the world on our own can be of pivotal importance in helping us learn who we really are. Has there ever been a time when the people burning books were on the right side of history? I only ask because YouTube is aggressively engaging in the outright censorship of any dissenting viewpoint on the Covid vaccine. Someone doesn't trust us to sort these ideas out and decide for ourselves. It sure seems as though many First World nations are combining the worst elements of "1984" with "Brave New World" with just a dash of "Fahrenheit 451" thrown in for fun. Doug Casey suggests 3 ways you can opt out of the rising insanity. They're well worth considering. A little humor makes it possible to get through tough times. JP Sears to the rescue! His latest video on 12 reasons NOT to speak up is well worth a few minutes of your time. www.thebryanhydeshow.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

La Ventana
Especialistas Secundarios | “Por su formación anglosajona el ministro Escrivá hablaba de 75 años Fahrenheit”

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 6:13


En la sección dedicada a los abuelos abordamos la polémica de trabajar hasta los 75 años con Amadeo, que está favor, y Ramira que está a favor y con drogas.

Humor en la Cadena SER
Especialistas Secundarios | “Por su formación anglosajona el ministro Escrivá hablaba de 75 años Fahrenheit”

Humor en la Cadena SER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 6:13


En la sección dedicada a los abuelos abordamos la polémica de trabajar hasta los 75 años con Amadeo, que está favor, y Ramira que está a favor y con drogas.

Midnight Train Podcast
Hollow Earth Shenanigans

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 109:16


Hollow Earth Theory   Well hello there passengers, and welcome to yet another exciting day aboard the MidnightTrain. Today we delve deep into the mysterious, creepy, possibly conspiratorial world that is our own. What do I mean by that? Well we are digging our way to the center of truth! Today, we learn about Hollow Earth… and for the flat earthers out there… you're gonna wanna hang out for a minute before you dip outta here… also fuck you.   (Cinematic trailer voice) In a World where there exists people who think the world is a flat piece of paper with trees growing out of it and a big guy who flips the piece of paper over to switch between day and night. One man wants to change that idea. His name… is Edmund Halley. Yes that Halley. The one known for the comet he discovered. But before we explore more about him and his findings, let's discuss what led us to this revolutionary hypothesis.   So besides idiots who believe the earth is flat, I mean stupid-endous personalities, there are other more interesting characters that believe the earth is completely hollow; or at least a large part of it. This is what we call the Hollow Earth Theory. Now where did this all come from? Well, nobody cares, Moody. That's the show folks!   Ok, ok, ok… fine. Since the early times many cultures, religions, and folklore believed that there was something below our feet. Whether it's the lovely and tropical Christian Hell, the Jungle-esque Greek Underworld, the balmy Nordic Svartálfaheim, or the temperate Jewish Sheol; there is a name for one simple idea. These cultures believed it to be where we either come from or where we go when we die. This may hold some truth, or not. Guess we will know more when the time comes.   The idea of a subterranean realm is also mentioned in Tibetan Buddhist belief. According to one story from Tibetan Buddhist tradition, there is an ancient city called Shamballa which is located inside the Earth. According to the Ancient Greeks, there were caverns under the surface which were entrances leading to the underworld, some of which were the caverns at Tainaron in Lakonia, at Troezen in Argolis, at Ephya in Thesprotia, at Herakleia in Pontos, and in Ermioni. In Thracian and Dacian legends, it is said that there are caverns occupied by an ancient god called Zalmoxis. In Mesopotamian religion there is a story of a man who, after traveling through the darkness of a tunnel in the mountain of "Mashu", entered a subterranean garden. Sounds lovely.  In Celtic mythology there is a legend of a cave called "Cruachan", also known as "Ireland's gate to Hell", a mythical and ancient cave from which according to legend strange creatures would emerge and be seen on the surface of the Earth.​​ They are said to be bald, taller than most with blue eyes and a big, bushy beard… fucking Moody. There are also stories of medieval knights and saints who went on pilgrimages to a cave located in Station Island, County Donegal in Ireland, where they made journeys inside the Earth into a place of purgatory. You guys know purgatory, that place or state of suffering inhabited by the souls of sinners who are shedding their sins before going to heaven. In County Down, Northern Ireland there is a myth which says tunnels lead to the land of the subterranean Tuatha Dé Danann, who are supposedly a group of people who are believed to have introduced Druidism to Ireland, and then they said fuck it and went back underground. In Hindu mythology, the underworld is referred to as Patala. In the Bengali version of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it has been depicted how Rama and Lakshmana were taken by the king of the underworld Ahiravan, brother of the demon king Ravana. Later on they were rescued by Hanuman. Got all that? The Angami Naga tribes of India claim that their ancestors emerged in ancient times from a subterranean land inside the Earth. The Taino from Cuba believe their ancestors emerged in ancient times from two caves in a mountain underground. Natives of the Trobriand Islands believe that their ancestors had come from a subterranean land through a cavern hole called "Obukula". Mexican folklore also tells of a cave in a mountain five miles south of Ojinaga, and that Mexico is possessed by devilish creatures who came from inside the Earth. Maybe THAT'S where the Chupacabra came from! In the middle ages, an ancient German myth held that some mountains located between Eisenach and Gotha hold a portal to the inner Earth. A Russian legend says the Samoyeds, an ancient Siberian tribe, traveled to a cavern city to live inside the Earth. Luckily, they had plenty of space rope to make it back out.  The Italian writer Dante describes a hollow earth in his well-known 14th-century work Inferno, in which the fall of Lucifer from heaven caused an enormous funnel to appear in a previously solid and spherical earth, as well as an enormous mountain opposite it, "Purgatory". There's that place, again. In Native American mythology, they believed that the ancestors of the Mandan people in ancient times emerged from a subterranean land through a cave at the north side of the Missouri River. There is also a tale about a tunnel in the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona near Cedar Creek which is said to lead inside the Earth to a land inhabited by a mysterious tribe. It is also the belief of the tribes of the Iroquois that their ancient ancestors emerged from a subterranean world inside the Earth. The elders of the Hopi people believe that a Sipapu entrance in the Grand Canyon exists which leads to the underworld. Brazilian Indians, who live alongside the Parima River in Brazil, claim that their forefathers emerged in ancient times from an underground land, and that many of their ancestors still remained inside the Earth. Ancestors of the Inca supposedly came from caves which are located east of Cuzco, Peru. So, this is something that has been floating around a shit ton of ancient mythos for a long ass time. Well, ya know… before that silly thing called SCIENCE. Moving on. Now to circle back to our friend Edmund. He was born in 1656, in Haggerston in Middlesex (not to be confused with uppersex or its ill-informed cousin the powerbottomsex). He was an English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist; because what else was there to do in the 1600's but be a know-it-all? He was known to work with Sir Isaac Newton among other notable (but not gonna note them here) proponents to science.  In 1692 he proffered the idea that the earth was indeed hollow and had a shell about 500 miles thick with two inner concentric (having a common center, as circles or spheres… hear that flat earthers??) shells and an inner core. He proposed that the atmospheres separated the shells and that they also had their own magnetic poles and that the shells moved at different speeds. This idea was used to elucidate(shed light upon… yes pun intended) anomalous(ih-nom-uh-luhs) compass readings. He conceptualized that the inner region had its own atmosphere and possibly luminous with plausible inhabitants. MOLE PEOPLE!! He also thought that escaping gases from the inner earth caused what is now known as the Northern Lights.   Now another early ambassador to this idea was Le Clerc Milfort. Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, or known by a simpler name, Louis Milfort. Monsieur Milfort was a higher ranking French military officer who offered his services during the late 1700's. He is most notably known for leading Creek Indian warriors during the American Revolutionary War as allies of the British. I guess having a common enemy here would make sense as to why he chose this group to lead. He emigrated in 1775 to what was then known as the British Colonies of North America. But we all know there is nothing Bri'ish about us.    Now why would a higher ranking French military Officer want to emigrate from his home to a place of turmoil? Great question Moody! I knew you were paying attention. Well, a little about this French saboteur.   He was known by many aliases, but we will just stick with Louis (Louie) for all intents and purposes. Louis was born in Thin-le-Moutier, near Mezieres, France. He served in the French Military from 1764 to 1774. Now this is according to his memoir that was dated in 1802. He left France after he ended up killing a servant of the king's household in a duel. Apparently, the king's servant loved the king. So much so that when Louis read aloud a poem that he had written that included the king, the servant jumped up, tore off his glove and slapped Louis across the face not once, but 4 fucking times! This is obviously something that Louis could not just let happen, so he challenged the servant to a duel. Not just any duel, mind you. He challenged him to a duel of what was then known as a “mort de coupes de papier.” The servant died an excruciating death and Louis fled. Here is the poem that started the feud.  There's a place in France Where the naked ladies dance There's a hole in the wall Where the men can see it all But the men don't care Cause they lost their underwear And the cops never shoot Cause they think it's kind of cute There a place in France Where the alligators dance If you give them a glance They could bite you in the pants There's a place on Mars Where the ladies smoke cigars Every puff she makes Is enough to kill the snakes When the snakes all die They put diamonds in their eye When the diamonds break The dancing makes them ache When the diamonds shine They really look so fine The king and the queen Have a rubber ding-a-ling All the girls in France Have ants in their pants Yes, this is 100% bullshit… but, you'll have that shit stuck in your head for days. Now as much as we tried to find ACTUAL information as to why there was duel and why it was with a servant of the king, we couldn't find much. But after digging up some more information on Louis we found out that he ended up going back to France to be a part of the Sacred Society of Sophisians.    This group is also known as the secret society of Napoleon's Sorcerers… This may have to be a bonus episode so stay tuned for more!   Now back to the “Core” of our episode. The Creek Indians who are originally from the Muscogee [məskóɡəlɡi](Thank wikipedia) area which is southeast united states which roughly translates to the areas around Tennessee, Alabama, western Georgia and Northern Florida. Louis adapted their customs and assimilated into their Tribe.  He even married the sister of the Chief.   Now after Louis and the rest of the people in the American Revolutionary War lost to the U.S. he decided to lead the Creek Tribe on an expedition in 1781 because, well, they had nothing else to do. On this expedition they were searching for caverns where allegedly the Creek Indians ancestors had emerged from. Maybe even the Origin of Bigfoot.   Yes, the Creek Indians had believed that their ancestors lived below the earth and lived in caverns along the Red River junction of the Mississippi River. Now during the expedition they did come across these caverns which they suspected could hold 20,000 of their family in. That's pretty much all they found. They didn't have video cameras back then otherwise, I'm pretty sure they would have found footage of bigfoot though.   Another advocate was Leonhard Euler, yes, you heard right. Buehler… Buehler… No Leonard Euler. A great 18th century mathematician; or not so great if you didn't enjoy math in school unlike moody who was the biggest nerd when it came to math.    Euler founded the study of graph theory and topology. No moody, not on-top-ology. Mind always in the gutter. Euler influenced many other discoveries such as analytic number theory, complex analysis, and the coolest subject ever; Infinitesimal Calculus. Which is Latin for BULLSHIT.   But anyways I digress. This guy knew his stuff BUT he did think with all his “infinite” wisdom that the earth was in fact hollow and had no inner shells but instead had a six hundred mile diameter sun in the center. The most intriguing and plausible theory he had within this whole idea was that you could enter into this interior from the northern and southern poles. Let's hold to that cool hypothesis for right now and move along with our next Interesting goon of the hollow earth community.   With Halley's spheres and Eulers's Holes came another great man with another great theory. Captain John Symmes! Yes you know Captain Symmes. HE was a hero in the war of 1812 after being sent with his Regiment to Canada and providing relief to American forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He was well known as a trader and lecturer after he left the army.    In 1818 Symmes announced his theory on Hollow Earth to the World! With his publication of his Circular No. 1.   “I declare the earth is hollow, and habitable within; containing a number of solid concentric spheres, one within the other, and that it is open at the poles 12 or 16 degrees; I pledge my life in support of this truth, and am ready to explore the hollow, if the world will support and aid me in the undertaking.”— John Cleves Symmes Jr., Symmes' Circular No. 1  While there were few people who would consider Symmes as the “Newton of the West”, most of the world was less than impressed. Although his theory wasn't as popular as one would expect, you gotta admire the confidence he had.   Symmes sent this declaration at a rather hefty cost to himself to “each notable foreign government, reigning prince, legislature, city, college, and philosophical societies, throughout the union, and to individual members of our National Legislature, as far as the five hundred copies would go.”15]   Symmes would then be followed by an exorbitant amount of ridicule for his proclamation, as many intellectuals were back then. This ridicule would later influence a rather bold move, Cotton. We'll touch on this later.    What was so special about his theory that got 98% of the world not on the edge of their seats? Well, to start he believed the Earth had five concentric spheres with where we live to be the largest  of the spheres. He also believed that the crust was 1000 miles thick with an arctic opening about 4000 miles wide and an antarctic opening around 6000 miles wide. He argued that because of the centrifugal force of the Earth's rotation that the poles would be flattened which would cause such a gradual gradation that you would travel into the Hollow Earth without even knowing you even did it.   Eventually he refined his theory because of such ridicule and criticism. Now his theory consists of just a single hollow sphere instead of five concentric spheres. So, now that we know all about symmes and his theory, why don't we talk about what he decided to do with his theory?    What do you think, Moody? You think he created a cult so he could be ostracized? Or do you think he gave up and realized he was silly? Hate to be the bearer of bad news here but he decided to take his theory and convince the U.S. congress to fund and organize an expedition to the south pole to enter the inner earth.    Good news and bad news folks. Good news, congress back then actually had some people with heads on their shoulders as opposed to those today and they said fuck that noise and denied funding for his expedition. Hamilton, Ohio even has a monument to him and his ideas. Fuckin' Ohio. Next up on our list of “what the fuck were they thinking?” We have Jeremiah Reynolds. He also delivered lectures on the "Hollow Earth" and argued for an expedition. I guess back in those days people just up and went to the far reaches of the earth just to prove a point. Reynolds said “look what I can do” and went on an expedition to Antarctica himself but missed joining the Great U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842, even though that venture was a result of his craziness, I MEAN “INTEREST”. He gained support from marine and scientific societies and, in 1828, successfully lobbied the House of Representatives to pass a resolution asking then-President John Quincy Adams to deploy a research vessel to the Pacific. The president, for his part, had first mentioned Reynolds in his November 4, 1826, diary entry, writing: “Mr Reynolds is a man who has been lecturing about the Country, in support of Captain John Cleves Symmes's theory that the Earth is a hollow Sphere, open at the Poles— His Lectures are said to have been well attended, and much approved as exhibitions of genius and of Science— But the Theory itself has been so much ridiculed, and is in truth so visionary, that Reynolds has now varied his purpose to the proposition of fitting out a voyage of circumnavigation to the Southern Ocean— He has obtained numerous signatures in Baltimore to a Memorial to Congress for this object, which he says will otherwise be very powerfully supported— It will however have no support in Congress. That day will come, but not yet nor in my time. May it be my fortune, and my praise to accelerate its approach.”  Adams' words proved prophetic. Though his administration opted to fund Reynolds' expedition, the voyage was waylaid by the 1828 presidential election, which found Adams roundly defeated by Andrew Jackson. The newly elected president canceled the expedition, leaving Reynolds to fund his trip through other sources. (The privately supported venture set sail in 1829 but ended in disaster, with the crew mutinying and leaving Reynolds' ass on shore.) Per Boston 1775, the U.S. Exploring Expedition only received the green light under the country's eighth president, Martin Van Buren. As Howard Dorre explains on his Plodding Through the Presidents blog, multiple media outlets (including Smithsonian, in an earlier version of this article) erroneously interpreted Adams' description of Reynolds' ideas as “visionary” as a sign of his support for the hollow earth theory. In fact, notes Bell in a separate Boston 1775 blog post, the term's connotations at the time were largely negative. In the words of 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson, a visionary was “one whose imagination is disturbed.” The president, adds Dorre, only agreed to support the polar expedition “after Reynolds abandoned the hollow earth idea.”  I had always heard that he was a believer in mole people and hollow earth, turns out his words were just misinterpreted. Hmm… I wonder if there are any other books out there where the overall ideas and verbage could and have been misinterpreted causing insane amounts of disingenuous beliefs? Nah!   Though Symmes himself never wrote a book about his ideas, several authors published works discussing his ideas. McBride wrote Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1826. It appears that Reynolds has an article that appeared as a separate booklet in 1827: Remarks of Symmes' Theory Which Appeared in the American Quarterly Review. In 1868, a professor W.F. Lyons published The Hollow Globe which put forth a Symmes-like Hollow Earth hypothesis, but failed to mention Symmes himself. Because fuck that guy, right? Symmes's son Americus then published The Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1878 to set the record straight. I think the duel would have been a better idea. Sir John Leslie proposed a hollow Earth in his 1829 Elements of Natural Philosophy (pp. 449–53). In 1864, in Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne described a hollow Earth containing two rotating binary stars, named Pluto and Proserpine. Ok… fiction. We get it. William Fairfield Warren, in his book Paradise Found–The Cradle of the Human Race at the North Pole, (1885) presented his belief that humanity originated on a continent in the Arctic called Hyperborea. This influenced some early Hollow Earth proponents. According to Marshall Gardner, both the Eskimo and Mongolian peoples had come from the interior of the Earth through an entrance at the North Pole. I wonder if they knew that.    NEQUA or The Problem of the Ages, first serialized in a newspaper printed in Topeka, Kansas in 1900 and considered an early feminist utopian novel, mentions John Cleves Symmes' theory to explain its setting in a hollow Earth. An early 20th-century proponent of hollow Earth, William Reed, wrote Phantom of the Poles in 1906. He supported the idea of a hollow Earth, but without interior shells or inner sun. Ok, no sun. Got it. The spiritualist writer Walburga, Lady Paget in her book Colloquies with an unseen friend (1907) was an early writer to mention the hollow Earth hypothesis. She claimed that cities exist beneath a desert, which is where the people of Atlantis moved. Mmmk. Deserts and Atlantis. Check. She said an entrance to the subterranean kingdom will be discovered in the 21st century. Pretty broad brush she's painting with there. Next up we're gonna talk a little about Admiral Richard E. Byrd. According to Hollow Earth theorists, Byrd met an ancient race underground in the South Pole. According to Byrd's “diary,” the government ordered Byrd to remain silent for what he witnessed during his Arctic assignment:              March 11, 1947 “I have just attended a Staff Meeting at the Pentagon. I have stated fully my discovery and the message from the Master. All is duly recorded. The President has been advised. I am now detained for several hours (six hours, thirty- nine minutes, to be exact.) I am interviewed intently by Top Security Forces and a Medical Team. It was an ordeal!!!! I am placed under strict control via the National Security provisions of this United States of America. I am ORDERED TO REMAIN SILENT IN REGARD TO ALL THAT I HAVE LEARNED, ON THE BEHALF OF HUMANITY!!! Incredible! I am reminded that I am a Military Man and I must obey orders.” After many polar accomplishments, Byrd organized Operation Highjump in 1947. The objective: construct an American training and research facility in the South Pole. Highjump was a significant illustration of the state of the world and the cold war thinking at the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exercise there in the summer of 1946 and felt it needed to do more. The northern winter was coming, and Highjump was a quickly planned exercise to move the whole thing to the South Pole. Politically, the orders were that the Navy should do all it could to establish a basis for a [land] claim in Antarctica. That was classified at the time.Now Operation High jump could probably be its own episode, or is at minimum a bonus. But we'll get some of the important details on how it pertains to this episode. Some say the American government sent their troops to the South Pole for any evidence of the rumored German Base 211. Nazis were fascinated with anything regarding the Aryan race. They traveled all over the world including Antarctica to learn more of alleged origins. The Germans did make their mark in the South Pole. However, what they have discovered doesn't compared to what Byrd recorded in his diary. the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exerci but was that all it was   “For thousands of years, people all over the world have written legends about Agartha (sometimes called Agarta or Agarthi), the underground city. Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarath, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary kingdom that is said to be located in the Earth's core. Agartha is frequently associated or confused with Shambhala which figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Madame Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. Theosophists in particular regard Agarthi as a vast complex of caves underneath Tibet inhabited by demi-gods, called asuras. Helena and Nicholas Roerich, whose teachings closely parallel theosophy, see Shambhala's existence as both spiritual and physical. Did Byrd find it? He claims to have met “The Master,” the city's leader, who told him of his concerns about the surface world: “Our interest rightly begins just after your Race exploded the first atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. It was that alarming time we sent our flying machines, the ‘Flugelrads' to your surface world to investigate what your Race had done…You see, we have never interfered before in your Race's wars and barbarity. But now we must, for you have learned to tamper with a certain power that is not for your Man, mainly that of atomic energy. Our emissaries have already delivered messages to the power of your World, and yet they do not heed.” Apparently, the government knew about Agartha before Byrd. Marshall Gardner wrote A Journey to the Earth's Interior in 1913 and published an expanded edition in 1920. He placed an interior sun in the Earth (ah ha! The Sun's back!) and built a working model of the Hollow Earth which he actually fucking patented (U.S. Patent 1,096,102). Gardner made no mention of Reed, but did criticize Symmes for his ideas. DUEL TIME! Around the same time, Vladimir Obruchev wrote a novel titled Plutonia, in which the Hollow Earth possessed an inner Sun and was inhabited by prehistoric species. The interior was connected with the surface by an opening in the Arctic. The explorer Ferdynand Ossendowski wrote a book in 1922 titled Beasts, Men and Gods. Ossendowski said he was told about a subterranean kingdom that exists inside the Earth. It was known to Buddhists as Agharti. George Papashvily in his Anything Can Happen (1940) claimed the discovery in the Caucasus mountains of a cavern containing human skeletons "with heads as big as bushel baskets" and an ancient tunnel leading to the center of the Earth. One man entered the tunnel and never returned. This dude was a sniper with the Imperial Russian Army during World War I Moody is going to love these next examples.  Novelist Lobsang Rampa in his book The Cave of the Ancients said an underground chamber system exists beneath the Himalayas of Tibet, filled with ancient machinery, records and treasure. Michael Grumley, a cryptozoologist, has linked Bigfoot and other hominid cryptids to ancient tunnel systems underground. According to the ancient astronaut writer Peter Kolosimo a robot was seen entering a tunnel below a monastery in Mongolia. Kolosimo also claimed a light was seen from underground in Azerbaijan. Kolosimo and other ancient astronaut writers such as Robert Charroux linked these activities to DUN DUN DUNNNN….UFOs. A book by a "Dr. Raymond Bernard" which appeared in 1964, The Hollow Earth, exemplifies the idea of UFOs coming from inside the Earth, and adds the idea that the Ring Nebula proves the existence of hollow worlds, as well as speculation on the fate of Atlantis and the origin of flying saucers. An article by Martin Gardner revealed that Walter Siegmeister used the pseudonym "Bernard", but not until the 1989 publishing of Walter Kafton-Minkel's Subterranean Worlds: 100,000 Years of Dragons, Dwarfs, the Dead, Lost Races & UFOs from Inside the Earth did the full story of Bernard/Siegmeister become well-known. Holy fucking book title, Batman!   The science fiction pulp magazine Amazing Stories promoted one such idea from 1945 to 1949 as "The Shaver Mystery". The magazine's editor, Ray Palmer, ran a series of stories by Richard Sharpe Shaver, claiming that a superior pre-historic race had built a honeycomb of caves in the Earth, and that their degenerate descendants, known as "Dero", live there TO THIS DAY, using the fantastic machines abandoned by the ancient races to torment those of us living on the surface. As one characteristic of this torment, Shaver described "voices" that purportedly came from no explainable source. Thousands of readers wrote to affirm that they, too, had heard the fiendish voices from inside the Earth. The writer David Hatcher Childress authored Lost Continents and the Hollow Earth(1998) in which he reprinted the stories of Palmer and defended the Hollow Earth idea based on alleged (cough… “alleged”) tunnel systems beneath South America and Central Asia. Hollow Earth proponents have claimed a number of different locations for the entrances which lead inside the Earth. Other than the North and South poles, entrances in locations which have been cited include: Paris in France, Staffordshire in England, Montreal in Canada, Hangchow in China, and The Amazon Rain Forest.   Ok, have you two gents heard of the Concave Hollow Earth Theory? It doesn't matter, we're still going to talk about this lunacy. Instead of saying that humans live on the outside surface of a hollow planet—sometimes called a "convex" Hollow Earth hypothesis—some whackamuffins have claimed humans live on the inside surface of a hollow spherical world, so that our universe itself lies in that world's interior. This has been called the "concave" Hollow Earth hypothesis or skycentrism. Cyrus Teed, a doctor from upstate New York, proposed such a concave Hollow Earth in 1869, calling his scheme "Cellular Cosmogony". He might as well have called it Goobery Kabooblenuts. See, I can make up words, too. Anyway, Teed founded a group called the Koreshan Unity based on this notion, which he called Koreshanity. Which sounds like insanity and would make far more sense. The main colony survives as a preserved Florida state historic site, at Estero, Florida, but all of Teed's followers have now died. Probably from eating Tide Pods. Teed's followers claimed to have experimentally verified the concavity of the Earth's curvature, through surveys of the Florida coastline making use of "rectilineator" equipment. Which sounds like something you use to clean out your colon.   Several 20th-century German writers, including Peter Bender, Johannes Lang, Karl Neupert, and Fritz Braut, published works advocating the Hollow Earth hypothesis, or Hohlweltlehre. It has even been reported, although apparently without historical documentation, that Adolf Hitler was influenced by concave Hollow Earth ideas and sent an expedition in an unsuccessful attempt to spy on the British fleet by pointing infrared cameras up at the sky. Oh boy. The Egyptian mathematician Mostafa “Admiral Akbar” Abdelkader wrote several scholarly papers working out a detailed mapping of the Concave Earth model In one chapter of his book On the Wild Side (1992), Martin Gardner discusses the Hollow Earth model articulated by Abdelkader. According to Gardner, this hypothesis posits that light rays travel in circular paths, and slow as they approach the center of the spherical star-filled cavern. No energy can reach the center of the cavern, which corresponds to no point a finite distance away from Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. A drill, Gardner says, would lengthen as it traveled away from the cavern and eventually pass through the "point at infinity" corresponding to the center of the Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. Supposedly no experiment can distinguish between the two cosmologies. Christ, my head hurts. Gardner notes that "most mathematicians believe that an inside-out universe, with properly adjusted physical laws, is empirically irrefutable". Gardner rejects the concave Hollow Earth hypothesis on the basis of Occam's razor. Occam's razor is the problem-solving principle that "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity", sometimes inaccurately paraphrased as "the simplest explanation is usually the best one." Purportedly verifiable hypotheses of a Concave Hollow Earth need to be distinguished from a thought experiment which defines a coordinate transformation such that the interior of the Earth becomes "exterior" and the exterior becomes "interior". (For example, in spherical coordinates, let radius r go to R2/r where R is the Earth's radius; see inversive geometry.) The transformation entails corresponding changes to the forms of physical laws. This is not a hypothesis but an illustration of the fact that any description of the physical world can be equivalently expressed in more than one way.   Contrary evidence   Seismic The picture of the structure of the Earth that has been arrived at through the study of seismic waves[52] is quite different from a fully hollow Earth. The time it takes for seismic waves to travel through and around the Earth directly contradicts a fully hollow sphere. The evidence indicates the Earth is mostly filled with solid rock (mantle and crust), liquid nickel-iron alloy (outer core), and solid nickel-iron (inner core).[53]   Gravity Main articles: Schiehallion experiment and Cavendish experiment Another set of scientific arguments against a Hollow Earth or any hollow planet comes from gravity. Massive objects tend to clump together gravitationally, creating non-hollow spherical objects such as stars and planets. The solid spheroid is the best way in which to minimize the gravitational potential energy of a rotating physical object; having hollowness is unfavorable in the energetic sense. In addition, ordinary matter is not strong enough to support a hollow shape of planetary size against the force of gravity; a planet-sized hollow shell with the known, observed thickness of the Earth's crust would not be able to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium with its own mass and would collapse.   Based upon the size of the Earth and the force of gravity on its surface, the average density of the planet Earth is 5.515 g/cm3, and typical densities of surface rocks are only half that (about 2.75 g/cm3). If any significant portion of the Earth were hollow, the average density would be much lower than that of surface rocks. The only way for Earth to have the force of gravity that it does is for much more dense material to make up a large part of the interior. Nickel-iron alloy under the conditions expected in a non-hollow Earth would have densities ranging from about 10 to 13 g/cm3, which brings the average density of Earth to its observed value.   Direct observation Drilling holes does not provide direct evidence against the hypothesis. The deepest hole drilled to date is the Kola Superdeep Borehole,[54] with a true vertical drill-depth of more than 7.5 miles (12 kilometers). However, the distance to the center of the Earth is nearly 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). Oil wells with longer depths are not vertical wells; the total depths quoted are measured depth (MD) or equivalently, along-hole depth (AHD) as these wells are deviated to horizontal. Their true vertical depth (TVD) is typically less than 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).   Ok, then let's discuss what actual scientists, like ALL OF THEM, believe the earth is actually composed of. The inner core This solid metal ball has a radius of 1,220 kilometers (758 miles), or about three-quarters that of the moon. It's located some 6,400 to 5,180 kilometers (4,000 to 3,220 miles) beneath Earth's surface. Extremely dense, it's made mostly of iron and nickel. The inner core spins a bit faster than the rest of the planet. It's also intensely hot: Temperatures sizzle at 5,400° Celsius (9,800° Fahrenheit). That's almost as hot as the surface of the sun. Pressures here are immense: well over 3 million times greater than on Earth's surface. Some research suggests there may also be an inner, inner core. It would likely consist almost entirely of iron.   The outer core   This part of the core is also made from iron and nickel, just in liquid form. It sits some 5,180 to 2,880 kilometers (3,220 to 1,790 miles) below the surface. Heated largely by the radioactive decay of the elements uranium and thorium, this liquid churns in huge, turbulent currents. That motion generates electrical currents. They, in turn, generate Earth's magnetic field. For reasons somehow related to the outer core, Earth's magnetic field reverses about every 200,000 to 300,000 years. Scientists are still working to understand how that happens.   The mantle   At close to 3,000 kilometers (1,865 miles) thick, this is Earth's thickest layer. It starts a mere 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) beneath the surface. Made mostly of iron, magnesium and silicon, it is dense, hot and semi-solid (think caramel candy). Like the layer below it, this one also circulates. It just does so far more slowly. Near its upper edges, somewhere between about 100 and 200 kilometers (62 to 124 miles) underground, the mantle's temperature reaches the melting point of rock. Indeed, it forms a layer of partially melted rock known as the asthenosphere (As-THEEN-oh-sfeer). Geologists believe this weak, hot, slippery part of the mantle is what Earth's tectonic plates ride upon and slide across.   Diamonds are tiny pieces of the mantle we can actually touch. Most form at depths above 200 kilometers (124 miles). But rare “super-deep” diamonds may have formed as far down as 700 kilometers (435 miles) below the surface. These crystals are then brought to the surface in volcanic rock known as kimberlite.   The mantle's outermost zone is relatively cool and rigid. It behaves more like the crust above it. Together, this uppermost part of the mantle layer and the crust are known as the lithosphere. The crust   Earth's crust is like the shell of a hard-boiled egg. It is extremely thin, cold and brittle compared to what lies below it. The crust is made of relatively light elements, especially silica, aluminum and oxygen. It's also highly variable in its thickness. Under the oceans (and Hawaiian Islands), it may be as little as 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) thick. Beneath the continents, the crust may be 30 to 70 kilometers (18.6 to 43.5 miles) thick.   Along with the upper zone of the mantle, the crust is broken into big pieces, like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle. These are known as tectonic plates. These move slowly — at just 3 to 5 centimeters (1.2 to 2 inches) per year. What drives the motion of tectonic plates is still not fully understood. It may be related to heat-driven convection currents in the mantle below. Some scientists think it's caused by the tug from slabs of crust of different densities, something called “slab pull.” In time, these plates will converge, pull apart or slide past each other. Those actions cause most earthquakes and volcanoes. It's a slow ride, but it makes for exciting times right here on Earth's surface.   https://www.imdb.com/list/ls003260126/?sort=user_rating,desc&st_dt=&mode=detail&page=1   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

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How To Love Lit Podcast
A Doll‘s House - Henrik Ibsen - Episode 1 - Norway At It‘s Literary Best!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 45:11


A Doll's House - Henrik Ibsen - Episode 1 - Norway At It's Literary Best!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  Today we begin our series on Henrik Ibsen and his great play- A Doll's House.  Ibsen was born in Norway, a country that shines a bright light on our view of the world more than most of us realize because it's such a small place geographically.  .   Haha- shines a light- is that a pun- Norway is, after all, the land of the midnight sun!  Where in the summer, the sun literally shines at midnight.     Well, there is that, but I was actually thinking about the tremendous influence of the Nobel committee and the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize the famous committee that grants  every year since 1901 on December 10th, from Oslo City Hall.  There they announce which human, in their estimation, on planet earth has conferred the greatest benefit on mankind.  What an amazing designation.      Oh, that's pretty important too.  I know this is a tangent, but why IS the Nobel Peace Prize selected by and given out by Norwegians instead of the Swedish people, since Alfred Nobel was Swedish and not Norwegian.      That's a really good question, and I'm not sure anyone knows- but it was definitely stipulated by Alfred Nobel at his death that although the other awards would be awarded in Stockholm, the Peace Prize would be awarded in Oslo, Norway and it has been ever since.      Norway is a country that has established itself for many years at the top of the lists of “best places to live on planet earth”- a designation it won again in 2020.  It has the highest life expectancy in the world, (82.4 average) in case you're wondering, second place went to Ireland, btw.  It's population on average is one of best educated in the world, and the gross national income is ranked third behind Switzerland and again Ireland.    Wow, and yet Christy, I wonder if you would like living there- let me remind you that the average temperature in the summer is 65 degrees Fahrenheit or 18 degrees Celsius.    I know, growing up in tropical climates where the average summer temperature is in the 90s or high 30s Celsius, I would definitely have to buy a new wardrobe, but that's not always a negative.    Ha!  No, I guess that's true.  Norway is also a land we generally think of for its striking outdoor beauty characterized by those magnificient fjords.    Fjord is one of the few Norwegian words that almost everyone knows.  It literally means where one fares through- and if you see pictures of them, that makes sense why.  They are fairy-tale like, truly and can be hundreds of miles long.  Of course, Norway isn't the only place where they exist, but they have over 1700 of them and two are featured on UNESCO's world heritage list.  Garry, describe what a fjord is for those of us, which includes me, who have never seen them.    Well, I've never seen them in person either..yet…but I will.  They are long narrow inlets of water with steep cliffs on both sides that were created by glaciers thousands of years ago.  They are astonishingly deep, often thousands of feet or meters deep.  They say one of the best ways to seem them is on a cruise ship, so that's my plan.     Ha!! Sounds like a great plan.  Of course, right after Fjords and the Nobel Prize, the next thing that comes to mind when we think of Norway is still not Ibsen but-  Vikings.      Oh Vikings for sure have put their mark on northern Europe, and many of us have a very specific image in our minds of raiding warriors arriving in those amazing ships that could move around 15-17 knots.  And although, the Vikings are mostly known for colonizing and conquering, which could be viewed negatively, you would be happy to know that women's rights date back to before the 1100s among vikings.  Women had the right to divorce, own property and were protected by law from sexual harassment.    Well, there you go, and I guess that's a good Segway to the reason for our interest today in Norway- because after those things- when we get to famous Norwegians, it's hard to find one more well known then their native son, Henrik Ibsen, who was also quite the feminist- although as we will talk about next episode- he fought that label as he fought all labels.        Yes- I guess he did.  But let's jump back just a little before we talk about Ibsen specifically,  to talk a little more bit about Norway,  because this little country has made such an important impact on the world but it isn't a country that necessarily and deliberately draws a lot of attention to itself.      I guess that's true.   Are you talking about Lasse Matberg- the real live version of Thor- Instagram and basically the internet has gone nuts over.      Okay- Christy- no drooling.  I was thinking King Harald the fifth.     Most of us don't even realize it is a constitutional monarchy with a very active monarch, Harald V who is 84 years old is known as a symbol of consolation and support; he and his beautiful queen Sonja- enjoy an 80% approval rating.  Which is incredible!     Well, it IS incredible- I'm not sure even Disney World enjoys an 80% approval rating.      Anyway, the modern, the highly educated and urbanized nation of Norway is not the Norway Henrik Ibsen grew up in- at least according to Ibsen.  His world was much more rural -and to hear him describe it, backwards- although, that's probably how people describe Memphis if they compare us to other more glamorous parts of the world.    True, he was born in is the city of Skien in the Telemark region of southern Norway.  It's a port city.  Today the municipality boasts a healthy 54 plus thousand residents and is famous for being the birth place of Henrik Ibsen.  During Ibsen's day it was one of the largest and  oldest cities in Norway  The Ibsen family was a solidly middle-class family apparently well respected and prosperous.  Both sides of his family tree were well established, they had worked and made their money in the trade and shipping industry.      Which was all well and good until something happened in his father's business and the family lost everything.  Apparently it was pretty bad and when Henrik was 15 he dropped out of school, moved out of the home and over 100 miles away to work as a pharmacist  assistant for basically just his room and board.  By age 18 he had fathered a child out of wedlock, which would ultimately be raised by his mother's family, and although he supported the child financially until the child was 15, I'm not sure they ever even met.     Well, so far, there's nothing in the story you're telling that would indicate to me that this is the man that is going to revolutionize theater as we know it and become the second most produced playwright in the world after William Shakespeare.  Exactly, he did not have a charmed childhood, but I will say, even as a child he dreamed of greatness.  His sister Hedvig told a story after he became famous about a conversation she remembered they had one day as they walked walked up Bratsberg hill in Telemark.  He told his sister that what he wanted to do in his life was  "to achieve 'the greatest and most perfect of all possible forms of greatness and perfection'."    HA!!  Well, I would laugh at that, but there's a real sense that he came close to doing something akin to that with the theater.     And so it goes to show you that should never count yourself out- even if you feel like you have no privilege in this life or have screwed everything up with what you do have.  You're never done til you're dead!  It's a nice thought. But back to ibsen, it's looking rough for little Henrik-at age 18- he's got no education, a child to support and a couple of plays that he wrote in his spare time stashed away. So he decides to do what a lot of us do- he left the little town of Grimstad where he was the pharmacy assistant and moved to the big city- Oslo, although at the time the name of Oslo was Christiania.  He'd been in the health care business so it's not shocking he'd decided to go to university and get a degree in medicine.  Unfortunately for him at the time, although maybe not for the world, he failed his college entrance exams.  And even though you'd think that would be a low point, I'm not sure it really was because it was around this time he cut a break in a field that he enjoyed far more.  So, I mentioned he had a couple of plays that he'd written in his spare time in Grimstad, well one of them got staged!  So after all the missteps up to that point,  by age 23 he'd had his first play performed- pretty incredible.  After this  a few more doors opened, and now instead of being an assistant to a pharmacist- he became – basically with zero experience, the assistant director to Bergen's main theater.       This, of course, is the moment his life changed forever because he clearly found his calling.  He no longer wanted to be a doctor- he would become a playwright.  But what is even more interesting is that he found himself at a particular historical junction for the history of Norway – as far as theater goes is not radically different than what we saw with William Butler Yeats.  Norway, like Ireland had an interest in creating its own unique theater tradition.  While Ireland had been colonized by the British; Norway had been ruled by Denmark for over 400 years.  But now there is this movement to start a true Norwegian theater company that will produce Norwegian plays- that would help shape a unique Norwegian identity.      Many of us don't really understand that  Norway had even been a part of Denmark for 400 years, which, of course,  is quite a long time.  And we certainly don't understand how that affected culture, but of course it would.   Denmark had asserted a lot of cultural and language influence.  But at this point in the story, there was a real interest in establishing a Norwegian identity eparate from the Danish one, and so the interest in establishing an original Norwegian theater came along at this time fortunately for Ibsen.      True, and although The Theater in Cristiania had finanicial problems and Ibsen wasn't particularly super-successful at making a go of it- now that we know his style- he would never have been a good fit for creating patriotic pieces, but nevertheless, because  He was involved in writing, directing, staging and producing over 145 plays- he learned a craft- and that is the legacy that created the opportunity for his art to take off on its own.     He also met and married Suzannah Thoreesen in 1858 and shortly after, they had their only child, Sigurd, who btw- grew up to become the prime minister of Norway in Stockholm- another story but worth googling.  Christy, I know you'll probably point this out later but Suzannah was quite an independent and intelligent woman, and many credit her for Ibsen's ultimate success.      I know!!  And I think we should talk about her, but I'll table it, at least for the moment.  The theater in Crisitiania went bankrupt; Ibsen was sued for incredible amounts of debt and he almost got himself thrown into debtors prison literally escaping the country.  He swung a government writing grant and moved his family to Italy.  Although he never stayed in one town very long, he would stay away from Norway and in this sort of self-imposed exile for 27 years.  When he finally returned to Norway,-he would go back as a hero- a celebrity- albeit a controversial one.    It's amazing to me that although, his body was physically out of Norway, it seems Ibsen's mind never left the place- even if he did insult it from time to time.  His plays, including A Doll's House, are set in Norway and what is even wilder, they are written in Dano-Norwegian- the common written language of Denmark and Norway.  And they were published by a Danish publisher, Gyldendal.  In fact, they were performed first in Sweden- not Italy or Germany where he was residing.     True, it's kind of a roundabout way to success and really an unlikely success it seems.  Most People watching his performances were watched translated pieces- usually that doesn't work well.  But in his case, the emotion, the appeal translated cross-culturally- and really still does.  Also, Ibsen was a far cry for a self-promoting influencer like we think of today.  He was kind of Ibsen a shy and antisocial dude.  He had no privileged family from a famous place to create buzz.  He was from this relatively small and undistinguished town, writing in a relatively obscure language-but all of a sudden he emerged and became an icon.  Like you said, today, his plays are the second most performed plays in the world- only behind William Shakespeare's- as you mentioned- incredible.  They are translated today in 78 different languages and performed all over the world. Nevermind the fact that he literally changed the way theater would be done from that point onward, and in fact is still done to this day.    Okay, I've heard people say that before, but I'm not sure I understand what you mean.  And even after reading A Doll's House, I don't understand how it's revolutionary besides the content being obviously controversial for the period.  In many ways, the plot and the characters seem so ordinary.    And that, darling, is exactly the genius of it.  Here's what was going on. And think about Shakespeare for a moment.  UP to that point, the theater had been a place where people went to get away from the world- and maybe it still is to some degree.  The plays produced were otherworldly.   They were about fairies and monsters; they were about kings- all the things Shakespeare writes about-  perhaps the things Marvel studios gets excited about- obviously there is nothing wrong escapism- that's a big part of performing arts.  And  In fact, that's where Ibsen started, he wrote about Vikings , monsters and all those things we enjoy in commercially successful movies today.  Except he chose not to stay in that vein.  He studied his craft; he began to pay attention to some key changes in what they were doing in theater in Moscow, Germany and other parts of Europe.  And those things appealed to him.  So, he made a shift- instead of writing stories that took us out of the world- he would write stories that reflect the world.  He would write the story of our lives.   He began writing plays that were realistic.  And when I use that word, I mean the theater movement called realism.  The plays he's most famous for start with the twelve he wrote between 1877-1899.  Some people call them his sociological plays; other people just call them the Ibsen cycle.  Either way, Ibsen began writing about middle class people- not kings, queens or fairies.  He wrote about problems- real life and difficult problems, and he wrote in prose.  He didn't use iambic pentameter or verse of any kind.   He wasn't going to have his characters give long soliloquies or speak with all these cheesy asides.  They weren't going to expound on philosophy in obvious ways- although these plays are extremely psychological.  The would be filled of short exchanges between characters.  They would say the sort of things we say and do the sort of things we tend to do- whether we admit it or not. Now to us that seems normal or maybe even obvious because that's how most of our television and movie experience is- but we got that idea from this movement.      And what's more, the staging was going to be different.  And again this may seem fairly obvious to us, but it was new when it happened- with realism the stage is going to have a box set- that means there are three walls and the pretend fourth wall which faces the audience.  The audience, or us watching, would pretend we are looking into someone's lives.   The drama would appear ordinary, maybe even bland, but the idea would be that the play would be psychologically driven- the plot would not be   the thing- the interior lives of the people involved would be the thing.  The protagonist would rise up not against dragons but against something much more complicated, more internal- the sort of things we rise up against- things like syphyllis- the disease Dr. Rank inherited from his father.      Oh my, so what about A Doll's House-    Exactly, what exactly IS a Doll's house about. BTW- even that title is controversial- in Norwegian it's really a Doll House- which isn't quite the same as a Doll's House- anyway- When it came out- it absolutely rocked the world- almost as much if not more than syphyllis.     It premiered in Copenhagen in December of 1879 to a packed house.  The applause was incredible and every one left the theater scandalized.  When it played in Germany, the lead actress, a famous actress, refused to perform the ending as written and forced Ibsen to rewrite the ending to her liking.  She was a storng enough voice that she threatened  she'd get someone else to rewrite the ending for him if he didn't change it- and since there were no copyright laws back then, she got her wish.    In Victorian England, the play was censored and forbidden to be performed, and America didn't perform it until 1889- a full ten years later.    The Americans are always slow.      I know- aren't we?    So, are we going to just talk about what other people thought about it, or is it time to find out what the scandal is all about?    Let's do it.  The setting is very simple.  It's set in an unnamed fairly average Norwegian town in an upper middle class home.  The whole thing from start to finish only occupies three days of Christmas.  It  opens with apparent harmony and confidence- a happy feeling and we soon understand that this family is a lot like a lot of middle class families- the family is comfortable but not not conflict free- and conflicts revolve around money-     Oh my- it doesn't get more real than that      One thing we have to bring up when we talk about live theater is that we have to remember that when it comes to plays- the creative experience involves more than the writer.  A drama is more than a written text- much more.  That's the beauty of live performances.   In fact every single performance of every single play by definition cannot help but be unique- even audiences affect how a performance goes.  No actor will ever perform exactly the same two nights in a row.  But beyond that, every actor who plays a role will interpret each character in his or her own way.  For example, Kristine could actually be a good character or a bad character depending on how the actress understands her and portrays her.  Every character will always be like that- bur especially in an Ibsen play.  Even the details of the set will never be the standardized.  Ibsen in his stage directions for A Doll's House, says and I read that the set is, “a comfortable, tastefully but not expensively furnished room.”  What does that look like? Every set will be different.  Every director will choose different things to enhance- from the set to the costuming to the lighting.  All of these collaborative choices affect how we understand and interpret what is going on.    True- but isn't there something of the intent of the creator and should that be respected- and make each performance mostly the same?    It's not that simple.  Let me give you an example, in 2007, in Edinbough, the director cast Torvald the husband as a four foot tall man- on purpose for a thematic reason.      In China, once the play was staged with a Western woman marrying into a Chinese family. All of this is allowed in the theater.      So, this play centers around Nora.  The character of Nora is widely considered one of the most challenging roles in the Western Canon and Deciding what to do with Nora is not a simple thing.  Who is this woman?  This will be a huge discussion between any director in charge and the actress charged with performing the role.    Why is that?  Again, she seems ordinary.      And in a sense, that's it exactly.  She is ordinary.  Her life could be my life.  Her home could be my home.  It is the fact that she seems ordinary that makes her so tremendously complicated.  Because no human is ordinary, not really.  No life, no matter how pampered, is care-free.  Sooner or later we all innately understand this, but then we don't know what to do with this understanding.  Well, Ibsen isn't going to answer that question for us.  In fact, that's exactly what is wants to NOT do.  Ibsen famously said, that a dramatist should never answer questions- only ask them.  And so, what we are left with is  questions- and this play for the last 100 years has created nothing but arguments and questions as to who is this woman?      So, let's ask the most basic of all questions about Nora- What is so enamoring or interesting about an ordinary, upper middle class Norwegian woman named Nora?    For one thing, if you're an actress given this role, you may immediately notice that Nora never leaves the stage.  The stage is the doll house and Nora is the Doll. Nora is always on display- she is always in view- she has no privacy- she has no breaks- and neither does the actress.  Everyone comes and goes- but Nora never has the freedom to breath- and this is the point of it- there is total claustrophobia in this performance-based life of a doll- there is no privacy in this life- this actress, as Nora, will experience the thrill and exhaustion from start to finish of the life of a doll in a doll house.      And how is a theater-viewer supposed to know to notice that?      Well, you likely won't- it's one of those things you intuitively feel even if you don't consciously think about it.  To get back to your question though?  For me, the first question I ask myself when I watch this play and honestly, I'm not sure I ever answer it- Do I like this woman?  Then I find myself asking a series of rambling questions: Is Nora a good person?  Is she a victim?  Is it right to like a doll in a doll house, and if a person likes that life, who am I to judge or dislike her for it?  Is it her exposure and lack of privacy that makes her unlikeable (because honestly, I usually land on the idea that I don't like her really- but I know some people do- in fact Ibsen himself adored her)    Oh my your mind runs wild!  Why would living like this in your mind make someone unlikeable?     Well, you tell me, do humans need privacy? Psychologically, that is.  Does a lack of privacy not to mention autonomy- but let's just stick with privacy- does that change a person in a negative way.      Well, you know I feel about this topic.  When it comes to development of children, it is Absolutely fundamental.  Children need to have secrets.  It gives them autonomy and where they find their humanity.  Parents, the cliché is mothers but dads can be bad about this too, who read their kids cellphone, track their kids ever move, determine their children's friend groups, and basically do their best to control their children's every decision- even if their intentions were pure, almost always raise children who are dysfunctional.  These are often the kids who have secret facebook pages, secret phones, secret boyfriends across the ocean years older, maybe even entirely secret lives.  It is just absolutely critical.      And so we meet Nora- and Ibsen does go a little into her personal history- maybe she's emotionally stunted in her development for being so patronized and controlled, maybe she's just deceptive and manulative by nature- maybe she's both- I guess I see what you mean- Ibsen asking questions but not giving answers.      Let's read the first line of the play,     “Hide the tree carefully, Helene.  The children mustn't catch a glimpse of it until this evening.”    And there you have it- Nora's entire world in the first word- there is something hide.    As we look at Nora we see that she, like many of us, achieve privacy through deception.  But what we don't know and what the  actress has to decide how to communicate to us is WHY is she doing this and what is she trying to achieve by all this?   Is Nora role-playing on purpose in order to get the life she wants?  Is Nora aware that she is a plaything for Torvald- his squirrel, his skylark?  Is this pretending instinctual?  When her deceptions become rather serious, does she even realize this?  Is she aware of the difference between secretly eating macaroons and forgery- I'm really not sure.    But even before we get there, the first scene for me really highlights a high level of deceit and inauthenticity.  The first action on stage is Nora paying a porter twice the cost of the service which wouldn't have stood out really except it's not long after that we begin to understand that one of the themes of the play is the real cost of fiscal irresponsibility, what does it mean by this little detain in the opening act?    I don't know what it means, except to help us understand that Nora lives in an imaginary world.  She pretends and overpaying is just a way to set all of this in motion.  The second action of this play is this business with the macaroons.  Let's read this part of the text?  For me it's hard to read.  It's SO patronizing.     HELMER.  That is like a woman! But seriously, Nora, you know what I think about that. No debt, no borrowing. There can be no freedom or beauty about a home life that depends on borrowing and debt. We two have kept bravely on the straight road so far, and we will go on the same way for the short time longer that there need be any struggle.  NORA.  [moving towards the stove]. As you please, Torvald.  HELMER.  [following her]. Come, come, my little skylark must not droop her wings. What is this! Is my little squirrel out of temper? [Taking out his purse.] Nora, what do you think I have got here?  NORA.  [turning round quickly]. Money!  HELMER.  There you are. [Gives her some money.] Do you think I don't know what a lot is wanted for housekeeping at Christmas-time?  NORA.  [counting]. Ten shillings—a pound—two pounds! Thank you, thank you, Torvald; that will keep me going for a long time.  HELMER.  Indeed it must.  NORA.  Yes, yes, it will. But come here and let me show you what I have bought. And all so cheap! Look, here is a new suit for Ivar, and a sword; and a horse and a trumpet for Bob; and a doll and dolly's bedstead for Emmy,—they are very plain, but anyway she will soon break them in pieces. And here are dress-lengths and handkerchiefs for the maids; old Anne ought really to have something better.  HELMER.  And what is in this parcel?  NORA.  [crying out]. No, no! you mustn't see that until this evening.  HELMER.  Very well. But now tell me, you extravagant little person, what would you like for yourself?  NORA.  For myself? Oh, I am sure I don't want anything.  HELMER.  Yes, but you must. Tell me something reasonable that you would particularly like to have.  NORA.  No, I really can't think of anything—unless, Torvald—  HELMER.  Well?  NORA.  [playing with his coat buttons, and without raising her eyes to his]. If you really want to give me something, you might—you might—  HELMER.  Well, out with it!  NORA.  [speaking quickly]. You might give me money, Torvald. Only just as much as you can afford; and then one of these days I will buy something with it.  HELMER.  But, Nora—  NORA.  Oh, do! dear Torvald; please, please do! Then I will wrap it up in beautiful gilt paper and hang it on the Christmas Tree. Wouldn't that be fun?  HELMER.  What are little people called that are always wasting money?  NORA.  Spendthrifts—I know. Let us do as you suggest, Torvald, and then I shall have time to think what I am most in want of. That is a very sensible plan, isn't it?  HELMER.  [smiling]. Indeed it is—that is to say, if you were really to save out of the money I give you, and then really buy something for yourself. But if you spend it all on the housekeeping and any number of unnecessary things, then I merely have to pay up again.  NORA.  Oh but, Torvald—  HELMER.  You can't deny it, my dear little Nora. [Puts his arm round her waist.] It's a sweet little spendthrift, but she uses up a deal of money. One would hardly believe how expensive such little persons are!  NORA.  It's a shame to say that. I do really save all I can.  HELMER.  [laughing]. That's very true,—all you can. But you can't save anything!  NORA.  [smiling quietly and happily]. You haven't any idea how many expenses we skylarks and squirrels have, Torvald.  HELMER.  You are an odd little soul. Very like your father. You always find some new way of wheedling money out of me, and, as soon as you have got it, it seems to melt in your hands. You never know where it has gone. Still, one must take you as you are. It is in the blood; for indeed it is true that you can inherit these things, Nora.  NORA.  Ah, I wish I had inherited many of papa's qualities.  HELMER.  And I would not wish you to be anything but just what you are, my sweet little skylark. But, do you know, it strikes me that you are looking rather—what shall I say—rather uneasy today?  NORA.  Do I?  HELMER.  You do, really. Look straight at me.  NORA.  [looks at him]. Well?  HELMER.  [wagging his finger at her]. Hasn't Miss Sweet Tooth been breaking rules in town today?  NORA.  No; what makes you think that?  HELMER.  Hasn't she paid a visit to the confectioner's?  NORA.  No, I assure you, Torvald—  HELMER.  Not been nibbling sweets?  NORA.  No, certainly not.  HELMER.  Not even taken a bite at a macaroon or two?  NORA.  No, Torvald, I assure you really—  HELMER.  There, there, of course I was only joking.  NORA.  [going to the table on the right]. I should not think of going against your wishes.  HELMER.  No, I am sure of that; besides, you gave me your word— [Going up to her.] Keep your little Christmas secrets to yourself, my darling. They will all be revealed tonight when the Christmas Tree is lit, no doubt.  NORA.  Did you remember to invite Doctor Rank?      Read this part.    Nora hides macaroons from her husband.  He wants to control her to every level, but she does seem to like the pay off of being taken care of.   We also see that he moralizes.  We see that his pet grievance is debt.  He is going out of his way to condemn it and she goes out of her way to supplant him.     It's a complicated co-existence.  Who are we to judge here- Nora for being a liar?  At this point, I feel sympathy for her.   I would even say the way this reads to me is that this man, Torvald doesn't want to control Nora, he believes he OWNS her.  She is his property.  His pet.  He loves her, but as a pet- an expensive hobby- I'd say, Christy, don't take offense to this, but he loves Nora in the way a guitarist might love his favorite Stratocaster.     Oh dear- that's getting close to home.       But, they have worked out a deal.  Do we let either party off the hook?  She lies and deceives, but she has no concerns in the world but to be a doll.  She loves stuff- she loves buying- she loves money- they have made a deal- she is a play thing- but she is also an expensive past time.      And- again- we are smacked with life- these kinds of deals are made all the time.  One of the more famous philosophical statements on that topic springs of course from the mouth of Marilyn Monroe when she sings, “Diamonds are a girl's best friend.”  I'm really not sure Ibsen wants us to pass judgement on her- but he does seem to be questioning the deal they've made.  Is this the deal we should be making?  It seems obvious that Torvald and Nora do not have any real communication or human relationship with each other- they manipulate each other, play with each other, even enjoy each other, but they are not connecting on any real and human level.  Is this comfortable life coming at the cost of their humanity?  What is that cost?     And to think that all that has happened is that she's bought macaroons.      I know- it's in the subtext of those macaroons!!! BTW- when I hear someone talk about macaroons I think of this cooking show the girls and I used to watch when they were living called “Sweet Genius”.  It was the first baking show I'd ever watched, and they were always making macaroons.  We don't have those really in Memphis, so when went to Paris and saw all those macaroons, we did exactly what Nora did and stuffed our mouth with them.    Hahahaha!  I can see you three, staking out the macaroon counters on the Champs Elysee-    That's exactly what we did!!!!  They're truly amazing and not easy to bake.  I tried and failed.    Well, I don't think Nora bakes.  And we see that Helmer disapproves of macaroons.  But more than that- They don't share  a life like we would understand healthy couples to do.      Yes- there is so much that is being introduced right here at the beginning- we meet the children and see that they are dolls too.  There is nothing in this text to suggest Nora is a nurturing mother.   We don't see her building with them anything different  than what she has built with Torvald- they have fun- but it's all very distant.  We also have a hint that this style of relationship is established by her father, perpetuated by Torvald but also extended to the next generation.  The nurse seems to take care of the children.  Nora plays with them when she wants to, but it's established early on, and then it will be explicitedly stated in Act 3, that as Nora is to Torvald so the children are to Nora.       Everyone plays a role it seems?  And I'm not sure Ibsen is endorsing this way of life.      Like I said, the man likes to ask questions and to not answer them.      And so I guess we will for the next two episodes.  Next time we will finish discussing Act 1 and move through Act 2.  The final week, we will look at the concluding scene that has scandalized the world for 100 years.      And yet, it is all so ordinary!!!    And yet not-  thanks for listening!.....               

JackAM FM
Cait Called The Twist

JackAM FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 175:34


They embraced. Both Penn Holderness and his wife Kim. The halogen lights caught the tears on their cheeks and made them shine like diamonds. Ironic that in this strange new world, those tears were worth more than an entire sea of diamonds. Much like this world, their tender moment wasn't to last and it was Penn who attempted to break first—ever the man on a mission—but his wife held him fast. Pulled him back, pulled him down so that their foreheads touched. She looked into his eyes, and pushed her forehead into his, harder than she ought to. Hoping that maybe if she applied enough force she could finally pierce the skin. Crush the bone that separated, to finally get through to him, or perhaps to finally understand him —the man he had become. Penn broke first. This time with more force and she let him. What choice did she have? “You don't know that.” he said, his response was delayed and directed at her earlier declaration. That common refrain that seemed to drive the two of them to tears more and more often. He turned from her and resumed stepping into his proximity suit. A shiny silver affair with built in helmet and footwear, raided from a fire station when it all went down, capable of withstanding up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. “Let's say you're right. Let's say there are others.” She said. “Why waste your time with this? Internets been gone for god knows how long.” “Which is why we broadcast.” said Penn and he rapped on the cold metal wall behind him, and the sound reverberated throughout the entire bunker. Kim couldn't take it. She broke down again. “Please don't go out there ,” she all but whispered. “Don't leave me all alone.” “I have to.” Penn said, and he worked both arms into the suit. “It's dangerous.” “That's what the suits for.” “Every time..” Kim began, and Penn stopped his preparations, stared at his wife with tenderness in his eyes. “Every time you go out...I feel like you leave a piece of yourself out there.” Seeing his wife as she was, Penn fought back both his desire to comfort her, and his desire to weep. He smiled as best he could. “Guess I'm just full of holes then,” he said. And he was right. He was damaged —leaking. He was a Swiss-cheesed levee that had been pouring out since before everything began, before the children. He would never tell Kim, though he suspected she could sense it, that soon there would be nothing more to spill. His will to live emptied out, gone to where all the water in the world had gone. To where all his kids had gone, his parents. Just —gone. Until then though, he'd do the only thing he could do. Retread the steps he took when life was worth living. What more could you ask of a living ghost? So he left his wife crying, slipped on his helmet, attached the oxygen tanks and brought up his equipment to the steel door at the top of the stairs. The one with the tiny view port like a welders mask. Once at the top he worked the wheel of the air-locked door, which eventually hissed open. Exposed to the outside he greeted the scorched earth and the perpetual ash that swirled and rode the hot air. He spied the red and wounded sky and began to set up his things: the camera, the speakers. He made sure everything was in frame and then he started up the karaoke version of Alicia Keyes' classic hit. And when it came time for him to do the chorus he belted out his own version of it into the microphone that was recording inside his suit. “THIS .WORLD. IS ON FIYAAAAAAAAHHHH!” Topics discussed on today's episode include: Cait Called The Twist, SlurpFam Fall Fashion Week Month, James Corden Car Talk, Notes From Van and more! Airdate: 09/17/21 - https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1151305250

Aiming For The Moon
Saving the Dogs with Biohacking: David Ishee (Dog Breeder and Biohacker)

Aiming For The Moon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 23:43


In this episode, we discuss David Ishee's mission to cure the genetic diseases of dogs through biohacking. Impact Books:1. "Dune" series 2. "Fahrenheit 451" Our Website: https://www.aimingforthemoon.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aiming4moon/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Aiming4MoonYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6-TwYdfPcWV-V1JvjBXk

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: For many Coloradans climate change is affecting them now; The Denver Coliseum

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 12:15


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Thursday September 16th.   Today - For many Coloradans signs of climate change are all around them. And after this summer, the days of Coloradans putting off climate change seem to be over.    But before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today, we're going back to September 16th 1949 when city dignitaries gathered on the south side of the National Western Stock Show grounds in northeast Denver to break ground on the Denver Coliseum.    For nearly a quarter century it hosted musical acts including Black Sabbath, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, the Eagles, Led Zeppelin, Elvis Presley and the Rolling Stones.   Now, our feature story.   For many Coloradans, climate change is happening now — all around them. They're choking on ozone spikes, losing favorite hiking spots like Hanging Lake, sweating through fall school days and feeling the wildfire smoke descend. The scientific consensus is that human-caused climate change has raised average temperatures in the West about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit in recent decades, and closer to two full degrees on maximum-temperature days. And after this summer, the days of Coloradans putting off climate change as a worry for hurricane-ravaged Louisiana or a water-challenged Middle East seem to be over. Mike Booth tells us more.   To read more of Mike Booth's reporting on climate change, go to coloradosun.com.  And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   The Aurora Police Department consistently violates state and federal law in a pattern of racially biased policing and excessive use of force, according to a year-long investigation into the agency launched by the Colorado Attorney General's Office. The department has been mired in a string of headline-grabbing controversies in recent years, including the 2019 death of Elijah McClain — an unarmed, 23-year-old Black man who died after an encounter with Aurora police and paramedics. Aurora police Chief Vanessa Wilson said her agency is committed to change. Attorney General Phil Weiser, a Democrat, launched the patterns and practices investigation into the department amid protests surrounding McClain's death. It's the first such investigation launched by Weiser's office under a sweeping police accountability law passed by the Colorado legislature in 2020.    Colorado Gov. Jared Polis married his longtime partner, Marlon Reis, on Wednesday afternoon. The couple wed at a small, traditional Jewish ceremony that was held outdoors with family and friends present. Every guest was required to test negative for COVID-19, the governor's office said. Polis, 46, is the nation's first openly gay elected governor.   The Polis administration is banking on an untested, first-in-the-nation type of regulation to sharply cut oil and gas sector emissions to meet state greenhouse gas targets — drawing praise from the industry, but roiling environmental groups and some local officials. The draft “greenhouse gas intensity target” rule, to be submitted to the Air Quality Control Commission on Friday, aims to cut overall emissions from oil and gas production by requiring operators to reduce emissions per barrel of oil equivalent they produce. But it has never been used industry wide, is based on incomplete data, and gives companies a free hand in deciding how to cut those emissions.   College leaders across Colorado worried students wouldn't show up this fall, especially due to concerns about the delta variant. But Colorado community college enrollment dipped just slightly over last year, and no school across the state experienced more than a single-digit percentage drop in enrollment.   For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. And don't forget to tune in again tomorrow for a special holiday episode. Now, a quick message from our editor.   The Colorado Sun is non-partisan and completely independent. We're always dedicated to telling the in-depth stories we need today more than ever. And The Sun is supported by readers and listeners like you.   Right now, you can head to ColoradoSun.com and become a member. Starting at $5 per month for a basic membership and if you bump it up to $20 per month, you'll get access to our exclusive politics and outdoors newsletters. Thanks for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE
Ep. 211: Reuniting with Lila Lipscomb & Abdul Henderson

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 70:51


Become a member of Michael Moore's Substack here: https://www.michaelmoore.com/subscribe A full transcript of this episode will soon be available here: https://rumble.media/category/podcast/transcripts/ Watch "Fahrenheit 9/11" here: https://youtu.be/cebnlqi9RGQ?t=2282 ***** After the free screening of “Fahrenheit 9/11” to mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11, Mike spoke with spoke with Lila Lipscomb, the mother from Flint, Michigan who lost her son in Iraq, and former Marine Corporal Abdul Henderson, who refused to follow any further orders to fight in a war based on lies. Both Lila and Abdul shared their stories in Fahrenheit 9/11. With America re-considering the legacy of 9/11 and America's so-called "war on terror", Mike is reunited with Lila and Abdul to get their thoughts and hear updates on their lives. ***** Underwriters: TrueBill -- Save money by cancelling your unused subscriptions at Truebill.com/RUMBLE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rumble-with-michael-moore/message

Jay's Analysis
V for Vendetta, 12 Monkeys, I Robot, Ready Player One & More Dystopia NOW Ep 3 (Half)

Jay's Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 84:36


We will cover the next chronological films in our dystopia series, including Demolition Man in 2032, V for Vendetta, 12 Monkeys, I Robot, Ready Player One, Event Horizon, Fahrenheit 451. My favorites here are now Demolition Man and 12 Monkeys, while the rest of these I find severely lacking. Never the less, we will have fun as we decode and deconstruct these texts. The full show can be obtained by subscribing to my site below.

Newshour
Climate change: World now sees twice as many days over 50C

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:09


The number of extremely hot days every year when the temperature reaches 50C has doubled since the 1980s, a global BBC analysis has found. They also now happen in more areas of the world than before, presenting unprecedented challenges to human health and to how we live. Also in the programme: poll highlights climate anxiety among youngsters, we hear from one; and Guinea's military junta starts consultation to try to build a consensus after the country's latest coup d'etat. (Photo: A man takes a drink close to a street thermometer (reading 49 degrees Celsius, 120.2 Fahrenheit) in southern Spain on the 13th of August. Credit: EPA).

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

When you think you have heard it all, and all one can do is shake ones' head, one more thing comes along to make you wonder to what level(s) can the idiocy reach.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Los Angeles Reduces Green Energy Goal by a Decade

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 5:13


Los Angeles is fast-tracking its green energy plan. The City Council approved a plan for 100% renewable energy by 2035. That's inline with President Biden's goal, and a decade sooner than LA's previous plan. The City Council decision comes after a comprehensive study that looked at everything from greenhouse gas emissions, public health, and cost versus benefit analysis to electricity demand, rooftop solar, and other renewable energy options.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.LA hopes to “set the stage for the country” and the rest of the world with LA100. (1) The transition would create about 9,500 clean energy jobs and cost between 57 and $87 billion, but according to LADWP General Manager Martin Adams, much of the investment would also coincide with infrastructure replacement that is already on the city's “to do” list.He says: “When this study started three-and-a-half years ago… the idea was to be where we want to be by 2045. So we have now shaved a decade off that timetable and we know we have a roadmap that will get us to 100% clean energy by 2035.”Adams says the city is going to “take this very seriously and make this happen.” And Councilman Mitch O'Farrell says that “LA100 is not a utopian gesture. It is a work plan for a world in trouble.”Code Red for HumanityThis comes as California firefighters are once again battling three massive wildfires, and just a few weeks after the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change published a report called “Code Red for Humanity.” (2) The report states that global warming is “unequivocally caused by human activities” and warns that the average world temperature will likely hit a dangerous threshold within the next 20 years. That threshold is about 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than a pre-industrial average and is generally viewed as the hottest that humanity could handle. Climate scientists say average temperatures are already 2 degrees hotter, and we are already seeing the impact of that with more extreme weather-related events and wildfires.LA100 Renewable Energy StudyLos Angeles partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to complete the study. (3) It shows that LA can hit an 84 to 100% clean energy goal by 2035 with a 76 to 100% decline in greenhouse gases. Results show the economic disruption would be minimal compared to the creation of jobs, economic output, public health benefits, and greenhouse gas reductions. The transition will require the shutting down of gas-operated power plants, and the massive adoption of solar and wind energy along with measures to improve energy efficiency, and energy storage.One big change will be the need for rooftop solar on homes and multi-unit buildings. The report says that the city has more than 13 gigawatts of solar rooftop potential. Private homes and multi-family buildings account for more than half of that potential, but off-site green energy production and energy storage will be needed to supply enough electricity to multi-unit buildings.LA100 Equity StrategiesAnother aspect of the plan is to make sure that everyone shares in the benefits, despite income levels. Policy officials say that will require “intentionally designed policies and programs” to ensure a fair distribution of the green energy benefits. A study on “Equity Strategies” was launched in July. (4) It looks at:1 - Access to these green energy programs2 - Local power grid upgrades3 - Assistance for renter participation in these programs4 - Charging stations for electric vehicles, and 5 - Impacts to housing and transportation, among several other issues.Adams says: “As LADWP expands these programs and adds many more, we must ensure that customers who are impacted by poor air quality, and have the least ability to afford higher electric bills, are able to benefit from the clean energy transformation.”The announcement puts Los Angeles in the forefront of a nationwide effort to address climate change. The LA County website has a chart that shows how many days a year the county hits temperatures over 95 degrees, and a forecast for an increase in those ultra-hot days if we don't take action to slow climate change now. (5) If you'd like to read more about this, check for links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://www.dailynews.com/2021/09/01/la-votes-for-100-renewable-energy-by-2035-a-decade-sooner-than-planned/2 - https://www.reuters.com/business/environment/un-sounds-clarion-call-over-irreversible-climate-impacts-by-humans-2021-08-09/3 - https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy21osti/79444-ES.pdf4 - https://www.ladwpnews.com/ladwp-launches-groundbreaking-la100-equity-strategies-initiative/5 - http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/eh/climatechange/ExtremeHeatNClimateChange.htm

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #476 - The Pancake Man Made Me Do It

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 173:00


On the trail of a missing opinion, an old friend comes across a secretive group attempting to summon a terrifying supernatural entity that will help his friend discover his true feelings about a film. On Episode 476 of Trick or Treat Radio we are joined by our old friend Ghetto Tim to talk about the Fantasia Film Fest and to also discuss the film The Empty Man from first time feature director David Prior! We also discuss the most depraved zombie movie of all time, the final film 20th Century Fox produced, and films to keep an eye on over the next year. So grab your favorite syrup, wade through the thick miasma, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: RIP Art Metrano, Taxidermia, MZ's Coffin Corner, Judge William B Keene, Police Academy, Jim Varney in drag, The Three Stooges, hashpipe alley, History of the World Part I, Macho Man Randy Salvage, Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast, Mario Cantone, RIP Michael K. Williams, Hap and Leonard, RIP Daffney, Steampipe Alley, Towering Inferno, Irwin Allen, Krypton, Genndy Tartakovsky, Andrei Tarkovsky, Dexter's Laboratory, Peter Lorre, Ken Burns Cartoon Documentaries, Jodorowsky's Hungry Hungry Hippos, Fahrenheit 451, Soylent Green, See Hear Podcast, Woodstock ‘99, Fantastic Fest, ICP and Gwar documentaries, Songwriter, Rock & Rule, Fantasia Film Fest, great international films, Joe Bob Briggs' The Last Drive-In, The Sadness, Suicide Squad, Charlotte Film Fest, Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched, Kier-La Janisse, Severin, Mad God, Phil Tippet, Alien on Stage, Christopher Guest, The Infinite Two Minutes, Tenet, The Spine of Night, Junkhead, Cat 3, Philosophy of Knife, Taiwanese Horror, Raven Banner, Uzumaki, The Boxer's Omen, Shaw Brothers, Montreal Canada, Hellbenders, Glass House, Field Sobriety Test, white eye patches, Hollywood Salvage, David Prior, David Fincher, The Empty Man, bowl of chili analogy, Cullen Bunn, Boom! Studios, Kill List, Carpenter, Raimi, the meaning of miasma, Kubrick, the last 20th Century Fox Film, Cronenberg, Lovecraft, cosmic horror, long opening sequences, Lustmord, Nomads, Beyond the Black Rainbow, Panos Cosmatos, In the Mouth of Madness, Angel Heart, Hereditary, The Ring, Nietzsche, Monique and Unique, Emmanuel Lewis, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Raw Force, creepypasta, Savageland, the Tubi Pimp, Weng's Chop, An Exemption to Life, and The Pancake Verdict.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/ETE79ZkSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2116/the-usain-bolt-of-asteroids/ On August 13, 2021, astronomers made an amazing discovery. They found an asteroid that is closer to our Sun than any other space rock.  Its closest approach to the Sun is 20 million kilometers or 12 million miles. That's 0.13 au or 13% of the average distance from Earth to the Sun. That's close enough that the surface temperature of this rock is about 500° Celsius or 900° Fahrenheit! Toasty! Hot enough to melt lead! It's now called 2021 PH27.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org. —Written & Record

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Hour 4 - Emily Gets Animated

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 20:50


We discuss Emily going to a San Antoni anime convention this weekend and another round of Are You Smarter Than Jason Dick. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nostalgia Trap
Nostalgia Trap - Episode 289: 9 Theses on 9/11, Part One w/ Justin Rogers-Cooper

Nostalgia Trap

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 85:01


To mark the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Justin Rogers-Cooper joins us for a trilogy of episodes considering the event's legacy and long-term impact. In Part One, we consider the immediate shock of the day and how it seemed to instantly give birth to a new historical era, examining how Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 and Jon Stewart's sappy Daily Show monologues reflect the sentimental nationalism that gripped American liberals in the attack's wake.