Podcasts about post covid

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  • 3,975PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about post covid

Show all podcasts related to post covid

Latest podcast episodes about post covid

Integrative Practitioner Podcast
Exploring the Future of Integrative Treatments for COVID-19 Long Haul Syndrome

Integrative Practitioner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 17:01


Richard Horowitz, MD, joins Integrative Practitioner associate editor, Avery St. Onge, to discuss COVID-19 Long Haul Syndrome, its symptoms, how its diagnosed as well as current and future treatments for the condition. Dr. Horowitz, who specializes in treating Lyme disease and other tick-borne disorders, draws parallels between Post-COVID-19 and chronic Lyme disease and discusses similarities between possible integrative treatments for the two conditions. This episode is sponsored by Rupa Health and is brought to you in part by the Integrative Healthcare Symposium. Find us at integrativepractitioner.com or e-mail us at IPEditor@divcom.com. Theme music: “Upbeat Party” by Scott Holmes via freemusicarchive.org and “Carefree” by Kevin Mcleod via incompetech.com.

Deep State Radio
A Post-COVID Boom, a Ukraine War & the "Goulash Archipelago": Predictions for 2022

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 24:07


As we begin a new year, the threats around the globe remain the same. Russia may invade Ukraine, Iran's nuclear ambitions may come to fruition, and democratic backsliding continues apace around the globe. To forecast what might happen this year and offer some hope about some potential foreign policy bright spots, DSR host David Rothkopf talked with Ed Luce of the Financial Times, Kori Schake of the American Enterprise Institute, and David Sanger of the New York Times. Will Russia further invade Ukraine? Are we witnessing the rise of a Hungarian model for illiberal democracy? Can we avoid a cold war with China? Find out the answers to these and other questions as we look ahead to 2022. Don't wait to listen to this prescient conversation.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Perspectives: Faith-Based Investing in a Post-COVID World - Participation and Growth in Faith-Based Investing

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:19


This is Investor Perspectives. I'm the host of Investor Connect, Hall T. Martin, where we connect startups and investors for funding. In our new Investor Perspectives series entitled “Faith-Based Investing in a Post-COVID World”, you'll hear about participation and growth in faith-based investing. As the COVID pandemic passes, we emerge into a new era. The faith-based investing space is now undergoing tremendous change as we shift to a post-COVID world. Faith-based investing takes precedence with many investors in the financial industry. We have investors and startup founders describe the changes coming up. Our guests are: , Founder and CEO,   [01:27], Associate Professor of Finance at and Investment Analyst at [03:19], Director of Private Markets, [09:56], Founder and Managing Principal, [14:13], CEO, [19:32], CEO, [25:09] We hope you enjoy the show. _______________________________For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:      Check out our other podcasts here:    For Investors check out:     For Startups check out:     For eGuides check out:     For upcoming Events, check out      For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group   Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .      

Speakernomics
Business Models Post-COVID with Randy Gage

Speakernomics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:16


After countless hours of practice and experience, you've perfected your key stories and their delivery, but what is the audience truly getting from your stories? Are they walking away with true solutions to their challenges, or did they just hear a brief motivational story they're going to soon forget? This week on the show, we invited Randy Gage, CPAE, to discuss why a good story isn't enough in the post-COVID market and what you can do to become an indispensable resource to your clients. Key Takeaways: What is the applicable message of your story? Stop pitching speeches, start offering solutions Who is Randy Gage, CPAE? In his own words, Randy is a writer who also happens to be a speaker, and a Hall of Fame speaker at that. He teaches individuals about the timeless principles of prosperity and makes them relevant to all of us today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ThePrint
ThePrintAM_WHY DID INEQUALITY IN INDIA DECLINE POST COVID-19 LOCKDOWNS?

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:49


Evolving Past Alzheimer's
Our Sense of Smell - Brainwaves of COVID and Alzheimer's with Thom Cleland PhD

Evolving Past Alzheimer's

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 54:39


This is a more theoretical episode that gives us some idea about what might be happening with the rhythms of an Alzheimer's or POST-COVID brain.  Our guest, Dr Thom Cleland, is a professor of theoretical and systems neuroscience at Cornell University.  His research is particularly focused on the mammalian olfactory system and on the emergent dynamical networks that govern communication and information transfer among brain areas.   We talk about brain circuits, neuronetworks and how this relates to our sense of smell and Alzheimer's in general. For more information on how you can prevent or push back against Alzheimer's and other dementias visit Kemperwellness.com or call (216) 337-1400.  We have support programs, virtual classes, and many other options. Consider supporting the Evolving Past Alzheimer's podcast at patreon.com/evolvingpast so we can continue to bring you the information most helpful to you.   1:42 - What we can learn from looking at brain waves  8:58 - The olfactory system and how it works  13:57 - What happens to people's brain waves when they are experiencing dementia processes  24:43 - How the olfactory system connects to the memory and can help with dementia intervention  36:18 - Is losing the sense of smell a sign of neurodegeneration? 

Deutschland heute - Deutschlandfunk
Klinikdirektor über Post-Covid - „Ein Langzeitproblem für den Betroffenen, aber auch für die Gesellschaft“

Deutschland heute - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 15:36


Etwa jeder sechste bis zehnte SARS-CoV-2-Infizierte bekommt Post- oder Long-Covid, rund 80 Prozent leiden auch nach über einem Jahr noch unter chronischer Erschöpfung oder anderen Symptomen, erklärt Andreas Stallmach von der Uniklinik Jena. Bislang gebe es nur unterstützende, keine ursächlichen Therapien.Sawicki, Peterwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Deutschland heuteDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

ET Markets Podcast - The Economic Times
ETMarkets Investors' Guide: Post-Covid investors, buckle up for your first exam in 2022

ET Markets Podcast - The Economic Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 17:44


100% Ska Podcast
100% Ska Podcast S04E44 – Post-COVID Winter Ska Party and the Last Episode of 2021

100% Ska Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 69:57


Well, after a brief disappearing act to get over COVID, your DJ Ryan Midnight is back for one last episode Continue reading100% Ska Podcast S04E44 – Post-COVID Winter Ska Party and the Last Episode of 2021 The post 100% Ska Podcast S04E44 – Post-COVID Winter Ska Party and the Last Episode of 2021 appeared first on DJ Ryan Midnight - NYC Ska DJ and Podcast Host.

Your Knee Your Health
Be Afraid of the Future of Healthcare - Access will be limited and very different post-covid

Your Knee Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 20:59


Covid is once again ravaging the world and the healthcare systems that people depend on. The United States spends more per person than any other country in the world yet the US does not have the best health metrics.Covid has not helped. Hospitals are overwhelmed. Doctors, nurses and other hospital workers are at the breaking point. PPE is still limited. Elective surgeries are cancelled. Wait times are longer than ever.The future is bleak. Many have left the profession of healthcare. I doubt many people will look eagerly to enter medical school, nursing school or some other hospital based profession. Patients will still need care. The ability to access care will be compromised. Wait times will be longer. Patients will suffer. The future is coming but it will be different and the effects of covid will leave a stain on healthcare systems for a long time. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/YourKneeYourHealth)

Business Standard Podcast
AIIB's Erik Berglöf on recovery in a post-Covid world

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 6:36


Q1: Welcome Dr Berglöf. We will like to know from you – the report has talked about hinterland development. But in these hinterlands, the market is absent. So, is it viable to put up manufacturing units in the remote areas? Ans: >I ndian hinterlands need not have to be the way they are today > China has also struggled with hinterland development for decades > Railway to Europe helped Chinese hinterlands to participate in global value chain   Q2: Do you think India has lessons to learn from China, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh – the primary Asian economies that have done well on economic recovery and also in terms of export? Ans: > Developing countries increased their presence in global value chain in the last 10 years > Global value chain has increasingly become fragmented > Bangladesh moved up its garment and textile industry closer to final product > Global value chains are increasingly shifting away from manufacturing towards services and information flows Q3: How important it is for India to have hinterland development, especially because of the experience which the companies as well as the government saw during lockdown last year when huge number of migrant labours travelled back to their villages. Ans: > Infrastructure is important to create opportunities closer to where people live > Infrastructure is necessary but not the only tool to create opportunities  > Need facilities for education, training, health care for people to live closer to where they work   Watch video

Growth Colony: Australia's B2B Growth Podcast
EP#65 Leandeo Perez from Salesforce: What Does Marketing Leadership Post-COVID Look Like [Rebroadcast]

Growth Colony: Australia's B2B Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 42:46


In this episode, host Shahin Hoda chats with Leandro Perez, Vice President, Asia Pacific Marketing at Salesforce, about how he manages his team and executive stakeholders in the post-COVID world.  Leandro stresses the importance of empathising with employees' situations while working on a project. He also shares his approach to boosting employee morale and ensuring proper upskilling of his team. Furthermore, he talks about how he aligns his KPIs with that of the business when it comes to marketing and the internal communication structures that he has established for providing visibility on all marketing efforts to stakeholders outside of the marketing teams. Leandro leads marketing across the Asia-Pacific region for Salesforce. Previously at Salesforce, he led the global corporate messaging team, responsible for crafting and disseminating the Salesforce corporate narrative to 50,000 employees and millions of customers globally each year. Read the show notes: https://xgrowth.com.au/blogs/marketing-leadership-postcovid/ Join the Slack channel: https://growthcolony.org/slack

Highly Suspect Reviews
Screener Squad: South Park Post COVID Part 1 & 2

Highly Suspect Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 29:13


SOUTH PARK POST COVID PART 1 & 2 TV MOVIE REVIEW The South Park boys are at it again with this epic two part look at a potential future after COVID. Following forty something years after the virus has been eradicated, our favorite group of kids now face the problems of adulthood along with all… Read More »Screener Squad: South Park Post COVID Part 1 & 2

One of Us
Screener Squad: South Park Post COVID Part 1 & 2

One of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 29:13


SOUTH PARK POST COVID PART 1 & 2 TV MOVIE REVIEW The South Park boys are at it again with this epic two part look at a potential future after COVID. Following forty something years after the virus has been eradicated, our favorite group of kids now face the problems of adulthood along with all… Read More »Screener Squad: South Park Post COVID Part 1 & 2

Capital Allocators
#2: Barry Sternlicht – Masterclass in Real Estate in a Post-Covid World, EP.216

Capital Allocators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 64:53


Barry Sternlicht is Chairman, CEO, and Founder of Starwood Capital Group, a $95 billion real estate investment firm with 4,000 employees and 16 offices worldwide. Barry has invested nearly $200 billion across every major real estate asset class around the world. The list of related real estate companies he's created, results, and associated accolades are extensive and truly impressive. Our conversation covers Barry's beginnings as an entrepreneur and real estate investor with some great stories along the way. We then turn to the current opportunity set across real estate asset classes and geographies and close with his approach to managing his own capital through his family office, SPACS, and experience during the pandemic.   Learn More Follow Ted on Twitter at @tseides or LinkedIn Subscribe to the mailing list Access Transcript with Premium Membership

Partners & Pals Podcast
Partners & Pals Season 2 Episode 7: South Park POST-COVID Special, Sean's visit to NYC, Kung-Fu Movies, Hudson Smokehouse BBQ

Partners & Pals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 126:10


Your three homeboys are back with a special episode where we talk kung fu movies, South Park, world travel, restaurant reviews, and much more. Get ready to get your laugh on! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sean0493/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sean0493/support

Cancel This Podcast!
Episode 37: A Festivus For the Rest of Us!

Cancel This Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 165:10


Cancel This Podcast comes to you LIVE on FESTIVUS!  We're going to be airing ALL the grievances tonight bashing the Biden Regime, the Omicron Narrative, Onlyfans Thots, Demi Lovato singing to ghosts, and bad George Floyd art!  We're also going to discuss Spider-Man No Way Home, Matrix Resurrections (should have stayed dead), Paul Feig crying FOUL over the Ghostbusters Box Set, Hawkeye bringing Kingpin to the MCU, South Park's Post-COVID taking on NFTs, Punisher goes woke and retires his iconic skull logo, JK Rowling vs angry Harry Potter trans-hags, Donald Trump turns heel and a whole lot more!  Don't miss it or I'm going to have a lot of problems with you people and you're going to hear about it!!!Support Our Content! LIKE, FOLLOW, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE!Website: https://cancelthispodcast.comBitchute: https://bitchute.com/cancelthispodcastOdysee: https://odysee.com/@cancelthispodcastRumble: https://rumble.com/c/cancelthispodcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5uBcbRt8Kho9b7S132YOM7

Bercoff dans tous ses états
Comment faire la fête dans un monde post-Covid ?

Bercoff dans tous ses états

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


La situation COVID / Comment vont nos restaurants ? L'ambiance est-elle à la fête ? / Comment faire la fête dans un monde post-Covid ?

True Transformation Podcast
Gym Safety + Cleanliness Post-COVID

True Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 4:22


Some of us are lucky enough to get back to the gym already! Since that is the case (and since some of you will be starting fresh this January) here are some quick gym tips for the new or the rusty! --- Grab our Free guide for men who want to get ripped here: http://LookGoodNaked.co Visit TheTrueTransformation.com/coaching to learn more about our high performance fat loss coaching for men 30-65. Follow me on Instagram: @josiahfitness

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
The Importance of IT in a Post-Covid Hybrid World

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 23:09


Les Lance is an IT support professional who also provides business services/advice in security, management, accountancy, law, human resources, marketing and Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big! Connect with Les Lance: Website: http://jgpalletsandtrucking.com/ Twitter: @JGPallets Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/J-G-Pallets-and-Trucking LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/j-&-g-pallets-inc/

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Adaptation: 2021, a Year of Re-Opening, Wine Pricing, and Clean & Natural Wine

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 65:53


2021.  A year with big expectations.  The re-opening of economies around the world with Covid vaccines in distributions instead led to fits and starts with the Delta and Omicron variants.  Wine pricing and costs went through gyrations with the tariffs between the EU and US imposed and then lifted and supply chain disruptions creating both cost and availability issues.  And clean and natural wines continued to become a broader topic amongst wine consumers and the trade who struggle with their definitions and impact.  XChateau assembled a panel across the wine value chain (Producer - Diana Snowden Seysses of Snowden Vineyard and Domaine Dujac;  Importer - Xavier Barlier of MMD; Distributor - Michael Papaleo of Banville Wine Merchants; Retailer - Kyle Meyer of The Wine Exchange; and Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW of The Wine Advocate) to discuss these issues and answer audience questions live on Clubhouse.  A wide-ranging and captivating conversation!Also, people have asked us how they can support the show.  So, we recently launched on  Patreon, where your contributions will help keep the wine business content flowing! Detailed Show Notes: Panelists: Producer perspective - Diana Snowden Seysses, winemaker at Snowden Vineyards in Napa & Domaine Dujac in BurgundyImporter perspective, Xavier Barlier, SVP of Marketing & Communications for Maison Marques & Domaines USA, the importation arm of Champagne Louis Roederer and related companiesDistributor perspective - Michael Papaleo, VP of Sales at Banville Wine Merchants, an importer and distributor focused on the New York, New Jersey, and Mid-Atlantic regionRetailer perspective - Kyle Meyer, Managing Partner of The Wine Exchange, a leader wine retailer in Orange County, CaliforniaWine Critic / Reviewer perspective - Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW, Editor-in-Chief of Robert Parker's The Wine Advocate for the last 13 yearsTopic: Re-opening from CovidDiana - producers in Napa and France weren't required to close. Their biggest concern was keeping employees safeMike - learned how to conduct non-in-person sales (online and on the phone) by creating compelling content and using humor to find ways to engage accountsLuxury wines did well - the average case price pre-pandemic was $136/case; increased by $30/caseOn-premise recovered, but not all the way - 2019 - 55% on-premise, 2020 - 27% on-premise, 2021 - 44% on-premiseCollectors who were drinking through their wines started re-filling their cellarsBanville Wine Merchants was able to expand through the crisis (headcount went from 12 salespeople in 2020 to 16 in 2021, with 21 expected in 2022)Kyle - 2020 Q2/3 - online orders went up dramatically - people bought everything2020 Q4 - needed more inventory, supply chain issues created lack of access that persisted into 2021A lot of people are now comfortable buying wine online, do to a big pick up business75% of sales online pre-Covid, now 85-90%2021 felt more normal, like 2018 (2019 had issues w/ tariffs, etc.)Xavier - MMD's luxury portfolio was positioned mainly towards on-premise Pivoted to off-premise (e.g., high-end Safeway stores in Los Angeles)Champagne shortages in 2021 - Roederer is sold out, pricing of Champagne is higher than it was before, bubbly is more popular than everLisa - The Wine Advocate piggybacked on the success of online wine sales -> web views were up 10x vs. pre-Covid, subscriptions showed strong growth, but not as much as web viewsEvents had to be canceled in 2020, tastings re-factored, including re-packaging wines into little bottles for tastingsPulled off some events (e.g., Kings of Rhone, Bordeaux 2010)End of 2021 - lots of Zoom fatigue, people want in-person events, but push for smaller events (e.g., masterclasses, dinners) to avoid large groupsHope to keep some virtual events in the future w/ hybrid elementsXavier - used to have to travel a lot before, pivoting to virtual staff training in the B2B context in 2021 was more efficient and convenientTopic: Inflation / Wine PricingKyle - some prices have gone up, but more steady than expectedCA prices are going up because of the light 2020 vintage (fires)Bordeaux 2020 releases prices much higherBurgundy - pretty steady pricing with slight increasesGermany - top producers are increasing prices as they were underpriced beforeXavier - w/ tariffs and increased shipping costs, MMD has tried to absorb the impact with their partners - sharing ⅓ producer/supplier, ⅓ importer/MMD, and ⅓ distributorMike - bought long on some products pre-tariffs, which helped through the first half of 2021Did reduce some margins and tried not to pass on increased costs to customersSome allocated Burgundy had to pass on cost increasesLisa - people looked more at domestic wines than usual, specifically 2018 and 2019 Napa wines, primarily because of 2020 fires and short vintageBordeaux 2020 is a lot higher pricing than 2019, even with a less consistent vintageDiana - had supply chain issues pre-Covid, including a glass shortage (as only river sand can be used, not desert sand)Have learned to order early to deal w/ shortages (e.g., glass, labels, capsules)Facing labor shortages globallyWineries have absorbed increased costs of glass and corksTopic: Clean & Natural WinesLisa - there is no definition of clean wine. It's just a marketing fabricationNatural wine is a misleading term as well. It means different things to different peopleKyle - no one has asked for clean wine yetCustomer curiosity around natural wine, but people believe they are faulty wines (e.g., mercaptans, Brettanomyces)Wine merchants need to educate consumers around these topicsXavier - positive part of this trend is that it creates a conversation around wineDiana - need to educate consumers around sustainability. It's positive that people are worried about the climate and sustainability. If there's no definition of the term, it becomes greenwashingAudience Questions: Matthew - how do you best educate, communicate organic sources, and implement sustainable practices without greenwashing? Lisa - be very honest about what you're doingKyle - make them “a” point vs. “the” point, the wine should be “the” point, make the best wine you canZiad - how is the wine sector coping with climate change? Lisa - need to live w/ extreme events (e.g., wildfires, water shortages) more frequently, all over the worldXavier - Piemonte & Champagne have benefitted from climate change, and some have adapted winemaking; e.g., Louis Roederer has evolved their Brut Premier multi-vintage wine to “Collection 242,” a new multi-vintage wine that will have a unique number and release each year as the wine is now based around a single vintageDiana - there are two conversations - one on adaptation and one on decelerating climate change through GHG emission reductionsAdaptation - France has to deal with frost issues, especially in Burgundy, Napa has drought and heat

Good Morning, HR
Talent Development in the Post-COVID Now Normal

Good Morning, HR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:39


With all the talk of the Great Resignation, some companies are actually laying off people and today's guest, Brian Hinchliffe, helps those professionals navigate the recruitment landscape.In his conversation with Mike, Brian asserts that, at least in the case of his job-seeker clients, expectations haven't changed: they are looking for positions where they can grow professionally.They talk about those expectations, which employers are most likely to retain quality talent, and the impact of technology on job interviews. They also discuss what employers should look for in an outplacement relationship.About our Guest:Brian provides outplacement and career transition services at Keystone Partners in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas. He specializes in outplacement, career coaching, recruiting, staffing, as well as talent and organization development.Known for a global and multi-cultural perspective, Brian has varied international and U.S. experience in industries including chemicals, mining, manufacturing, oil and gas, airlines, professional services, financial services, and consulting.Brian was previously CEO of Kurru, LLC, a Texas-talent consulting firm he co-founded, since in 1999. Recently, he led the Executive Career Transition practice of Career Partners International (CPI) LLC in Texas and Louisiana, building a strong Executive Network. As Senior Recruitment Consultant with Performance Search Group, he recruited for difficult-to-fill C-level, Executive, Managerial, and Engineering Technical positions for client companies. As VP Senior Consultant with Right Management in North Texas, Brian provided career and executive coaching.Brian is a certified CPI Senior Career Transition Consultant, a Certified New Horizons Coach, and is certified in the CPI Facilitator Manager as Coach Learning Series®.Brian had international experience as an organizational change consultant and has previously sold HR technology. He holds an MBA from Macquarie Graduate School of Management and a BS in Psychology from the University of Sydney. www.keystonepartners.comGood Morning, HR is brought to you by Imperative—premium background checks with fast and friendly service. For more information about our commitment to quality and excellent customer service, visit us at imperativeinfo.com.If you are an HRCI or SHRM-certified professional, this episode of Good Morning, HR has been pre-approved for half a recertification credit. To obtain the recertification information for this episode, visit goodmorninghr.com.

Running After Age 40
Running Scientific Publication Winter Review- Effects of Running on Knees, Why Runners Run, Running Post COVID and More!

Running After Age 40

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 17:44


Join us for a quick review of the recent running publications from November-December 2021.Recreational runners who recovered from COVID show different running kinetics and muscle activities compared with healthy controlsConsequences and prognosis of running related knee injuries among recreational runnersExercise induced hypertension, arterial stiffness, and cardiorespiratory fitness in runnersExercise plasma boosts memory and dampens brain inflammation via cluterinBone mineral density in high level endurance runners: site-specific characteristicsType of self talk matters: Its effects on perceived exertion, cardiorespiratory, and cortisol responses during an iso-metabolic endurance exerciseAge related differences in motivation of recreational runners, marathoners, and ultra-marathonersMotivation behind running among older adult runnersRunning myth: recreational running causes knee osteoarthritisBe sure to check out all the resources for runners over age 40 at https://runningwithgrit.com.

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money
What's ahead? The post-Covid social trends that will stick, with Simon Kuestenmacher

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 41:28


How has the pandemic re-shaped your life? It would be very unusual if you hadn't had some major upheavals over the last couple of years, but what's going to remain as a long-term trend, a legacy of the lockdowns, and what fads are soon going to be forgotten. I'm sure many of us would like to forget the last couple of years, but they will be pretty hard to forget. In fact, it's likely Covid will leave scars on some of us, how we do things what we feel comfortable with and how we want to live, but Covid has also brought with a couple of positive innovations, it has brought forward a number of trends which were probably going to happen anyway and these will improve our lives. In today's show, I want to discuss these because whether you are a property investor, a business owner, or a professional understanding these social trends post-Covid will be critical for your success. And who better to discuss them with than our regular guest, leading demographer Simon Kuestenmacher, so welcome to today's show. How has Covid changed social trends? As we move into a new world of what some will call Covid normal, what will we look back on as a short-term fad, and what will last forever. Which trends will last? Online shopping? Working from home? Where do we want to live and how do we want to live? That's what I'm going to ask leading demographer Simon Kuestenmacher, director of the Demographics Group because if we understand how the pandemic re-shaped our wish list, not just for housing and property, but for many things in life, it will make us better investors, business people, and entrepreneurs. Let's look at a number of social trends that will shape demand and the way we will be living moving forward. Work from home Before Covid, just 5% of workers worked from home. During lockdown, at-home workers approached 50%. It's likely that the trend of working from home will continue moving forward. If nothing else, employers and workers will work out hybrid arrangements – workers will be partially remote, partially in-person In the longer term, the proportion of the workforce working from home could settle at about the 10-15 percent mark. The future of the CBD There will be a rise of work near home workspaces Overall, through the next 2 or 3 years, the area will completely recover However, it won't happen immediately The importance of neighbourhood The 20-minute neighbourhood - The ability to work, live, and play all within 20 minutes' reach is the new gold standard desirable lifestyle. COVID created a more intense sense of community Home improvements The collective dwell time in the family home has been boosted by the work from home revolution pandemic. The greater the dwell time the greater the tendency to invest in the family home with new appliances, technology, furniture, furnishings. Millennials These are the children of the Baby Boomers born 1984-2002, now aged 19-37, and who over the next five to six years will push into their late 30s and early 40s These upgraders will trigger a surge in demand for family-friendly residential property in the suburbs. Boomers born 1946-1964 and who are now aged 62-75. They will reinvent this time (65-plus) in the life cycle as the most exciting time of all: kids off their hands, mortgage paid out, health still okay. The 2020s are their time to spend the kids' inheritance and to methodically tick off activities from their ever-expanding bucket list. VESPAs - Virus Escapees Seeking Provincial Australia Work from lifestyle regions Scootering out of capital cities in search of affordability and serenity in a lifestyle town. FIZOs You've heard of Fly-in Fly-out or FIFO workers? Well, how about Fly-In Zoom-Out or FIZO workers? Workers who are remote most of the time, but are required to work in person for at least a couple of events Links and Resources: Michael Yardney Simon Kuestenmacher - Director of Research at The Demographics Group As our markets move forward why not get the team at Metropole to build you a personalised   Strategic Property Plan – this will help both beginning and experienced investors. Subscribe to Simon's YouTube channel here Read Simon Kuesetenmacher's blogs on Property Update here. Get a bundle of eBooks and reports www.PodcastBonus.com.au Shownotes plus more here: What's ahead? The post-Covid social trends that will stick, with Simon Kuestenmacher Some of our favourite quotes from the show: “They're upgraders now, they've upgraded homes rather than apartments, and that's going to create a huge demand for certain sorts of properties in the family-friendly residential suburbs.” – Michael Yardney “Continuing on with the Vespa analogy, they're going to be scootering out of the capital cities and moving into the regional areas.” – Michael Yardney “Those who succeed in life do not think they're going to fail, they know it.” – Michael Yardney PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how

Skip the Queue
The fight for talent with Kate Nicholls, CEO of UKHospitality

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:03


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcastIf you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends April 29th 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.ukhospitality.org.uk/https://twitter.com/UKHospKatehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kate-nicholls-093b0514/ Kate Nicholls is CEO of UKHospitality, the powerful voice representing the broad hospitality sector, having previously worked as CEO and Strategic Affairs Director of the ALMR.In July 2019, Kate was appointed Chair of the Tourism Alliance, the membership organisation for the tourism industry comprising of leading trade associations/trade bodies within the sector. Kate is also Chair of Mayor of London's Night Time Commission and is also a member of the Events Industry Board, London Food Board, Tourism Industry Council, Cultural Cities Enquiry, London & Partners Members Group and the Advisory Board for the Institute for Industrial Strategy.After gaining a degree in English and a post-graduate diploma in competition law, Kate worked as a researcher in the House of Commons and European Parliament before joining Whitbread as Government Relations Manager, starting her career in hospitality in 1993. Kate was Director at one of the largest independent public affairs companies, working with a number of hospitality, retail and leisure accounts before establishing her own strategic communications consultancy in 2000. She is a graduate of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge and Kings College London.A highly motivated Board-level adviser with a proven track record in devising and delivering strategic public policy and communication campaigns. Over 25 years experience working in a variety of government, corporate, agency and freelance roles. Transcription:Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world. In today's episode, I speak with Kate Nicholls, CEO of UKHospitality and the Co-chair of the London Tourism Recovery Board. Kate answers your burning questions on how to attract and maintain talent in the current challenging climate. If you like what you hear, subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Kate, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I know how incredibly busy you are, so I'm very grateful.Kate Nicholls: Thank you. It's great to be with you. I don't think I've had any time in the last two years really where it hasn't been incredibly busy, so it's good to take some time out and have a chance to have a chat. So thank you for having me.Kelly Molson: You are very welcome. You are very welcome. I'm glad I could give you that time. Right, Kate, icebreaker questions, because this is where we start all of our podcast interviews. I want to know what is at the top of your bucket list?Kate Nicholls: Ooh, well, for the last two summers we'd been planning ... My eldest was just about to go to University when COVID hit, and for the last two summers we'd been planning to go to Costa Rica as a sort of last big family holiday. And of course that's been canceled for the last two years. So top of my bucket list at the moment is to go on holiday with my two daughters, ideally Costa Rica, but actually I'd settle for anywhere at the moment. I haven't really had a proper break. But yeah, Costa Rica.Kelly Molson: Costa Rica, definitely. Yeah. I hear you. I feel like anywhere with some sun right now would probably do you the world a good, Kate.Kate Nicholls: Exactly.Kelly Molson: Okay. If you could bring back any fashion trend, what would it be?Kate Nicholls: Well, to be fair, they've never gone away from my wardrobe, but I would really like to bring back the wrap dress. They were such a good staple for anybody who worked in the '80s and '90s and the early '00s. Quite like to bring them back as a major fashion trend.Kelly Molson: Yeah, good. Can't go wrong with a wrap dress, can you? Boots, wrap dress, cardie, done.Kate Nicholls: You can't. Very forgiving, pair with boots or heels or flats or trainers, and you can just adjust it according to how you're feeling during the week.Kelly Molson: It's the perfect work-to-evening outfit. They're perfect.Kate Nicholls: Exactly.Kelly Molson: Okay, Kate, and this might be a little bit like asking you what your favourite child is, but I want to know what your favourite restaurant is?Kate Nicholls: Oh, that's the difficult one because it changes so much depending on how I'm feeling and the time of day and what I'm doing. But during the lockdown, my local Korean cafe has been my go-to place for getting a quick fix, some comfort food, and they've kept me going throughout lockdown. I'm a big fan of street food.Kelly Molson: Oh yeah, love street food. We have a really big street food community in Cambridge, actually, and it's just amazing, isn't it? Like being able to try all those different cuisines in one place? Fantastic.Kate Nicholls: It is. It is. And I think I've got kind of a butterfly brain, so being able to go try lots of little things, lots of little samples and eat that kind of stuff is great. But the other thing we did do over the summer, my daughter and I, we went and celebrated the new three Michelin star female chefs that we had in London that were awarded. So again, I go from street food to high-end.Kelly Molson: Love it. Absolutely love it. Okay, Kate, it's unpopular opinion time. I ask everybody that comes on the podcast to share an unpopular opinion with us. It can be humorous, can be serious, whatever it needs to have to be your unpopular opinion.Kate Nicholls: Well, I did think long and hard about this one because there are so many unpopular opinions I think I could have. But if I'm sort of talking about the biggest one that would sort of divide a lot of people, cats are better than dogs. I'm really not a dog person.Kelly Molson: Oh, okay.Kate Nicholls: That's going to be controversial and split.Kelly Molson: It's very controversial. And I'm not going to lie, I've got two dogs, so I am a dog person. But Kate, my dogs are a nightmare at the moment. We've had a flea situation this year. I've got a very noisy little dachshund who is absolutely filthy. The weather is disgusting. You have to go out with them all the time. Cats are sounding more and more appealing to me by the day.Kate Nicholls: Cats are sort of neat, clean, undemanding. They're not as problematic as dogs. I always think dogs, you feel as though you've got another kid in the house. I mean, my unpopular opinion is based on the fact that I did have a nasty encounter with a dog when I was little, so I am quite scared of them. But yeah, dogs are not as good as cats.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, let's see what our listeners think. I'm not going to lie because it's the time of year I'm swaying towards a swaying cat, Kate. Yeah. You might have changed my opinion there. Nice. Listen, thank you again for coming on the podcast. I really do appreciate it. I mean, I'd be super gobsmacked if anybody that's listening to this podcast episode doesn't know who you are, but just give us a little brief overview of what your role is at the moment, just to explain how critical it has been over the past couple of years.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. So I'm currently Chief Executive at UKHospitality. That's the national trade body that represents hospitality operators and businesses and employers. And so we have 700 member companies. Between them, they operate just over 100,000 outlets across the UK, from a single-site pub, coffee shop, cafe, restaurant, park bar, hotel, holiday accommodation, right the way through to the national chains.Kate Nicholls: Our role as the trade body is to be the voice and face of the industry to promote the sector as a great place to grow, work, and invest, to engage with the government, to make sure we've got the most supportive regulatory and tax environment within which businesses can thrive and survive. And then to provide insight, advice, and guidance to our members on the way in which they can operate to be compliant and to help their businesses grow.Kate Nicholls: And so normally that's quite a broad-based role, but it was really front and centre as soon as COVID hit because clearly, we've got inbound tourism. We've got hotels that were hit first. City centre restaurants, pubs, and bars started to feel the effects of COVID back in February. And really since February ... I mean my first meeting on COVID with the government was the 28th of January last year.Kate Nicholls: And since then, it's been pretty full-on making sure that in real-time we can present the views, concerns, impact of COVID on our business sector and try and make sure that we get the support needed to sustain those businesses, to maintain the employment, to protect jobs within the industry when we've been so hard hit by COVID.Kate Nicholls: So really a big role with government, meeting government ministers and officials two, three, four times a week at the height of the crisis, and also being on the media to try and explain what the impact is of what appeared to be relatively small scale changes, what big impact that can have on business viability and really spelling it out to make sure that people understand what that means potentially longer term in terms of viable businesses, the economy, employment in the UK.Kelly Molson: And, as I said, you have been the spokesperson for the sector throughout the pandemic. And I have to say, Kate, you were in my top five Twitter accounts that I followed continuously throughout. So I had Kate's, I had Bernard Donoghue, I had ALVA, ASVA and Blooloop. And that was my top five to find out what the hell was going on in the sectors that we worked in. So thank you so much for sharing and for doing that role.Kelly Molson: So what I want to talk about today is about attracting and retaining talent within the attractions and hospitality sectors. But I guess, from a ... I don't run an attraction. I work with them. I'm an associate in that sector. So I guess I want to ask a couple of questions about the general public and what we can do right now.Kelly Molson: So we have a situation in our local town. I live in a town called Saffron Walden just outside Cambridge, a beautiful town, a market town, lots of lovely pubs. One of my favourite pubs, which is one of a chain, has had to close for a good couple of months now. And essentially, it closed because some of its other restaurants were so overwhelmed and so busy but so short-staffed that they had to redistribute staff from our pub to their pubs.Kelly Molson: And I guess that's happening in a lot of different places as well. So if we're unable to book a table because a venue is short-staffed, what can we, as the general public, do right now to support the sector?Kate Nicholls: Well, I think it does highlight a challenge that the industry has got. It's more acute in certain parts of the country, but up until Omicron hit and we were all going back eating and drinking out more regularly, the industry as a whole just did not have sufficient labour to be able to operate at full strength. So a quarter of our businesses in the same situation as the one you just describe saying that they were having to restrict hours, cut covers, not open for certain days of the week, turn away bookings simply because they didn't have the staff.Kate Nicholls: So I think as the general public, what we can do with those businesses is try and be a bit more creative in supporting them. Is there a different time that we can book? Because everybody tries to book dinner or lunch at the same time. Can we spread it out a little bit throughout the day? Can we look at going for early suppers or late suppers or brunches or afternoons? If we can't, then can we help them in other ways if they're still doing takeaway, if they're still doing delivery, we can support our businesses in that way. Or booking ahead in advance and making sure that we take out gift cards and those kinds of creative solutions some of our businesses have done where you can get cash through the tills and book two or three meals in advance.Kate Nicholls: So that's a main bit of support. The second thing is that if you do have a booking and your plans change and you can't make it, let them know, and let them know in sufficient time. Because we still are getting quite a lot of no-shows that people make these bookings, something changes. Plans always change, we do know that, but people aren't letting them know. And particularly at the moment when you've got larger scale bookings for Christmas, people will have bought that food in well in advance and will start cooking it well in advance, so you do need to let them know the day before or at least a good couple of hours before if you can't make your booking, and then they can pass it onto somebody on a waiting list.Kelly Molson: That actually leads to another question is how is the sector feeling right now? So with Omicron, with the Christmas rush, what's the general mood like in the hospitality sector at the moment? Are we seeing a lot of people booking, cancelling reservations that they have for large groups of people? Is it quieter than it should be?Kate Nicholls: Quieter than it would be at a normal Christmas. So even before we had Omicron, we knew that we weren't having the same level of bookings as we were seeing Christmas 2019 and previously, so trade is down. We have seen cancellations. They're running at about 10% at the moment, and we have seen a downturn in footfall over the last week. Not just for those bookings and corporate events, Christmas parties, Christmas socials, but just a more general decline in walk-in bookings and walk-in activity. So we are seeing revenues down over the course of the last week, 15, 20%, and that's as a result of the uncertainty.Kate Nicholls: There's a high degree of nervousness within the industry and a great degree of fear at the moment because we've all been in this situation before. Sadly, this time last year, people will have invested heavily to be able to open and operate at Christmas, and unless you get that Christmas trade-in, it can be very damaging to the businesses. They rely on having a good December in order to get them through the quieter months of January to March. And without that good December, there are many businesses that will undoubtedly go to the wall. What should be a very optimistic and hopeful time has, in the space of a week, turned to be very uncertain and very concerning.Kelly Molson: Okay. So look, some great advice there from Kate. If we can look at when you're booking, changing times, if you can look at supporting your local restaurants by booking gift vouchers, for example, or if they are doing takeaway, please do do that and let's try and get them through this really difficult period that we're seeing.Kelly Molson: Now Kate, as I said, I want to talk about attracting and retaining talent in the visitor attraction sector. I don't run an attraction. So what I did, and what I thought was a good idea, is to ask some of the past guests that have been on to ask me to ask you questions. And I've had some fantastic questions in from many of the different guests that we've had on. So let me just ask you a few of the things that have come in. Gordon Morrison, the CEO of ASVA, and Adam Goymour, park director at ROARR! Dinosaur Adventure, actually had really, really similar questions. So let me read out what Gordon wrote over because he puts it far more eloquently than I ever could.Kelly Molson: So Gordon said, "Staff are the beating heart of every tourism business and can undoubtedly make the visitor experience memorable both positively and negatively. As we face up to what is quite possibly the most difficult recruitment and retention environment in the tourism industry has ever seen, is it right that we should continue to rely on our people so heavily to deliver outstanding experiences? And if so, how do we ensure that our businesses are attractive, and how do we keep that top talent in the industry?"Kate Nicholls: I think this is the number one issue that all operators are grappling with at the moment as we come out and we've got a very tight labour market and we've got a real battle just to get staff in, nevermind the battle for talent that we had going into COVID. So we were already facing those challenges. I do think what we need to do is to use COVID as a reset moment and look again at our ways of working, style of working, what we're expecting of people. This gives us an opportunity to revise terms and conditions and to look again at hours of work in the sector to make sure that we are being as flexible as we possibly can and we are being as responsive as we possibly can to what new recruits are telling us.Kate Nicholls: Because we've got lots of new, younger people coming into the industry, many have had no experience before and are questioning, quite rightly, some of the ways that we do things. So particularly in food and beverages and things like that, less so in attractions, but you do get some antisocial hours. You do get double shifts. And people have different ways of paying people. And I think the labour scheduling and the flexibility that we can provide should be a positive rather than it being something that holds us back.Kate Nicholls: So I do think we can look again at making sure that we are as attractive as we possibly can be and that we've got our best foot forward. I think secondly, what we need to be doing as an industry is to look after the sector's employer brand. Individual business is very good at doing this, promoting themselves as a career of choice, but we want to get across the fact that we're a career and we have a great plethora of opportunities available to people if they come and work within our businesses.Kate Nicholls: Because we're an industry largely of small and independent businesses, we don't have the size and scale, but I think we can look again at the sector branding to be able to make sure we put the best foot forward, that we describe how important it is as a career, how meritocratic it is. Because there's no sector likes ours that provides young people with such opportunity where you can come in with limited experience, limited qualifications and skills. We will upskill you very rapidly and you can move into management within about two years. There's no other sector that will give you that level of responsibility and authority at such a young age and at such a low level within the business, and the pay and salary that goes alongside it.Kate Nicholls: So I think there's more we can do around that in terms of communicating career of choice. And also communicating that even if you only want to come with us for a short time, we will equip you with common transferrable skills that other employers will find valuable; business, finance, people management, leadership, conflict management. You get that by working in hospitality businesses and visitor economy businesses, again, at a very low entry-level, and these are soft skills, people skills that are valuable at all levels.Kate Nicholls: And then the final element is about making sure that we do invest in our people, that we do train them to provide continuing professional development and we invest in leadership and management as people go through. We're very good at taking people at entry-level and doing the immediate skills and training they need to be able to function. We need to look at how we can continue to invest in those people. That's what young people particularly are looking for from careers and employers now.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. It's really interesting what you said about the soft skills as well, because I think that one of the best starts that I ever had to my working career was working in hospitality and in retail because it gave me so much experience of understanding how to talk to people, how to communicate with people. And from that customer service perspective as well. I think it gave me such a good grounding in my career, and all of those skills I learnt then, I've taken through into what I do now in terms of sales and an account management role.Kate Nicholls: Absolutely. And if you think about some of the young people who've been most affected by COVID and had their schooling disrupted, their social lives disrupted for a couple of years, those are the skills that they are lacking. When teachers are talking about young people coming back into school, it's time management. It's personnel skills. It's social skills. It's communication. That's what they get from us.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Completely, completely agree. Mark Ellis, who's the interim lead at the National Memorial Arboretum, actually has asked a question that picks up on some of your earlier points there. He says that, "One of the outcomes of the industry-wide staffing shortage is that staff are able to negotiate a better work-life balance, which is a really good thing. Ultimately that is going to lead to better conditions throughout the industry, hopefully, more job satisfaction, higher standards and a better customer experience." Mark asks, "Do you think that we will see the appearance of some widely-accepted examples of best practice?" So things like how businesses will manage seasonal contracts or flexible hours or unsociable hours like you mentioned?Kate Nicholls: Yes. I think we will start to see that evolving as we go further forward and as we come out of this. I think that's what I mean by a COVID reset moment, that we can look again at the ways that we've done things to be able to offer that kind of attractive proposition to people. So moving away from some of the zero-hours contracts, moving away from some of the seasonal changes where people don't have that much certainty, and towards one that is focused on what the applicant is looking for and wanting and the flexibility that they're needing, and presenting it in a way which is appealing to them.Kate Nicholls: I think we will, if we work carefully at it, I think there's a great opportunity for us across the entire sector to pick up some of those really good case studies and examples and promote them and push them out around the sector so that we have a positive employability story to tell.Kelly Molson: That is great. Now, I'm going to pick up on that a little bit later on because we've had a really good question about that very topic. Let me ask you about the supply chain, though, and again, this is another question from Mark at the National Memorial Arboretum. So the supply chain at the moment is disrupted. Food costs are increasing. We all need to find a more sustainable way to feed humanity. What can we do as an industry, and this is the attractions industry, to help the public recognise that hospitality outlets that source locally, use seasonal ingredients, increase their plant-based options, that they are the best place to respond to these pressures? But at the same time, costs are going to rise through dual pressure of food and wage increases.Kate Nicholls: Well, I think this is going to be a collective challenge for all of us because it's inevitable that with the cost pressures that we've got that are building across the sector, and not just our sector but across the economy, prices are going to have to go up to consumers irrespective of what we're talking about in terms of local sourcing, et cetera, and the positive efforts we've got. So I think as an industry we're going to have to work to be able to communicate to consumers clearly why we are having to put prices up post-pandemic, and it is going to be a struggle and a challenge and there's going to be that juggling act which there always is around pricing decisions about how far you can push prices onto consumers before you turn off demand.Kate Nicholls: But with VAT alone going up, there is going to have to be a price increase that we are going to have to pass on. So I think that's one challenge that we need to look at separately. I think the advantage is it's going to be across the economy as a whole and we're not going to be doing it in isolation. So I think customers are going to get more used to hearing about prices and hearing about costs coming through.Kate Nicholls: And then I think, you're right, there is a real opportunity there for turning that conversation around and explaining about how local sourcing is more beneficial, meets the broader sustainability issues that consumers are increasingly concerned about. Not just consumers, potential employees. So sustainability and environmental and social governance issues are coming higher up the agenda when we're talking about recruitment and putting ourselves out as an attractive proposition.Kate Nicholls: People are looking for authentic stories about local sourcing, local supply chain, carbon net zero, limiting waste, all of those kind of positive issues that we can turn to our advantage. But I do think customers understand it doesn't come cost-free. So I think they are two sides of the same coin. I don't think we should be apologetic about the fact that we need to be able to invest in good quality produce in order to deliver a more sustainable food supply chain.Kelly Molson: Do you think those conversations are slightly easier to have now as well, since the pandemic? Because I think what we did see when attractions were able to open up and hospitality were able to open up is that we saw a huge increase in demand for things that were local. We wanted to understand more about our local environment. We wanted to be able to support our local independents. So do you think that's going to be an easier conversation to have now that we're in that mindset already?Kate Nicholls: I think so. I think COVID provides us with that opportunity. Certainly one of the strong trends, and it sees no sign of abating as we come out of COVID, localism and hyperlocalism was a trend we saw during lockdown when, inevitably if you can't travel, you explore in your neighborhood. But even as we reopened, people were exploring in their locality before they've got confident enough to go further across the country or into city centres. And clearly you're moving away from global travel for two years. Again, those are trends that become sticky with consumers and consumers are interested in hearing and exploring it more.Kate Nicholls: So I think neighbourhood is going to stick with us for a lot longer. Certainly as well in terms of the different ways in which we work, I don't think it's going to be as polarised as in the office or at home, but I do think you're going to be working remotely and people are going to be looking at neighbourhood and local options to be able to facilitate that. So I do think that that frees up the conversation to be had more generally about how we are making a more sustainable, more robust, more resilient supply chain by looking locally. But equally, that doesn't come cost-free.Kelly Molson: Absolutely. Let's talk about opening hours. So Mark had a really good question around that. So he says, "Over the last few months, as venues have reopened, we've seen many places change their opening hours, and that's to enable them to offer fair shifts for their staff in response to business needs." He actually says some are open fewer days each week, and some are closing earlier. The micropub and brewpub and taphouse that he tends to frequent, he does put in brackets here, "On an all too infrequent basis though. Nights out are a rare treat. But they're all offering a brilliant experience with great staff during their opening hours. Does Kate think that the public will learn to understand that not opening all hours is a new thing to be embraced, or do you think that pressure to increase the venues to go back to 11:00 to 11:00 will be the norm?"Kate Nicholls: I think it's probably too early to say yet with consumers and consumer habits and trends because I don't think people are going out in the same way that they were yet. What we have seen after this reopening, post the 19th of July, that there is an expectation from consumers to go back to normal and they're not very forgiving of those who aren't. So I think consumers during COVID have got used to having things when they want it, at the time that they want it, and rapidly, and they don't take kindly to things not being available for them.Kate Nicholls: So I suspect it will be more challenging to have that on a longer-term basis if that's a longer way of working. What we do know, however, is that what consumers really don't like is uncertainty. So if they can guarantee that you are always open for these particular days, these particular hours, they will understand that more readily than they turn up at your door and you're not open today because you can't get the staff. That's the bit that seems to create the disconnect.Kate Nicholls: And what we don't have yet is a loyal customer base back. So if they can't get it from you, they will go and find it somewhere else is what we're seeing very rapidly. So I don't think it means that everybody has to go back to 11:00 to 11:00, seven days a week and full service, but you do need to get back to some consistency and some standardisation for customers. And certainly what we're finding in the restaurant side, for example, are quite a lot of businesses in city centres are closing Monday and Tuesday, and that causes a degree of confusion for consumers when they're back out.Kate Nicholls: Now, having said that, our customer habits are going to change a little bit again over Christmas if we do have restrictions brought back in due to Omicron and therefore customers again will be adapting to changes and the ways that they're doing things and changes in the ways of working. But I do think that will depend on where you are located. If you are located in a city centre and people are not visiting the city centre as regularly, you need to have that certainty about when you are available and open that matches and meets with them. If you are in a local neighbourhood and a local area and you're part of the community, I think there will be increasing pressure back being available when the customers want you.Kelly Molson: Earlier in this question you mentioned that it's too early to tell because we're not seeing the demand, we're not seeing people going out as frequently as they were. It's a difficult question, but how long do you think that we need to leave it until we do start to see some data around that?Kate Nicholls: Again, I think that's difficult to be able to work out because of the uncertainties of new variants and changes in restrictions. We haven't had a clear consistent period where we've been able to trade normally. Had we not had Omicron coming along, I think we would have got a better feel for it. After Christmas, we would have been able to look back at five, six months where we could see what customers were doing, how confident they were, and could try and see trading was doing without the blips that were caused by supply chain shortages, delivery shortages, pingdemics, labour shortages across our industry. I suspect that it's going to be until the middle of next year before you can really start to plan with any certainty around what's stuck, what's a long-term trend and what's something that you're nudging consumer behaviour around.Kelly Molson: Thank you. You mentioned earlier about sharing best practices and we've had a great question from Hannah Monteverde who's the Park Manager at BeWILDerwood in Cheshire. So Hannah says, "It's not always feasible to be able to offer an increased salary or market-leading benefits." She'd be really interested to know of any examples of curveball ideas that have attracted staff recently. Do you have any case studies or examples of attractions that you feel have really bucked the trend for recruitment particularly well?Kate Nicholls: I think the ones that are doing interesting stuff around flexible hours, hours when you want it, more frequent pay. One of the things that we found across our sector was that people were getting paid after four weeks, six weeks in some cases when they were a new starter, compared to some of the newer startup companies and labour scheduling companies and temporary recruitment from Amazon where they were getting paid within the week. So as soon as they did a shift, they were getting paid.Kate Nicholls: And actually that was something that people found was really attractive, that as soon as they'd done their job, they were getting their pay almost immediately, so a return almost back to weekly pay packets was quite an interesting one. It's not necessarily creative or curveball, but it's just listening to what people were saying that was a frustration for them that they wanted to be able to have.Kate Nicholls: Food, uniforms, selling those kinds of benefits, the walking to work for anybody who's in a local attraction or provision of transport for those people who were off the beaten track and people relying upon cars, et cetera. Those are things that have been used quite creatively. And then flexible labour scheduling, giving people the ability to tell the employer when they were available to work and how many hours they had rather than getting that rota coming down on a fixed basis saying, "This is when we rota-ed you and you have to go away and work out somebody else to swap with if it coincides with your yoga class or your student lesson or a GP's appointment."Kate Nicholls: So I think putting more power in the hands of the employees and giving them the ability to be able to ask for what they want, when they want, hours and pay, those are the two creative ones I've seen most frequently.Kelly Molson: That's fascinating. I mean, the crux of it is flexibility, ultimate flexibility as the employee. That is such a simple change to be paid weekly, so that instant gratification, "I've done a really good job. I've been paid for it." What a simple change to be able to make that could make such a big difference.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. And there's technology that enables you to do it now. So on the labour scheduling front in terms of, "I'm available for these hours and I'd like some work." Stint provides the opportunity and there's labour scheduling that provides the opportunity to do that, to just log on and say, "I can do four hours," rather than, "I can do a full day." And that sometimes is better. And equally, there's technology that allows you to drawdown. So if the business still wants to keep a monthly salary payroll, you can draw down earlier ahead of your salary, so you just get it a bit more when you've been doing your work. Particularly relevant for young people coming into the sector.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. And hopefully retaining them for a little bit longer, because that is the challenge with the sector is that it has always been seen as a bit of a stopgap, hasn't it? And ideally, we want to-Kate Nicholls: It has, and in some respects, we shouldn't be apologetic for that because it is a good first job. It's a good first base. Transferrable skills that we talked about before. We obviously want to keep and capture those people who want to use it as a career. But equally, given the labour shortages we're facing, if we can keep those people with us for longer who are just looking at it as a stopgap, that's all to the good as well. And that's about making sure we invest in them and make sure that they're supported as they come into the company.Kate Nicholls: Because at the moment, churn is so high across the sector as a whole. People come in, find that the work's too busy, too demanding, not for them, and they go away again. So let's just support them, nurture them and try and help to make sure that they have as good an experience as they can while they're with us.Kelly Molson: Definitely. Final question for you from our attractions audience. And again, this is from Hannah. So Hannah asks, "Do we have any realistic idea of timescales in terms of the forecast for recovery?" And this is specifically around the recruitment challenges that we're having at the moment. She asks, "Is this something that we have to adapt and change to live within the long term, or is it something that we could potentially predict will slowly improve and recover back to a pre-Brexit and pre-COVID-19 scenario?"Kate Nicholls: Gosh. There are two factors to that, particularly if we're talking about labour markets. So the government-commissioned independent research to look at when domestic tourism for fallen revenues would recover to pre-pandemic levels, and I suppose that's the best indicator of when do you think demand is going to get up there? When do you think your money is going to come back? And the independent forecast suggested that domestic tourism revenues would recover by the end of 2023 and international, that's not until 2024.Kate Nicholls: Now the government has said it will work with the industry to try and bring that forward a year, but that still looks as though you're going to have most of 2022 where you are operating suboptimally, that you're not operating at full demand. And I think in terms of labour shortages and challenges, again, likely to be temporary but let's not forget that pre-COVID, we had a 5% vacancy rate. Post-COVID, it's 10%. So it was a tight labour market before we went into the COVID crisis.Kate Nicholls: How temporary is temporary? I think you're going to be living with cost price inflation and the disruption to the supply chain for at least six months of 2022 and I think the labour issues are going to be with us probably for a year or two. If nothing else changes, our biggest challenge for getting people back into work is twofold. One is we've got a hiatus in the talent pipeline where we haven't been able to train our own. Our apprentices haven't been able to go through people and vocational training, haven't been able to go through catering colleges, et cetera. Haven't been able to go through because people have been disrupted in education.Kate Nicholls: And the same goes at the higher levels for hospitality degrees, but also curator jobs and those kinds of occupational training skilled jobs in the sector. So you've got a two-year talent hiatus, talent pipeline hiatus, and you've got COVID travel restrictions that are preventing people from moving globally. And you can only see what's happened with Omicron to see that that's going to be with us probably for at least another year. So you are going to have a global disrupted labour market and you're going to have global disrupted supply chains for at least another year.Kelly Molson: Gosh. Another year of this.Kate Nicholls: Sorry.Kelly Molson: Weren't we saying this last year? We were nearly-Kate Nicholls: I don't mean that we're going to be having another year of COVID restrictions or the challenges that we've got, but I think the global supply chain, the global economy is still going to be in quite an uncertain state for the whole of 2022. And people certainly won't be moving around the globe as freely as they have been pre-pandemic. We're not going to get back to that sort of free movement. It's nothing to do with Brexit, but just that movement of people isn't going to be happening to the same degree, hence you've got a delay in domestic and international recovery. You've got a delay in international recovery.Kate Nicholls: The people who've moved abroad during COVID or people who would normally be coming into the UK to look for work or those with settled status who might be returning, they're not moving around because of COVID and they're not moving around because of the problems of international travel.Kelly Molson: Kate, thank you. Thank you so much for answering the questions today. It's been incredible to have you on. I'd like to end the podcast the way that I always end the podcast which is to ask you about a book that you could recommend to our listeners. It might be something that you love. It might be something that's helped your career in some way or helped shape your career in some way. What would you recommend for us today?Kate Nicholls: I am a voracious reader, so I usually have three or four books on the go at any one time. But I'm definitely a fiction reader. I've got two books. One that was really ... is a business book that I found really quite useful when I first was made chief executive about six, seven years ago. And that was Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In, which I would definitely recommend for any female leaders in the industry to look at. It talks about some of the different ways that people experience things at work and certainly helped me to think about how I wanted to support the next generation of women coming up and making sure that we had more female representation on boards.Kate Nicholls: And then my absolute favourite book, which is my go-to book at any time that I just want a little bit of escapism and a really good story is Wuthering Heights. However bad you're feeling, there's always something entertaining and enjoyable in getting lost in somebody else's story and that's my recommended read.Kelly Molson: Fantastic recommendations. I actually do remember on Twitter you tweeting photos of your book pile, your COVID book pile. They were huge.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. Because everybody knows I'm a reader and I read an awful lot, at Christmas I get big ... And that's what everybody buys me as a gift. So I always get quite a lot of books at Christmas, and last Christmas I got 20. And as we went into lockdown, of January, I thought, "Right, can I complete my reading pile before we come out of lockdown?" Actually, I had to go and buy another 30 books. By the time we came out of lockdown on the 19th of July, I had read 56 books.Kelly Molson: Oh my goodness, 56 ... Well, I guess books are a much better option than getting socks for Christmas, right?Kate Nicholls: Absolutely. Absolutely. So yes, I do have big piles. I still have piles of books all over the house that I'm still reading. But yeah, I usually have ... I finish three books a week.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. Well, listen, so if you want to win a copy of Kate's books, you know what to do. Go over to this podcast announcement on Twitter, retweet the announcement with the words I want Kate's books, and you might well be in with a chance of winning them. Kate, thank you once again for coming on the podcast today. Very, very grateful that you've been able to spare us some time to come on and chat, and I very much hope that you get that well-deserved rest and holiday to Costa Rica sometime very soon.Kate Nicholls: Thank you so much. It's been an absolute pleasure. Thank you for having me.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Midday
"Mister Manners': Some pointers for your post-COVID return to the office

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:03


Before the omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus made businesses reconsider plans to return to their workplaces, people who have had the luxury of being able to work at home were beginning to consider the upside and downside of returning to in-person employment. There's no question that the world has changed a lot in the nearly two years since since the pandemic began. If and when folks do return to the workplace, have the rules for office etiquette changed too? Tom's first guest today is Thomas P. Farley, an etiquette expert who writes a syndicated column called “Ask Mister Manners,” and who appears in the media and consults with companies about workplace etiquette. Thomas Farley joins us on Zoom from New York City. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kings Without Crowns Podcast
Dr. Kavarga Podcast, Episode 2770: South Park: Post Covid: The Return of Covid Review

Kings Without Crowns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 5:57


In this episode of the Dr. Kavarga Podcast, the Doctor reviews the movie South Park: Post Covid: The Return of Covid.

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Perspectives: Impact Investing in a Post-COVID World - Changes Expected in the Coming 12 Months

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 15:50


This is Investor Perspectives. I'm the host of Investor Connect, Hall T. Martin, where we connect startups and investors for funding. In our final Investor Perspectives episode on Impact Investing in a Post-COVID World, you'll hear about changes expected in the coming 12 months and our guests' final thoughts. As the COVID pandemic passes, we emerge into a new era. The impact space is now undergoing tremendous change as we shift to a post-COVID world. Impact investing in the areas of sustainability and the environment takes precedence in the financial industry. We have investors and startup founders describe the changes coming up. Our guests are: , CEO, [01:13], Founder and Managing Director, [02:31], Managing Partner, [06:45], Principal, Escaladora Ventures [10:43], Chief Investment Officer, [12:40] We hope you enjoy the show. _______________________________For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:      Check out our other podcasts here:    For Investors check out:     For Startups check out:     For eGuides check out:  For upcoming Events, check out      For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group   Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .  

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast
Bill and Fro's Thoughts on South Park: Post Covid: The Return of Covid

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 22:50


After only having to wait a few weeks, we get South Park: Post Covid: The Return of Covid. Was it as good as the first one? Join Bill and Fro as they give their thoughts on the movie, what they liked and didn't like plus discuss the ending to which seems has a split among South Park fans.Follow the show on Twitter https://twitter.com/sharkspond97Join the shows Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/sharkspond/

My Morning Coffee
My Morning Coffee w/ Officer Jenna Wolfinger, RBPD School Resource Officer

My Morning Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 51:20


With the TikTok viral threat of gun violence on school campuses, some schools have shut down and others saw a drop in attendance. Post-Covid campus life has been scary for students, teachers, and parents. There is a rise in violence on campus, inappropriate photos being sent around, and substance abuse. SROs (school resource officers) have proven to be a benefit to the Redondo Beach Community and will always be held in high regard. The ladies of My Morning Coffee Podcast speak with Officer Jenna Wolfinger and get down to the good, the bad, and the ugly of the job, teenage trends, and ways that parents and school districts can best partner with their law enforcement agencies. "We Are the Community - Leading the Way in Law Enforcement" ~RBPD     How do you feel about police officers on campus? Let's hear from you.    With MY MORNING COFFEE, the conversation is always hot, bold, organic, and full of flavor. Dive in and have a sip.    SUBSCRIBE: https://apple.co/3q9SALY Join the #CupCrew https://bit.ly/3BcEBth Follow Tonya on Twitter and Instagram @TonyaMcKenziePR Follow Gia on Instagram @iamgiasneed & @themahoganybox For comments, guest opportunities or brand collaborations, contact info@sandandshores.com. #ContentMatters #PositivePR #Leadership is Newsworthy! #MyMorningCoffee #Podcast #TonyaMcKenzie #GiaSneed #LLEADtheWay #CommunityEngagement #BusinessOwners #Survivors #WomenOwned #BlackOwned #TrueStory  #BlackBusiness #Media #Storyteller #Entrepreneur #TonyaMcKenzie #GiaSneed #MMC  

Listen, Watch, Discuss!
Series Review: South Park: Post Covid: The Return of Covid

Listen, Watch, Discuss!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 51:19


And thus concludes the saga of Covid… maybe. On tonight's episode, I'll be reviewing the latest South Park special: Post Covid: The Return of Covid. Enjoy.

Air Quotes: The Cardwell Beach Podcast
Marketing Post-Covid: Bruce Ditman, Managing Partner at Chief Seconds

Air Quotes: The Cardwell Beach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 36:49


Marketing Post-Covid: Bruce Ditman, Managing Partner at Chief Seconds by Cardwell Beach

The Talent Development Hot Seat
Bonus Q&A with Jonathan Miri

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 12:30


In this episode of THE TALENT DEVELOPMENT HOT SEAT, Jonathan Miri, a post-COVID leadership advisor and author of The Post COVID-19 Leadership Guide, is Andy's guest. Jonathan Miri is also a public speaker, thought leader, MBA professor, and coach. He has more than 20 years of Fortune 500 leadership experience, and he created The Post COVID-19 Leadership Guide to assist learning and development and talent development HR leadership teams to build customized tactical guides to anticipate all aspects of post-COVID change and challenge. He uses his eight essentials to avoid disaster framework to create customized leadership programs for companies. In this bonus interview, you'll hear: 12. Why Jonathan Miri decided to go the entrepreneurial route after so many years of working within companies. 13. The career accomplishment he is most proud of and why it means so much to him. 14. His biggest career failure and what he learned from that failure. 15. The biggest frustration he sees in talent development and what could be done to change it. 16. The trend he's following in talent development right now. 17. The TED talk by Tai Lopez that had an impact on his career. 19. His advice for creating more career success. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (andystorch.com) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (linkedin.com/in/andystorch) https://tdtt.us/ (tdtt.us/) Connect with Jonathan Miri: https://www.linkedin.com/in/therapidbrands/ (linkedin.com/in/therapidbrands) https://rapidaccelerator.com/ (rapidaccelerator.com/) jonathan@therapidbrands.com

BEYOND BARRIERS
Episode 199: Paving The Way For Others with 5F World's Dr. Ganesh Natarajan & Dr. Uma Ganesh

BEYOND BARRIERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 50:14


Robin Sharma once said, “Success is not a function of the size of your title but the richness of your contribution.” It's about impact, influence and inspiration. Our guests are a perfect example of the power of sincere and selfless contribution and how it fosters true fulfilment. Meet Dr. Ganesh Natarajan & Dr. Uma Ganesh, Co-Founders of 5F World, who share their career journeys and how their shared values of working for the good of the community and their country has inspired them to create impact and opportunity using their 5F framework – Fast, Focused, Flexible, Friendly and Fun. Dr. Ganesh Natarajan is the Executive Chairman of 5F World, a platform for Digital Start-ups, Skills and Social Ventures. He is also Chairman of Honeywell Automation India Limited and Lighthouse Communities Foundation and a Board member of the State Bank of India, Hinduja Global Solutions, Global Talent Track, Educate Girls and the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network. Ganesh is a Distinguished Alumnus of IIT Bombay and NITIE. Dr. Uma Ganesh is the co-founder of 5F World and founder of multiple companies including Global Talent Track focused on skills development for the digital era, Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Analytics, Kalzoom Advisors and Skills Alpha – the digital platform for talent development. In this episode, Uma & Ganesh share their vision, the foundational pillars of their partnership, why learning should be a collective collaboration, and how leaders should view talent differently for the future. Visit https://www.iambeyondbarriers.com where you will find show notes and links to all the resources in this episode, including the best way to get in touch with Dr. Ganesh Natarajan & Dr. Uma Ganesh. Highlights: [02:54] Uma's story [07:50] Ganesh's story [10:21] Uma & Ganesh's shared vision [13:46] The foundational pillar of Ganesh & Uma's partnership [16:14] The importance of taking risks [19:25] In service of something bigger [23:48] The formation of 5F World [27:35] The future is collective collaborative learning [31:07] How leaders should be looking at talent for the future [39:09] The habits of success [45:16] Who you surround yourself with matters [48:35} Ganesh & Uma's message to the world Quotes: “it's not about making money for ourselves or for shareholders, it's about doing good work for the community, the country, with people whom we love, and who we want to see succeed.” – Dr. Ganesh Natarajan “Life is a journey where you learn from failures, and you learn from successes.” – Dr. Uma Ganesh “For every negative event that takes you away from your path, I've always found that there are five helping hands there to support me.” – Dr. Uma Ganesh “Purpose, focus and a positive attitude will keep you going towards success.” – Dr. Uma Ganesh “If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always gotten.” – Dr. Ganesh Natarajan “Believe in yourself. Don't stop, just do it.” – Dr. Uma Ganesh “Try to make sure that everything is done in the shortest possible time and with the maximum possible impact.” - Dr. Ganesh Natarajan About Dr. Ganesh Natarajan: Dr. Ganesh Natarajan is the Executive Chairman of 5F World, a platform for Digital Start-ups, Skills and Social Ventures in the country. He is also Chairman of Honeywell Automation India Limited and Lighthouse Communities Foundation and a Board member of the State Bank of India, Hinduja Global Solutions, Global Talent Track, Educate Girls and the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network. Ganesh is a Distinguished Alumnus of IIT Bombay and NITIE. He has been Chairman of NASSCOM and President of the HBS Club of India and led APTECH and then Zensar Technologies to global success from 1991 to 2016. Harvard Business School (HBS) has written and teaches two case studies on his work. About Dr. Uma Ganesh: Uma Ganesh has three decades of success in corporate and entrepreneurial ventures covering manufacturing, media, banking and IT sectors. Uma has had indepth exposure to functional areas such as marketing, product management, finance and operations through CXO/CEO positions with large organisations having their footprint in India and global markets. Her last corporate assignment was with HSBC as their Chief Corporate Development Officer for its Global Resourcing Business and previously she has been associated with Zee Education, Aptech, NIIT, Fibre Glass Pilkington and Crompton Greaves.  Over the last decade, Uma has turned an entrepreneur founding Global Talent Track focussed on skills development for the digital era, Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Analytics, Kalzoom Advisors and Skills Alpha – the digital platform for talent development. One of the noteworthy initiatives is 5F World Pvt Ltd cofounded with Dr Ganesh Natarajan which is focussed on consulting for digital transformation and investment in digital startups. Uma's academic credentials include MBA from the Faculty of Management Studies, University of Delhi and Phd from IIT Bombay. She has played leadership roles in several industry forums namely CII, NHRD Network, Bombay Management Association, Indian Women's Network (IWN) to name a few. She has co-authored a book – a Tata McGraw Hill publication ‘Knowledge Force' with Dr Ganesh Natarajan and has a regular column in the Financial Express focussed around Digital technologies. Links: Websites: https://ganeshnatarajan.in/ http://5fworld.com/ Recent Books: RISING TO THE CHINA CHALLENGE: WINNING THROUGH STRATEGIC PATIENCE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH Accelerating Digital Success: Reimagining Organisations for a Post-COVID-19 World LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ganeshnatarajan/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/uma-ganesh-77369217/

Forum - La 1ere
L'architecture et l'urbanisme face aux défis du monde post-Covid: interview de Laurent Guidetti

Forum - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 4:33


Interview de Laurent Guidetti, architecte, urbaniste à Lausanne.

AnthroDish
95: Post-COVID Taste Loss with Rebecca Ma

AnthroDish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 31:26


When we think about COVID, we usually think about the short term health effects and terrifying stories from the ICU. However, there's a lot to learn about the ways that long haul COVID symptoms affect people. Those that experience long term symptoms are sometimes referred to as “long haulers” on Twitter threads, and you don't see much covered about their health challenges across the media. But with the high rates of infection across the US and Canada, understanding how people will be negotiating these symptoms and recovery is an important element in understanding what comes next for all of us and how to help each other in the recovery stages of the pandemic. One of the symptoms of long COVID is a loss of taste, smell, and appetite. I've heard accounts of this in little snips across Instagram, but wasn't really sure what that meant, or just how long long COVID really was. My guest this week, Rebecca Ma, is a Masters student of food anthropology in Idaho. She is also a COVID survivor who is experiencing long COVID. Her Instagram account caught my attention a while back, @postcovideatsandsmells, as it is a documentation of her experiences trying different foods after losing taste and smell during her COVID recovery. She discusses how old favourites aren't as they were, and what new elements of food she gravitates towards through this. We talk today about her sensory experiences with food post-COVID, and how she uses her knowledge from anthropology to bring these experiences more public through her Instagram account. Learn More About Rebecca:  COVID Instagram: @postcovideatsandsmells Instagram: @rebeccamamoo

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Perspectives: Impact Investing in a Post-COVID World – Participation in the Impact Investing Space and What Investors Look For

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 10:55


This is Investor Perspectives. I'm the host of Investor Connect, Hall T. Martin, where we connect startups and investors for funding. In our new Investor Perspectives series entitled “Impact Investing in a post-COVID World”, you'll hear about participation in the impact investing space and what investors look for. As the COVID pandemic passes, we emerge into a new era. The impact space is now undergoing tremendous change as we shift to a post-COVID world. Impact investing in the areas of sustainability and the environment takes precedence in the financial industry. We have investors and startup founders describe the changes coming up. Our guests are: , CEO, [01:13], Founder and Managing Director, [02:50], Managing Partner, [05:34], Principal, Escaladora Ventures [07:05], Chief Investment Officer, [08:53] We hope you enjoy the show. _______________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:      Check out our other podcasts here:    For Investors check out:     For Startups check out:     For eGuides check out:     For upcoming Events, check out  For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group   Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .  

The Homeowners Show
How Homes Will Be Different Post Covid

The Homeowners Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 43:05


In this episode Craig and Kevin discuss how homes will be different post covid. As we all know, Covid came in and changed everything. Almost two years have elapsed and so much is different. One of the ways Covid has affected our world is how we live in our homes. New trends have already emerged, and we believe more are coming. We spend some time discussing several ways we believe purchasing and living in your home has been affected by Covid and how those things will affect homes into the future.    Sustained Growth Solutions Email – Design a lead generation system specifically for your business so that you never have to search for leads again!   Termisave Email – Warranty your home against the threat of termites.    Buy a Homeowners Show T-Shirt!   Subscribe to our YouTube Channel   The Homeowners Show Website The Homeowners Show Facebook Page Instagram @homeownersshow Twitter @HomeownersThe   Info@homeownersshow.com 

The Talent Development Hot Seat
The 8 Talent Development Essentials to Avoid Disaster

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 34:47


In this episode of THE TALENT DEVELOPMENT HOT SEAT, Jonathan Miri, a post-COVID leadership advisor and author of The Post COVID-19 Leadership Guide, is Andy's guest. Jonathan Miri is also a public speaker, thought leader, MBA professor, and coach. He has more than 20 years of Fortune 500 leadership experience, and he created The Post COVID-19 Leadership Guide to assist learning and development and talent development HR leadership teams to build customized tactical guides to anticipate all aspects of post-COVID change and challenge. He uses his eight essentials to avoid disaster framework to create customized leadership programs for companies. In this interview, you'll hear: The current state of talent development and where Jonathan Miri thinks it's going. Why this is the prime time for leadership to be the partner of senior management and create training packages. How he got into talent development and his general philosophy surrounding talent development. The reason boundaries are so important in our modern world of constant connection. Jonathan Miri outlines his eight essentials to avoid disaster. How taking care of our mental health and the mental health of others can affect workplace culture. Why people need to feel as though they are contributing and making progress to achieve fulfillment. The reward systems that are exciting employees, increase loyalty, and encourage them to stay where they are. The risk of continuing to do business as companies have in the past and why it's so important to make people feel as though they're part of a team. One example of a company that has implemented Jonathan Miri's eight essentials and how it's working for them. What leaders need to do to be effective at driving loyalty and keeping their employees engaged while mitigating turnover. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (andystorch.com) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (linkedin.com/in/andystorch) https://tdtt.us/ (tdtt.us/) Connect with Jonathan Miri: https://www.linkedin.com/in/therapidbrands/ (linkedin.com/in/therapidbrands) https://rapidaccelerator.com/ (rapidaccelerator.com/) jonathan@therapidbrands.com

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast
66. Following Your Bliss

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 34:46


Happy Mid-December, Listeners! In this week's episode, Karen and Katie discuss how we can all follow our bliss when it comes to dreaming big (even if we aren't able to go anywhere at the moment). The pair also talks about vision boarding, waiting in line for concerts, and Karen as a MAJOR mic drop moment when she asks, "Post-COVID, WHO ARE WE NOW?" Thanks for listening - enjoy! Resources from today's episode: - Check out Adam Grant's WorkLife podcast: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/worklife

Migration Policy Institute Podcasts
SI4RI Conference: Planning and Shaping Inclusive Post-COVID-19 Recovery

Migration Policy Institute Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 73:21


In this session moderated by MPI's International Program Director of Research Meghan Benton, panelists Anila Noor, Member, European Commission's Expert Group on the Views of Migrants, and Founder, New Women Connectors, the Netherlands; Scarlet Cronin, Acting Executive Director, The Tent Partnership for Refugees; Katharina Bamberg, Policy Advisor on Migration and Integration, Eurocities; and Christina Pope, Senior Director of Welcoming International, Welcoming America discussed the following questions: Over the past year-and-a-half, we have heard a lot of conversations about (and calls for) "inclusive recovery". If we were to make this more concrete: what does inclusive recovery look like for you? How can government, the private sector, and social-sector organizations partner design and promote strategies for post-COVID-19 recovery that reflect the needs and resources of diverse communities? Where can we identify examples of these strategies? How can "social innovation for inclusion" evolve into "inclusive social innovation"—expanding opportunities for diverse groups to participate in social entrepreneurship, community engagement, and policymaking?

Nordeast Podcast
Across the Spiderverse Teaser, South Park - Post Covid, and Nat‘l Lampoons Xmas Vacation Rewatch (Ep 536)

Nordeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021


The TreppWire Podcast
112. Post-COVID Property Valuations, Hotel Transactions, Office Occupancy

The TreppWire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 44:40


In this week's episode, we look at the hospitality transaction market which has been busy recently, with the sales providing insight into post-COVID valuations. Then, we turn to the office sector where we see signs of occupancy rebounding and highlight several important Trading Alerts. Lastly, we share some positive and negative retail news and dive into our latest property value analysis. Episode Notes: Omicron news and Fed update (0:21) Hotel transactions (5:10) Office occupancy and headlines (12:13) Shorting office? Positive stories (23:57) Deed-in-lieu for large office loan (30:01) Retail green shoot and crabgrass (34:49) Property values analysis: https://www.trepp.com/trepptalk/commercial-property-values-pain-retail-catches-breath(38:27) Shoutouts (40:22) Questions or comments? Contact us at podcast@trepp.com. Follow Trepp: Twitter: www.twitter.com/TreppWire LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/trepp-llc Facebook: www.facebook.com/TreppLLC

Al Cine con las Amikas: El Podcast
South Park Post Covid

Al Cine con las Amikas: El Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 99:08


Negra está con licencia, así que por primera vez, este podcast reune a tres representantes del amikaverse para hablar de lo que siempre quiso la Diva: South Park, y la reciente película "Post Covid" en Paramount+ fue la oportunidad perfecta. Además: El villano de la semana es Hades de la película "Hércules" de Disney, Summer Amikas hablaron de Romane y el recomendado de la semana es Schitt's Creek, disponible en Paramount+.

Invest:Insights by Capital Analytics
Post-COVID office dynamics and leadership training key for law firms moving forward

Invest:Insights by Capital Analytics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 7:02


Leslie Packer, managing partner at Ellis & Winters, does not see the legal profession going back to what it was before COVID. In an interview with Invest:Insights, Packer said she thinks that remote work has increased efficiency in many areas of practicing law except for training new lawyers, an area where there is no replacement for being in a traditional office setting. There are systemic structures that need to be broken to fully address the gap in corporate women leadership everywhere, specifically in the legal profession. As such, law firms need to be flexible, offer paternity leave, and realize that women can lead just as effectively as their male counterparts, Packer said. For more information about our interviewee, visit: https://www.elliswinters.com/ Register to read all Capital Analytics reports for free: https://www.capitalanalyticsassociate...

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Patrick Wood on Technocracy in a Post-Covid World (Part 2) (Preview)

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 1:42


Dec 8 – Technocracy involves the reprogramming of the economy and how it functions through the use of science and technology but also the reprogramming of the individual via the use of social and... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Post COVID-19 syndrome can be a long haul

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 13:54


Most people who have COVID-19 recover completely within a few weeks. But some people — even those who had mild versions of the disease — continue to experience symptoms after their initial recovery. Sometimes called “long haulers” or “long COVID," these patients can have fatigue, shortness of breath, brain fog and other symptoms long after the time of their infection.Post-COVID-19 syndrome conditions are generally considered to be effects of COVID-19 that persist for more than four weeks after you've been diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.A recent Mayo Clinic study on post-COVID-19 symptoms found that more women than men suffer long-term effects. Women predominantly showed symptoms of fatigue, followed by muscle pain and low blood pressure, while men primarily experienced shortness of breath.Research is also underway to better understand what may be causing post-COVID-19 syndrome."We do have some research now that shows that some of the cells that are used to create immunity after an infection, they may be malfunctioning in this condition in patients with long-haul COVID," says  Dr. Greg Vanichkachorn, director of Mayo Clinic's COVID Activity Rehabilitation Program. "We also now have some research that shows that patients with this condition can have antibodies against themselves, otherwise known as an auto-antibody. And this may be associated with the long-haul COVID state, so immune dysfunction and auto immunity, they may be at play here."The COVID Activity Rehabilitation Program at Mayo Clinic helps people experiencing post-COVID-19 syndrome by working with patients to decrease symptoms and improve overall functioning and quality of life. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Vanichkachorn discusses how treatment can help patients who suffer from post-COVID-19 syndrome.

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Patrick Wood on Technocracy in a Post-Covid World (Part 1) (Preview)

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 2:25


Dec 7 – FS Insider speaks with Patrick Wood, the world's foremost leading expert and author on the subject of technocracy, who has detailed its history, evolution, and ongoing implementation. In... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

The Analysis: A Movie and TV Podcast
EP 199: South Park Post Covid

The Analysis: A Movie and TV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 24:23


Matt and Bob take a trip inside Kenny's time machine to chat about the newest south park exclusive event/ "Movie Made for TV" South Park: Post Pandemic. Give it a listen today!

Blunt Force Truth
The Vaccine / What's Coming Next - An Interview with Michael Guy

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 89:23


Today's show rundown: Mark is going to Texas to spend Thanksgiving with his buddy Chuck. Chuck and Mark wish all our listeners a Happy Thanksgiving. The WHO have received 20,000 reports of new eye disorders that have occurred POST COVID-19 vaccinations. Mark goes into some detail on the various disorders and explains some of the facts. Heres the bottom line all of these eye conditions are related to increased pressure and spinal fluid. If you were vaccinated prior to may, the government says you are now unvaccinated, because you need to get jabbed every 6 months. Our Government is NOT recognizing natural immunity. Mark explains - the government wants to eliminate a control group. When the people without the vaccination do NOT develop these future health problems, there is no control group. Michael Guy explains his experience with Operation Warp Speed - he was in meetings with multiple Generals, and they were all asking Michael "how we get people to wear masks". The Path to 71%, they wanted to know what Michael thought about helping get people to comply. But thy lied - it was taking a direction he was not privy to say. Anthony Fauci was on TV reading copy that Michael Guy wrote...how is it that they are real. We need to stop calling this COVID-19 Vaccine a vaccine. The old definition used to be a substance that protected and PREVENTED you from getting a disease. Now you can call it a vaccine even if it only a therapeutic, having nothing do do with prevention. When you got the Polio VACCINE....you didn't get Polio. https://worldmission.cc/donate-humanitarianoutreach/