Podcasts about presbyterian church

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Branch of Protestant Christianity in which the church is governed by presbyters (elders)

  • 497PODCASTS
  • 2,054EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 9, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about presbyterian church

Show all podcasts related to presbyterian church

Latest podcast episodes about presbyterian church

Kanawha Salines PCA
08/07/2022: Luke 23:13-25 "Give Us Barabbas"

Kanawha Salines PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 30:11


Kanawha Salines PCA
08/07/2022 PM: Gen. 1:1-2:3 "The Work of Creation"

Kanawha Salines PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:12


Wife, The on SermonAudio
Husbands Honoring Their Wives

Wife, The on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 43:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Church of Cape Cod, OPC is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Husbands Honoring Their Wives Subtitle: 1 Peter Speaker: Dr. James La Belle Broadcaster: Presbyterian Church of Cape Cod, OPC Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/7/2022 Bible: 1 Peter 3:7 Length: 43 min.

Husband, The on SermonAudio
Husbands Honoring Their Wives

Husband, The on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 43:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Church of Cape Cod, OPC is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Husbands Honoring Their Wives Subtitle: 1 Peter Speaker: Dr. James La Belle Broadcaster: Presbyterian Church of Cape Cod, OPC Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/7/2022 Bible: 1 Peter 3:7 Length: 43 min.

St. Andrew's Podcast

Message from Pastor Peter Dunn entitled "Recliner" For more information, visit sntandrews.org. © St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven
Episode 201: Roswell Presbyterian Church | Summer of Love: "Not a Kid Person" Matthew 19:13-15 Rev. Jeff Meyers | Sunday, August 7, 2022

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 19:53


Doubt on SermonAudio
Dealing with Doubt

Doubt on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 28:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Church of Coventry is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Dealing with Doubt Speaker: Will Snyder Broadcaster: Presbyterian Church of Coventry Event: Sunday Service Date: 6/26/2022 Bible: 1 John 3:19-24 Length: 28 min.

ANTICHRISTS on SermonAudio
Christians and Antichrists

ANTICHRISTS on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 27:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Church of Coventry is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Christians and Antichrists Speaker: Will Snyder Broadcaster: Presbyterian Church of Coventry Event: Sunday Service Date: 6/5/2022 Bible: 1 John 2:18-29 Length: 27 min.

The Bioethics Podcast
Rev. W.F. “Bo” Collins, III | Senior Pastor of Lakeview Presbyterian Church in Vernon Hills, IL

The Bioethics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 33:13


CBHD Executive Director, Matthew Eppinette, interviews his senior pastor, Bo Collins regarding his recent attendance at CBHD's summer conference Pastors Workshop in Deerfield Illinois at the end of June. Bo gives insight and feedback into the topics covered within the workshop, and even turns the tables on Matthew; the interviewer becomes the interviewee! Bo is from Birmingham, AL. He holds degrees from the University of Alabama in Birmingham (BA, English) and Covenant Theological Seminary (MDiv). He was ordained as a Presbyterian minister in while serving on the pastoral staff of Riveroaks Reformed Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Memphis, TN. Bo and his wife, Katie, have three sons, Fraser, Elliot, & Bruce. He loves bike racing, blues guitar, explaining the Bible, and growing in his ability to serve the LORD's people and the church. Rev. Collins has served as the pastor of Lakeview Presbyterian Church since 2018. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cbhd/support

The Back to Jerusalem Podcast
Episode 658: Major Denomination Labels Israel Racist - With Rabbi Myles Weiss

The Back to Jerusalem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 25:23


Rabbi Myles Weiss is back on the BTJ podcast to talk about the recent news that the Presbyterian Church in the US has voted to label Israel an apartheid state.

St. Andrew's Podcast

Message from Pastor Peter Dunn entitled "Help!" For more information, visit sntandrews.org. © St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven
Episode 199: Roswell Presbyterian Church | Summer of Love: "The Wisdom of Don Henley" Matthew 18:21-35 | Sunday, July 31, 2022

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 19:53


Presbyterian Church of Los Gatos
Rev Joey Lee: “What’s in Your Wallet?” (07/31/2022)

Presbyterian Church of Los Gatos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022


Luke 12:13-21 The post Rev Joey Lee: “What’s in Your Wallet?” (07/31/2022) appeared first on Presbyterian Church of Los Gatos.

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2274: Old Graves in an Old Town

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:49


Episode: 2274 Old graves in an old town and a new view of who we were.  Today, old gravestones.

ManKind Podcast
The Powerful Psychology Of Dismantling Racism: Three Pillars Of Sacred Intelligence | Dr. Rev. TLC | Ep #083

ManKind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 58:50


Can we use spiritual awareness to dismantle racism? Put another way … How can we tap into our own sacred intelligence to empower change in the world? This week on the ManKind Podcast I'm with Rev. Dr. Terrlyn Curry Avery, the Reverend Dr. TLC. Regardless of your belief or non-belief this podcast might help you connect to a deeper sense of who you are as a motivated and passionate advocate for change … in all kinds of environments. Rev. Dr. TLC is the author of two books. Today we're talking about her newest book, ""What's it like to be a Black Woman Pastor in the (mostly white) Presbyterian Church? What kinds of transformations are possible when we get willing to set aside old ways of seeing and hearing the world and living from a sacred purpose. There are three pillars in Sacred Intelligence. Sacred Motive, Self-ish Mindset, and Shared Movement.   In this podcast we dive into the journey of learning about our sacred intelligence and bringing it forward into the world. There are ways to make a difference. YOU can make a difference. How to Find Rev. Dr. TLC: Website: SacredIntelligence.comBook: Dismantling Racism: Healing Separation from the Inside OutRadio Show: Dismantle Racism: with Rev. Dr. TLCAdditional ResourcesSubscribe/Rate/Review ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐: >>>HERE

Kanawha Salines PCA
07/24/2022: Luke 23:1-12 "Delivered Over to the Gentiles"

Kanawha Salines PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 37:48


Covenant Presbyterian Church Fort Smith Podcast

Sun, 24 Jul 2022 14:30:00 +0000 PCA, Reformed, Presbyterian, Evangelical, Presbyterian Church in America, Reformed Church, Covenant 00:00:00 no

St. Andrew's Podcast
Thy Will Be Done

St. Andrew's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022


Message from Elder Phil Dunn entitled "Thy Will Be Done." For more information, visit sntandrews.org. © St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

South Charlotte Presbyterian Church
Saved for a Different Life || Titus 3:1-8 || Pastor Dean Faulkner

South Charlotte Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 42:14


Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven
Episode 197: Roswell Presbyterian Church | Summer of Love: "There's Always a Leaf at God's Table" Acts 10:9-28 | Sunday, July 124, 2022

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 21:37


SOLA Network
113: Hope and Encouragement for Burned Out Pastors: An Interview with Harold Kim

SOLA Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 25:52


SOLA Network had the privilege of speaking to Harold Kim, pastor of Christ Central of Southern California and president of SOLA Network. Harold Kim talked with Jason Chao, video manager at SOLA Network about burned-out pastors and how to help them. Check out this important interview where they discuss why so many church leaders are discouraged during this season and what to say to a church leader who is contemplating quitting ministry right now. Harold Kim is the senior and founding pastor of Christ Central of Southern California and serves on the Board for Christ Central Network (CCN). He received his Master of Divinity (M.Div.) from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and his Master of Theology (Th.M.) from Princeton Theological Seminary. He was ordained in the Presbyterian Church of America (PCA) in 2001 and is now a member of the Korean American Presbyterian Church (KAPC). Harold is a happily married husband to SunHi, and devoted father to his two daughters, Taylor and Elizabeth. Harold serves as the President of SOLA Network. Video and full transcript: https://sola.network/article/hope-and-encouragement-for-burned-out-pastors-interview/ Links: Weekly Newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/sola/tgif Monthly Newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/sola/newsletter Facebook: https://facebook.com/thesolanetwork Instagram: https://instagram.com/thesolanetwork Twitter: https://twitter.com/thesolanetwork YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqsoKbSYBbZZoovA24PhqAg Podcast: http://anchor.fm/solanetwork Website: https://sola.network

Sermons from Presbyterian Church of Upper Montclair, NJ
”Don't Confuse the Good With the Better” - July 17, 2022

Sermons from Presbyterian Church of Upper Montclair, NJ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 20:23


The Presbyterian Church of Upper Montclair Sunday, July 17, 2022 Sermon: "Don't Confuse the Good With the Better" Scriptures: Psalm 148:1-13, Luke 10:38-42 Pastor Greg Horn Elder Blaire Rzempoluch, liturgist

Christian Podcast Community
SPECIAL (006) – Joy Amidst Trials (James 1:2-4) – Rev. Rob Hill – West Springfield, MA

Christian Podcast Community

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


In this episode, Rev. Rob Hill unpacks James 1:2-4 and gives comfort to those facing trials. We all face trials sometimes, and sometimes they are significant trials. What is God doing? Why is this happening? Will I make it through this? We need a comforting word from God that He is sovereign and working in our trials to preserve us to the end. Listen in as Rev. Hill preaches for your comfort in Christ. Check out West Springfield Covenant Community Church and listen to some more of Rob's sermons. If you're in the area, swing by and worship with them. Check out other churches in the Presbyterian Church in America. I mentioned a cool vintage black and white picture of Donut Dip in the 1950s. Check out Donut Dip HERE. As mentioned, Rob's wife is Megan Hill who is the Managing Editor of The Gospel Coalition. Check out Megan's books HERE. ALL SERMONS FROM OTHER PREACHERS AIRED ON SMALL TOWN THEOLOGIAN ARE USED WITH PERMISSION FROM THE PREACHERS.

SOLA Network
Preaching on the Verge of Quitting | AALC Session 4 | Rev. Harold Y. Kim

SOLA Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 58:02


Harold Kim, pastor of Christ Central of Southern California and president of SOLA Network, led the fourth session of the AALC Conference. His encouraging message focused on Psalm 42 and how it offers an assessment of your condition – with practical prescriptions – to better preach to your own soul and the soul of others. Harold Kim is the senior and founding pastor of Christ Central of Southern California and serves on the Board for Christ Central Network (CCN). He received his Master of Divinity (M.Div.) from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and his Master of Theology (Th.M.) from Princeton Theological Seminary. He was ordained in the Presbyterian Church of America (PCA) in 2001 and is now a member of the Korean American Presbyterian Church (KAPC). Harold is a happily married husband to SunHi, and devoted father to his two daughters, Taylor and Elizabeth. Harold serves as the President of SOLA Network. Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/cm23X2JZYoQ

Southern Gothic
83: The Tragic Death of Julia Legare

Southern Gothic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 31:48 Very Popular


The legend of Julia Legare has been passed down for generations, likely due to the fact that it brings into focus a far-reaching human anxiety, the fear of being buried alive. In 1852, while visiting her relatives at their home in Ediso Island, South Carolina, 22-year-old Julia Legare fell ill. Her diagnosis was not good, Julia had been struck with diphtheria and there was little that they could do for her.  Eventually, Julia just slipped further away deep into a coma, and after many days and nights passed their worst fear was realized, Julia succumbed to her fate.  After the doctor declared her deceased the family moved quickly to say their goodbyes and ready their beloved's remains for burial.  It is said that in the week following Julia's burial, the faint sound of weeping and screaming could be heard emanating from the church cemetery, yet no one walked the grounds to see if they could find the source.  The mausoleum, located at the historic Presbyterian Church of Edisto Island, was not re-opened for over a decade following Julia's death, but when it was, a horrific. Julia's remains were not where they had been left. It seems that Julia Legare had been buried alive. This episode is made possible by:  Apostrophe, a personalized skin care treatment that delivers. Use code GOTHIC at checkout for five dollars off your first visit. Green Chef, a CCOF-certified meal kit company that makes eating well easy with plans to fit every lifestyle. Whether you're Keto, Paleo, Vegan, Vegetarian, Gluten-Free, or just looking to eat more balanced meals, Use code GOTHIC135 to get $135 off across five boxes, plus free shipping on your first box!” Help Southern Gothic grow by becoming a Patreon Supporter today! Connect with Southern Gothic Media: Website: SouthernGothicMedia.com Merch Store: https://www.southerngothicmedia.com/merch Pinterest: @SouthernGothicMedia Facebook: @SouthernGothicMedia Instagram: @SouthernGothicMedia Twitter: @SoGoPodcast Southern Gothic will be a vendor at the following upcoming events: Dark History & Horror Convention, Champaign, IL - August 19-20, 2022  True Crime Podcast Festival, Dallas, TX - August 26-28, 2022

New Books in Genocide Studies
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

New Books in African Studies
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in Religion
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in History
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

South Charlotte Presbyterian Church
The Fruits of a Life Changed by the Spirit || Galatians 5:16-25 || Pastoral Intern Pancho Contesse

South Charlotte Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 40:25


Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven
Episode 195: Roswell Presbyterian Church | Summer of Love: "You Can't Be Serious?!" Matthew 5:43-48 | Sunday, July 17, 2022

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 22:06


St. Andrew's Podcast
A Demonstration of Love

St. Andrew's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022


Message from Pastor Shawn Hurley entitled "A Demonstration of Love." For more information, visit sntandrews.org. © St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

New Books in Christian Studies
Philippe Denis, "The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial" (James Currey, 2022)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 62:21


Why did some sectors of the Rwandan churches adopt an ambiguous attitude towards the genocide against the Tutsi which claimed the lives of around 800,000 people in three months between April and July 1994? What prevented the churches' acceptance that they may have had some responsibility? And how should we account for the efforts made by other sectors of the churches to remember and commemorate the genocide and rebuild pastoral programmes?  Drawing on interviews with genocide survivors, Rwandans in exile, missionaries and government officials, as well as Church archives and other sources, this book is the first academic study on Christianity and the genocide against the Tutsi to explore these contentious questions in depth, and reveals more internal diversity within the Christian churches than is often assumed. While some Christians, Protestant as well as Catholic, took risks to shelter Tutsi people, others uncritically embraced the interim government's view that the Tutsi were enemies of the people and some, even priests and pastors, assisted the killers. The church leaders only condemned the war: they never actually denounced the genocide against the Tutsi.  In The Genocide Against the Tutsi, and the Rwandan Churches: Between Grief and Denial (James Currey, 2022), Denis examines in detail the responses of two churches, the Catholic Church, the biggest and the most complex, and the Presbyterian Church in Rwanda, which made an unconditional confession of guilt in December 1996. A case study is devoted to the Catholic parish La Crête Congo-Nil in western Rwanda, led at the time by the French priest Gabriel Maindron, a man whom genocide survivors accuse of having failed publicly to oppose the genocide and of having close links with the authorities and some of the perpetrators. By 1997, the defensive attitude adopted by many Catholics had started to change. The Extraordinary Synod on Ethnocentricity in 1999-2000 was a milestone. Yet, especially in the immediate aftermath of the genocide, tension and suspicion persist. Allison Isidore is the Assistant Director for the American Catholic Historical Association. Her research interest is focused on the twentieth-century American Civil Rights Movement and the Catholic Church's response to racism, and the participation of Catholic clergy, nuns, and laypeople in marches, sit-ins, and kneel-ins during the 1950s and 1960s. Allison is also a Video Editor for The Religious Studies Project, producing videos for the podcast and marketing team. She tweets from @AllisonIsidore1. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

ExtraChristy - Podcast

Barns Barnsa sermon by Rev. J. Christy Ramsey DOWNLOAD A LIVE RECORDING Audio from worship at the 11 AM Worship Service July 10, 2022at Valley Presbyterian Church, Bishop,CAedited from a flawless transcription made by edigitaltranscriptions all errors are mine. Luke 12:13-21 Sermons also available free on iTunes If greed is your politics, this is a political sermon. I hope it’s not a political sermon, and that greed is not your politics. Because you may think from the beginning that the sermon is about or the scripture’s about Jesus said I’m not going to be a divider or an arbitrator. I’m not going to be your financial counselor or your family intervention specialist. I’m not, just like with Martha and Mary the last time I preached about telling the other sibling to do what I want, well, I’m not going to tell you and your brother how to get along with money. But later on Jesus says to everybody, he really knew what that was about. It wasn’t about fairness or judicial process or financial planning or any of that stuff. It was about greed. And he tells the story about a man with the land that produces very well, and what does he do about it. Now, some people will hide their greed, not so much in dividing their inheritance among their brothers, but they will say this. Have you ever heard this? Have you said it? Don’t raise your hand if you did because it’s a bad thing. If you said “The church needs to run like a business.” You ever hear that? “We have to run the church like a business.” Or “We have to run the country like a business.” That is usually a cover-up for greed. Because what is the business, then, if you say the church, or the country, or the nonprofit, or the family has to run like a business? Who’s the customer? What’s the product? Who do you serve? Well, yeah, if you’re running a government like a business, well, then you have the product of governmental services and graft and corruption and all that. And you give it to the highest bidder, the one who will pay you the most, and the rest of you forget about it. You know, hey, if you want some government services, how about giving some money? You know, this is a business. I’m not in it for my health. The same thing with the church. Running a church like a business, that usually means I’ve given a lot of money to this church, and I’m not getting a lot back. You’ve got to run like a business, you know, take care of your paying customers. That’s not with the church is about. The church is one of the only institutions that exist primarily for those outside the institution. And that’s not very business-y. 12 Step has this tradition, as well. 12 Step’s tradition, you probably wonder in a 12 Step group, any of the recovery groups, you may say to yourself, hey, what’s a recovery group for? Well, it’s for those folks that go, those poor folks that go to the recovery group to recover. That’s their purpose, their meaning, and their mission. I mean, they’re the paying customers; right? No. It says right in every recovery group the tradition is that their number one purpose is for those that are still suffering. That’s not very business-y. It’s for the other people, not the customers. It’s not so much the problem with money or with riches. You say, oh, well, he’s just all against the riches. He’s all about terrible awful things. But no, it’s not about that. It’s about who does that serve? Who is it for? The little zing right at the end, you know, man, those things you have prepared, who will they be for? You know, that is a good question to ask before you die. All these things that I have prepared, who are they for? Who is my life for? Who are my riches for? What am I here for? Warren Buffett, who we talk about, has a philosophy. He’s one of the world’s, I don’t know what number he is, he’s like eighth or something. He’s getting up to $100 billion. He says his money is not his. And he tells other billionaires and millionaires, the money is not theirs, it’s just entrusted to us while we’re here. He knows, and he thinks about the next generations, about what’s going on with the money. And running things like a business doesn’t work for the government. The government does things that no one wants to do, that no one can find a profit in, that no one can find enough people to do it. And there’s all sorts of things that only the government could do. The interstate highway system is an absolute loser in terms of building projects and things. To have an interstate highway system that goes from coast to coast, up and down, north and south, maintained, is a government job no nonprofit business would ever take on because there’s no money in it. You can’t have enough tolls to keep backing the money. They keep trying to do that, and they keep failing. But, you know, once we got the interstate highway system, boy, trucking really took off. Shipping really turned out. Amazon would not be possible without the interstate highway system. And the government does that. Ever heard of the Internet? Nobody wanted to do the Internet. It was ridiculous. Nobody wanted to do that. There was no money in there. I remember in 1990 they were saying, what’s the good of the Internet? Who’s going to look at this stuff? But the government saw something in it and put it in there. AT&T wouldn’t do it. There wasn’t any money in it. They had plenty of money in the telephone and in their leased lines. They’ve got plenty of money. And they had no interest in getting the Internet to everybody. Who wants that? There’s no money there. The government did it, called Arpanet, and set it up and made the protocols and promoted it and did that. When I started using the Internet, imagine if you will how old I am. When I started using the Internet, you were not allowed to talk about money. You were not allowed to talk about products. You were not allowed to talk about prices or anything. It was like community radio. You couldn’t make money on the Internet because it belonged to the government. ATTENDEE: So un-American. REV. RAMSEY: I know. But then the government says, okay, we got it going. You see how great it is? We got it done. Go for it. And gave it over to private industry. But the private industry, the government as a business would not have done that because it was a big money loser to make it. Ever heard of Hoover Dam? Nobody wanted to do that project. Way too much money. The government did it and electrified the nation along with other projects. Rural electrification, no one wants to run electric line to little towns and little farms and everywhere. The government, in rural electrification and co-ops, they made electricity go out through the entire country. The same thing we’re trying to do with telecommunications today, to go out through the entire country. There’s no money in it. There’s no profit in it. Who’s the customer? They can’t pay. If all the government had to do – Obama said this and got into so much trouble because he didn’t know what he was doing. Obama says, if I just had to make widgets or an app, that would be easy because I would just have to worry about satisfying my customer about whether they would buy the app or not. But when I make a widget or an app, I’m in the government, I have to worry about everybody. I have to worry about the poor people who can’t afford the widget and the app. What are they going to do? I have to worry about unintended consequences about the environment, about our society, about economics, about the next generations. I have to worry about a lot more than selling the widget at the store. And I just can’t go bankrupt and walk away. It’s a lot harder to be good government than it is to be business because it’s not all about greed. It’s about asking the question, who is this for? Is it for the paying customers? The one that has the money? Or is it for everyone, for the next generation, for the greater good, for the culture, for all that. Look at what he said in that scripture. Back to scripture. I knew you never thought I’d get there. But look at all the scriptures he said, “What am I going to do?” How many times does he say “I” and “my”? What am I going to do? What am I going to do with all this? What am I going to do? Say to myself – he even talks to himself. He talks. The only other person he talks to is himself. He says to Saul – now, I don’t know about economics and farming business back in Jesus’ time. But I’m thinking there’s a couple people working that land. I’m thinking maybe one or two. I’m thinking there were some people selling the stuff. I’m thinking there were some people keeping track of the ledgers and all that. I’m thinking there were some people driving the wagons to market. I’m thinking there’s a lot of people. How about those people? How about the people that built the barns, or tore them down and built bigger ones? What about them? What did they do? He didn’t say anything about them. You know, you fool. The things you have prepared, who would they come from us? Now, if your politics are about greed, you’re going to say this is a politician story. But I want to tell you that the idea of what do we do with our wealth is very biblical. About person-wise and with society. What do we do with our wealth? Do we build bigger and bigger barns so that less and less people can have more and more? There’s all sorts of statistics. But the one I like is pretty close. It would be nice if it was exact. But it’s really close to 50% of the world’s wealth, 50% of the world’s wealth. You got a barn. 50% of the barn go to 1% of the people. All right? 50% of the world’s wealth goes to 1% of the people. Well, they earned it. Or I don’t know, whatever you want to say. But I don’t know. Is that the way we want it? Is that the way we want to do that? Wonder how the other side, there’s another 51%. Did you know that? 1% of the world’s wealth. 1% of the world’s wealth. Remember that 1% of the people had 50% of the wealth. If you look at the other end, the 1% of the wealth pretty much goes to 50% of the world. So 50% of the world’s population is dividing up 1% of the wealth. while 1% of the people is putting in a big barn of 50%. Is that the way we want it? Is that the way Jesus wants it? Is that showing that we’re not into greed, that we’re thinking about that? There’s a wonderful quote. And remember why did that guy build bigger barns? It was for security. Wasn’t it? He says, “What am I to do?” And he says at the end, goes “Whoa, I’m set now. I can eat, drink, and be merry. I’ve got all I want. That’s my security.” And what he feared was the loss of security. But let’s take a look at the video. Stored Locally: extrachristy.com/storage/video/Wealth_Inequality_in_America.mp4 There’s a chart I saw recently that I can’t get out of my head. A Harvard business professor and economist asked more than 5,000 Americans how they thought wealth was distributed within the United States. This is what they said they thought it was. Dividing the country into five rough groups at the top, bottom, and middle three 20% groups, they asked people how they thought the wealth in this country was divided. Then he asked them what they thought was the ideal distribution. And 92%, that’s at least nine out of 10 of them, said it should be more like this. In other words, more equitable than they think it is. Now, that fact is telling, admittedly, the notion that most Americans know that the system is already skewed unfairly. But what’s most interesting to me is the reality compared to our perception. The ideal is as far removed from our perception of reality as the actual distribution is from what we think exists in this country. So ignore the ideal for a moment. Here’s what we think it is again. And here is the actual distribution. Shockingly skewed. Not only do the bottom 20% and the next 20%, the bottom 40% of Americans barely have any of the wealth. I mean, it’s hard to even see them on the chart. But the top 1% has more of the country’s wealth than nine out of 10 Americans believe the entire top 20% should have. Mind-blowing. But let’s look at it another way because I found this chart kind of difficult to wrap my head around. Instead, let’s reduce the 311 million Americans to just a representative 100 people. Make it simple. Here they are. Teachers, coaches, firefighters, construction workers, engineers, doctors, lawyers, some investment bankers, a CEO, maybe a celebrity. Now let’s line them up according to their wealth, poorest people on the left, wealthiest on the right, just a steady row of folks, based on their net worth. We’ll color code them like we did before, based on which 20% quintile they fall into. Now, let’s reduce the total wealth of the United States, which was roughly $54 trillion in 2009, to this symbolic pile of cash. And let’s distribute it among our 100 Americans. Well, here’s socialism, all the wealth of the country distributed equally. We all know that won’t work. We need to encourage people to work, and work hard to achieve that good old American dream, keep our country moving forward. So here’s that ideal we asked everyone about. Something like this curve. This isn’t too bad. We’ve got some incentive, as the wealthiest folks are now about 10 to 20 times better off than the poorest Americans. But hey, even the poor folks aren’t actually poor since the poverty line stayed almost entirely off the chart. We have a super healthy middle-class with a smooth transition into wealth. And yes, Republicans and Democrats alike chose this curve. Nine out of 10 people, 90%, said this was a nice ideal distribution of America’s wealth. But let’s move on. This is what people think America’s wealth distribution actually looks like. Not as equitable, clearly. But for me, even this still looks pretty great. Yes, the poorest 20 to 30% are starting to suffer quite a lot compared to the ideal. And the middle-class is certainly struggling more than they were, while the rich and wealthy are making roughly 100 times that of the poorest Americans and about 10 times that of the still-healthy middle-class. Sadly, this isn’t even close to the reality. Here is the actual distribution of wealth in America. The poorest Americans don’t even register. They’re down to pocket change. And the middle-class is barely distinguishable from the poor. In fact, even the rich, between the top 10 and 20 percentile are worse off. Only the top 10% are better off. And how much better off? So much better off that the top 2 to 5% are actually off the chart at this scale. And the top 1%, this guy, well, his stack of money stretches 10 times higher than we can show. Here’s his stack of cash restacked, all by itself. This is the top 1% we’ve been hearing so much about. So much green in his pockets that I have to give him a whole new column of his own because he won’t fit on my chart. 1% of America has 40% of all the nation’s wealth. The bottom 80%, eight out of every 10 people, or 80 out of these hundred, only has 7% between them. This has only gotten worse in the last 20 to 30 years. While the richest 1% take home almost a quarter of the national income today, in 1976, they took home only 9%. Meaning their share of income has nearly tripled in the last 30 years. The top 1% own half the country’s stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. The bottom 50% of Americans own only 0.5% of these investments. Which means they aren’t investing. They’re just scraping by. I’m sure many of these wealthy people have worked very hard for their money. But do you really believe that the CEO is working 380 times harder than his average employee? Not his lowest paid employee. Not the janitor. But the average earner in his company. The average worker needs to work more than a month to earn what the CEO makes in one hour. We certainly don’t have to go all the way to socialism to find something that is fair for hard-working Americans. We don’t even have to achieve what most of us consider might be ideal. All we need to do is wake up and realize that the reality in this country is not at all what we think it is. All right. That was, like, 10 years ago. And it’s worse now, if you can imagine. Now, is that political? Well, if your politics is greed, yeah. Yeah, it’s political. So what are we going to do? Remember that our guy in the scripture was about security, and worried about security, and he built bigger barns for security and said, “Eat, drink, and be merry.” I used to, when I was more annoying than I am now, I know it’s hard to imagine, but I used to go around and say, you know, “Eat, drink, and be merry” is in the Bible. It’s right there in the Bible. I’d tell everybody that, and they go, oh, yeah, really? I go, yeah. The next verse it says, “And then God said ‘You fool.’” Right after. So you’ve got to kind of read more than one verse in the Bible. That’d be good. All right. But Ernst Bloch says this. In fact, he’s back early in the 1900s. “The most tragic form of loss isn’t the loss of security. It’s the loss of the capability, capacity to imagine that things could be different.” The most tragic form of loss is not what that guy felt in the story of Jesus, that loss of security. It’s a loss of the capability, the capacity to imagine that things could be different. Do we have that? Are we tragic, more tragic than the person in our story that had everything and then died the next day. We could even be more – it’s not Bible, but I think that’s true. We can imagine things. How could things be different? Well, on an individual level, certainly, we can spread the wealth around. We can do things that are not concentrated. Maybe, just maybe, oh, my gosh, it’s so easy to order from Amazon, but maybe we don’t want Jeff Bezos to have traveling to Mars money when other people don’t have traveling to the grocery store money. Maybe we don’t want to buy everything on Amazon. Maybe. Maybe could do other things, too, about choosing where we spend our money, choosing who. Maybe we tip more. You know? Tip used to be To Insure Promptitude. Did you know that’s what it stood for? To Insure Promptitude. I think that was a reverse engineer. I don’t think it started that. And it came out, well, it came out with Prohibition, and the bars quit selling drinks, and they figured out they weren’t making money, so they cut the wages of the workers, and the workers didn’t have any money, so they had to say everybody throw some money to the worker because we’re not paying them anymore. But now I think tips are To Insure Poverty. Because if you’re working for tips, you’re going to be in poverty. So we were at a conference. All the big, big thinkers of the Presbyterian Church had a conference for training. And, you know, we were at a conference center, and they said, “Shall we leave something for the housekeeping staff when we check out?” And the person says, “Well, you know, the tip is included in your registration fee. And we do put on a gratuity. But I want to tell you, none of these people are making too much money. So if you want to leave something, go ahead.” Maybe you want to do that. But how about some more specific examples, Christy? Well, there’s Warren Buffett. Have you heard of Warren Buffett? I talked about him earlier. That man is, even though he’s having so much trouble giving away his money, you know how much money Warren Buffett has given away in his lifetime? What do you think? What would be a lot of money to give away, if you were really rich? What do you think? How much? ATTENDEE: One million. REV. RAMSEY: One million. Do we have any – it’s higher. Anybody? ATTENDEE: 10 million. REV. RAMSEY: 10 million. Higher still. ATTENDEE: 50 million. REV. RAMSEY: 50 million. That’d be a lot. ATTENDEE: Billion. REV. RAMSEY: Million, yeah. He’s given 42 billion with a “b” dollars away in his lifetime. The man still has almost 100 million, can’t stop making money, poor guy. In fact, Warren Buffett has so much money that he’s hired Bill Gates, who’s a billionaire on his own, to spend his money. He actually gives money to Bill Gates, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to go ahead and spend it for him on things like Third World health and all that. In fact, Warren Buffett is behind something called the Giving Pledge. And what that is, he invites millionaires and billionaires to pledge, it’s not a legal contract or anything like that, but they have a letter, and it’s all public and all that, you can look it up, GivingPledge.org. And these people pledge to give away half of their fortune during their lifetime or when they die. At least half. He’s getting a handful of billionaires and millionaires to sign up, you can look it up on the website, and they have a little letter about what they’re doing and how they’re giving away their money. So maybe… But Christy, you say. We’re not billionaires. We’re not millionaires. We’re barely scraping by. Come on. What else can we do? Well, there’s a guy and his wife in Akron, Ohio – Akron, Ohio, where they shoot black people with 60 bullets if they run away from the police, my hometown – Duane and Lisa. Duane and Lisa just had a heart for ministry and decided they needed to do something for race relations and poor relations. And so they took their family of four – hello – and bought a house in the poorest, awful-est, most neglected neighborhood in Akron, Summit Lake. Summit Lake, during the 2008 when everything fell apart, money and all that, you could buy a house in Summit Lake for one dollar. They had one dollar houses at Summit Lake because no one wanted to live at Summit Lake. One dollar. Well, I don’t know what he paid, but he got a pretty good deal. But that was later on. It was early, around 1998. He moved his family there and started working in the community. He started out with the bike shop and brought the neighborhood kids in, got some donated bikes, and says, hey, you work enough hours on fixing these bikes and learn how to use the bikes and being a good person, you can take the bike home with you. And he’s still doing this now, 25 years later. But also it’s moved into, it’s higher, what they call reentry ministry, in that they take the people, and in fact they’ve got a little building, it’s called The Front Porch. It’s a café. It’s a coffee shop. It’s a rehabilitation center. It’s within walking distance of the jail. And a lot of folks come right out of the jail, they don’t have a job, they don’t have prospects, they don’t have anything, and go to The Front Porch. And The Front Porch finds them a job, gives them a job, puts them to work, does something. They have a recovery meeting on Sunday. And that is his retirement. I mean, that’s what Duane and Lisa did with their money. They made The Front Porch. And they got the foundation, they got employees, and they’ve got things, they got the 501(c)(3) in about 10 years. But they started out the ministry, and they moved to the worst neighborhood in Akron. And, oh, they’re a couple good white people. And lived there, and gained the trust of the community, and worked with community, and bought a ministry. That’s a barn heat bill. What about something a little closer to home? We’re not all from Akron, Ohio, Christy. Although everybody could be, should be, and it’s a sad thing you are not. But we have Carson City. 10 years. I’m in my 10th year at Computer Corps. Computer Corps is run by Ron Norton. Ron Norton is an amazing guy with great talents, former Army drill instructor, among other things. So he’s got a little of that sprinkled in there. And what he did when it was time for him to retire, he took his retirement, and he, if you will, founded Computer Corps. He got donations, and he got a house, and he started making computers available to senior citizens. Because back then seniors didn’t know about the mouse and graphics and back there 25 years ago. He started out with that. He started refurbishing computers. He started saying, hey, give me your old computers. He got old computers, taught people how to refurbish them, and then sell them at a cheap rate to people that don’t have computers. Twenty-five years later, he’s got four different locations. He’s got over 1,000 computers a month coming in. They’re refurbished, and they’re sent out, and they’re sold, and people are rehabilitated. People, again, are coming out, even before, instead of jail, they get to go to community service at Computer Corps. He feeds them six hot meals a week, daily lunches. Has a food pantry runs there, rehabilitation things. And I said, “Ron,” you know, the man’s getting old. I mean, I’m old. He, yeah, really there. And I said, “Ron, you know, what are you going to do? And how long are you going to do this?” You know, he’s there, six, seven days a week because on Sundays he’s up there rolling supplies in. I said, “Ron, Ron, what are you going to do?” And he goes, “Well, this is my retirement. I took all my retirement money, and that’s what you see around here. I got nowhere to go. This is what I’m retired from. This is what I’ve got to do.” He lives at the original house, along with other people in various modes of employee, volunteer, rehabilitation. And that’s how he built his barn, and how he invests, and how he answered the question: When you’re gone, whose would this be? Maybe that’s all you need to do, you know, to overcome our propensity to greed and security and material things is to ask yourself, all these things I have prepared, if my life was gone today, whose would they be? What have I done for others? How am I rich toward God, as the commentators that wrote the Bible put in at the end. Those are good questions. Then you get yourself in the place where God calls you a fool. Never, never a good thing. So what can you do? You can refinance. You can say I’m not like the billionaires and the millionaires. Anybody can do this. I mean, right now I’m in Valley Bishop, and I don’t want to say I’m a saint or nothing. I’m not. In fact, this is what I do because I’m not a saint. I’m here in Valley Bishop, and my church home is an Episcopal Church in Carson City, and I’m rarely there. In fact, it’s getting so they have to pay me to be there. They have to hire me for a Sunday. And I go, well, I got that Sunday, great. But every Sunday my tithe is there, my contribution is there. And you can think about that. One of the cures, if you will, treatments for greed is to start percentage giving. It doesn’t have to be 10%. Doesn’t have to be a tithe. I haven’t done the math yet. I really need to do that. But if you can commit yourself to a certain percentage of your income going to other people, the church is fine, nonprofits, whatever, any of that would help your greed and your barn building. Just by thinking about percentage giving to something that will go on beyond you. You can reinvest. And like Warren Buffett says, and he should know, he’s got more money than most of us, than about everybody but seven people in the world, you could say, “This isn’t my money. I’m just holding on to it while I’m here.” And move it to other people. So you can set up automatic giving. You’ve got to watch out. There’s some dangers in that and some things. And also, if you notice, that was in Episcopal Church, and I’m a little embarrassed because I am giving money to the Episcopal Church when I’m Presbyterian. So I also give money to the Presbyterian Church PC(USA) Mission. I have a missionary I support. And that’s not because I’m wonderful. It’s because I’m horrible. If I didn’t set that up automatically, I wouldn’t do it. And I didn’t do it. And I would go to the Episcopal Church, and I would look at Betty Lynn, I’d go, we haven’t been there in two months, and we owe this. Oh, my gosh, I’m not writing that check. Ow. So we do that. So you can reinvest your money. And pledge to yourself, like even – you don’t have to be a billionaire. You can pledge to yourself. Pledge. It is not a legally binding contract. Oh, there it is again. You can say to yourself, you can even write yourself a little letter, don’t have a website, but you can say I’m going to give this much away. Doesn’t have to be 50% like the billionaires. But can it be 2%? Can it be 1%? The important thing is that it’s going to be regular, it’s going to be a percentage, and you’re going to commit. You know, if last year you gave to something $1000, maybe you’re going to go by percentage, and that turns out to be $800. I think that’s a better gift. Not just if you’re in the mood, just saying I’m committed, and I’m going to do that. Reinvest. You can also rebuild. I didn’t say rebuild, but at Computer Corps they rebuild. And what they do, they take chances on all sorts of people. When I showed up there, imagine, if you will, I showed up there, minister without a church, coming to Nevada without a job. That is very suspect. Why were you kicked out of the church? Who hates you? What have you done? I mean, that is an obvious question. And they gave me a chance. And after a year I got the key to the place. I tried to not take it; but no, I still have it. But rebuild. And they just don’t rebuild computers. They take people there who have never had a job, that have never been outside their home, and they take them in, and they show them how to work a time clock, and they show them how to show up and how to leave, they give them a lunch, and they show them how to clock out for lunch and clock in for lunch. And there’s a lot of people don’t know how to do these things. And then when they leave, they’ve got one line on their résumé. And they’ve got a reference from Ron. And so many people have gone through there. And our best volunteers we lose because they go out and get somebody to pay them for what we train them to do. So you can refurbish. You can invest in other people. Invest in other people that don’t really – maybe not worth the investment. And we’ve had some bad things. That happens. You can also, oh, it’s kind of like reentry, as well, in that you let people back in to life, figure out how they to get back into life. That’s what they do at, I didn’t say it, Southside Ministries in Akron. They figure out how to get people back into things. Maybe you’re in recovery. Maybe you support someone in recovery. Maybe you host a recovery group at the church or somewhere. But maybe we can figure out how to get people back on their feet again, and what could be done to help people instead of blame them. There’s a little program up in Carson City called Circles. And what the Circles does is not so much giving money to the poor people, but they have the poor people and the people that are struggling, the people that almost have the first and last month’s rent, almost, to come and to – they have dinner, and they have training, and they asked them, what do you need to do to get a job? One time they said, “Everybody wants us to know PowerPoint. We don’t know how to do that.” Or “We don’t have a computer.” So we had a class in PowerPoint. Everybody learned how to use PowerPoint, and they can have another thing on their resume. Reentry. Where are you putting the stuff of your life? What barns are you building? When you leave, the things you have prepared, who will they be? Think about that, and God and Jesus will not call you a fool. You will not be a fool. You will be blessed. Amen.

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St. Andrew's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022


Message from David Piorek entitled "Who is My Neighbor?" For more information, visit sntandrews.org. © St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Kanawha Salines PCA
07/03/2022: Luke 22:47-53 "The Betrayal and Arrest of Jesus"

Kanawha Salines PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 36:25


Guilt Grace Gratitude
Guy P. Waters | Presbyterian Church Government

Guilt Grace Gratitude

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 61:51


Looking for a Reformed Church in Orange County? Check out Santa Ana Reformed (a United Reformed Church plant) meeting Sundays at 2 PM at Davis Elementary School! Please help support the show on our Patreon Page! Check out the ESBT Series & NSBT Series from IVP Academic! Get a copy of the Family Worship Bible Study, The Works of William Perkins, & the RHB Store! SEASON 4 EPISODE 21 Join Nick & Peter of the Guilt Grace Gratitude Podcast as they continue Season 4, The Reformed Church, with Episode 21, "Presbyterian Church Government." Guy P. Waters (PhD., Duke University) is the James M. Baird Jr. Professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi, as well as the Academic Dean at both Jackson and Brazil campuses. Resources for this season: Recovering the Reformed Confession: R. Scott Clark Well Ordered, Living Well: Guy P. Waters How Jesus Runs the Church: Guy Prentiss Waters Welcome to a Reformed Church: Daniel R. Hyde A Better Way: Michael Horton Have Feedback or Questions? Email us at: guiltgracepod@gmail.com Find us on Instagram: @guiltgracepod Follow us on Twitter: @guiltgracepod Find us on YouTube: Guilt Grace Gratitude Podcast Please rate and subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you use! Looking for a Reformed Church? North American Presbyterian & Reformed Churches --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gggpodcast/support

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven
Episode 192: Roswell Presbyterian Church | Summer of Love: "Look Who's Coming to Dinner" Luke 19:1-10 | Sunday, July 3, 2022

Roswell Presbyterian Church RPC@eleven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 22:47


Thank God I'm Atheist
An American Mess #551

Thank God I'm Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:58


World Cup in Qatar is probably going to be really boring, Presbyterian Church of America parts with National Association of Evangelicals, ski resort sprays sacred mountain with sewage, army chaplain celebrates end of Roe v. Wade, Pixar's gay kiss ruffles feathers at Oklahoma theater, FBI finally raids some churches, and celebrating the 4th of July feels extra crappy this year.

The World and Everything In It
6.3.22 Culture Friday, Obi-Wan Kenobi, and Ask the Editor

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 34:10 Very Popular


On Culture Friday, Andrew Walker answers questions from World Journalism Institute students; Collin Garbarino reviews the new Star Wars series, Obi-Wan Kenobi; and on Ask the Editor, Paul Butler answers questions about Lawless and the new donor drive. Plus: a septuagenarian graduate, and the Friday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from Ridge Haven, The Camp, and Retreat Center of the Presbyterian Church in America. With campuses located in North Carolina and Iowa, Ridge Haven serves over 12,000 guests year-round in efforts to support the Church and train future generations in ministry. More at ridgehaven.org And from The Master's University Online Programs--teaching Christ in all things. More at online.masters.eduListen to Beyond the Forum on Apple Podcasts here: bit.ly/BeyondTheForumApple And explore more about the Veritas Forum here: www.veritas.org

The World and Everything In It
6.2.22 Inflation and small businesses, and protecting seniors from scams

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 34:01 Very Popular


Josh Schumacher talks to small business owners feeling inflation's squeeze; Mary Reichard talks to Open Doors CEO David Curry about the rising violence against Christians in Nigeria; and Kim Henderson meets an investigator who spent decades hunting down scammers who prey on the elderly. Plus: commentary from Cal Thomas, an open doggy door invitation, and the Thursday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from The Master's University Online Programs--teaching Christ in all things. More at online.masters.edu And from Ridge Haven, The Camp, and Retreat Center of the Presbyterian Church in America. With campuses located in North Carolina and Iowa, Ridge Haven serves over 12,000 guests year-round in efforts to support the Church and train future generations in ministry. More at ridgehaven.org Listen to Beyond the Forum on Apple Podcasts here: bit.ly/BeyondTheForumApple And explore more about the Veritas Forum here: www.veritas.org

The World and Everything In It
6.1.22 Washington Wednesday, World Tour, and surrounded by history

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 34:04 Very Popular


On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to Zach Cooper about the Indo-Pacific trade alliance; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on the latest international news; and two short profiles from WJI students. Plus: commentary from Les Sillars, and the Wednesday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate.Additional support comes from The Master's University Online Programs--teaching Christ in all things. More at online.masters.edu And from Ridge Haven, The Camp, and Retreat Center of the Presbyterian Church in America. With campuses located in North Carolina and Iowa, Ridge Haven serves over 12,000 guests year-round in efforts to support the Church and train future generations in ministry. More at ridgehaven.orgListen to Beyond the Forum on Apple Podcasts here: bit.ly/BeyondTheForumApple And explore more about the Veritas Forum here: www.veritas.org