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Town in East Lothian, Scotland

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Latest podcast episodes about Dunbar

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb
Ep 63 Part 2 - Dr. Mark Dunbar "Glaucoma"

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:41


Dr. Mark Dunbar is the director of Optometric services at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and is a founding member of the Optometric Glaucoma Society and the Optometric Retinal Society.

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb
Ep 63 Part 1 - Dr. Mark Dunbar "Glaucoma"

Open Your Eyes with Dr. Kerry Gelb

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 54:16


Dr. Mark Dunbar is the director of Optometric services at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and is a founding member of the Optometric Glaucoma Society and the Optometric Retinal Society.

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - There Is Not A Greater!

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 43:30


Sun AM

KFC Radio
KFC Asked Bert Kreischer for a Picture of His Balls Ft. Whitney Cummings

KFC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 97:08


- KFC's Beef with Bing Bong guy - Feits' new tattoo - Dunbar's Number - how many "friends" do you have? - AITA - couple argues over mermaids - asking to return a charger - FULLY ghosted cheating boyfriend - Voicemails - Mom made out with Arnold Schwarzenegger - Murder someone and go to trial - Dumped at prom - Skylarrrrrrrr - 01:52:39 - Whitney Cummings on having a guy pee on her, having her ear bitten off, her sex doll, insulting Feits and much more.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-28: James "Lou" Gorman, Westerly High makes playoffs, and Scott Erik Dupré

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 4:10


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, James "Lou" Gorman was an American baseball executive, and the former general manager of the Seattle Mariners and Boston Red Sox? He spent more than three decades in baseball operations, as a general manager, assistant GM, farm system director or scouting director, and at the time of his death he was the Red Sox' executive consultant for public affairs with an emphasis on community projects. He also was the coordinator of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, to which he was inducted in 2002. Now, for our feature story: Westerly High's football team really didn't have a signature win on its mantle heading into Friday night's Division II contest with Barrington last week. Now, it does. Westerly used an opportunistic defense and the running of junior Zack Tuck to shut out the Eagles, 28-0, at Augeri Field, clinching a spot in the D-II playoffs. Barrington came into the game atop Division II-A with a 4-1 league mark. The Eagles were 5-1 overall. Westerly coach Stanley Dunbar said: "Barrington is a good team. When you watch them on film, they are probably the hardest-playing team I've seen," "They fly around and play with great effort. Our kids bounced back from last week's loss (27-20 to Classical). They played their hearts out today." Westerly's first three league wins came against teams that are a combined 4-10. Tuck scored touchdowns on runs of 3, 5 and 55 yards. He finished with 230 yards on 26 carries and surpassed the 1,000-yard mark for the year. It was his third 200-plus rushing performance of the season. He now has 1,047 yards with 13 rushing touchdowns. "It was a perfect night. We wanted it and we needed it," Tuck said. "We knew we could beat these guys. They are a hard-nosed football team. But we wanted to set the tone tonight for the rest of the season." Dunbar said it was the best win of the season for the Bulldogs. "I think we are getting better. Classical is a good football team and we played them tough and could have won the game," Dunbar said. "The boys just came out tonight, stepped it up and brought it home." For more information on all things Westerly and Rhode Island, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from Randall Realtors Compass in Westerly. They're looking for real estate agents. You'll need to obtain a real estate license before you start. Pay can be $100,000 or more per year. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=ca280a731c2da875&advn=7652287743140876 Today we're remembering the life of Scott Erik Dupré.  Scott was born in 1953 and raised in Jamestown. He attended elementary school there, and then in 1971 graduated from Rogers High School in Newport. Scott pursued his love of the outdoors by earning a degree in Forest Management at Paul Smith's College and graduated from The Rhode Island School of Electronics, helping him secure a position at the Raytheon Company as a Module Quality Assurance Engineer. Fulfilling yet another goal, Scott became a licensed contractor which would showcase his remarkable wood working ability. In 1996, Scott married the former Linda Beebe Keene. Until his death, he and Linda shared their passion for all things nature provided by camping, hiking and kayaking at any place their RV, "The Relentless", brought them. Scott took great pleasure maintaining their two acre homestead in Westerly. He cherished working the land and updating their small cottage house. Happily working side by side, he and Linda created their own little woodland paradise. Scott will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Scott's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Edinburgh Report
Meeting people on a Pilgrimage for COP26

The Edinburgh Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 15:19


A walk is taking place from Dunbar to Glasgow in time for COP26. We joined the walk just after it left the Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop and went with them as far as Granton Castle Walled Garden where the Keeper of the Soil, artist Natalie Taylor, collected a small sample of soil in her hand made cape with its special pockets. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/edinburgh-reporter/message

Lee County Public Schools
Podcast Ep. 48 - Denise Spence On Dunbar High's Endless Tech Opportunities

Lee County Public Schools

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 21:17


On this episode of the LeeSchools TV Podcast, we talk to Dunbar High School Lead Technology Teacher Denise Spence about the 30+ technology certifications that Dunbar students can earn, the tech academy programs offered at Dunbar High and how their students have proven so successful, even on an International level. #LoveLeeSchools

Blas Pod
Síolta, Mháire Mhac an tSaoi, Eachtra ar Oileán na Rún

Blas Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 18:15


Pléann an t-iriseoir Ciarán Dunbar leabhar úr dá chuid, Síolta. Ómós ó Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh, Sinéad Ní Uallacháin agus Louis de Paor ag tabhairt do Mháire Mhac an tSaoi. Agus léirmheas ó Róise, girseach óg, ar Eachtra ar Oileán na Rún, leabhar a bhí ainmnithe i mbliana do Gradam Réics Carló ag Gradaim Fhoilsitheoireachta an Oireachtais. Ciarán Dunbar on his new book, Síolta. Ailbhe Ní Ghearbhuigh, Sinéad Ní Uallacháin and Louis de Paor remember Máire Mhac an tSaoi. And a review from Róise of Eachtra ar Oileán na Rún which was nominated for this year's Réics Carló Award.

Veteran's Minimum
605. NBA Preview Show: Western Conference

Veteran's Minimum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 127:42


On this episode, Lamb is joined by Agent Chris & Dunbar to talk about the Western conference this year in the NBA. Are the Lakers going to cruise the regular season to be healthy in the playoffs, Why can't the Suns be last year's version of the Suns, Luka chaos and why him being MVP isn't a smart call because of his team, Jokic being the most disrespected defending MVP, can the Jazz finally get over the hump, how many Spurs can you mention and Finals/MVP picks to close out the show Join the Patreon for the Month of October in the $10 Tier or Higher for a chance to win an NFL Helmet of your choosing! PATREON https://bit.ly/2F2Rdvg Shoutout To The Members Of The Patreon Christopher Villescaz Dereck Pleites Devin Rendon Mike Wozniak Ryan Pistner Stephen Briggs Jordan Riley Podcasts https://apple.co/2R494Ff PATREON https://bit.ly/2F2Rdvg TWITCH https://bit.ly/31TN7P3 SPOTIFY https://spoti.fi/3bn9QGx VM YOUTUBE https://bit.ly/336DWdB TWITTER http://www.twitter.com/VeteransMinimum INSTAGRAM http://www.instagram.com/VeteransMinimum FACEBOOK Facebook.com/veteransminimum LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/company/52152267 LAMB'S TWITTER https://bit.ly/3l0mQoJ LAMB'S IG https://bit.ly/33ddtMt Guest: Chris on instagram & Dunbar Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Okiki Podcast: Making Inspirational People Known
Okiki Podcast Episode 66: Creating a slow-fast fashion brand that makes an impact with Joelle Dunbar

Okiki Podcast: Making Inspirational People Known

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:59


The woman behind the brand- The Free Spirits Apparel and Fibre Company, designing and creating contemporary and knitted apparel. Joelle was born and raised in the Philippines, went to school in Alberta, and currently living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. She is also a mom, wife, entrepreneur, and designer. Her brand is driven by the philosophy of “quality over quantity”. She focuses on executing ethical practices to contribute to the well-being of our planet with the materials she uses and a zero-waste policy to their made-to-order and custom-made products. Her mission is to design and make quality apparel from sustainable yarn and textile selection. She's always trying to source high-quality materials that have a less environmental impact; And to educate designing.   OKIKI RESOURCES: Need to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile? Try my new LinkedIn Profile Optimization Course! Video Editing and Subtitle Programs I use (affiliates links are included): Subtitles: Happy Scribe Subtitles and Headers: ClipScribe Need high-quality virtual assistants? Mine is amazing and I met him through iWorker. Pivo App to create amazing video content: Want to create 360 Virtual Tours? Insta360 ONE R Camera Insta360 ONE X Camera Insta360 ONE R Virtual Tour Kit FREEBIES: FREE DOWNLOADABLE PDF: www.okikiconsulting.com/resources My Top 14 Resources for Entrepreneurs and Solopreneurs PDF contains: My Top 4 Free Resources for Creating Content My Top 4 Phone Apps for Creating Video Content My Top 3 Desktop Apps for Creating Video Content My Top 4 Recommended tools for Solopreneurs ABOUT FIYIN: Fiyin Obayan is the founder of Okiki Consulting, where she helps business owners communicate their personal brand or company brand stories through video content, in order to communicate to their target audience.   She has been participating in video storytelling for 9 years starting with her previous Myspace Channel and to her personal YouTube Channel. As an entrepreneur, She has learned to develop that skill for social media and now specializes in using it for the LinkedIn platform. Through posting regular content from September 2019, She has gone from 1000 connections to 8000 connections on the platforms and gained clients and she wants to empower others to do the same. Contact Fiyin: Website: www.okikiconsulting.com Email: info@okikiconsulting.com Phone: (306)716-0324 Instagram: @Okikiconsulting Facebook: @Okikiconsulting LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fiyinfoluwaobayan/ Business: https://www.linkedin.com/company/okiki

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - Serving God With Our Whole Heart

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 40:15


SWFL Sports
Inside Southwest Florida Football Podcast Season 4, Episode 9

SWFL Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:58


Adam, Dustin and Alex review last week's games -- including the marathon Dunbar vs. South Fort Myers game -- and give their predictions for this week.

Where Medicine Meets Ministry: Dr. Sheri Talks Faith & Facts

In this episode we cover:·         Your turning point can come when you pack up and leave·         Forgiveness is necessary to heal, move forward, and clear the baggage·         Don't become a mirror of your pain·         How our perception of time affects our approach to life and our reflections to grow·         “Greater is He that is within me” allows you to tap into The Messenger and The Message·         The difference between being in the world or being of the world·         The connection between nutrition, spirituality, and financial freedom·         How we treat our bodies on the inside will determine how the universe responds to us on the outside·         Your body is the temple of God---cleansing the toxins is vital to hearing from God clearly because of improved spiritual consciousness·         There is always a silver lining in your clouds of darknessRance Dunbar, also known as, The Chakra Doctor, was born and raised in the Big Easy New Orleans. After overcoming countless hardships in life including child abuse, depression, disease, addiction, lack of education, suicide attempts, near death and more, he propelled himself into a positive spiritual state of being and into a full-time black business owner. Rance was able to turn his life around into what he calls a complete success. Email: hiphopjesus2@gmail.comPhone: 818-429-1675Brand/Organization Name:MyFCA IncWebsite:https://chakradoctor.org/Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/FullChakraActivation/Twitter:https://mobile.twitter.com/prophetepInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/chakradoctor_/Rance Dunbar, The Chakra Doctor is most known for 3 things:Creating The Miracle Food All-Natural Intracellular Detox Cleansing RegimenCreating The FCA Yoga Guided MeditationCreating The Money Magick Esoteric ProgramTo learn more about The Chakra Doctor and his work, please visit: https://chakradoctor.org/Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page.Do you follow us on social media?  I'd be honored for your following on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.https://www.facebook.com/Where-Medicine-Meets-Ministryhttps://www.twitter.com/medmeetsminhttps://www.instagram.com/medicinemeetsministryRatings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated.They help our podcast rank higher on iTunes, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review for the Where Medicine Meets Ministry Podcast on iTunes.

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - Benefits From Giving To Missions

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 44:15


Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - Grace Purpose Giving - How?

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 45:46


Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - How To Deal With Criticism

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 50:54


Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - Be Careful For Nothing!

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 45:02


The Badass Womens Council
Stand Tall in Your Story - Whitney Dunbar

The Badass Womens Council

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:47


In this week's Stand Tall in Your Story series is Whitney Dunbar. Whitney is the Head of Commercial Operations at Delta Faucet Company. Today, her story is about doing hard things, taking risks, falling down, then getting up and learning from your experiences. Listen now to Whitney's inspiring speech!

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts
Player's Lounge: Lance Dunbar Joins the Show

Dallas Cowboys Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 47:58


Lance Dunbar joins Danny McCray, Barry Church and Newy Scruggs share their thoughts on Trevon Diggs winning NFL Defensive Player of the Month for September, #CARvsDAL and more on this episode of the Player's Lounge!

The Players Lounge
Player's Lounge: Lance Dunbar Joins the Show

The Players Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 47:58


Lance Dunbar joins Danny McCray, Barry Church and Newy Scruggs share their thoughts on Trevon Diggs winning NFL Defensive Player of the Month for September, #CARvsDAL and more on this episode of the Player's Lounge!

Beyond the Standard
"The Geriatric Toothfairy"

Beyond the Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 19:03


Guest Sonya Dunbar, RDH, MHA, is a TEDx and national public speaker guided by over 30 years of dental experience in private practice, skilled nursing facilities, and academia. Sonya and her husband, Gerald Dunbar (both Navy veterans), are the owners of Mobile Dental Xpress, providing comprehensive dental care to long-term care facilities. In addition, Sonya is a geriatric oral health educator providing hands-on training to Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) who work with aging adults. The co-founder of the National Mobile & Teledentistry Dental Conference and the American Mobile Dentistry & Teledentistry Alliance, Sonya is currently pursuing a PhD in Gerontology. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted issues of access to healthcare across the US and globally. With oral health as an example, Beyond the Standard, explores how innovative approaches combining mobile services and telehealth have bridged gaps in access and created new income opportunities providers with accreditation offering assurance of quality. Key Topics “The Geriatric Toothfairy” origin story (1:40) Pandemic accelerated range of mobile dentistry practice specialties (3:06) Access isn't only for the underserved (4:42) “It doesn't take away from the brick-and-mortar building.” (5:17) “Mobile dentistry and teledentistry go together like peanut butter and jelly.” (6:04) Starting a national organization, bringing mobile clinicians together. “Together we're stronger.” (7:39) The oral-systemic link; combining mobile dentistry and mobile medical (9:18) Establishing the bar for quality of care through accreditation (10:15) The changing face of dentistry (14:05) One more question: long-term care workarounds during COVID lockdowns (16:45) Our speakers are here to help. Have a question about this episode? Reach Ms. Dunbar at geriatrictoothfairy@800mdx.com Have an idea for a future podcast? Reach Ms. FitzSimmons at afitzsimmons@achc.org. Connect with us. Has your organization's use of mobile services and/or telehealth changed in the past two years? Share your organization's approach on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn, and tag ACHC. Learn more about ACHC accredited programs at achc.org Sign up for e-newsletters focused on your healthcare setting. www.achc.org/e-news-signup

Speaking from WATER
Speaking from WATER episode 8 with Surf Photographer Matty Dunbar of Narrabeen, NSW, Australia

Speaking from WATER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:40


In this episode, artist Sean Ruttkay speaks with Australian Surf Photographer Matty Dunbar of Narrabeen, NSW, Australia. Matty details his time shooting on tour with the World Surfing League (WSL), gives us his history from curious kid to expert water lensman, and informs us how he goes about shooting the epic breaks of Australia. Join us now for this intriguing conversation.

BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast
So how would you start building your Citadel?

BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 17:41


  Meshtadel   Please check out   https://www.citadel21.com/meshtadel  So how would you… During a well needed holiday and in aspiration to increase critical thinking, two people, father and son (called SoulexBoy and Soulexporter) came up with the Mindadel — a simple mind game starting with the question: “So how would you...” The idea of the Mindadel is to philosophise on different scenarios. Anything is possible, everything goes, but that means that each (more or less realistic) argument can be met with a similar counterargument. While playing this game with the simple subject “So how would you start building your Citadel”, the game became a lot more serious.   Exploring scenarios Several scenarios were discussed over the consecutive days. How to save Ben Gunn from a totalitarian coup by the Church of fiat in the UK? How to defend Citadel Island? (In this scenario some very wealthy Bitcoiners had bought up Cyprus) The solution amounted to Stackmore convincing half the Turkish Maritime Force into joining us instead of attacking us.  A lot of Strategies and Tactical situations were explored between the two of us.  Strategy is putting down the long-term goals and how to achieve them. Tactics are much more concrete. Oriented toward smaller steps. Tackle specific situations that come up along the way to the goal outlined in your strategy.   Bitcoin Plebs often talk about the meme-like Citadel when thinking about Strategy. A safe haven of self-providing and self-sovereignty, alone or with like minded people. We both love to see (and talk with) Bitcoin Plebs that are building in that direction in their own way. Some just stack Sats, others are creating a business, others just try to be more independent in their food production and so on. So the one scenario we wanted to dive deeper into, started with the Strategy scenario: “So how would you start a citadel?” The physical aspect, the building of a place where we truly can be Sovereignabitches, but also withstand any (theoretical) adversary, even state players. The fun part with the Mindadel game is that, since we are hypothesizing about the future, we can change the fictive past, correct the first actions taken. It's possible to mind-raise any capital needed, such as in the scenario where we bought Cyprus. IRL my stack isn't big enough to buy a parking spot, still work in progress. :) The  first idea Soulexboy came up with was to build a physical Citadel with a bunch of people. A one-man citadel is not really feasible, the walls would have to be manned, food production overseen and so on. So we dove into a whole social analysis of how such a cooperation could work out. It was a fun exercise, but once adversaries started to show up in the equation, things started to change dramatically. As fictive adversaries kept appearing, the defenses and architecture changed frequently. The evolution went from a portcullis to a reinforced fortress built into a mountain. But however well built our defences, we quickly saw how even with an unlimited budget, a Citadel in hostile territory quickly escalated to an arms race. Since you have to plan for the worst and hope for the best, the worst quickly becomes a country turning upon the Citadel. We concluded that any country can always mobilize more (military or police) power than whatever budget a private entity could generate. This didn't keep SoulexBoy from thoroughly enjoying thinking up strategic elements and weapons, but unless you can count on help from other states, a Citadel (small or even the size of a whole community) does not really stand a chance in defending itself using force. Being the tactician in this game, SoulexBoy explained that there are, according to him, 4 different important warfare strategies/tactics:  Blitzkrieg (offensive) Hit and hide (offensive) Guerilla / Asymmetrical (defensive) Trench warfate / Attritional (defensive) Since we want to live our life in peace, we were only looking at the defensive strategies/tactics.   Trench warfare Putting all the Plebs in a centralized location, even if it was an island, ends up in a type of trench warfare. A battle of attrition, where the defenders can be outclassed, outnumbered and even starved. Also, no matter how we planned it out, when you are a minority, you might not like democracy.    The Guerilla Approach “Guerrilla tactics focus on avoiding head-on confrontations with enemy armies, instead of engaging in limited skirmishes with the goal of exhausting adversaries and forcing them to withdraw. Guerrilla groups often depend on the logistical and political support of either the local population or foreign backers who do not engage in an armed struggle but sympathize with the guerrilla group's efforts. Guerrilla warfare is a type of asymmetric warfare: competition between opponents of unequal strength. It is also a type of irregular warfare: that is, it aims not simply to defeat an enemy, but to win popular support and political influence, to the enemy's cost. ” — Wikipedia We took four main points into consideration when discussing this approach. 1. Bitcoiners are scattered around the world A lot of us feel alone in our Housadels (Forgive us, we -del'd everything in our game.) Our own small place we occupy in the world, be it an apartment, a house or even a big estate. Unless you have a whole bunch of plebs nearby, the chances are you feel out of tune in your personal meatspace. Some Bitcoiners are preppers or gun fanatics, heck some might have a small armory, able to fend off a mob. But even that wouldn't last long against a bigger, organized force. 2. Big enough area Our planning for strategies and tactics means that we are in a state of defense against physical attacks. This defense has to protect our daily life, not define it. We don't have a standing army and we have lives to live. If we grow our own food, that food would have to be grown on a big farmland, and/or employ technical equipment such as aquaponics/hydroponics. How is it possible to both protect and maintain this? Short version: it is hard when you're alone. 3. Don't be where an attacker expects you to be This is a bit of a scary one, but preppers know this: when SHTF you have an option to bug in or bug out. The Pleb with the armory might very well build his bug in bunker, but when WWIII breaks out in your backyard this might not be sufficient. Even when it is only a police force representing a corrupt regime, the chances that we would outlast a siege seems minimal. 4. Intermediary tactic Even if the Guerilla approach is the only tactic we considered between the two of us, we did recognize that this could only be an intermediary solution: all we want is to live in peace!      The Meshtadel So, after having discussed many strategies, we came to the conclusion that one centralized location is good, but only when its size is big enough to sustain a high strategic advantage. It became apparent that we needed to come up with a system where decentralized tactics are used. We needed more and smaller citadels, connected like a mesh network! And thus, the Meshtadel was born. The Meshtadel was the next logical step for our housadels scattered around the world, the smallest unit of a Citadel, a Bitcoin household. We realized: When the walls you erect around yourself for protection are built because of the fear planted in your mind, those walls form a prison and you hand the fear mongers the only key. Build bridges, not walls! Playing out some scenarios In our hypothetical game, a group of Bitcoiners decided to work together. Spread out over a whole region, each forming a back-up base for the others. In the scenario where there was a complete meltdown of society, some Housadels grouped together as a Streetadel, using tunnels to move from one house to another, to flee or help defend.  In a scenario where a whole country decided to prosecute all Bitcoiners, the quest for refuge played out over an even bigger distance, so ideally our Meshtadel consists of locations across national borders.  A third scenario involved a communal mountain base as a Bug-out destination. A cooperative buy of a holiday destination, where all of them passed by at some point in a normal year to spend their holidays and help build up their safe haven for whenever disaster would strike. Complete with a bunker system built in the mountain with aquaponics, and redundancy all over :)  We played out different scenarios, and for each scenario we were able to dive into the past to prepare the best Meshtadel for each of the situations. We had scenarios with little money and ones where we were Saylors.  For each of these Meshtadel scenarios we dove into strategies, tactics, architecture, food production, and even politics. Politics is not about how to make sure to get elected as leader, but rather how do you make sure that those who are in a Meshtadel can stay organized without a hierarchy?  Trust   This presented a perfect time to explain the concept of Dunbar's number to SoulexBoy. It is only writing this article that we found a diagram, but it really calls to the concept of what we were thinking, so in all honesty we only now started using the labels Kin, Super Family, Clan or Tribe. Ideally, a Meshtadel reaches a maximum of 150 people. If the population is getting close to that number, Clans or Super families should decide for themselves if they would like to start a tribe on their own, or with another group of plebs. Splitting up is not saying goodbye forever. Meshtadels would still interact with each other. Some Meshtadels could just be Clans. Each group of people that wants to form a Meshtadel, would make up their own rules or agreements. In the end it all comes down to the level of trust.  The further you move away from the Core Relationships, towards the Casual Relationships the less trust there will be. Trust is extremely important, because this is where the first three point we mentioned earlier come together: Bitcoiners are scattered around the world—> This is why we want to organize Big enough area—> Apparent from previous point, Bitcoiners are all over the world Don't be where an attacker expects you to be—> With sufficient trust, you can leave your home behind when the need arrives, and flee to another trusted place in the Meshtadel. “But why not just unite and fight?” you might ask. Well, in our reasoning because of two reasons: We established it earlier: A single place of defence will become a prison if facing a ‘big' attacker. Even if you could win the first few confrontations, any violence (even in self-defence) will turn the narrative against you if the masses don't understand your reasoning.    Intermediary tactic  The long term goal is to gain the support of a critical mass of the total population. If enough people see that Bitcoin is as peaceful as it gets in the long run, some nations could become friendly/supportive enough to create a Bitcoin safe haven. But what happens if all hashing power and tons of Bitcoiners are located in the same place. This would be an ideal target for... well let's call it an “accident with fertilizer”, a “misplaced EMP” or an “oopsie with the nuclear launch codes”. (Yes, we ran into this scenario in our Mindatel game) To be honest, we consider ourselves already in a state of war, but not with conventional weapons. We are fighting for the moral high ground. Fighting with memes, Medium articles and Twitter threads. We leave those battles for the Toxic Maximalists, the Nic Carters, in short those with a smoother pen than ours. But any guerilla tactic should make sure to not lose any foothold in these areas.  A good example is the boobie traps the Vietcong used in Vietnam. SoulexBoy described some of those in the defense discussions, and Soulexporter realized when hearing those stories that one of the strongest weapons in existence is the demoralizing factor. In a war where narrative and perception are the most important, violence should really be a last resort. For this reason our Meshtadel would be equipped with a well planned violence escalation. “Violence is almost never the answer, until it is the only answer...  then you go all in.” In the Mindatel we came up with “The Sniper Cameraman” which would thus be one of the newer military functions in a Meshtadel preparedness. :) Instead of snipers taking out people (as evil as they might or might not be), a Sniper Cameraman would make sure to document any violent act committed towards the peaceful Meshtadel. So when the moment that violence does become the only answer, the narrative cannot so easily be turned against us.   Conclusion  Although these dramatical scenarios are fun to ‘play out', I hope we will never have to put them to practice. It is better to have an option it turns out you never need, than needing an option it turns out that you never had.  Do we all have to instantly set up a bug out plan with pleb locations mapped out? No, not necessarily, but we should start building our Meshtadels. Real life connections to fellow plebs. You can start building on your circular economy mini-network. Make a chain of trust. When you get to know a pleb with whom you feel like finding a long lost friend, your base for your Meshtadel is set. We are busy building our own mini-network of pleb friends. And we are participating in an experimental effort to let self organized groups work together with their own Lightning Network nodes as well (Rings-of-Fire). In the meanwhile, MaxBitbuybit was recently looking into a concept for his podcast with the aim of exploring with other Bitcoiners the skills needed to be self sovereign. Czino mentioned the Mesthadel concept and Max loved it so much that he baptised the concept: Meshtadel Monthly on his podcast, with SoulexBoy's blessing of course. ;)  We strongly believe: "What makes Bitcoin to be Bitcoin is the people, the plebs." And when plebs come together... together plebs strong.   Share on Twitter Read Next Article   Soulexporter was a Bitcoin Twitter lurker until he got (won) a SatsLedger for his son Soulexboy. This was the trigger for a father stacking Sats for his offspring, to team up with his son to explore together the rabbit holes that Bitcoin opened to them. From helping with (& participating in) the Bitcoin VoicePaper, teaming up with other plebs to start the Rings-of-Fire, to supporting the circular Sat-conomy and reviewing what they bought in SoulexBoy's BXXI YouTube channel. Together they feel at home with their online pleb friends, with whom they hope to build the base for their own Mesthadel.  

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - The Importance of the Presence of the Power of God

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 47:36


Woodburn Baptist Church: Sermons (Audio)
Pray Until the Peace Comes

Woodburn Baptist Church: Sermons (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 33:09


Pray Until the Peace Comes-Philippians 4 Sermon by Jason Dunbar, Youth and Young Adult Pastor Woodburn Baptist Church, Woodburn, KY www.woodburnbaptist.org

TeeTalk
Episode 133: Ryder Cup Preview - Whistling Straits

TeeTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 94:08


It's a week three years in the making. The Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits has arrived and we give our perspective on what lies ahead. That includes predictions on who wins, who is the heel and the champion for each team, why the dynamics of team events do not always work, our thoughts on the course itself, and even what type of beer we think the winning team might be enjoying on Sunday. We take a look at the week that was with birdies, bogies, pars, and honourable mentions given to a variety of subjects and topics including LPGA KPMG insights and stats, European Tour Ryder Cup clothing, Max Homa's decision to put more effort into his game, Jin Young Ko's win in Portland, an 11 year-old making two aces, and Katy Rutherford playing in a Mackenzie Tour-PGA TOUR Canada event. The Tip of Week has us discussing short game, and the Mail Bag is Ryder Cup heavy with questions that range from "Who will hit an errant bal furthest into Lake Michigan this week?", to which player we would choose from each team if there had to be a sudden death, one-man playoff. It's a lot of fun, and might be the only Golf Podcast Episode that ever discusses Dunbar's Number... (You'll have to tune in for an explanation, but it's Ryder Cup relevant!) Instagram: Flagstick (https://www.instagram.com/flagstickgolf/) Scott (https://www.instagram.com/scotmac1970/) Stefan (https://www.instagram.com/steedorf/) Twitter: Flagstick (https://twitter.com/Flagstick) Scott (https://twitter.com/ScotMacGolf) Stefan (https://twitter.com/Steedorf) Facebook: @Flagstick (https://www.facebook.com/Flagstick/)

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Jared Dunbar - Precept Upon Precept

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 48:42


ER Docs and Bourbon on the Rocks
Friendships: Dig Your Well Before You are Thirsty

ER Docs and Bourbon on the Rocks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:31


What is your Dunbar number? What IS the Dunbar number? Who are your greatest friends and advocates?  Are they blood, are they not?  Why did they become so close to you and why do you choose to keep trusting them to protect you and advocate for you? Tonight Cullen and Raj will deep dive into friendships.  They'll pull from Robin Dunbar's book: Friends: Understanding the Power of our Most Important Relationships https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B08W4XPK7G/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_YY58WKNN82KBBGXE3YV3 Can good friends really improve your health and immunity?  Can you live a longer healthier life because of a village of support?  Please join us tonight for another amazing crucial talk and decide for yourself. Ryan Holiday:Stillness Is the Key https://smile.amazon.com/dp/0525538585/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_PRP635GC16R1MGC6CMWPCheck us out on YouTube now!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vU7wNs1wo6UDISCLAIMER:The statements made and opinions expressed during this podcast are our own personal statements and opinions and should not be construed as the statements or opinions of any entity or institution that we may have been employed by or affiliated with at any time in our professional lives.  Additionally, we take patient confidentiality incredibly seriously.  For that reason, any references to stories about patients have purposefully been modified so as to not identify any particular patient or location.  Finally, while we are both doctors, nothing that we say in this podcast should be construed as medical advice.  If you are in need of medical advice, please contact your personal physician.  Also, while we are doctors, we are not your doctors.  Please discuss anything we discuss medically with your doctor.  Additionally any ideas or opinions expressed in the links above or by the guests on our show do not necessarily reflect our own personal or professional opinions, or the opinions of any organizations that we currently or formerly worked for or represented.  Thanks again for listening!

Best Day Ever
Episode 44: Organizing Your Prayer Life with Lyli Dunbar

Best Day Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 32:56


Mentioned in this episode: Fervent: A Woman's Battle Plan to Serious, Specific, and Strategic Prayer  by Priscilla Shirer Psalm 91 Ephesians 6 Ephesians 3:15   Connect with Katy:  Website Instagram Facebook   Connect with Lyli: Website Facebook Instagram This podcast produced and edited by Angie Elkins Media.  

Rising Laterally
Be the Node: Graph Databases and Dunbar's Number

Rising Laterally

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 20:13


In this episode, we reflect on the significance of human networks in the context of graph databases, Dunbar's number, and the shifting social landscape amid the pandemic. We also share some stories about the great connectors throughout history.====================0:00 Graph databases3:25 Dunbar's number 4:28 Social brain hypothesis6:44 Jordan Peterson and how our actions have ripple effects 8:11 What the pandemic has changed about our friendships12:53 The story of how The Beatles were formed15:03 Go to Market Grit podcast recommendation15:50 How is Quentin Tarantino a node?18:17 What's the big idea?====================LinkTree to support us (thank you!)Let's get in touch!Join the discussion in the episode comments on our YouTube channel or social media pages...InstagramTwitter

Culture Class Podcast
THE GREAT VACCINE DEBATE (w/ Femi Akinremi & Rev Rance Dunbar)

Culture Class Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 81:09


What happens when you put an anti-vaxxer and a former research scientist in a room to talk about vaccines? Can a self proclaimed 'lord of all universes' find common ground with a former senior adviser to the World Health Organization? Listen to Rev Rance Dunbar from Houston, Texas debate Femi Akinremi from Liverpool UK about the effectiveness of vaccines, the need for mandatory vaccinations and how it all ties to human rights and public safety.

Humans Outside
141: Why 10 Minutes of Focus Can Help You Keep an Outdoor Habit (Christina Dunbar)

Humans Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 49:09


You know that intentionality is the foundation of keeping any habit, challenging or not. But maybe we're overthinking this whole thing. What if there was a way to not only make and keep the outdoor, nature-focused habit you want to create, but also give better focus to your entire day? And what if it was only a matter of setting aside 10 minutes? That's the theory that drives the work of today's guest, Christina Dunbar. Her program, Intentional Ten, works with clients (and a focus on busy moms) to give them the framework to drive focus and success all day long. And guess what? Heading outside is a vital part of that. In this episode Christina walks us through the simple but powerful Intentional Ten framework while handing us tools for making, keeping or reenergizing a daily nature habit. Some of the good stuff: [3:37] Christina Dunbar's favorite outdoor space [4:33] How Christina became a person who goes outside [10:38] Is there a moment where things changed? [15:35] What is the Intentional Ten method? [22:49] Why 10 minutes? [27:01] What are the reasons people struggle to make this happen? [29:06] Specific steps for creating a habit [35:36] What role does nature play? [40:33] How to create daily mindfulness [45:04] Christina's favorite and most essential outdoor gear [47:29] Christna's favorite outdoor moment Connect with this episode: Learn more about Intentional Ten: www.intentionalten.com Christina's free guide to Intentional 10: www.intentionalten.com/journal Follow Intentional Ten on Instagram: https://instagram.com/intentionalmama_ Follow Intentional Ten on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/intentionalten Subscribe to the Humans Outside newsletter to win a free decal: https://humansoutside.com/newsletter/ Find full show notes at humansoutside.com https://www.humansoutside.com/podcasts/

TRIGGERnometry
BBC Interviews TRIGGERnometry - Karen Dunbar

TRIGGERnometry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 65:07


A special episode in which Konstantin and Francis are interviewed by Scottish comedian, actress and writer Karen Dunbar for the BBC.Get TICKETS to TRIGGERnometry Live with Andrew Doyle here: https://leicestersquaretheatre.ticketsolve.com/shows/873619472Join our exclusive TRIGGERnometry community on Locals! https://triggernometry.locals.com/OR Support TRIGGERnometry Here:https://www.subscribestar.com/triggernometryhttps://www.patreon.com/triggerpod​​​Bitcoin: bc1qm6vvhduc6s3rvy8u76sllmrfpynfv94qw8p8d5Buy Merch Here:https://www.triggerpod.co.uk/shop/​​​Advertise on TRIGGERnometry:marketing@triggerpod.co.ukJoin the Mailing List:https://www.triggerpod.co.uk/sign-up/​​​Find TRIGGERnometry on Social Media: https://twitter.com/triggerpod​​​https://www.facebook.com/triggerpod​​​https://www.instagram.com/triggerpod​​​About TRIGGERnometry: Stand-up comedians Konstantin Kisin (@konstantinkisin) and Francis Foster (@francisjfoster) make sense of politics, economics, free speech, AI, drug policy and WW3 with the help of presidential advisors, renowned economists, award-winning journalists, controversial writers, leading scientists and notorious comedians.

Working Title
My Drug of Choice

Working Title

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 29:33


09: Part 1 of 2. How can we navigate relationships after such a bizarre year of scarcity/ "pod mentality" while having the whole world at our fingertips? I had the pleasure of chatting with Professor Sean Branagan (@sean_branagan on Twitter) and friend Ruby Saracino (@rubysaracino on Instagram) about relationships. We talked Dunbar's Number, Jane McGonigal's method from "Superbetter", the 5 step process to making connections, and this bizarre post-Covid, pre-feeling normal time in our lives. Feel free to follow along with journal prompts you can find on my Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/margot.lee/ Find me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/margot.lee/ Find me on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/MargotLee Find me on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@margot.lee

Culture Class Podcast
Ep 139- Chakra Doctor (w/ Rev Rance Dunbar)

Culture Class Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 54:25


The Chakra Doctor gives his opinion on what science gets wrong and how humans can access their full potential.

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - Saving The Next Generation

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 40:03


Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY
Pastor Dunbar - The Necessity Of A Tender Heart

Freedom Baptist Church, Auburn NY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 49:23


featured Wiki of the Day
Battle of Dunbar (1650)

featured Wiki of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 4:25


Episode 1582: Our article of the day is Battle of Dunbar (1650).

Revolution 250 Podcast
The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale & Moses Dunbar, with Virginia DeJohn Anderson

Revolution 250 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 31:58


 Virginia DeJohn Anderson (University of Colorado) eminent scholar of life in Colonial America and most recently the author of The Martyr and the Traitor:  Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution talks with us about these two men from Connecticut, both hanged in the first year of the War--Hale hanged by the British as a spy, Dunbar hanged in Connecticut as a loyalist.  What lead each one his particular path?  What do their stories tell us about the Revolution?  

True Crime Never Sleeps
The Dunbar Armored Heist

True Crime Never Sleeps

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 13:30


This week on the True Crime Never Sleeps Podcast, we dive into the insane Dunbar Armored Heist. It has become the largest American Cash Heist in history taking place in downtown Los Angeles, California. The question is did the Dunbar Armored facility robbers get away with all the money or did they face justice. This episode is sponsored by PodDecks: Go to http://www.poddecks.com and use Promo Code Larry21 for TEN PERCENT off your first purchase. Follow Us on Social MediaTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/truecrimens IG: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimeneversleepspodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/truecrimeneversleepspodcast Support The Show by Buying Us a Coffee:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/tcnsJoin Our Patreon: https://patreon.com/truecrimeneversleepsEquipment We Use From Amazon:USB Lava lier Lapel Microphone: https://amzn.to/3sX7eb9Tzumi ON AIR Reverb PR O: https://amzn.to/3jiyhuc

The Digiday Podcast
LinkedIn's Imani Dunbar is helping to build more equitable workplaces across industries

The Digiday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 43:15


The compensation gap is closing, albeit slowly and unevenly. In the effort to create balanced workplaces, LinkedIn occupies the position of potential catalyst. The Microsoft-owned business-centric social network not only provides a platform with tools through which hiring practices can be made more meritocratic but also offers an example of an equitable organization. It even has an executive charged with overseeing equity strategy. “I don't know that any companies have started to unify all their efforts around ... a single role and actually set up a team that's meant to focus on this,” said LinkedIn's head of equity strategy Imani Dunbar in the latest episode of the Digiday Podcast. LinkedIn's focus on equity spans inside and outside its own walls. Internally, LinkedIn has achieved a notable level of compensatory fairness among its employees. Employees of color in the U.S. earn $1 for every $1 earned by white employees, and female employees earn $0.998 for every $1 earned by male employees. But the work is far from finished. “We've been on our equity journey for a while. It's also our forever work. It's not something that's like a six-month or couple-year project,” Dunbar said.

Social Blend
23: Rocking with Scotty Dunbar (of DMK)

Social Blend

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 28:18


This week on Social Blend, George has singer/songwriter Scotty Dunbar of the band DMK on the show to talk about the bands new single "Drive or Crash". George also discussed music with Scotty, the Station Nightclub fire, and his connection to music.  Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/socialblendpod/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/socialblend Twitter: https://twitter.com/socialblendpod Goli Gummies: 5% OFF with PROMO: GSTILWELL https://go.goli.com/gstilwell  Mercari: Use this link for $30 to spend on Mercari! Mercari: https://www.mercari.com/invitations/?iv_code=KBXUDY

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#372: The Science of Making and Keeping Friends | Robin Dunbar

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 63:00


Friendship might not necessarily be something you've considered to be an urgent psychological and physiological issue. On this show, we spend a lot of time exploring how the quality of our relationships determines the quality of our lives and our health. Sadly, in many ways, it's harder than ever to make and keep friends.  With loneliness and disconnection on the rise, it's clear that our society just wasn't constructed for social connection. And recent data suggests we're in a friendship crisis, with many of us reporting that we have fewer close friendships than ever. Our guest today is Robin Dunbar, an Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford University and the author of numerous books on the development of Homo sapiens. Dunbar is perhaps best known for formulating “Dunbar's number,” which is a measurement of the number of relationships our brain is capable of maintaining at any one time. He is a world-renowned expert on human relationships, and has a ton of fascinating research findings and practical tips for upping your friendship game. In this conversation, we dive into the science behind human relationships, the upsides and downsides of maintaining friendships on social media, the viability of friendships across gender lines, and what science says you can do to compensate if you feel you are currently lacking in close friendships.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/robin-dunbar-372

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#372: The Science of Making and Keeping Friends | Robin Dunbar

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 66:45


Friendship might not necessarily be something you've considered to be an urgent psychological and physiological issue. On this show, we spend a lot of time exploring how the quality of our relationships determines the quality of our lives and our health. Sadly, in many ways, it's harder than ever to make and keep friends.  With loneliness and disconnection on the rise, it's clear that our society just wasn't constructed for social connection. And recent data suggests we're in a friendship crisis, with many of us reporting that we have fewer close friendships than ever. Our guest today is Robin Dunbar, an Emeritus Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at Oxford University and the author of numerous books on the development of Homo sapiens. Dunbar is perhaps best known for formulating “Dunbar's number,” which is a measurement of the number of relationships our brain is capable of maintaining at any one time. He is a world-renowned expert on human relationships, and has a ton of fascinating research findings and practical tips for upping your friendship game. In this conversation, we dive into the science behind human relationships, the upsides and downsides of maintaining friendships on social media, the viability of friendships across gender lines, and what science says you can do to compensate if you feel you are currently lacking in close friendships.  Download the Ten Percent Happier app today: https://10percenthappier.app.link/install Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/robin-dunbar-372

Veteran's Minimum
587. 2021 NFL Season Awards: What We Betting Legends!

Veteran's Minimum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 85:22


On this episode, Lamb is joined by Allen, Dunbar and Impy to talk about who's winning Rookie of the year, Coach of the year, comeback player of the year, MVP, Who's leading the league in receiving TD's and all other stat categories  Guests: @allenstrk @nickdunbar718 @impy718 Join the NFL Survivor Contest Now! Enter the $20 Patreon for the month of August or September, Deadline is September 8th The Link To the VM Eliminator Contest: https://www.officefootballpool.com/pools.cfm?poolid=184848&p=2&pwd=h%215jc%5E $20 entry Franchise Tag or Higher for the Month of August or September OR Venmo, PayPal (preferably) to get in  Grand Prize: $500 & 3 Merch items/Bomber Jacket Second Place: The first Loser, Congrats & Be Better! Shoutout To The Members Of The Patreon Nick Chavez Christopher Villescaz Daniel Gibson Dereck Pleites Devin Rendon Kori Johnson-Hoopes Ryan Pistner Stephen Briggs Podcasts https://apple.co/2R494Ff PATREON https://bit.ly/2F2Rdvg TWITCH https://bit.ly/31TN7P3 SPOTIFY https://spoti.fi/3bn9QGx VM YOUTUBE https://bit.ly/336DWdB TWITTER http://www.twitter.com/VeteransMinimum INSTAGRAM http://www.instagram.com/VeteransMinimum FACEBOOK Facebook.com/veteransminimum LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/company/52152267 LAMB'S TWITTER https://bit.ly/3l0mQoJ LAMB'S IG https://bit.ly/33ddtMt MERCH STORE http://bit.ly/3qxPQr7 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Critical Nonsense
136! Falling for New Things and Our Communities

Critical Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 43:53


Why do people fall in love with new things in their 30s? And what communities are you a part of? [19:53] This week, special guest Hannah Jegart, Joey, and Jess talk about Regina-George-ing on MacroBars, playing the recorder, syncing up having babies, the ritual head nod of community, fellowship, and getting invited to a stranger's seder table. They don't talk about how sorry we are for breaking the uke-transition-tradition. doo-doo-doo-doooo... doo-doo-doo-doooooo... doot. There. references New Scientist: "The 7 Primes of Life" Adam Curtis documentaries: check out this one or this one, says Hannah The Atlantic: "Why Millennial Leftists Have Made a BBC Filmmaker a Cult Hero" In you care for a refresh on Dunbar's Number Theory "YOUR RECORDER COMMUNITY"

Crush the Rush
139 - LIVE Coaching: Launching your Offer with Christina Dunbar (PART 3)

Crush the Rush

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 28:47


In this episode, hear a live coaching call with Holly and one of her mastermind clients, Christina. They discuss strategies for Christina to have a successful launch and how being a part of the mastermind has led to the growth she has seen in her business.  What we chat about in this episode?-The impact of being clear on your messaging-Mapping out a launch plan-How being a part of a community impacted the launch processAbout Christina:Christina Dunbar is a nurse practitioner, yoga teacher, and recovering stressed-out mom of three. Inspired to change her lifestyle after a stress-induced illness, she began journaling daily. This helped her to slow down and redesign her life to improve her mental and physical health. She went on to create the Intentional Ten Podcast, Blog, and Journal to help other overwhelmed moms take control of their health and happiness through intentional time, relationships, and health. Outside of her passion projects, she enjoys sipping hot coffee, sitting outside in the rain, and throwing dance parties with her kids.Connect with Christina:IG: @intentionalmama_10 Minute Daily Journal for MomsSeven Days of MindfulnessBoth free at www.intentionalten.com/journalTEXT HOLLY: https://bit.ly/TextHollyApply for the Mastermind - https://www.hollymariehaynes.com/crushtherushcollectiveJoin the Crush the Rush Community -www.facebook.com/groups/crushtherushI hope these tips help! Keep in touch! Leave me a message at hollymariehaynes.com or instagram.com/holly_marie_haynes

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast
Deming Lens #51 - Pay for Performance

The W. Edwards Deming Institute® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 14:21


In our 51st Deming Lens episode, host Tripp Babbitt shares his interpretation of wide-ranging aspects and implications of Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. This month he looks at supply chain and risk management. Show Notes [00:00:14] Deming Lens - Episode 51: Pay for Performance [00:02:19] A Journey with Pay for Performance [00:03:28] The New Harmony Project [00:04:33] The Result of Collectivism [00:06:35] Analytical vs Synthetic Thinking [00:10:19] Dr. Deming and Pay for Performance [00:12:22] Pay for Performance, Collectivism and Dr. Deming     Transcript [00:00:14] In the 51st episode of the Demning lens, we'll talk about. Pay for performance. Hi, I'm Tripp Babbitt, host of the Deming Institute podcast, and this is the fifty first episode of the Deming Lens. And as I was going back and searching through some of the old episodes I've done, I noticed I hadn't done one on pay for performance. And it kind of came to the forefront of my mind when I was going through some Tic Tacs. And there's a couple of people out there that are big advocates of pay for performance as ways to keep people in their organizations, which is becoming a problem now. You know, people aren't going back to work for variety reasons. The stimming check certainly plays a role in that, working from home, people being called back to work when they had got used to being at home. There's this thing that goes around on LinkedIn about you only live once and you might as well do something that that makes you happy. And organizations these days don't seem to be making people very happy. And so these are some of the topics that I think I want to talk about with regards to pay for performance. And I actually put a whole YouTube video together on my personal YouTube channel responding to Tessa White, who goes by the name Job Doc Tessa. And she used to get some pretty good advice. But one of the pieces of advice was if you're going to keep people that you got to pay for performance.   [00:02:19] So let's talk about that, because it's been an interesting journey with regards to pay for performance and at least in my own personal journey, doing public and private seminars where we would talk about pay for performance, which was something that Dr Deming obviously advocated against. And I'd often get a lot of pushback on this. You know, when you're talking about getting rid of incentives or paying for performance at almost every public or private seminar that I did, I get some pushback either allowed during the course of the seminar or privately afterwards that asking if Dr Deming was a socialist or a communist. And I've done other episodes on this particular subject, but I'm from Indiana and in Indiana. Back in the early 1980s.   [00:03:28] There was a project called and New Harmony, Indiana, that basically advocated for collectivism, which was put together as a utopian society by a gentleman, by the British industrialists, by the name of Robert Owen from 1825 to 1827. So let's have a look, maybe a little bit over a year. And then it was dissolved in 1827 because this whole concept of social education and equality did not work well for a lot of different reasons. But the idea of a utopian society in New Harmony, Indiana, was to eliminate crime and poverty and increase health, decrease misery and increase your intelligence and happiness. And this was what this community of equality was supposed to achieve in Indiana.   [00:04:33] And but what happened over time is that people discovered that the equality that this society was advocating, that there were certain rare and very hard working people, you know, putting together the agriculture that was needed for the society or building houses or whatever, is that the hard working realize that they were earning the same as the laziest of the people in the group and that caused conflict. And then people stopped working. So food wasn't being grown and houses weren't. Their houses and buildings were being built because there was kind of a pointing fingers and blame and things of that sort. So this whole utopian society based on collectivism was didn't work out. It collapsed very quickly and. You know, when you when I'm talking about pay for performance in public and private seminars. You know, the thing I'm communicating to people is that the individual cannot be separated from the system that you work in. And what I discovered over the years is there's there's something called Dunbar's number, which is 150. When an organization grows to about 150, you you become it becomes more and more bureaucratic. And the larger it grows, the more bureaucratic that it becomes. And managing that becomes very difficult. So the larger your system is, the harder it is to separate the performance of an individual from the system that that you're working in. Now, I've seen it get really bad, anywhere from 75 to 150 employees and working with some smaller organizations.   [00:06:35] And but it's borne the pay for performance. The mindset is borne from what I referenced is analytical versus synthetic thinking. And that is that, you know, we break down the pieces in analytic and analytical thinking and we break them down all the way to the individual and say, OK, here's your goals. If you just meet your goals and everybody meets their goals, the company's going to do well. And I think if you go back to the interview I did with Paula Marshall, you'll discover that you can't separate the individual from that system and that the system is greater than the sum of its parts. So the whole concept of synthetic thinking or systems thinking gives you a different view of how your organization works. And it's not something that you can just break apart all the way down to the individual and add it up. It's exponential. And managing the interconnections in a system is where you get your largest gains. So, you know, it's been interesting from my standpoint that we have gone from this concept of Dr. Deming's ideas around pay for performance, where people were, in essence, questioning whether he was a socialist or a communist or whatever. To today we seem to have this pendulum swinging, swinging where, you know, everybody should be getting the same pay. And I you know, the things that Dr. Deming worked on from my studies and my using his system of profound knowledge are getting clarity of purpose.   [00:08:29] You know, if you if you understand your system and you understand your connection to the customer, that raises your level as a worker, understanding kind of what you do as opposed to just being kind of this cog in the system that just does its thing. And there's no benefit to doing that, but that people are paid differently based on the skills that they get. And developing those skills becomes something that the organization would want to do for its own benefit, as well as the benefit of the individual. One other thing Dr. Deming advocated is innovation and that people are participating and coming up with ideas and more and more. I've seen this huge conflict in organizations between the executives micromanaging things. And, you know, you do your work and you do it in this way, as opposed to giving more responsibility that the worker has even greater knowledge because they're actually doing the work to make their own decisions about their own work. And that management's job is to remove the barriers that create problems for the workers. And they're facilitating things, moving, moving forward. And the best organizations that I've worked with either working towards that or they're getting the knowledge to work towards that. And this is what will keep people there. Never will there be this collectivism type of mentality on the one and one side of things where, you know, everybody gets the same pay.   [00:10:19] And on the other end, where there's this pay for performance, there's Dr. Deming is proposing something very different than those two concepts to be able to make the organization better and have individuals want to be a part of that and not go to things like wanting to be an entrepreneur. Fighting, though, the work from home, you know, going to a smaller company or just staying waiting till the clock runs out on their stimming checks, these are all things that are preventing us from moving forward. Now, one thing I am getting more and more concerned about is, you know, we need these large organizations to achieve big things. You know, an individual entrepreneur has to be very fortunate. You know, there's very few Jeff Bezos of the world that start from scratch and then grow a particular company into a behemoth like Amazon. And so we need these large organizations and we need them to run well because they can achieve big things, whether it's making cars or homes or whatever it is. These are very large systems and people get lost in the shuffle in the way that things are happening today. And so they're dissatisfied. We have a whole generation of people that are really caught up and trying to do something for the greater good. But I think it gets a little bit misguided. And I believe that some of the organizations that we have today with the mindset of micromanaging people and control and incentives and pay for performance are all things that are making their systems worse.   [00:12:22] And, you know. We don't need pay for performance and we don't need collectivism, but what we do need are good systems that people want to work in on a daily basis. And so that's that's the message I wanted to communicate this month in the Deming lens is this concept of pay for performance where you can separate an individual from the system, which you can't. And the larger the system is, the harder that becomes. If you're an entrepreneur, then, yeah, pay for performance. And that's that's exactly what you get when you're an entrepreneur, you know, a company of one. But as it grows, there needs to be a better an organization built on a clarity of purpose, their connection to the customer, and that the person, no matter where they are in your organization, can understand that what the customer is looking for. And I use what's called a customer lens to be able to achieve that and innovation, the ability to share ideas that they have about the work and the way that it should be done and the ownership of that by the worker as opposed to management and executives and people of that sort. So that was it for this week. I'll talk to you again next month for the latest videos, blogs, events and information from the Dummying Institute. Be sure to go to Deming dot org.

Screaming in the Cloud
Analyzing Analysts with James Governor

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 41:00


About JamesJames is the Redmonk co-founder, sunshine in a bag, industry analyst loves developers, "motivating in a surreal kind of way". Came up with "progressive delivery". He/HimLinks: RedMonk: https://redmonk.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MonkChips Monktoberfest: https://monktoberfest.com/ Monki Gras: https://monkigras.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Cloud Economist Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of Cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Your company might be stuck in the middle of a DevOps revolution without even realizing it. Lucky you! Does your company culture discourage risk? Are you willing to admit it? Does your team have clear responsibilities? Depends on who you ask. Are you struggling to get buy in on DevOps practices? Well, download the 2021 State of DevOps report brought to you annually by Puppet since 2011 to explore the trends and blockers keeping evolution firms stuck in the middle of their DevOps evolution. Because they fail to evolve or die like dinosaurs. The significance of organizational buy in, and oh it is significant indeed, and why team identities and interaction models matter. Not to mention weither the use of automation and the cloud translate to DevOps success. All that and more awaits you. Visit: www.puppet.com to download your copy of the report now!Corey: And now for something completely different!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined this week by James Governor, analyst and co-founder of a boutique analysis shop called RedMonk. James, thank you for coming on the show.James: Oh, it's my pleasure. Corey.Corey: I've more or less had to continue pestering you with invites onto this for years because it's a high bar, but you are absolutely one of my favorite people in tech for a variety of reasons that I'm sure we're going to get into. But first, let's let you tell the story. What is it you'd say it is that you do here?James: We—industry analysts; we're a research firm, as you said. I think we do things slightly differently. RedMonk has a very strong opinion about how the industry works. And so whilst there are plenty of research firms that look at the industry, and technology adoption, and process adoption through the lens of the purchaser, RedMonk focuses on it through the lens of the practitioner: the developer, the SRE, the people that are really doing the engineering. And so, historically IT was a top-down function: it required a lot of permission; it was something that was slow, you would make a request, you might get some resources six to nine months later, and they were probably the resources that you didn't actually want, but something that was purchased from somebody that was particularly good at selling things.Corey: Yes. And the thing that you were purchasing was aimed at people who are particularly good at buying things, but not using the things.James: Exactly right. And so I think that RedMonk we look at the world—the new world, which is based on the fact there's open-source software, there's cloud-based software, there are platforms like GitHub. So, there's all of this knowledge out there, and increasingly—it's not a permission-free world. But technology adoption is more strongly influenced than ever by developers. That's what RedMonk understands; that's what makes us tick; that's what excites us. What are the decisions that developers are making? When and why? And how can we tap into that knowledge to help everyone become more effective?Corey: RedMonk is one of those companies that is so rare, it may as well not count when you do a survey of a landscape. We've touched on that before on the show. In 2019, we had your colleague, Rachel Stevens on the show; in 2020, we had your business partner Stephen O'Grady on, and in 2021 we have you. Apparently, you're doling out staff at the rate of one a year. That's okay; I will outlast your expansion plans.James: Yeah, I think you probably will. One thing that RedMonk is not good at doing is growing, which may go to some of the uniqueness that you're talking about. We do what we do very well, but we definitely still haven't worked out what we're going to be when we grow up.Corey: I will admit that every time I see a RedMonk blog post that comes across my desk, I don't even need to click on it anymore; I don't need to read the thing because I already get that sinking feeling, because I know without even glancing at it, I'm going to read this and it's going to be depressing because I'm going to wish I had written it instead because the points are always so pitch-perfect. And it feels like the thing that I struggle to articulate on the best of days, you folks—across the board—just wind up putting out almost effortlessly. Or at least that's how it seems from the outside.James: I think Stephen does that.Corey: It's funny; it's what he said about you.James: I like to sell his ideas, sell his work. He's the brains and the talent of the operation in terms of co-founders. Kelly and Rachel are both incredibly smart people, and yeah, they definitely do a fantastic job of writing with clarity, and getting ideas across by stuff just tends to be sort of jumbled up. I do my best, but certainly, those fully formed, ‘I wish I had written that' pieces, they come from my colleagues. So, thank you very much for that praise of them.Corey: One of the central tenets that RedMonk has always believed and espoused is that developers are kingmakers, to use the term—and I steal that term, of course, from your co-founder's book, The New Kingmakers, which, from my read, was talking about developers. That makes a lot of sense for a lot of tools that see bottom-up adoption, but in a world of cloud, where you're seeing massive deals get signed, I don't know too many developers out there who can sign a 50 million dollar cloud services contract more than once because they get fired the first time they outstrip their authority. Do you think that that model is changing?James: So, ‘new kingmakers' is quite a gendered term, and I have been asked to reconsider its use because, I mean, I don't know whether it should be ‘new monarchmakers?' That aside, developers are a fundamentally influential constituency. It's important, I think, to say that they themselves are not necessarily the monarchs; they are not the ones sitting in Buckingham Palace [laugh] or whatever, but they are influences. And it's important to understand the difference between influence and purchase. You're absolutely right, Corey, the cloud is becoming more, like traditional IT. Something I noticed with your good friends at GCP, this was shortly after the article came out that they were going to cut bait if they didn't get to number two after whatever period of time it was, they then went intentionally inside a bunch of 10-year deals with massive enterprises, I guess, to make it clear that they are in it for the long haul. But yeah, were developers making that decision? No. On the other hand, we don't talk to any organizations that are good at creating digital products and services—and increasingly, that's something that pretty much everybody needs to do—that do not pay a lot more attention to the needs and desires of their developers. They are reshoring, they are not outsourcing everything, they want developers that are close to the business, that understand the business, and they're investing heavily in those people. And rather than seeing them as, sort of, oh, we're going to get the cheapest possible people we can that have some Java skills and hope that these applications aren't crap. It may not be Netflix, “Hey, we're going to pay above market rate,” but it's certainly what do they want? What tools do they want to use? How can we help them become more effective? And so yeah, you might sign a really big deal, but you still want to be thinking, “Hang on a minute, what are the skills that people have? What is going to make them happy? What do they know? Because if they aren't productive, if they aren't happy, we may lose them, and they are very, very important talent.” So, they may not be the people with 50 million dollars in budget, but their opinion is indeed important. And I think that RedMonk is not saying there is no such thing as top-down purchasing anymore. What we are saying is that you need to be serving the needs of this very important constituency, and they will make you more productive. The happier they are, the more flow they can have, the more creative they can be with the tools at hand, the better the business outcomes are going to be. So, it's really about having a mindset and an organizational structure that enables you to become more effective by better serving the needs of developers, frankly. It used to just be the only tech companies had to care about that, but now everybody does. I mean, if we look at, whoever it is: Lego, or Capital One, or Branch, the new insurance company—I love Branch, by the way. I mean—Corey: Yeah. They're fantastic people, I love working with them. I wish I got to spend more time talking with them. So far, all I can do is drag them on to the podcast and argue on Twitter, but one of these days, one of these days, they're going to have an AWS bill bigger than 50 cents a month, and then, oh, then I've got them.James: There you go. But I think that the thing of him intentionally saying we're not going to set up—I mean, are they in Columbus, I think?Corey: They are. The greater Ohio region, yes.James: Yes. And Joe is all about, we need tools that juniors can be effective with, and we need to satisfy the needs of those juniors so they can be productive in driving our business forward. Juniors is already—and perhaps as a bad term, but new entrants into the industry, and how can we support them where they are, but also help them gain new skills to become more effective? And I just think it's about a different posture, and I think they're a great example because not everybody is south of Market, able to pay 350 grand a year plus stock options. That's just not realistic for most businesses. So, it is important to think about developers and their needs, the skills they learned, if they're from a non-traditional background, what are those skills? How can we support them and become more effective?Corey: That's really what it comes down to. We're all trying to do more with less, but rather than trying to work twice as hard, how to become more effective with the time we have and still go home in time for dinner every day?James: Definitely. I have to say, I mean, 2020 sucked in lots of ways, but not missing a single meal with my family definitely was not one of them.Corey: Yeah. There are certain things I'm willing to trade and certain things I'm not. And honestly, family time is one of them. So, I met you—I don't even recall what year—because what is even time anymore in this pandemic era?—where we sat down and grabbed a drink, I want to say it was at Google Cloud Next—the conference that Google does every year about their cloud—not that Google loses interest in things, but even their conference is called ‘Next'—but I didn't know what to expect when I sat down and spoke with you, and I got the sense you had no idea what to make of me back then because I was basically what I am now, only less fully formed. I was obnoxious on Twitter, I had barely coherent thoughts that I could periodically hurl into the abyss and see if they resonated, but stands out is one of the seminal grabbing a drink with someone moments in the course of my career.James: Well, I mean, fledgling Corey was pretty close to where he is now. But yeah, you bring something unique to the table. And I didn't totally know what to expect; I knew there would be snark. But yeah, it was certainly a pleasure to meet you, and I think that whenever I meet someone, I'm always interested in if there is any way I can help them. And it was nice because you're clearly a talented fellow and everything else, but it was like, are there some areas where I might be able to help? I mean, I think that's a good position as a human meeting another human. And yeah, it was a pleasure. I think it was in the Intercontinental, I guess, in [unintelligible 00:11:00].Corey: Yes, that's exactly where it was. Good memory. In fact, I can tell you the date: it was April 11 of 2019. And I know that because right after we finished having a drink, you tweeted out a GIF of Snow White carving a pie, saying, “QuinnyPig is an industry analyst.” And the first time I saw that, it was, “I thought he liked me. Why on earth would he insult me that way?”But it turned into something where when you have loud angry opinions, if you call yourself an analyst, suddenly people know what to do with you. I'm not kidding, I had that tweet laser engraved on a piece of wood through Laser Tweets. It is sitting on my shelf right now, which is how I know the date because it's the closest thing I have to a credential in almost anything that I do. So, congratulations, you're the accrediting university. Good job.James: [laugh]. I credentialed you. How about that?Corey: It's true, though. It didn't occur to me that analysts were a real thing. I didn't know what it was, and that's part of what we talked about at lunch, where it seemed that every time I tried to articulate what I do, people got confused. Analyst is not that far removed from an awful lot of what I do. And as I started going to analyst events, and catching up with other analysts—you know, the real kind of analyst, I would say, “I feel like a fake analyst. I have no idea what I'm actually doing.” And they said, “You are an analyst. Welcome to the club. We meet at the bar.” It turns out, no one really knows what is going on, fully, in this zany industry, and I feel like that the thing that we all bond over on some level is the sense of, we each only see a piece of it, and we try and piece it together with our understanding of the world and ideally try and make some sense out of it. At least, that's my off-the-cuff definition of an industry analyst. As someone who's an actual industry analyst, and not just a pretend one on Twitter, what's your take on the subject?James: Well, it's a remarkable privilege, and it's interesting because it is an uncredentialed job. Anybody can be, theoretically at least, an industry analyst. If people say you are and think you are, then then you are; you walk and quack like a duck. It's basically about research and trying to understand a problem space and trying to articulate and help people to basically become more effective by understanding that problem space themselves, more. So, it might be about products, as I say, it might be about processes, but for me, I've just always enjoyed research. And I've always enjoyed advice. You need a particular mindset to give people advice. That's one of the key things that, as an industry analyst, you're sort of expected to do. But yeah, it's the getting out there and learning from people that is the best part of the job. And I guess that's why I've been doing it for such an ungodly long time; because I love learning, and I love talking to people, and I love trying to help people understand stuff. So, it suits me very well. It's basically a job, which is about research, analysis, communication.Corey: The research part is the part that I want to push back on because you say that, and I cringe. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education. And academia was never really something that I was drawn to, excelled at, or frankly, was even halfway competent at for a variety of reasons. So, when you say ‘research,' I think of something awful and horrible. But then I look at the things I do when I talk to companies that are building something, and then I talked to the customers who are using the thing the company's building, and, okay, those two things don't always align as far as conversations go, so let's take this thing that they built, and I'll build something myself with it in an afternoon and see what the real story is. And it never occurred to me until we started having conversations to view that through the lens of well, that is actual research. I just consider it messing around with computers until something explodes.James: Well, I think. I mean, that is research, isn't it?Corey: I think so. I'm trying to understand what your vision of research is. Because from where I sit, it's either something negative and boring or almost subverting the premises you're starting with to a point where you can twist it back on itself in some sort of ridiculous pretzel and come out with something that if it's not functional, at least it's hopefully funny.James: The funny part I certainly wish that I could get anywhere close to the level of humor that you bring to the table on some of the analysis. But look, I mean, yes, it's easy to see things as a sort of dry. Look, I mean, a great job I had randomly in my 20s, I sort of lied, fluked, lucked my way into researching Eastern European art and architecture. And a big part of the job was going to all of these amazing museums and libraries in and around London, trying to find catalogs from art exhibitions. And you're learning about [Anastasi Kremnica 00:15:36], one of the greatest exponents of the illuminated manuscript and just, sort of, finding out about this interesting work, you're finding out that some of the articles in this dictionary that you're researching for had been completely made up, and that there wasn't a bibliography, these were people that were writing for free and they just made shit up, so… but I just found that fascinating, and if you point me at a body of knowledge, I will enjoy learning stuff. So, I totally know what you mean; one can look at it from a, is this an academic pursuit? But I think, yeah, I've just always enjoyed learning stuff. And in terms of what is research, a lot of what RedMonk does is on the qualitative side; we're trying to understand what people think of things, why they make the choices that they do, you have thousands of conversations, synthesize that into a worldview, you may try and play with those tools, you can't always do that. I mean, to your point, play with things and break things, but how deep can you go? I'm talking to developers that are writing in Rust; they're writing in Go, they're writing in Node, they're writing in, you know, all of these programming languages under the sun. I don't know every programming language, so you have to synthesize. I know a little bit and enough to probably cut off my own thumb, but it's about trying to understand people's experience. And then, of course, you have a chance to bring some quantitative things to the table. That was one of the things that RedMonk for a long time, we'd always—we were always very wary of, sort of, quantitative models in research because you see this stuff, it's all hockey sticks, it's all up into the right—Corey: Yeah. You have that ridiculous graph thing, which I'm sorry, I'm sure has an official name. And every analyst firm has its own magic name, whether it's a ‘Magic Quadrant,' or the ‘Forrester Wave,' or, I don't know, ‘The Crushing Pit Of Despair.' I don't know what company is which. But you have the programming language up-and-to-the-right line graph that I'm not sure the exact methodology, but you wind up placing slash ranking all of the programming languages that are whatever body of work you're consuming—I believe it might be Stack Overflow—James: Yeah.Corey: —and people look for that whenever it comes out. And for some reason, no one ever yells at you the way that they would if you were—oh, I don't know, a woman—or someone who didn't look like us, with our over-represented faces.James: Well, yeah. There is some of that. I mean, look, there are two defining forces to the culture. One is outrage, and if you can tap into people's outrage, then you're golden—Corey: Oh, rage-driven development is very much a thing. I guess I shouldn't be quite as flippant. It's kind of magic that you can wind up publishing these things as an organization, and people mostly accept it. People pay attention to it; it gets a lot of publicity, but no one argues with you about nonsense, for the most, part that I've seen.James: I mean, so there's a couple of things. One is outrage; universal human thing, and too much of that in the culture, but it seems to work in terms of driving attention. And the other is confirmation bias. So, I think the beauty of the programming language rankings—which is basically a scatterplot based on looking at conversations in StackOverflow and some behaviors in GitHub, and trying to understand whether they correlate—we're very open about the methodology. It's not something where—there are some other companies where you don't actually know how they've reached the conclusions they do. And we've been doing it for a long time; it is somewhat dry. I mean, when you read the post the way Stephen writes it, he really does come across quite academic; 20 paragraphs of explication of the methodology followed by a few paragraphs explaining what we found with the research. Every time we publish it, someone will say, “CSS is not a programming language,” or, “Why is COBOL not on there?” And it's largely a function of methodology. So, there's always raged to be had.Corey: Oh, absolutely. Channeling rage is basically one of my primary core competencies.James: There you go. So, I think that it's both. One of the beauties of the thing is that on any given day when we publish it, people either want to pat themselves on the back and say, “Hey, look, I've made a really good choice. My programming language is becoming more popular,” or they are furious and like, “Well, come on, we're not seeing any slow down. I don't know why those RedMonk folks are saying that.” So, in amongst those two things, the programming language rankings was where we began to realize that we could have a footprint that was a bit more quantitative, and trying to understand the breadcrumbs that developers were dropping because the simple fact is, is—look, when we look at the platforms where developers do their work today, they are in effect instrumented. And you can understand things, not with a survey where a lot of good developers—a lot of people in general—are not going to fill in surveys, but you can begin to understand people's behaviors without talking to them, and so for RedMonk, that's really thrilling. So, if we've got a model where we can understand things by talking to people, and understand things by not talking to people, then we're cooking with gas.Corey: I really love installing, upgrading, and fixing security agents in my cloud estate! Why do I say that? Because I sell things, because I sell things for a company that deploys an agent, there's no other reason. Because let's face it. Agents can be a real headache. Well, now Orca Security gives you a single tool that detects basically every risk in your cloud environment -- and that's as easy to install and maintain as a smartphone app. It is agentless, or my intro would've gotten me into trouble here, but  it can still see deep into your AWS workloads, while guaranteeing 100% coverage. With Orca Security, there are no overlooked assets, no DevOps headaches, and believe me you will hear from those people if you cause them headaches. and no performance hits on live environments. Connect your first cloud account in minutes and see for yourself at orca.security. Thats “Orca” as in whale, “dot” security as in that things you company claims to care about but doesn't until right after it really should have.Corey: One of the I think most defining characteristics about you is that, first, you tend to undersell the weight your words carry. And I can't figure out, honestly, whether that is because you're unaware of them, or you're naturally a modest person, but I will say you're absolutely one of my favorite Twitter follows; @monkchips. If you're not following James, you absolutely should be. Mostly because of what you do whenever someone gives you a modicum of attention, or of credibility, or of power, and that is you immediately—it is reflexive and clearly so, you reach out to find someone you can use that credibility to lift up. It's really an inspirational thing to see. It's one of the things that if I could change anything about myself, it would be to make that less friction-full process, and I think it only comes from practice. You're the kind of person I think—I guess I'm trying to say that I aspire to be in ways that are beyond where I already am.James: [laugh]. Well, that's very charming. Look, we are creatures of extreme privilege. I mean, I say you and I specifically, but people in this industry generally. And maybe not enough people recognize that privilege, but I do, and it's just become more and more clear to me the longer I've been in this industry, that privilege does need to be more evenly distributed. So, if I can help someone, I naturally will. I think it is a muscle that I've exercised, don't get me wrong—Corey: Oh, it is a muscle and it is a skill that can absolutely be improved. I was nowhere near where I am now, back when I started. I gave talks early on in my speaking career, about how to handle a job interview. What I accidentally built was, “How to handle a job interview if you're a white guy in tech,” which it turns out is not the inclusive message I wanted to be delivering, so I retired the talk until I could rebuild it with someone who didn't look like me and give it jointly.James: And that's admirable. And that's—Corey: I wouldn't say it's admirable. I'd say it's the bare minimum, to be perfectly honest.James: You're too kind. I do what I can, it's a very small amount. I do have a lot of privilege, and I'm aware that not everybody has that privilege. And I'm just a work in progress. I'm doing my best, but I guess what I would say is the people listening is that you do have an opportunity, as Corey said about me just now, maybe I don't realize the weight of my words, what I would say is that perhaps you have privileges you can share, that you're not fully aware that you have. In sharing those privileges, in finding folks that you can help it does make you feel good. And if you would like to feel better, trying to help people in some small way is one of the ways that you can feel better. And I mentioned outrage, and I was sort of joking in terms of the programming language rankings, but clearly, we live in a culture where there is too much outrage. And so to take a step back and help someone, that is a very pure thing and makes you feel good. So, if you want to feel a bit less outraged, feel that you've made an impact, you can never finish a day feeling bad about the contribution you've made if you've helped someone else. So, we do have a rare privilege, and I get a lot out of it. And so I would just say it works for me, and in an era when there's a lot of anger around, helping people is usually the time when you're not angry. And there's a lot to be said for that.Corey: I'll take it beyond that. It's easy to cast this in a purely feel-good, oh, you'll give something up in order to lift people up. It never works that way. It always comes back in some weird esoteric way. For example, I go to an awful lot of conferences during, you know, normal years, and I see an awful lot of events and they're all—hmm—how to put this?—they're all directionally the same. The RedMonk events are hands down the exception to all of that. I've been to Monktoberfest once, and I keep hoping to go to—I'm sorry, was it Monki Gras is the one in the UK?James: Monki Gras, yeah.Corey: Yeah. It's just a different experience across the board where I didn't even speak and I have a standing policy just due to time commitments not to really attend conferences I'm not speaking at. I made an exception, both due to the fact that it's RedMonk, so I wanted to see what this event was all about, and also it was in Portland, Maine; my mom lived 15 minutes away, it's an excuse to go back, but not spend too much time. So, great. It was more or less a lark, and it is hands down the number one event I will make it a point to attend. And I put that above re:Invent, which is the center of my cloud-y universe every year, just because of the stories that get told, the people that get invited, just the sheer number of good people in one place is incredible. And I don't want to sound callous, or crass pointing this out, but more business for my company came out of that conference from casual conversations than any other three conferences you can name. It was phenomenal. And it wasn't because I was there setting up an expo booth—there isn't an expo hall—and it isn't because I went around harassing people into signing contracts, which some people seem to think is how it works. It's because there were good people, and I got to have great conversations. And I kept in touch with a lot of folks, and those relationships over time turned into business because that's the way it works.James: Yeah. I mean, we don't go big, we go small. We focus on creating an intimate environment that's safe and inclusive and makes people feel good. We strongly curate the events we run. As Stephen explicitly says in terms of the talks that he accepts, these are talks that you won't hear elsewhere. And we try and provide a platform for some different kind of thinking, some different voices, and we just had some magical, magical speakers, I think, at both events over the years. So, we keep it down to sort of the size of a village; we don't want to be too much over the Dunbar number. And that's where rich interactions between humans emerge. The idea, I think, at our conference is, is that over a couple of days, you will actually get to know some people, and know them well. And we have been lucky enough to attract many kind, and good, and nice people, and that's what makes the event so great. It's not because of Steve, or me, or the others on the team putting it together. It's about the people that come. And they're wonderful, and that's why it's a good event. The key there is we focus on amazing food and drink experiences, really nice people, and keep it small, and try and be as inclusive as you can. One of the things that we've done within the event is we've had a diversity and inclusion sponsorship. And so folks like GitHub, and MongoDB, and Red Hat have been kind enough—I mean, Red Hat—interestingly enough the event as a whole, Red Hat has sponsored Monktoberfest every year it's been on. But the DNI sponsorship is interesting because what we do with that is we look at that as an opportunity. So, there's a few things. When you're running an event, you can solve the speaker problem because there is an amazing pipeline of just fantastic speakers from all different kinds of backgrounds. And I think we do quite well on that, but the DNI sponsorship is really about having a program with resources to make sure that your delegates begin to look a little bit more diverse as well. And that may involve travel stipends, as well as free tickets, accommodation, and so on, which is not an easy one to pull off.Corey: But it's necessary. I mean, I will say one of the great things about this past year of remote—there have been a lot of trials and tribulations, don't get me wrong—but the fact that suddenly all these conferences are available to anyone with an internet connection is a huge accessibility story. When we go back to in-person events, I don't want to lose that.James: Yeah, I agree. I mean, I think that's been one of the really interesting stories of the—and it is in so many dimensions. I bang on about this a lot, but so much talent in tech from Nigeria. Nigeria is just an amazing, amazing geography, huge population, tons of people doing really interesting work, educating themselves, and pushing and driving forward in tech, and then we make it hard for them to get visas to travel to the US or Europe. And I find that to be… disappointing. So, opening it up to other geographies—which is one of the things that free online events does—is fantastic. You know, perhaps somebody has some accessibility needs, and they just—it's harder for them to travel. Or perhaps you're a single parent and you're unable to travel. Being able to dip into all of these events, I think is potentially a transformative model vis-à-vis inclusion. So, yeah, I hope, A) that you're right, and, B) that we as an industry are intentional because without being intentional, we're not going to realize those benefits, without understanding there were benefits, and we can indeed lower some of the barriers to entry participation, and perhaps most importantly, provide the feedback loop. Because it's not enough to let people in; you need to welcome them. I talked about the DNI program: we have—we're never quite sure what to call them. We call them mentors or things like that, but people to welcome people into the community, make introductions, this industry, sometimes it's, “Oh, great. We've got new people, but then we don't support them when they arrive.” And that's one of the things as an industry we are, frankly, bad at, and we need to get better at it.Corey: I could not agree with you more strongly. Every time I wind up looking at building an event or whatnot or seeing other people's events, it's easy to criticize, but I try to extend grace as much as possible. But whenever I see an event that is very clearly built by people with privilege, for people with privilege, it rubs me the wrong way. And I'm getting worse and worse with time at keeping my mouth shut about that thing. I know, believe it or not, I am capable of keeping my mouth shut from time to time or so I'm told. But it's irritating, it rankles because it's people not taking advantage of their privileged position to help others and that, at some point, bugs me.James: Me too. That's the bottom line, we can and must do better. And so things that, sort of, make you proud of every year, I change my theme for Monki Gras, and, you know, it's been about scaling your craft, it's been about homebrews—so that was sort of about your side gig. It wasn't about the hustle so much as just things people were interested in. Sometimes a side project turns into something amazing in its own right. I've done Scandinavian craft—the influence of the Nordics on our industry. We talk about privilege: every conference that you go to is basically a conference about what San Francisco thinks. So, it was nice to do something where I looked at the influence of Scandinavian craft and culture. Anyway, to get to my point, I did the conference one year about accessibility. I called it ‘accessible craft.' And we had some folks from a group called Code Your Future, which is a nonprofit which is basically training refugees to code. And when you've got a wheelchair-bound refugee at your conference, then you may be doing something right. I mean, the whole wheelchair thing is really interesting because it's so easy to just not realize. And I had been doing these conferences in edgy venues. And I remember walking with my sister, Saffron, to check out one of the potential venues. It was pretty cool, but when we were walking there, there were all these broken cobblestones, and there were quite a lot of heavy vehicles on the road next to it. And it was just very clear that for somebody that had either issues with walking or frankly, with their sight, it just wasn't going to fly anymore. And I think doing the accessibility conference was a watershed for me because we had to think through so many things that we had not given enough attention vis-à-vis accessibility and inclusion.Corey: I think it's also important to remember that if you're organizing a conference and someone in a wheelchair shows up, you don't want to ask that person to do extra work to help accommodate that person. You want to reach out to experts on this; take the burden on yourself. Don't put additional labor on people who are already in a relatively challenging situation. I feel like it's one of those basic things that people miss.James: Well, that's exactly right. I mean, we offered basically, we were like, look, we will pay for your transport. Get a cab that is accessible. But when he was going to come along, we said, “Oh, don't worry, we've made sure that everything is accessible.” We actually had to go further out of London. We went to the Olympic Park to run it that year because we're so modern, and the investments they made for the Olympics, the accessibility was good from the tube, to the bus, and everything else. And the first day, he came along and he was like, “Oh, I got the cab because I didn't really believe that the accessibility would work.” And I think on the second day, he just used the shuttle bus because he saw that the experience was good. So, I think that's the thing; don't make people do the work. It's our job to do the work to make a better environment for as many people as possible.Corey: James, before we call it a show, I have to ask. Your Twitter name is @monkchips and it is one of the most frustrating things in the world trying to keep up with you because your Twitter username doesn't change, but the name that goes above it changes on what appears to be a daily basis. I always felt weird asking you this in person, when I was in slapping distance, but now we're on a podcast where you can't possibly refuse to answer. What the hell is up with that?James: Well, I think if something can be changeable, if something can be mutable, then why not? It's a weird thing with Twitter is that it enables that, and it's just something fun. I know it can be sort of annoying to people. I used to mess around with my profile picture a lot; that was the thing that I really focused on. But recently, at least, I just—there are things that I find funny, or dumb, or interesting, and I'll just make that my username. It's not hugely intentional, but it is, I guess, a bit of a calling card. I like puns; it's partly, you know, why you do something. Because you can, so I've been more consistent with my profile picture. If you keep changing both of them all the time, that's probably suboptimal. Sounds good.Corey: Sounds good. It just makes it hard to track who exactly—“Who is this lunatic, and how did they get into my—oh, it's James, again.” Ugh, branding is hard. At least you're not changing your picture at the same time. That would just be unmanageable.James: Yeah, no, that's what I'm saying. I think you've got to do—you can't do both at the same time and maintain—Corey: At that point, you're basically fleeing creditors.James: Well, that may have happened. Maybe that's an issue for me.Corey: James, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to tolerate my slings, and arrows, and other various vocal devices. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you believe, what you're up to, and how to find you. Where are you hiding?James: Yeah, I mean, I think you've said already, that was very kind: I am at @monkchips. I'm not on topic. I think as this conversation has shown, I [laugh] don't think we've spoken as much about technology as perhaps we should, given the show is normally about the cloud.Corey: The show is normally about the business of cloud, and people stories are always better than technology stories because technology is always people.James: And so, yep, I'm all over the map; I can be annoying; I wear my heart on my sleeve. But I try and be kind as much as I can, and yeah, I tweet a lot. That's the best place to find me. And definitely look at redmonk.com. But I have smart colleagues doing great work, and if you're interested in developers and technology infrastructure, we're a great place to come and learn about those things. And we're very accessible. We love to talk to people, and if you want to get better at dealing with software developers, yeah, you should talk to us. We're nice people and we're ready to chat.Corey: Excellent. We will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:37:03]. James, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really do appreciate it.James: My pleasure. But you've made me feel like a nice person, which is a bit weird.Corey: I know, right? That's okay. You can go for a walk. Shake it off.James: [laugh].Corey: It'll be okay. James Governor, analyst and co-founder at RedMonk. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment in which you attempt to gatekeep being an industry analyst.Announcer: This has been this week's episode of Screaming in the Cloud. You can also find more Corey at screaminginthecloud.com, or wherever fine snark is sold.This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.