Podcasts about Switzerland

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Federal republic in Central Europe

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Best podcasts about Switzerland

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Latest podcast episodes about Switzerland

Ask Drone U
BONUS: Drone Life News 010 – The All-New Sub-250 Gram Drone Autel Evo Nano, DJI Mavic 3 Leaks, Matternet Station launch

Ask Drone U

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:46


Following in DJI's Suit, Autel Launches the Evo Nano Weighing Less than 250 Grams, DJI Mavic 3 Leaks, New Matternet Station Makes Drone Delivery Scalable In our first drone story of this week, you will learn about two new drones by Autel – the Evo Nano (and Nano +) and the soon-to-be-launched Evo Lite. Like the much-loved DJI Mavic Mini, the Autel Nano is a sub-250-gram drone that is suitable for both recreational flying and occasional commercial flying. Tik-Tok and Instagram content creators will surely love our next news story which is about the Autel Evo Lite. Featuring the world's first 4-axis gimbal design to support vertical video creation, this soon-to-be-released drone takes content creation to the next level. You will also get some interesting updates on the DJI Mavic 3. While multiple DJI Mavic 3 models are currently in the works, we talk a bit about how the ongoing supply chain issues can derail DJI's grand plans. Our last story for today is all about Matternet's Station launch at a Switzerland hospital. You will learn how Matternet is using its M2 drone and cloud storage to facilitate autonomous BVLOS flights for making last-mile drone deliveries. You do not want to miss this one. Tune in now! Get Your Biggest and Most Common Drone Certificate Questions Answered by Downloading this FREE Part 107 PDF Enjoy! Make sure to get yourself the all-new Drone U landing pad! Get your questions answered: https://thedroneu.com/. If you enjoy the show, the #1 thing you can do to help us out is to subscribe to it on iTunes. Can we ask you to do that for us real quick? While you're there, leave us a 5-star review, if you're inclined to do so. Thanks! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ask-drone-u/id967352832. Become a Drone U Member. Access to over 30 courses, great resources, and our incredible community. Follow Us Site – https://thedroneu.com/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/droneu Instagram – https://instagram.com/thedroneu/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/thedroneu YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/c/droneu Timestamps [00:26] Autel's launches two new drones - the Autel Evo Nano and Autel Evo Lite [02:55] The all-new Autel Evo Lite - a boon for TikTok and Instagram creators? [04:06] Supply chain issues a threat to DJI Mavic 3 release?  [08:33] Autonomous BVLOS flights with the  Matternet M2 drone

True Stories Of Tinseltown
Author Robert Matzen And I Talk His Latest Book..Warrior...Audrey Hepburn..Son Luca Calls Her A Badass...She Was AMAZING/.

True Stories Of Tinseltown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:49


This is Robert's fourth time on the show and the fourth book we've discussed. His latest  is Warrior...Audrey Hepburn is a great companion piece to Dutch Girl. Her son Luca called his mom a badass and wanted the world to know all the courageous and kind things she did as the Ambassador Of Unicef. She traveled war zones, met the starving populations of so many countries. During her final visit before she retired from Unicef she visited a place where ten people died in the time she was there. She watched a teen take his last breath. Throughout her years she was a force to be reckoned with. Fragile in size, but not in will, compassion and spirit. Yes, Audrey was more then a badass, she was a Warrior,  We also talk her movies after retirement, her marriages and her finally meeting her soulmate Robert Wolders (her Robbie)who was with Audrey every step of the way. She loved to laugh, have a drink and be in her beloved garden in Switzerland. She adored her sons. This book is a triumph to Audrey in every way. I loved her even more after reading this book. Thanks so much to Robert for coming on the show again. You are so FAB! Mostly, thanks so much to all my listeners. You are all the BEST! Love youse all, Grace https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Matzen/e/B001HD2ZAC%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share   I am on instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr and just started twitter again. I believe it's Gracee@tinseltowntru. you can listen to podcast  www.truestoriesoftinseltown.com https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-stories-of-tinseltown/id136374488 https://open.spotify.com/show/6iTSF8pIrVTbZ8QqNidVUy?si=zn73ahjEQKOzrMtc-8VRhg You can also listen on google play, spotify, YouTube, player FM, I heart radio, amazon music, vurbl and basically anywhere podcasts are played.     

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Sam Smith - Montreux Jazz Festival 2015 | Live Performing | Full Concert

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:10


All uploads on this channel are for promotional purposes only! The music has been converted before uploading to prevent ripping and to protect the artist(s) and label(s). If you don't want your content here (that goes for audio or images) please contact me immediately via email: unpluggedtube@outlook.it and I WILL REMOVE THE EPISODE OR ARTWORK IMMEDIATELY! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sam Smith Live at Montreux Jazz Festival 2015 00:00 Like I Can 04:52 Money On My Mind 09:57 Stay With Me MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVAL WHERE LEGENDS ARE BORN The Montreux Jazz Festival takes place for two weeks every summer in Switzerland, drawing 250,000 music lovers to the shores of Lake Geneva. Since 1967, the Festival has celebrated all genres of music and generated countless legendary performances. Artists who have graced the stage of Montreux include Aretha Franklin, David Bowie, Prince, Bob Dylan, Lauryn Hill, Kendrick Lamar, Leonard Cohen, Marvin Gaye, Miles Davis, Nina Simone and many more.  

Most memorable journeys
Switzerland - When you get to know your country because of the Miss Hongkong Contest

Most memorable journeys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:10


I was born in one of the most beautiful countries in the world and it took me many years to realize that. As a child growing up with my grandparents who didn't know how to drive a car, I didn't have anyone to take show me around and after I became a tour guide at the age of 20, I spent the next 11 years mostly living all over the world. When I got assigned to an incoming tour from a group from Hongkong, I got very excited. I got the know my country while assisting the 20 contestants of the Miss Hongkong Contest 1991 and a few months later I showed my picture book country to a group of Germans who traveled with the Diner's Club and who had spent a lot of money on this tour. Travel with me from Lucerne to Mount Titlis and from St Moritz to Zermatt, find out why the Swiss don't export wine and why William Tell took out two arrows of his quiver. Please subscribe, comment, like, and share this podcast with your family, loved ones, and friends. I would love to hear from you You can find me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/elisabeth.toufexis Instagram: elisabethvilligertoufexis Support this podcast

New Books in World Affairs
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Film
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books Network
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 172: Shaqaroni & Brees

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 51:44


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet to ask, suss and answer a general knowledge quiz with topics including Natural Wonders, 90's Music, U.S. Geography, Hamilton, Animated Characters, Wild Celebs, European History, State Nicknames, Chemistry, Athletes, Classic Cars, Giving Celebs, Kitchen Appliances, Insects, Poisons and more! Round One NATURAL WONDERS - The Simpson Desert, which contains the world longest parallel sand dunes, can be found on what continent? 90'S MUSIC - The band Pavement appeared on what parody talk show in 1997 where they were mistaken for The Beatles? U.S. GEOGRAPHY - The Tongass National Forest, which is the largest national forest in the U.S., is found in which state? HAMILTON - Which U.S. historical figure sings the first line of the hit Broadway musical Hamilton? ANIMATED CHARACTERS - Prickle, Goo, Minga and Rodgy are all characters that were on what animated show? WILD CELEBS - Which musician known for hits "Your Love is My Drug" and "Praying" once bribed Prince's gardener so she could sneak into his house to plant her demo tape? Round Two EUROPEAN HISTORY - First built in 1895, destroyed in 1943, then rebuilt in 1961 to serve as a WWII Exhibit and memorial, Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is located in which European city? STATE NICKNAMES - "Almost Heaven" and "the Switzerland of America" are two nicknames for which state? CHEMISTRY - The Kastle-Meyer test was developed by two analytical chemists in 1903, that uses a chemical indicator to help detect the presence of what? ATHLETES - What was the last year that Shaquille O'Neal played professional basketball? CLASSIC CARS - Named after a Native American mythological creature, what model car by Ford created the "personal luxury car" niche market in the late 1950's when it was redesigned to have four seats (instead of two)? GIVING CELEBS - What famous actor, known for their role on Star Trek, sold a kidney stone to an online casino which they then donated to charity? Rate My Question KITCHEN APPLIANCES - Originally intended for a Jewish stew of meat & beans called cholent, what kitchen appliance was originally introduced in 1971? Final Questions INSECTS - How many eyes do most full-grown caterpillars have? POISONS - In 2013, actress Shannon Richardson was charged in the mailing of letters to President Barack Obama and Mike Bloomberg that were laced with what poison? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges October 20th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EDT October 21st, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollies Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EDT You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Issa, Adam V., Tommy (The Electric Mud) and Tim (Pat's Garden Service) Thank you, Team Captains – Mo, Jenny, Rick G., Skyler, Dylan, Shaun, Lydia, Gil, David, Aaron, Kristen & Fletcher Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Rachael, Rikki, Jon Lewis, Moo, Tim, Nabeel, Patrick, Jon, Adam B., Ryan, Mollie, Lisa, Alex, Spencer, Kaitlynn, Manu, Matthew, Luc, Hank, Justin, Cooper, Elyse, Sarah, Karly, Kristopher, Josh, Lucas Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Laurel, A-A-Ron, Loren, Hbomb, Alex, Doug, Kevin and Sara, Tiffany, Allison, Paige, We Do Stuff, Kenya, Jeff, Eric, Steven, Efren, Mike J., Mike C., Mike. K If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support."

BetterHealthGuy Blogcasts
Episode #154: Cutting Edge Integrative Medicine Tools with Dr. Michael Karlfeldt, ND, PhD

BetterHealthGuy Blogcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 96:28


Why You Should Listen: In this episode, you will learn about cutting edge integrative medicine tools in support of those dealing with complex, chronic illness. About My Guest: My guest for this episode is Dr. Michael Karlfeldt. Michael Karlfeldt, ND, PhD is a Board-Certified Naturopath with expertise in a wide variety of naturopathic modalities and healing practices. His fascination with naturopathy began at an early age when he met Dr. Ingemar Wiberg, a leading Swedish Naturopathic Doctor, in Switzerland when he was 13 years old. After studying Engineering for two years, he worked with Dr. Wilberg for seven years in a demanding, rigorous, and carefully-supervised apprenticeship. It was this work that opened his eyes to the world of natural healing. Dr. Karlfeldt currently practices at the Karlfeldt Center in Meridian, Idaho, where he works with patients using numerous healing tools including: IV Therapy, Applied Psycho Neurobiology, Oxidative Medicine, Naturopathic Oncology, Neural Therapy, Sports Performance, Energy Medicine, Natural Medicine, Nutritional Therapies, Aromatherapy, Auriculotherapy, Reflexology, Autonomic Response Testing, Anti-Aging Medicine, and others. His passion to promote Natural Health publicly has led Dr. Karlfeldt to be a sought-after lecturer, writer, and professor. His current endeavors include hosting of the popular TV show "True Health with Dr. Karlfeldt" available on Amazon Prime and the HealthMade Radio Show and Podcast. Tens of thousands of patients have sought his naturopathic expertise in his clinic in the more than 30 years that Dr. Karlfeldt has been practicing. Dr. Karlfeldt believes in the innate intelligence and healing power of the body and if properly supported spiritually, emotionally, and nutritionally, it can find its way back to health. Key Takeaways: How does Autonomic Response Testing (ART) provide new insights? How often does trauma play a role in complex, chronic illness? What do live blood cell microscopy and oxidative dried blood testing tell about the patient's health status? In support of detoxification, how are Laser Energetic Detox (LED) and ionic foot baths utilized? What are the more common conditions where ozone therapy may be helpful? Can HBOT be helpful in those dealing with chronic Lyme disease? What is PDT or photodynamic therapy? What are the applications of PDT? What is the role of a photosensitizer? Can PDT help to address microbial overgrowths? What is the role of stem cell medicine in Lyme disease and other chronic conditions? What is platelet-derived nano medicine? Are platelets able to deliver medications to a specific target area in the body? What is the HOCATT? How might peptides be supportive in chronic conditions? What cutting edge integrative medicine tools might be used in the treatment of Lyme disease or mold illness? Connect With My Guest: https://TheKarlfeldtCenter.com Interview Date: October 12, 2021 Transcript: To review a transcript of this show, visit http://BetterHealthGuy.com/Episode154 Additional Information: To learn more, visit http://BetterHealthGuy.com. Disclaimer: The content of this show is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any illness or medical condition. Nothing in today's discussion is meant to serve as medical advice or as information to facilitate self-treatment. As always, please discuss any potential health-related decisions with your own personal medical authority.

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast
AT#773 - Travel to Montreux and the Swiss Riviera

Amateur Traveler Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 42:16


Hear about travel to Montreux and the Swiss Riviera as the Amateur Traveler talks to Chantal Patton from GrowingUpWithoutBorders.com about her adopted home country.

The John Batchelor Show
1767: #SmallBusinessAmerica: The only mistake you make is not to sell to the globe @GeneMarks @Guardian @PhillyInquirer

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 10:20


Photo:  The mechanical celestial globe made in 1594 in Kassel by en:Joost Bürgi, clockmaker from Switzerland. Now at Schweizerisches Landesmuseum i #SmallBusinessAmerica: The only mistake you make is not to sell to the globe @GeneMarks  @Guardian @PhillyInquirer Make the world your market with these tips and resources https://www.inquirer.com/news/small-business-overseas-exports-help-resources-20211012.html Gene Marks, @genemarks  @Guardian @PhillyInquirer, Washington Post Small Business columnist.  .. Permissions: The mechanical celestial globe made 1594 in Kassel by en:Joost Bürgi, clockmaker from Switzerland. Now at Schweizerisches Landesmuseum in Zurich. Source | Own work Author | Horology I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following licenses: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Between Us: John Littleton and Kate Vogel's Contributions to Glass

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 78:22


Well-known early on for their signature blown glass Bags, the subsequent cast glass work of John Littleton and Kate Vogel provided a new outlet for complex contemplations, questions and reflections. In this dramatic departure from their lighthearted Bags, faces and hands are used in various poses and combinations to explore states of mind, relationships, and even spiritual themes. Cast arms with hands in amber glass hold a brilliant jewel-cut form, which seems to spread its glowing light to all that surrounds it. Use of multiple techniques by Littleton and Vogel reveals an intimate understanding of their medium, and the execution of each work reflects artists deserving of their place at the top of the contemporary glass movement. Not only visually stunning, their sculpture allows the viewer to create a narrative, each piece a captured moment in a story of the viewers' choosing. They state: “As we focus on each form, we see possibilities for the next, and our vocabulary of form and ideas expands. We bounce ideas back and forth, we build on each other's concepts, and we learn from each other's insights. Collaboration brings our individual sensibilities together to generate something neither of us would have made alone. “ Littleton and Vogel are nationally renowned American Studio Glass Movement artists who work and reside in Bakersville, North Carolina. Their creative partnership began in the mid-to-late 20th century, when they began collaborating on their first glass pieces in 1979 after meeting as art students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.  Creating sculptural blown and cast glass works and installations that speak to the importance of their relationships to one another, their family, and their community, Littleton and Vogel currently exhibit their works in Between Us: A Retrospective Exhibition of Work by John Littleton and Kate Vogel at the Bergstrom Mahler Museum of Glass in Neenah, Wisconsin. On view now through February 13, 2022, the exhibition is accompanied by a perfect bound 84-page publication with essays by Casey Eichhorn, exhibition curator, and Susie J. Silbert, Curator of Postwar and Contemporary Glass at the Corning Museum of Glass.  “This retrospective exhibition highlights important works, milestones, and innovations in their shared careers,” says Casey Eichhorn, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions,” – all while tying their experiences and influences back to John's father, Harvey Littleton, an American glass artist, educator, and one of the founders of the American Studio Glass Movement.”  Harvey Littleton, whose influential work will also be shown in the exhibition, is often referred to as the “Father of the Studio Glass Movement.” In his role as an educator, he initiated the first hot glass program offered by an America University at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and promoted the idea of glass as a course of study in university art departments in the United States. Littleton's students went on to become the dominant figures in the American Studio Glass Movement while broadening the study of glass art and university-level hot glass programs throughout the U.S.  John Littleton states: “Harvey introduced glass as a medium for artists. The Toledo workshops were dad's idea. He had help from Norm Schuman and later Dominic Labino. The workshops wouldn't have happened without him. He certainly had help developing technique, but more than anyone else he saw the possibility of putting glass in the hands of artists. The industrial model was designers who worked on paper passing the design to the factory worker who had little expressive input. There were artist craftsmen and women who worked with glass individually, but dad pursued the idea of glass being available to art students. The early years were a time he pushed to get glass into universities to expand glass's creative and expressive potential. He saw the need for many artists working with glass for the growth of the field.” Littleton and Vogel's work has appeared in several group exhibitions including the Sculpture Objects and Functional Art (SOFA) in Chicago and the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C. Their glass works can also be seen in private and public collections in North America, Europe, and Asia. Locations include the William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park in Little Rock, AR; the Museum of Contemporary Design and Applied Arts in Switzerland; Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in Denmark; the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY; The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA. Features on their work have appeared in various publications—such as The Washington Post, The New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, and CBS Sunday Morning.  Littleton and Vogel state: “Choice, chance, circumstance, seductive qualities of the material…a little bit of all of the above. We stay with glass because it feels right. The process allows us to collaborate, start to finish. Glass is versatile, and we see endless possibilities in it and through it. In our work we strive to make something that is a personal expression of our thoughts and experiences.”  

Slightly Foxed
36: Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

Slightly Foxed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:39


The cartoonist, writer and illustrator Posy Simmonds brilliantly captures the ambitions and pretensions of the literary world, and the journalist and curator Paul Gravett has worked in comics publishing for decades. Together they bring graphic novels and comic books to the foreground with the Slightly Foxed team. We draw moral lessons from the Ally Sloper cartoons of the 1870s, glimpse Frans Masereel's wordless woodcut stories of the 1920s, view the pictorial politics of Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo in the 1940s and revisit Art Spiegelman's 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus before taking a closer look at more contemporary works. From a tragicomic summer with Joff Winterhart, nuclear explosions with Raymond Briggs, the shadow of James Joyce with Mary and Bryan Talbot and an Iranian childhood with Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, the discussion moves through panels, frames, splashes and spreads to Posy Simmonds's own methods in bringing literature to life, including crosshatching to Vivaldi. Originally serialized in the Guardian, Posy's Gemma Bovery builds on the bones of Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Tamara Drewe draws from Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, while Cassandra Darke takes inspiration from Dickens's A Christmas Carol. Though rooted in the classics, the devil is in Posy's detail, be it real French coffee pots, the joy of characters' names, such as Kevin Penwallet, and fictional places, such as Tresoddit. We continue our travels off the beaten track with our usual round-up of reading recommendations, and a trip to Gilbert White's House and Gardens in Hampshire, where we view the landscapes that sparked his evergreen classic The Natural History of Selborne. (Episode duration: 44 minutes; 39 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. Ally Sloper: A Moral Lesson, cartoons by Marie Duval and words by Judy's office boy is out of print (4:48) Miné Okubo, Citizen 13660 (6:29) George Takei, They Called Us Enemy (7:25) Jules Feiffer, Passionella and Other Stories is out of print (9:05) Art Spiegelman, Maus (10:37) Mary M. Talbot & Bryan Talbot, Dotter of Her Father's Eyes (12:52) Joff Winterhart, Days of the Bagnold Summer (13:22) Raymond Briggs, When the Wind Blows (15:42) Raymond Briggs, Ethel & Ernest (17:07) Posy Simmonds, Gemma Bovery (17:48) Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe (17:48) Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (28:31) Posy Simmonds, Cassandra Darke (29:04) Riad Sattouf, The Arab of the Future (30:24) Alison Bechdel, Fun Home (31:20) Posy Simmonds, Literary Life Revisited Paul Gravett, Posy Simmonds Emma Tennant, Burnt Diaries is out of print (34:20) Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways (37:28) Our Time, an anthology commissioned by The Lakes International Comic Art Festival (38:29) Laurie Lee, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. Published in our series of Slightly Foxed Editions, along with Cider with Rosie (39:54) Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne (41:24) Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Illustrations Underwear Was Important, Hazel Wood on the cartoons of Posy Simmonds, Issue 15 Cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 16 Inside cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 60 Touched with a Secret Delight, Melissa Harrison on Gilbert White, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Issue 48 Other Links Posy Simmonds Close Up, Cartoonmuseum Basel, Switzerland. The exhibition runs until 24 October 2021 (2:39) The bd BOUM festival, Blois, France. The festival is chaired by Posy Simmonds and runs from 19-21 November 2021 Gosh! Comics, London, UK (31:58) The Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, UK (32:08) Thought Bubble, The Yorkshire Comic Convention, Harrogate, UK (32:26) Gilbert White's House & Gardens, Selborne, UK (41:13) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

Poetry For Now
BACK HOME AGAIN

Poetry For Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:47


After 6 weeks traveling in Europe I have thousands of images to process and select, from my hike around Mont Blanc, my daughters wedding in Germany, and our river cruise down the Danube.I start the TMB Hike and this episode in Les Hoches, France and will continue in episode 13 in Italy and Switzerland.Writing poetry requires uses a different part of the brain from the visual processing of the images. So expect poetry relating to this trip to appear over the coming weeks. Thanks for your patience, waiting for this podcast!Support the show (http://www.prasad.org)

Dying To Tell You
The Vampiric Scare

Dying To Tell You

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:03


From Transylvania to Switzerland to the United Kingdom to the United States, Vampires have always been that of legend and lore. But, some of the best works of literary fiction are actually based on frightening facts. [TRIGGER WARNING: death, vampires, brief mention of the act of cannibalism, random lyrics of one hit wonders]

Matrix Assassins
SkyGodz with David Boller

Matrix Assassins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 91:34


#27 Step into the game with the MA girls to go on a journey with David Boller, the anime series creator of a trans-media project called Sky Godz. David's background includes working for Marvel Comics where he worked on Spider-man, and then moved to DC Comics to work on Batman, Superman, and Justice League. Later, he worked with other comic book companies and created his own graphic novel company, Virtual Graphics. David also does independent work for a variety of clients doing TV commercials. Some topics discussed include:Tapping into the creative realm, working for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, anime, Sky Godz, trans-medium projects, origin of the universe, Anunnaki, alien races, graphic novels, mythology, Chariots of the Gods, passion projects, life in Switzerland, Hudson Valley UFO cases, The Phoenix Lights, UFO disclosure, The Roswell Incident, the breakaway society, portals, work behind creating an anime series, script writing, storyboards, layouts, the success of Dragon Ball Z, Moebus, Netflix payment terms, blockchain, NFTs, smart contracts, DAOs, virtual reality, technological innovations, creating more than you consume, Wax Cloud Wallet, Binance, Coinbase, and so much more. You can find David:IG: @skygodz_galactic; @boller2112YouTube: David BollerWebsite: Skygodz.com; www.virtual-graphics.chPrimal Alchemy Link: https://bit.ly/3g7afQWUSE CODE: MATRIX10 for 10% offThank you stepping into the game with us!To Connect with Us on Instagram click HERETo Connect with Us on Twitter click HERETo Connect with VLOW click HERETo Connect with Nicole click HERELINKTREESPOTIFY PLAYLISTThis is the beginning of an incredible journey and we thank you for joining us as we all #AssassinateTheMatrix together. P.s. Do something today to interrupt the pattern.

The Forum
A dirty history of diamonds

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:40


We seem to have an almost insatiable appetite for the glitter and sparkle of diamonds. Yet transforming these stones into jewels fit for princesses and film stars involves a long chain of production and distribution. And the diamond industry has long been bound up with a much darker side: the exploitation of workers, environmental damage, all-powerful monopolies and violent mafias, not to mention the so-called Blood Diamonds used to finance armed conflict. So how is the industry trying to clean up its image and regulate the trade? Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the history of the diamond trade are: Dr. Lansana Gberie, former coordinator for the UN Security Council Panel of Experts on Liberia. He is the author of A Dirty War in West Africa: The RUF and the Destruction of Sierra Leone. He's also Sierra Leone's current Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva and the Sierra Leonean Ambassador to Switzerland - though his contributions to this programme are in a personal capacity. Ian Smillie, founder of the Diamond Development Initiative, now DDI at Resolve, an organisation which works to improve conditions for small-scale miners. He is the author of several books, including Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond Trade. He is based in Canada. Dr. Tijl Vanneste, researcher at the Portuguese Institute of International Relations at Nova University in Lisbon. He is the author of Blood, Sweat and Earth: The Struggle for Control over the World's Diamonds Throughout History. [Image: Examining a gem diamond in Antwerp, Belgium; Credit: Paul O'Driscoll/Getty Images]

Mind & Matter
Christian Luscher: Drug Addiction, Cocaine, Caffeine, Nicotine, THC, Opioids & the Brain | #40

Mind & Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:02


Christian Luscher, MD, PhD is a neuroscientist and neurologist who runs a research lab at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. Dr. Lusher's lab studies the mechanisms that underlie drug reinforcement and addiction in the brain and he is an expert in the neuroscience of drug addiction. Christian talks to Nick about: what is addiction is and what some key parts of the brain and neurotransmitter systems are involved in drug addiction; differences in the addictive potential of different types of drugs, ranging from stimulants (e.g. cocaine, nicotine, caffeine) to cannabinoids (e.g. THC), opioids, and psychedelics. Dr. Luscher describes the difference between addiction vs. dependency, habitual vs. goal-directed behavior, as well as some of his latest research on how dopamine and serotonin systems in the brain are both involved in drug-seeking behavior.USEFUL LINKS:Download the podcast & follow Nick at his website[www.nickjikomes.com]Support the show on Patreon & get early access to episodes[https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes]Sign up for the weekly Mind & Matter newsletter[https://mindandmatter.substack.com/]Athletic Greens, comprehensive daily nutrition (Free 1-year supply of Vitamin D w/ purchase)[https://www.athleticgreens.com/mindandmatter]Try MUD/WTR, a mushroom-based coffee alternative[https://www.mudwtr.com/mindmatter]Discount Code ($5 off) = MINDMATTEROrganize your digital highlights & notes w/ Readwise (2 months free w/ subscription)[https://readwise.io/nickjikomes/]Start your own podcast (get $20 Amazon gift card after signup)[https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1507198]Buy Mind & Matter T-Shirts[https://www.etsy.com/shop/OURMIND?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=1036758072§ion_id=34648633]Connect with Nick Jikomes on Twitter[https://twitter.com/trikomes]​​​Learn more about our podcast sponsor, Dosist[https://dosist.com/]ABOUT Nick Jikomes:Nick is a neuroscientist and podcast host. He is currently Director of Science & Innovation at Leafly, a technology startup in the legal cannabis industry. He received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University and a B.S. in Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes)

Get Over It! Podcast
The Key To Digestive Wellness

Get Over It! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Christopher Vasey, ND talks about his new book Restoring Your Intestinal Flora The Key To Digestive Health: Strengthen The Immune System, Reduce Inflammation, Rebuild Gut Health. Our intestinal flora performs a large number of duties - far more than just aiding digestion. For example, recent research has revealed that our intestinal flora help fights off infections by killing microbes and viruses, increase our resistance to allergens and inflammation, cleanse our intestinal systems by neutralizing toxins. Due to this, we raise support to our moods and energy levels by interacting with hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore the key to digestive wellness. Christopher Vasey explains how to restore balance to your microbiome. He examines the many functions of intestinal flora and their role in a healthy immune system, including their anti-inflammatory effects and role in the creation of lymphocytes. He explores the major causes of weakened flora, especially the overuse of antibiotics and the overconsumption of refined foods, low-fiber foods, and he outlines the ailments and diseases that can result, such as bloating, food intolerance, mood swings, fungal infections, and greater susceptibility to colds and flu. Providing everything you need to know for optimum digestive wellness, Vasey shows that repairing the balance of your intestinal flora is simple and accessible to anyone making it the key to digestive health. We talk about A layman's explanation of the intestinal floraThe three intestinal tracks and their purposeThe two major categories of bacteriaIntestinal tract and the immune systemThe correlation between the intestines and autoimmune disease and mental disordersPrebiotics and probioticsMicrobes in the stomachIntestinal mucousFlora of fermentationsFlora of putrefacationThe intestines and skin diseases Christopher Vasey, ND, is a naturopath specializing in detoxification and rejuvenation. He is the author of several books, including The Acid-Alkaline Diet for Optimum Health, Natural Remedies for Inflammation, Liver Detox, Natural Antibiotics and Antivirals, and Good Sugar, Bad Sugar. He lives near Montreux, Switzerland. christophervasey.ch

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep 59: Alain Ebobissé 'Meeting Africa's Infrastructure Needs'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:11


Alain Ebobissé is a specialist in the financing and development of infrastructure and CEO  of Africa50. Prior to joining the organization, Mr. Ebobissé served as the Global Head of the World Bank Group's Global Infrastructure Project Development Fund (IFC InfraVentures), where he oversaw a team of infrastructure specialists and led the development of and investment in numerous infrastructure projects in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Mr. Ebobissé led the design, structuring, and implementation of IFC InfraVentures from its inception. He also served as Chief Investment Officer in the Global Infrastructure and Natural Resources Department of the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private-sector arm of the World Bank Group, based in Washington.Prior to joining the IFC in 1998, he held several positions in the financial services industry in France, including Deputy Head of Project and Structured Finance at Caisse des Depots et Consignations. Ebobissé holds a Master of Business Administration from the International School for Management Development (IMD) in Lausanne, Switzerland.Further reading:Africa50https://www.africa50.com/

The Scoop
Bank exec explains how Switzerland's massive wealth channels are opening up to crypto

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:31


Sygnum is one of the few cryptocurrency banks operating in Europe. On this episode of The Scoop, Mathias Imbach Co-Founder and Group CEO of Sygnum joined host Frank Chaparro to discuss the country's crypto ecosystem and how large wealth channels are opening up to bitcoin and other digital assets. “Nowadays, the conversation goes very different," said Imbach. "There's very few banks in Switzerland which have not made it a strategic priority to really think [supporting digital assets] through. Some would still say, 'right now we want to not touch it for x, y, z reasons,' but there needs to be a strategic rationale. They need to have an answer to clients, why they do it or why they don't do it." Sygnum's clients aren't just interested in crypto assets, but all real-world assets that are traded on a blockchain. “It's about creating a more direct link between what we own and how we transfer it,” he said. For that reason, Sygnum is currently exploring the tokenization of wines and other pieces of art for clients who also want to own fractionalized shares of such assets. “If you accumulate 100 percent equivalent of a wine bottle, you can also then burn the tokens and take physical delivery of the wine. So basically, you're creating this digital, but at the same time still a real asset, kind of convergence, where you can take it, use it as an investment opportunity, as a financial gains opportunity, with liquidity along the way.” Episode 64 of Season 3 of The Scoop was recorded remotely with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Mathias Imbach, co-founder & Group CEO at Sygnum. Listen below, and subscribe to The Scoop on Apple, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. Email feedback and revision requests to podcast@theblockcrypto.com. This episode is brought to you by our sponsors Bakkt, Kraken, and Exodus Bakkt® unlocks the $1.2+ trillion of digital assets that is currently held in cryptocurrencies, rewards and loyalty points, gaming assets and merchant stored value. We began in 2018 with the vision to bring trust and transparency to digital assets. Through the Bakkt Warehouse and Bakkt Bitcoin Futures and Options contracts, we serve institutional clients in an end-to-end regulated market with true price transparency. For consumers, Bakkt aggregates digital assets to enable instant liquidity and to empower users to trade, transfer and pay however they want. Visit Bakkt.com for more information About Kraken Whether you're an experienced crypto trader or just starting out, Kraken has the tools to help you achieve financial freedom. With 50+ cryptocurrencies to choose from, industry-leading security and a wide variety of features to suit any investing strategy, Kraken puts the power in your hands to buy, sell and trade digital assets. Visit Kraken.com to get started today. About Exodus Exodus is leading the world out of traditional finance by building beautiful and user-friendly crypto products. Forget having to learn the nuances of different cryptocurrencies. Exodus is designed for everyone and hides the complex details behind a beautiful and intuitive interface.   Buy and sell one cryptocurrency for another from the comfort of your wallet, in seconds. Funds remain under your full control.   Secure, manage, stake, and exchange all of your favorite cryptocurrencies from one wallet. No account registration is required. Download Exodus at Exodus.com or directly from Google Play and the iOS App Store and you're ready to go.

Space Café Podcast
EP38 Joellen Russell, Mayday Mayday, an oceanographer's passionate cry for help to the space community.

Space Café Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 64:09


Can the space community help combat climate change? Professor Joellen Russell from the University of Arizona calls for the largest friendly army in human history. Host: Markus Mooslechner: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markus-mooslechner-87878085/Guest: Professor Joellen Russel Joellen RusselPublisher: Torsten Kriening: https://www.linkedin.com/in/torsten-kriening-68456/ Who we are?SpaceWatch.Global is a digital magazine and portal for those interested in space, and the far-reaching impact that space developments have. While showcasing the technology that enables the industry to edge closer to the next frontier, SpaceWatch.Global also provides analysis, forecasts, and insight into the geopolitical implications of space developments. From space policy, exploration, and missions, to space weapons and technology, we provide a complete perspective on the emerging space sector as it expands into a global marketplace. The team behind SpaceWatch.Global is a dynamic mix of space geeks, tech junkies, space policy experts, regional specialists, and passionate writers. We fully believe that space should be used for humanity, that it enables knowledge, and enriches societies.SpaceWatch.Global is published by ThorGroup GmbH, headquartered in Bern, Switzerland. In the true Swiss spirit, neutrality, ethics and integrity are at our core. SpaceWatch.Global abides by the Society of Professional Journalists' code of ethics; we seek the truth and report on it. ThorGroup GmbHWaaghausgasse 183011 BernSwitzerlandWebsite: www.spacewatch.global Email: info@thorgroup.ch Exclusive distribution Partner: Bookwire - www.bookwire.de See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Inner Circle with Carrie Doll

James Shapiro obtained his medical degree from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and trained in surgery at the University of Bristol. After coming to Canada in 1993, he received training in liver transplantation and hepatobiliary surgery at the University of Alberta, and earned a PhD in Experimental Surgery. Shapiro developed a brand new approach to optimize islet cell transplant engraftment that involved a radical departure from previous practice. Of almost 300 islet transplants attempted before 1999, fewer than 10% of these worked in patients. His protocol was designed to address many of the previous shortcomings by transplanting sufficient numbers of islets into the liver by using multiple donors, and by testing a novel anti-rejection strategy that avoided steroids and allowed the transplanted islets to work at their best. The result became known internationally as the ‘Edmonton Protocol.' Shapiro led the clinical team that tested his approach in seven initial patients, all of whom (100%) were able to discontinue the need for insulin injections for periods beyond a year. He was the lead author in the landmark paper published in July, 2000 that described these results. Since then, he and his team have transplanted almost 300 Canadians and have continued to refine and optimize the protocol. This treatment has been replicated many times internationally, and over 2000 patients worldwide have now received islet transplants using the backbone of his protocol. A large ‘registration' trial conducted in Canada and the USA reported its positive findings in 2016 in the Journal Diabetes Care. Countries including England, Scotland, France, Switzerland, Australia, and Canada have approved and funded islet transplantation as part of ‘standard of care' for patients with brittle, difficult-to-control, forms of Type 1 diabetes. Since the development of the Edmonton Protocol, he has led or co-led three major ongoing international multicentre clinical trials to further improve islet transplantation outcomes. He leads the Edmonton team, which is the largest islet transplantation team worldwide. Shapiro also led the first-in-human stem cell transplant trials in Edmonton, Canada in 2014, and continues to refine stem cell transplantation approaches in patients. So far these studies are proving both promising and safe when tested in Canadians. In his basic science laboratory, Professor Shapiro developed a new means to transplant cells beneath the skin by using a temporary tube to induce new blood vessels to grow. Before then, islet transplants beneath the skin failed universally, but this treatment is now known as the ‘Deviceless Technique'. In liver transplantation research, Shapiro and his team recently conducted two trials in Edmonton of a new machine designed to incubate and keep donated human livers alive outside the body before transplantation. This technology is radically altering our ability to rescue damaged livers and provide safer livers for transplant. It is also allowing these transplants to happen during regular daylight hours. Professor Shapiro further led a cross-Canadian research team to test similar technologies in heart, lung, kidney and pancreas transplantations as part of the Canadian National Transplant Research Project.  His busy research lab is currently working on more than 30 projects and 15 human clinical trials. One is an exciting immune reset trial. In this study, people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are given a combination of targeted medications designed to reset their immune system and repair the pancreas. Besides maintaining an active immunology/transplant research laboratory, Dr. Shapiro has a busy clinical practice specializing in hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery, surgical oncology, as well as transplant surgery, and was featured in an internationally acclaimed movie about organ transplantation called ‘Memento Mori.' A shorter length version of this called ‘Vital Bonds' was aired last year across Canada by the CBC's David Suzuki's 'The Nature of Things'. An edited version called ‘Transplanting Hope' has been aired across the USA as part of PBS. This movie is helping to raise awareness about organ donation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Travel Babies Podcast - Travel Tips & Tricks
Episode 45 - Geneva & The Caprices Festival - Travel Babies Podcast

Travel Babies Podcast - Travel Tips & Tricks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 22:38


Each week we talk about important travel topics to help you decide when, where, and how to explore the world in style. This week we are talking all about our first trip back to Switzerland since the pandemic began. We visited Geneva & Crans Montana for the Caprices Festival. Listen to hear all about why we love Switzerland and how much fun we had at the music festival. Also be sure to follow us on Instagram: @JQLouise @TravelWithJuliana @TravelBabies Check out our website https://thetravelbabies.com!

Women's Liberation Radio News
German Lesbian Feminists with Julia Beck

Women's Liberation Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 66:17


Join Julia Beck for three delightful interviews with German lesbian feminists Inge Klein, Manuela Kay, and Judith. These three women talk about their experiences in the German world of lesbian feminism and culture. The show is rounded off by Julia's report and commentary on the subject so stay tuned til the very end! After the greeting, hear the beloved German lesbian anthem, “Wir Sind Die Homosexuellen Frauen" by the Flying Lesbians (1975). Then listen to an interview with Manuela Kay, co-owner of L-Mag, the largest lesbian magazine in Germany - with readers in Austria and Switzerland, too! Manuela talks about the Berlin Dyke March and the concept of lesbian visibility. After Zuckerklub's pop-punk song, "Die Zeit steht still", listen to an interview with Judith, who speaks about how current lesbian culture compares to her experiences in the 80's and 90's in Berlin. An interlude with the song "Auf'm Bahnhof Zoo" by Godmother of Punk, Nina Hagen, is followed by the third and final interview with Inge Kleine, active member of KOFRA, the communications center for women in Munich, Germany. Inge offers insight into different modes of activism, such as marches and online campaigns, to support women's autonomy and the Nordic Model. Finally, Julia rounds out the episode with a commentary on German lesbian culture, community and herstory. Thanks for staying tuned to feminist community radio, WLRN. If you'd like to donate to the cause, please click on this link https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ULAE4ZHPARLFE

My Favorite Flop
Hold Me Bat Boy

My Favorite Flop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 75:22


"Embrace it", "there's always a tomorrow" as hosts Bobby and Kristina discuss 2004's Dracula, The Musical and 2006's Lestat on episode eighteen of My Favorite Flop.   ABOUT DRACULA, THE MUSICAL Based on the Victorian novel by Bram Stoker, Dracula, The Musical tells the story of the famed vampire as he lusts for new blood. Jonathan Harker and Mina Murray fall victim to Dracula's unnatural charm and, along with Doctor Van Helsing, must fight Dracula's supernatural powers. The musical features music by Frank Wildhorn and book and lyrics by Christopher Hampton and Don Black. Following a record-breaking run at the La Jolla Playhouse in 2001, the musical finally opened on Broadway to mostly negative reviews 3 years later in 2004. Though this production was intended as a serious, dramatic interpretation of the source material, critics complained of a complete lack of emotion in general, and of suspense and horror in particular. Also, while the plot of the musical hits all the major points of Stoker's novel, critics felt it did so in such an obtuse way that audience members unfamiliar with the story may find themselves unable to comprehend the action. Despite failing on Broadway, the musical has gone on to become extremely popular throughout Europe and Asia. The musical made its international debut at Theater St. Gallen, Switzerland in 2005, with notable productions following in the UK, Tokyo, and Seoul.   Original Broadway Cast Melissa Errico as Mina Murray Tom Hewitt as Dracula Stephen McKinley Henderson as Abraham Van Helsing Chris Hoch as Arthur Holmwood Kelli O'Hara as Lucy Westenra Darren Ritchie as Jonathan Harker Bart Shatto as Quincey Morris Don Stephenson as Renfield Shonn Wiley as Jack Seward Lena Hall as Second Vampire Melissa Fagan as Third Vampire Jenifer Foote as First Vampire Michael Herwitz as Child Pamela Jordan as Third Vampire (Alternate) Elizabeth Loyacano as Second Vampire (Alternate) Tracy Miller as First Vampire (Alternate) Matthew Nardozzi as Child (Alternate) Graham Rowat as Ensemble   ABOUT LESTAT Inspired by three of the novels in Anne Rice's The Vampire Chronicles, Lestat tells the story of a man who escapes the tyranny of his oppressive family only to have his life taken from him by the vampire, Magnus. The musical features music by Elton John, lyrics by Bernie Taupin, and a book by Linda Woolverton. Officially the highest-earning pre-Broadway play in San Francisco history (beating out Wicked AND Cats), Lestat finally opened on Broadway at the Palace Theater on March 25, 2006 after a series of drastic revisions. Reviews of the Broadway production were uniformly negative. Ben Brantley famously described the show as a "musical sleeping pill" and Peter Marks of the Washington Post remarked that apparently "a gay vampire with a two-octave range can be just as dull as a straight one." The musical closed on May 28, 2006, after 33 previews and 39 performances. An Original Broadway Cast Recording was recorded by Mercury Records a week earlier, however, after the show's closing, Elton John's management stated "there are no plans to release the recording..." Lestat has not been seen again (at least officially) since its original run.   Original Off-Broadway Cast Hugh Panaro as Lestat Carolee Carmello as Gabrielle Allison Fischer as Claudia Michael Genet as Marius Roderick Hill as Nicolas Drew Sarich as Armand Jim Stanek as Louis Rachel Coloff as Ensemble Nikki Renée Daniels as Eleni Joseph Dellger as Magnus Colleen Fitzpatrick as Ensemble Patrick Mellen as Ensemble Chris Peluso as Ensemble Dominique Plaisant as Ensemble Megan Reinking as Beautiful Woman Will Swenson as Marquis/Laurent Tommar Wilson as Ensemble

Fully Funded Podcast with Mike Kim & Mary Valloni
033: What Does It Mean to Be Faithful with Kelly Baader

Fully Funded Podcast with Mike Kim & Mary Valloni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:47


Kelly Baader lives in Switzerland and serves as a mentor to Christian marketplace leaders across the world.  Here are some of the things Kelly touches on: The 5 invisible areas that affect your life and business Switching the discussion from how much you want to make to how much you want to give Inviting Jesus to your business meetings How giving and receiving are emotional things and we have different reasons for giving to different causes Why you don't need everybody to support your cause and a small group that aligns with your goal is ideal Resources: kellybaader.com Power of One Framework Masterclass Connect with Kelly: Facebook Instagram LinkedIn YouTube Missionary Support Raising Roadmap (PDF) In this roadmap key masterclass you'll find out where you are in the support raising process and pick up any components you may be missing to ensure your long-term success. Get Your Missionary Support Raising Roadmap If you'd like to develop a steady stream of recurring financial support, then check out fullyfundedacademy.com to enroll in the Academy!

Podcasts - SWI swissinfo.ch
Meet couples saying 'I do' to gay marriage

Podcasts - SWI swissinfo.ch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:10


Now that Switzerland has approved marriage for all, host Susan Misicka talks with some couples who explain why it's important to them. We also hear from opponents of Swiss legislation granting same-sex couples the right to marry.

Knowing Faith
After The Fact: Luther and the Righteousness of God with Dr. Gregg Allison

Knowing Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:06


Kyle Worley is joined by Dr. Gregg Allison to answer the question, did Martin Luther have anything to say about the righteousness of God in Romans?Questions Covered in This Episode:Did Martin Luther have anything to say about the righteousness of God in Romans?Outside of the miraculous work of the Holy Spirit, was there anything that was happening at a linguistic or a theological level in Luther's understanding of the concept that was the key to that discovery? How did that change happen?Helpful Definitions:Justice of God: God's wrath and condemnation towards sinners.Righteousness of God: A gift that God gives to sinners who repent, confess Christ, turn to Christ through the gospel. A gift of perfect standing before God. God's gift of the righteousness of Christ by which we can stand before him.Justification: Divine declaration. We are no longer condemned or guilty, we are forgiven of our sins and the perfect righteousness of Jesus Christ is attributed to us. So God when he sees us, sees us clothed in the perfect righteousness of Jesus Christ. The Sweet Exchange: Our sin is imputed to Christ, Christ's righteousness is imputed to us.Guest Bio:Dr. Gregg Allison is a professor of Christian Theology at Southern Seminary. Prior to joining the faculty of Southern, Dr. Allison was a professor at Western Seminary, and prior to that He served with campus crusade for Christ for 18 years, was a missionary in Italy and Switzerland. Dr. Allison is the author of numerous books including: Historical Theology: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine, Sojourners and Strangers: The Doctrine of the Church, and Roman Catholic Theology and Practice: An Evangelical Assessment. On top of writing and teaching, Dr. Allison serves as a pastor at Sojourn Community Church East in Louisville, KY.Resources Mentioned in This Episode:Romans 1:17Knowing Faith Dr. Gregg Allison EpisodesAmazon affiliate links are used where appropriate. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases, thank you for supporting Knowing Faith.Sponsors:Reserve your spot now to attend Southern Seminary Preview Day on October 15. Use the promo code KNOWINGFAITH, and Southern will waive the $25 fee for lodging and meals.To learn more about our sponsors please visit our website.Follow Us:Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | WebsiteSupport Knowing Faith and Become a Patron:patreon.com/knowingfaith

Wine for Normal People
Ep 395: Walla Walla, Washington's Caprio Cellars and Its Estate Wines

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:12


Caprio Cellars makes wines from estate vineyards in the Walla Walla viticultural area of eastern Washington. Owner and winemaker, Dennis Murphy crafts wines mainly from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot from his three Walla Walla vineyards, one of which is named after his Italian grandmother Eleanor Caprio, and another for his great grandmother Sanitella Caprio. In the show, Dennis shares some good information about Walla Walla and its climate, soils, and the region's unique position in the wine world. The bulk of the show is dedicated to my conversation with him, and he gives us a different perspective from others we've talked to in Walla Walla, like Sleight of Hand Cellars (who doesn't love Jerry Solomon and Episode 295) and Amavi/ Pepperbridge (Eric McKibben rocks out Episode 294). But a lot of Dennis's references are to seminal figures in the Walla Walla wine industry.   Photo: Dennis Murphy, Caprio Cellars Given that, in the first part of the show, I spend a few minutes telling you about the founding figures in the Walla Walla wine industry.  Not only does this help in explaining the references, it sets you up to understand all of Walla Walla -- if you ever talk to anyone about the region or go visit, these names will come up over and over again. They are...   Norm McKibben. A founding father of Walla Walla's wine industry, and he founded Pepper Bridge Cellars and Amavi. His mentorship, forward thinking attitude (he was an early proponent of sustainability), and openness are a big part of the success of Walla Walla. Jean-Francois Pellet is the Director of Winemaking and a partner at Pepper Bridge and Amavi. He was born and raised in Switzerland, and is a third-generation wine grower. After working in vineyards around Europe and for Heitz Cellars in the Napa Valley, he was recruited by Norm to Pepper Bridge  and also helped start Amavi. He is an active partner in the businessl and an important force in the Walla Walla wine scene. Marty Clubb is Managing Winemaker and co-owner of L'Ecole N° 41 with his wife, Megan, and their children, Riley and Rebecca.  Megan's parents, Jean and Baker Ferguson, founded L'Ecole in 1983. In 1989, Marty and Megan moved to Walla Walla and Marty became manager and winemaker of L'Ecole.  Marty, along with Norm McKibben and Gary Figgins (see below) were the three most important figures in starting viticulture in the Walla Walla Valley.  Marty is one of the most revered figures in Walla Walla.   Gary Figgins is the founder of Leonetti Cellar, which was Walla Walla's first commercial winery. The Figgins family has been in Walla Walla for over a century and Gary learned viticulture from his uncles, who were farmers. He is self-taught and has done miraculous things for Walla Walla – Leonetti's wines were among the first to gain high scores and national recognition for the valley. Gary and his wife Nancy passed on the winery to their kids, Chris and Amy, but Gary is a major figure in the development of Walla Walla and is still active in vineyard consulting.   Christophe Baron is a native of Champagne and came to Walla Walla in 1993 while doing an internship at a vineyard in Oregon. He saw the famed “rocks” of the Milton-Freewater district that looked like the puddingstone in Châteauneuf-du-Pape, and decided to buy 10 acres for his Cayuse Vineyards. The waitlist for the winery is many years deep, so Cayuse's wines are only available to us on the secondary market (auctions and stuff – there is a podcast to come on auctions that will make that secondary market easy to understand!). He's essential to helping make Walla Walla wine a coveted, hard to get luxury!   Dennis Murphy mentions other important wineries: Gramercy Cellars, Va Piano, and Hanatoro, to name a few!    Finally, we discuss a few vineyards: Seven Hills and Sevein: These are top vineyards of Walla Walla. They have unique soils and are managed by the founding fathers of Walla Walla – Norm McKibben, Marty, Clubb, Gary Figgins, and a few others, with many top wineries sourcing from this land. Photo: Seven Hills Vineyard After the intro, Dennis and I discuss Caprio, and its vineyards and its wines, which are quite tasty. Dennis discusses winemaking techniques, viticulture and sustainability, and his unique, very welcoming hospitality model. He has recently purchased a stake in Pepper Bridge and Amavi, so we discuss that briefly as well.   If you haven't been to Walla Walla, put it on the list. In many ways it represents the. best of the American wine industry -- collegial, entrepreneurial, with a focus on hard work and quality. Who could ask for more?   Photo: Caprio Cellars _________________________________________________________________ Registration for the FREE Wines of the Médoc Class is here:  Session 1, October 21 at 8 PM Eastern Session 2, October 28, at 8 PM Eastern   Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal To become a member of Patreon go to www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes

Mytholadies
40. Bluebeard's Bride (World Folklore)

Mytholadies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:05


In today's giant of an episode, we delve into the classic tale of Bluebeard's Bride. We cover three different versions of the story, including La Barbe Bleue from France, Knight Goldbeard from Switzerland, and Zerendac and Abu Freywar from Palestine. We also discuss how Bluebeard has influenced the modern-day horror genre, how its message is still very applicable to this day, and Lizzie also blows Zoe's mind by revealing specific works that were inspired by the tale. For more information about today's episode, go to mytholadies.com. Our cover art is by Helena Cailleaux. You can find her and more of her work on Instagram @helena.cailleaux.illustratrice. Our theme song was composed and performed by Icarus Tyree. To hear more of their music, check out icarust.bandcamp.com.

New Books in American Studies
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in Film
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

Intersections: The Art Basel Podcast

“We see the world as this huge kaleidoscopic field of information … and I think the way we see culture and the arts should also embrace that,” Doug Aitken says. In this conversation with Marc Spiegler, the interdisciplinary artist discusses his wide-ranging practice, from its roots in Los Angeles in the 1970s and 80s to his project Station to Station, which transformed a train along a 4,000-mile journey into a nomadic studio, to his recent collaboration with musician Jamie xx and creating sculptures that live underwater. Art Basel Executive Editor Jeni Fulton also speaks with musician Fatima al Qadiri about her latest album, Medieval Femme, her lifelong fascination with the sensual recitation of classical Arabic poetry, and her recent forays into scoring films.

Redeemer Weekend Sermons
Prayer of Enlightenment

Redeemer Weekend Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:05


Prayer of EnlightenmentOctober 10 2021 • Ephesians • Week 1Teacher: Adam Barnett---Acts 19:25-27 NIV"Men, you know we receive a good income from this business. And you see and hear how this fellow Paul has convinced and led astray large numbers of people here in Ephesus and in practically the whole province of Asia. He says that manmade gods are no gods at all. There is danger not only that our trade will lose its good name, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will be discredited, and the goddess herself, who is worshipped throughout the whole province of Asia and the world, will be robbed of her divine majesty."1. The Greatness of God2. The Exalted Christ3. Salvation4. The Status of Believers5. Unity of Jew and Gentile6. Struggle with Evil7. Ethical Obligation of Believers8. Ministry to the Gentiles9. The ChurchD.M. Lloyd Jones"Ephesians is the distilled essence of the Christian religion, the most authoritative and most supreme compilation of our holy Christian faith."Klyne Snodgrass"One of the divinest compositions of man, the Bach of the Bible, the Switzerland of the New Testament, and the crown and climax of Pauline theology."James Dunn"If theology is measured in terms of articulation of Christian belief, then Paul's letters laid a foundation for Christian theology which has never been rivaled or superseded. It is important, therefore, for each generation to reflect afresh on Paul's theology."Ephesians 1:15-23 NIVFor this reason, ever since I heard about your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love for all God's people, I have not stopped giving thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers. I keep asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better. I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in his holy people, and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is the same as the mighty strength he exerted when he raised Christ from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every name that is invoked, not only in the present age but also in the one to come. And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way.1. Enlightenment to know the hope to which we are called.2. Enlightenment to know riches of his glorious inheritance.3. Enlightenment to know his incomparably great power.

The Walkshow
Craftsmanship and Design in Olympus Watches with Jenna Zhang

The Walkshow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 43:15


This week we explore the walk of life with the founder of Olympus Watches Jenna Zhang. Olympus Watches use recycled parts off supercars and incorporate them into their watches which are assembled and certified in Switzerland. Jenna and I had a great conversation about how she came up with the idea for Olympus Watches, the value of handcrafted products and overcoming the challenges of a new entrepreneur. Music by Misha Zarins. Show Links:  Olympus Watches Website: olympuswatches.co Olympus Watches IndieGoGo: indiegogo.com/projects/the-galante-watch-made-with-reclaimed-lamborghinis#/ Olympus Watches Instagram: instagram.com/olympuswatchesco/ Walkshow Website: https://thewalkshowpodcast.com/ (https://thewalkshowpodcast.com/) Walkshow Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheWalkshowPod (https://twitter.com/TheWalkshowPod) Walkshow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_walkshow/ (https://www.instagram.com/the_walkshow/) Walkshow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewalkshow/ (https://www.facebook.com/thewalkshow/) Walkshow Email: walker@thewalkshowpodcast.com Misha YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf1hf_KEOaqnq3q6Yb3_hbw (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf1hf_KEOaqnq3q6Yb3_hbw)

Health Unchained Podcast
Ep. 88: Community-owned Swiss Healthcare Ecosystem - Eberhard Scheuer (President dHealth Network)

Health Unchained Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 71:42


Dr. Eberhard Scheuer is the founder and the President of the Board of Directors at dHealth foundation and has been a pioneer in using blockchain in the healthcare field. Eberhard holds a Ph.D. in psychology and views healthcare always from the patient's point of view. He has been a researcher, lecturer, therapist, digital health entrepreneur, and networker for two decades. Eberhard is a psychologist by training and was trained as a clinical psychologist, but mainly worked in the research environment studying at UMass Amherst and University of Tübingen. CONNECT WITH EBERHARD LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eberhardscheuer/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/medrepublik Website: https://dhealth.network/ Related episode - https://soundcloud.com/healthunchained/ep-84-nem-development-for-healthcare-gregory-saive-ceo-ubcdigital Show Notes ●Introduction to Eberhard's background ●What is the use case and vision of dHealth Foundation which was previously called the HIT foundation? ●Tokenizing Health data and how patients should ideally be reimbursed for usage of their health data ●Tracing detection system for Covid and other Illnesses and how those use cases are the best for blockchain ●What is Data privacy and how usage of Blockchain transforms the way to store that data off chain and use blockchain for identity management? ●Partnership with Roche on using patients' data for one of their Hemophilia drug launches and using blockchain for that launch. ●Alpha and beta testing on the dHealth platform ●What is DHP or Digital Health Point tokens and what kind services can be acquired using these tokens? ●Due to the rules and laws of Switzerland, how is operating a Blockchain company there? What are the Pros and Cons? ●European Society of Organ Transplantation (ESOT) exchange and how blockchain can play an important role in the matching process ●What are the financial and technical challenges which are being worked on to be launched in the coming months? ●What influential book can you recommend? “100 years of solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez ”The Ascent of Money” by Nial Furguson ●What are some of the preferred exercises that you like to do to stay active? Running and Sailing. News Corner https://blog.helium.com/more-than-a-data-point-norada-brings-elderly-care-to-the-peoples-network-f75d7e579fed As most of us know, demand for elderly care services continues to climb higher as each new generation lives longer than the previous one. Norada Corporation has teamed up with Helium, also known as the People's Network, to enhance communications between at-home elderly care managers, seniors, and care givers. Norada solves this challenge by irradicating the need for a smartphone. Instead, as each caregiver completes their service, they tap a button on their ID badge to automatically log location details to the central cloud database using asset tracking technology from Abeeway. To make all of this possible, Norada needed a long-range IoT wireless network, and Helium fit the bill perfectly. As the fastest-growing wireless network, The People's Network enables cost efficiencies of only $1 per badge per year. Health Unchained Links Website: healthunchained.org Telegram: t.me/healthunchained Twitter: twitter.com/Healthunchaind

Patrick Boyle On Finance
The Pandora Papers - Everything You Need To Know!

Patrick Boyle On Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:47


Revelations from nearly 12 million leaked confidential financial records have thrown light on the concealed wealth of powerful public figures around the world. How do they hide their money, and why is this information important? The Pandora Papers were released this week showing that Jordan's King - Abdullah II amassed $100 million in property including homes in The United States and London. An alleged mistress of Vladimir Putin, Russia's leader managed to covertly buy a luxury residence in Monaco. Tony & Cherie Blair used a company structure avoiding paying Stamp duty on their London home. The Czech Republic's prime minister, an anticorruption crusader, secretly acquired a French Riviera estate.Revelations from the Pandora Papers report, a collaboration by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and media partners that include The Washington Post and The Guardian, began reverberating through and beyond the financial world of the rich and powerful almost immediately after the authors started releasing them on Sunday.  In Today's video we look at what data was released, and to what extent does it matter.  We Discuss why wealthy individuals have moved their wealth into South Dakota Trusts and away from Switzerland and The Cayman Islands.Patrick's Books:Statistics For The Trading Floor:  https://amzn.to/3eerLA0Derivatives For The Trading Floor:  https://amzn.to/3cjsyPFCorporate Finance:  https://amzn.to/3fn3rvC Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/PatrickBoyleOnFinanceVisit our website: www.onfinance.orgFollow Patrick on Twitter Here: https://twitter.com/PatrickEBoylePatrick Boyle On Finance YouTube Channel Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/PatrickBoyleOnFinance)

Ten Thousand Worlds
The Family Altar Audio Devotional - Day 281

Ten Thousand Worlds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 5:00


But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ. Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ, And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith: That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death; (Philipians 3:7-10) 73 If anything turned me the first time against my—made me ashamed of America, was…I was in Switzerland one day, and Brother Arganbright and I had found a good place way down by Lausanne where we could get a big, fine steak, about so big around, weigh about three-quarters of a pound, I think, for around thirty cents in American money. Oh, we were living like kings! Every day we'd go down there. And all of them there drink wine, you know; their water's no good. And I wouldn't drink that wine, so I got me a little jug from the—a drugstore that had distilled water. And I packed that jug wherever I went. I guess everybody thought, “That boy carries his own brand.” So I had it in my hand. We went down there to this place where all the—selling these steaks, and one day Miss America drove up. About a '28 model Chevy, had a poodle dog setting on the lap and brought that in there, and she had enough…Them two women had enough ten cent store jewelry, great big, long things, and earrings, and hanging way down, and paint; and both of them fifty years old, as old as me. And you'd thought they wanted to be fifteen. But what are they trying to do? They're trying to drive life's road looking through a rear-view mirror, looking back to what they used to be. 74 Now, Christian don't do that. A Christian don't try to be what he used to be; he's not looking where he's been, he's looking where he's going. See, see? Don't pay no attention to what you was then; you've done lived that out. You'll never return to it; that's in the past. And any man that drives life's road looking through a rear-view mirror will go to wreck; and so will you on this Christian road. Don't look back what you was, look what you're going to be. Paul said, “Forgetting those things which are in the past, I press towards the mark of the high calling.” 75 Now, but it made you ashamed. They brought this little, old stinking dog in there and set it upon the table! Now, that would make anybody vomit! And fooling with that dog right there, setting it right up there with their hands, and then going to eat with them same hands! And the waiter come over there, and blabbed off something. Dr. Guggenbuhl was with me; he started laughing, and turned his head. I said, “What's—what'd say?” Said, “The waiter said, ‘Take that off!'” They said, “No, she's an American; let her alone.” In other words, “She don't know any better.” See? 64-0823e - "Questions And Answers #2" Rev. William Marrion Branham ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Order your own copy of the Family Altar at http://store.bibleway.org Appreciate what we do? Consider supporting us: https://anchor.fm/ten-thousand-worlds/support --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ten-thousand-worlds/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ten-thousand-worlds/support

New Books Network
Caitlin Donohue Wylie, "Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work Behind the Scenes" (MIT Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:55


Those awe-inspiring dinosaur skeletons on display in museums do not spring fully assembled from the earth. Technicians known as preparators have painstakingly removed the fossils from rock, repaired broken bones, and reconstructed missing pieces to create them. These specimens are foundational evidence for paleontologists, and yet the work and workers in fossil preparation labs go largely unacknowledged in publications and specimen records. In Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work Behind the Scenes (MIT Press, 2021), Caitlin Wylie investigates the skilled labor of fossil preparators and argues for a new model of science that includes all research work and workers. Drawing on ethnographic observations and interviews, Wylie shows that the everyday work of fossil preparation requires creativity, problem-solving, and craft. She finds that preparators privilege their own skills over technology and that scientists prefer to rely on these trusted technicians rather than new technologies. Wylie examines how fossil preparators decide what fossils, and therefore dinosaurs, look like; how labor relations between interdependent yet hierarchically unequal collaborators influence scientific practice; how some museums display preparators at work behind glass, as if they were another exhibit; and how these workers learn their skills without formal training or scientific credentials. The work of preparing specimens is a crucial component of scientific research, although it leaves few written traces. Wylie argues that the paleontology research community's social structure demonstrates how other sciences might incorporate non-scientists into research work, empowering and educating both scientists and nonscientists. The open access edition of this book was made possible by generous funding from Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1232: Audi: EV Close To Profitability Of Fossil Cars | 08 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:29


Show #1238 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Friday 8th October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. REPORT: NIO TO ENTER GERMANY Q4 2022 Matthias Schmidt @auto_schmidt "China's electric car manufacturer, Nio, will enter the German market from Q4 2022, their European spokesperson confirms" AUDI EVS CLOSE TO SAME PROFIT MARGINS AS COMBUSTION "Audi, which accounted for more than a quarter of Volkswagen's first-half operating profit, has embarked on an ambitious shift towards battery-powered vehicles, meaning all new models it will release from 2026 will be fully electric." says Reuters: "Meantime, production of internal combustion engines will be gradually phased out up to 2033. Audi's CFO in August said it would only take 2-3 years before profitability of electric vehicles (EV) would match that of combustion engine cars. [Markus] Duesmann thinks this could happen even more quickly." according to the Audi Chief Executive: "Apart from efforts to challenge Tesla (TSLA.O) and become the biggest seller of EVs, Volkswagen, the world's No.2 carmaker, is also doubling down on efforts to develop software, which CEO Herbert Diess said is the industry's real gamechanger." Duesmann: ""The point where we earn as much money with electric cars as with combustion engine cars is now, or ... next year, 2023. They are very even now, the prices" https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/audi-ceo-sees-chip-shortage-perfect-storm-will-get-through-it-2021-10-04/ 144,000 ID.3 ORDERS RECEIVED – 50 PERCENT FROM NEW VOLKSWAGEN CUSTOMERS Strong performance of the all-electric Volkswagen ID.3 after its first year in the European market.  By the end of September, the car had already been ordered around 144,000 times in Europe – 50 percent of buyers had not driven a Volkswagen before and were new to the brand, found a study commissioned by the company. For comparison: On average, the ratio of new customers for other Volkswagen models is around 36 percent. In the first half of 2021, the strong demand for the ID.3 and other ID. models made Volkswagen the market leader for battery-electric vehicles in Europe within a very short time. In August, the car was the most popular electric car in many markets including Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Austria and Switzerland. Based on new registrations, the ID.3 also ranked top in Western Europe overall in August. In order to meet the strong demand, some 1,200 of the best-selling electric cars are leaving the production lines in Zwickau and Dresden every day, with Zwickau operating three shifts on both production lines. Moreover, production for the local market has started in Anting in China – the car will be launched on the Chinese market in the fall of this year. Read more: https://www.volkswagen-newsroom.com/en/press-releases/volkswagen-gains-some-70000-new-customers-with-best-selling-id3-in-the-first-year-7536 AUDI E-TRON SPORTBACK FACELIFT SPOTTED UNDER LIGHT CAMO "Audi has been selling the E-Tron, its first ground-up electric SUV, since 2018, so it was already in need of a mid lifecycle refresh. Our spies just sent us the first photos of what appears to be the facelifted E-Tron in its coupe-like Sportback version wearing some camouflage that shows us where the manufacturer made changes." says InsideEVs: "Looking through the photos, we notice that the front end of the vehicle is getting a completely revised fascia, along with new headlights, a new bumper and new grille (most of which was hidden but it does look different). Audi also added camouflage that extends back onto the front fenders and side skirts, so we presume there are some changes hiding under there as well. We're expecting to see the updated Audi E-Tron Sportback (as well as the more traditional non-Sportback model) debut sometime next year; in the US they will be sold as 2023 model-year and it looks like the model's popularity has been increasing in the second quarter of 2021." Read more: https://insideevs.com/news/538900/audi-etron-facelift-spy-photos/ VOLTA TRUCKS EXPANDS UK TEAM "The Swedish electric truck start-up Volta Trucks wants to expand its research and development team in the UK to accelerate the development of the Volta Zero. The company is therefore launching a recruitment drive with the aim of employing more than 280 people by the end of 2021." says electrive: "Currently, Volta Trucks says it has over 150 employees, up from a “handful” at the beginning of the year. Volta is currently looking for industrial and commercial experts, but above all for “talented and forward-thinking engineers”. Seventy positions have been advertised." Earlier in September, Volta Trucks had announced that series production of the Zero would start at Steyr Automotive in Austria. The first examples are to be used in pilot fleets in Paris and London." Read more: https://www.electrive.com/2021/10/05/volta-trucks-expands-uk-team/ THE FIRST KIA EV6 ON NORWEGIAN SOIL "Today the first EV6 left in Norway from the vessel "Morning Lily" in the port of Drammen. There are high expectations for the new Kia electric crossover that has finally made its way to Norway. " says Wataha.no: "awaiting the cars. As planned, the first cars will be delivered at the end of October. There are also demonstration cars on board for many dealers. So some customers will be able to book a test drive soon. Later this year, there will be more such vehicles to more dealers." Read more: https://wataha.no/en/2021/10/04/the-first-kia-ev6-on-norwegian-soil/ TESLA HAS RAISED PRICES AGAIN "After a flurry of price increases in the first half of the year, Tesla held vehicle prices in the United States relatively steady throughout the third quarter, only adjusting the base price of the Model S and Model X back in August. Now, days into the fourth quarter, Tesla has continued the earlier trend of price increases on the Model 3 and Model Y." writes The Street.com: "Model 3 Standard Range Plus increased by $2,000 to $41,990. Model 3 Performance increased by $1,000 to $57,990. Model Y Long Range increased by $1,000 to $54,990. Model Y Performance increased by $1,000 to $61,990. Due to Tesla's order backlog, it's likely that Q2 did not reflect the full impact of those price changes. Investors may get an even better understanding when Tesla reports third quarter earnings, expected on Monday, October 25th." We started the year with a SR+ costing $37,990. That's $4000 more, and $5000 more for Model Y Long Range. https://www.thestreet.com/tesla/news/tesla-has-raised-prices-again-here-are-the-changes-tsla MODEL Y MADE IN CHINA GETS 28 MILE RANGE BOOST  " The Model Y made in China for the local market gets a range increase of up to 28 miles while keeping the same purchase price. According to the company's Chinese website, spotted by @ray4tesla/Twitter, the manufacturer has increased the range of Model Y Long Range and Model Y Performance while car prices have remained the same." says Tesmanian: "Model Y for overseas markets is also expected to receive an increase in range. Tesla recently registered several new Model Y variants, including an export version. There is a possibility that this is the variant with the increased range, in accordance with the updates for Model Y in China." But is it more range, or more reported range? Is it a change to the NEDC testing standards? And WLTP/WLTC should start soon in China.  Could it be a change from the 4.6Ah LG Chem 2170 cells to the 5.0Ah LG Chem cells, so the total pack goes from 75->81kWh? https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-model-y-made-in-china-gets-28-mile-range-increase-while-maintaining-the-same-price TESLA IS BUILDING MODEL Y BODIES WITH SINGLE FRONT AND REAR CASTINGS "In an auto manufacturing first, Tesla has started building Model Y bodies with two giant single casting pieces for the front and back of the electric SUV. Tesla has already been producing the Model Y with a single rear body piece that replaced 70 different parts in the vehicle." says electrek: Earlier this year, a picture of the first single front casting part of the Model Y produced at Gigafactory Texas leaked. Tesla has been wanting to go a step further and joined those two parts with a structural battery pack powered by its new 4680 battery cells unveiled last year. However, the automaker has lately indicated that the integration of the new cells and structural battery pack might not be introduced with the start of Model Y production at the new factories." https://electrek.co/2021/10/05/tesla-building-model-y-bodies-single-front-rear-castings-manufacturing-first FIRST LOOK AT RIVIAN'S “SENTRY MODE” GEAR GUARD FEATURE IN ACTION (VIDEO) "If Tesla owners have Sentry Mode, Rivian owners will have Gear Guard for security. Recently, a Gear Guard buddy was spotted actively working in a seemingly parked Rivian vehicle. " says Teslarati: "A short clip from Twitter user @D_Love revealed Rivian's rather kid-friendly Gear Guard buddy at work while the vehicle's owner is away. The character captured in the short clip was also seen in a Rivian video posted last month. According to Rivian's Director of UX Design Brennan Boblett, owners can activate a suite of security products through Gear Guard.  Gear Guard seems to be an umbrella term for a list of security features. It will most likely use Driver+ hardware installed in all R1 Rivian vehicles, which includes 11 cameras, 12 ultrasonic sensors, five radars, and a high-precision GPS antenna. Rivian has not fully discussed Gear Guard's suite of security features in detail yet." https://www.teslarati.com/rivian-tesla-sentry-mode-gear-guard-video/ NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returned on Sunday 10th October! Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

Women's Liberation Radio News
Edition 66: Lesbian Feminism in Germany

Women's Liberation Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 89:06


Julia Beck took the reigns for this show and delivers both interviews and commentary from Germany to create our program on Lesbian Feminism in Germany. Thanks for tuning in. Today's program will be a bit longer than usual due to packing it with stellar feminist content. First up, hear Jenn Bilek's special report on the Gender Industry. Jenn appeals to listeners to become proactive in our feminism and speak out against the industry that medicalizes children and falsely claims biological sex is on a spectrum. Hear She! Hear She! The 11th Hour Blog has gone global! Thank you Jenn, for this wonderful exclusive report. Next, hear Emliann Lorenzen deliver the world news segment followed by a little snippet of Flying Lesbians doing their song “Wir Sind Die Homosexuellen Frauen” (1975), before gearing up to hear Julia's first interview with Manuela Kay, co-owner of L-Mag, Germany's largest lesbian magazine with readers in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Then hear a sampling of Zuckerklub doing their song “Die Zeit steht still” before hearing another interview Julia did with a German lesbian called Judith. Judith tells us about lesbian culture in the 80's and 90's in Berlin and how it compares to now. On to another snippet of song...this time from Nina Hagen doing “Auf'm Bahnhof Zoo" and then to the third and final interview segment Julia did with Inge Klein, an active member of KOFRA, the communication center for women in Munich, Germany. Inge speaks about abolitionist protests, the role of lesbians in organizing movements, as well as the website “ich hab nicht angezeigt” - (translation “I did not report”) a campaign to break the taboo of reporting sexual violence. Finally, don't miss Julia's report and commentary on German lesbian culture, community and herstory. It is so wonderful for WLRN to have a correspondent in Berlin! Julia! What a life, Sister, Our Sister! Thank you for sharing your studies and love of women's and lesbian culture with us. You are making lesbianism dangerous again! Raw! WLRN is (Y)OUR community-powered feminist radio station in the Femisphere. Thanks for staying tuned. If you like what you're hearing and would like to donate to the cause of feminist-powered radio, please click below and donate generously. Choose a gift in exchange for your donation from our Merch page linked below. Enjoy! https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ULAE4ZHPARLFE https://womensliberationradionews.com/merch/

Cider Chat
291: The Century Farm of Ploughman Cider

Cider Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 54:39


Who is Ploughman Cider Ploughman Cider is based in Wenksville Pennsylvania on a family farm owned by the Wenks Family for the past 100 years. The farm is called Three Springs and it is exactly 1.5 miles from the ancestral farm that started back in 1818 when the first Wenk arrived from Switzerland. Dave Wenk The farm today has dedicated 6 acres to cider specific varieties. In addition the family grow other fruit trees for the fresh fruit market. The farm itself is managed by David Wenk who begins the episode with telling the back story of how the family came to Adams County. You will also hear from his son Ben Wenk who established the cider brand Ploughman. Ben along with cidermaker Edwin Winzeler began selling their ciders in 2016. Ben Wenk The Future looks bright for Ploughman Cider Fans Expect more More Single Varietal Ciders in the cue Tasting Room and Production Facility in Gardners, which is the same town that Big Hill Ciderworks in episode 289 is located. Both cideries are in Adams County which is a magnificent fruit belt with Apple Trees everywhere Contact for Ploughman Cider  Website: https://www.ploughmancider.com Address: 14 Lincoln Square Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 Telephone: (717) 420-2582 Tip of the glass to the following sponsor for this episode 290 Northwest Cider Club - go to https://nwciderclub.com/podcast/ and sign up for the newsletter and next cider box offerings to be delivered directly to your doorstep! Mentions in this Chat 281: Cider Fueled Road Trip to NY and PA ciderGoingUP Campaign page and Sponsors Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving! Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts. Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio , Spotify and wherever you love to listen to podcasts. Follow on Cider Chat's blog, social media and podcast Twitter @ciderchat Instagram: @ciderchatciderville Cider Chat FaceBook Page Cider Chat YouTube

Marketplace All-in-One
How the U.S. became a tax haven for the globe’s wealthy and elite

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:54


Over the weekend, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists broke news about leaked financial documents called the Pandora Papers, which highlighted how the global elite shield their wealth. Dominic Rushe, U.S. business editor at The Guardian, spoke with us about how the documents reveal that some states, principally South Dakota, offer greater protections for offshore money than places like Switzerland or the Cayman Islands. Also on today’s program: A look at the Fed’s debt ceiling playbook, Molly Wood on the Facebook and Instagram outage and ride-hailing apps face competition from an old rival: taxis.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
How the U.S. became a tax haven for the globe’s wealthy and elite

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:54


Over the weekend, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists broke news about leaked financial documents called the Pandora Papers, which highlighted how the global elite shield their wealth. Dominic Rushe, U.S. business editor at The Guardian, spoke with us about how the documents reveal that some states, principally South Dakota, offer greater protections for offshore money than places like Switzerland or the Cayman Islands. Also on today’s program: A look at the Fed’s debt ceiling playbook, Molly Wood on the Facebook and Instagram outage and ride-hailing apps face competition from an old rival: taxis.

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
This Week's Top Stories - Britney Spears Is Free, a Hamster Trades Cryptocurrency & More

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 30:33


Britney Spears's father loses control of her conservatorship, Switzerland legalizes same-sex marriage, and a hamster becomes a superstar among cryptocurrency enthusiasts. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Throwing Shade
AZ does something good? Switzerland passes Gay Marriage and updates on vets affected by 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

Throwing Shade

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 59:36


On this week's ATTITUDES! Erin talks about Arizona's recently passed law making it harder for rapists to request custody. Bryan weighs in on Dancing with the Stars JoJo Siwa making history dancing with a same sex partner, Switzerland becomes the 30th country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage, and a revisiting of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell'. All this plus Popeye, Cybill Shepherd and a LulaRich review!! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.