Podcasts about Inequality

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Best podcasts about Inequality

Show all podcasts related to inequality

Latest podcast episodes about Inequality

The Gareth Cliff Show
How to Solve Inequality

The Gareth Cliff Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 62:41


15.11.22 Pt 1 - Seems like Lebang is going through the most. An audience member had a dream about Gareth, and both Gareth and Simphiwe don't trust Jeff Bezos' announcement of pledging to give away most of his wealth!

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Why men are wholly responsible for unwanted pregnancies

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 18:59


It started with a Tweet in 2018, "men are 100 percent responsible for unwanted pregnancies". Gabrielle Blair believes abortion is not an issue about women controlling their own bodies, it's about men controlling theirs. She's a pro-choice Mormon mother of six who says it's simple biology. Since the Roe V Wade decision that removes the automatic right to an abortion for women in America, she's taken her Tweet to the next level. She lays out 28 arguments for men taking greater responsibility in the abortion debate in her new book, Ejaculate Responsibly: A Whole New Way to Think About Abortion.

The Sociology Show
Interview with Mark Brooks OBE discussing International Men's Day

The Sociology Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 31:36


In this episode, Matthew talks to mark Brooks OBE about International Men's Day which takes place on the 19th November. Mark is a senior policy adviser on men and boys' wellbeing and a national ambassador for International Men's Day UK. You can visit www.ukmensday.org.uk and Marks' personal website is www.mark-brooks.co.uk

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Prof Simon Chadwick: the movement to boycott the Football World Cup

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 12:39


Calls for boycotts of the 2022 FIFA World Cup have been growing from football clubs, supporters and players alike. Host nation Qatar has been accused of using this month's event to gloss over its poor human rights record.

You've Got Lael
Ep 47: Mutual Aid with AJ McCreary and LaQuisha Minneweather

You've Got Lael

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 74:30


Today we are talking about mutual aid. Why? Because I'm wondering if engaging in mutual aid might be a means for healing as well as personal and collective transformation.  See, one thing I frequently hear from people is that they feel powerless to change "the system." They don't know how we can possibly dismantle racism, capitalism, or the patriarchy. They feel like their personal efforts won't ever be enough. I disagree. I believe our personal efforts - our learning, our growing awareness, our shifting beliefs, the conversations we have with our partners and kids and friends, where we invest our money, where we shop or not, the questions we ask at our PTA meetings and places of work - DO make a difference. As we change, we can't help but influence those around us. Rev angel Kyodo Williams says “Without inner change there can be no outer change. Without collective change, no change matters.” So, it's not only our indivudal efforts, but also combined or collective efforts that I am learning can be the pathway for creating a new world. One that doesn't rely on competition, scarcity, urgency, and extraction of energy and labor from every person and plant and animal on the planet.  Think of it another way. Participating in collective change movements might just provide us with the real time "internship" we need to embody the information we are learning intellectually. It is one thing to read articles and share them on social media. It's another to put your coat on, leave the house on a weekend morning, and participate in direct action. It's one thing to read articles and books, it's another to join a community and support each other through mutual aid organizations. Perhaps it is in these spaces that our beliefs and fears can be challenged. Perhaps it is in these spaces of community action and community care that we can begin to experience some hope and believe that a new world order can be created. Together. Each of us matter. All of our small actions when put together do make a difference.  Do not believe the lie that we are powerless. There are more of us than there are of them.  I first learned about mutual aid during the pandemic. I mean, I imagine it was referenced in social work school - but I didn't understand its power or potential until after George Flloyd was murdered. Up until that point, I was not tapped into the networks of care happening right here in my own community. Again, humbling given that I am a social worker by training and trade. (Let this be a reminder that there's no shame in continuing to learn!) Mutual aid came to my awareness as people were organizing to support protestors in Portland in 2020-2021. I learned there were groups of people providing medical care, food, supplies, emotional support and more for front line protestors. I began to follow these groups on social media which led me to learning about other groups and organizations. My curiosity led me to Equitable Giving Circle and MxMBloc. It led me to individuals who were part of mutual aid movements providing support to people in need. Support like housing, food, transportation, bills, clothing, healthcare advocacy and more. Regular community members, like me, sharing their resources, money, time, gifts and talents to support those who had fallen through the cracks, who have been pushed to the margins, and/or on the front lines fighting for freedom and safety for all of us. I've also been learning how much of what ails us - feelings of disconnection, disillusionment, restlessness, depression, low-grade anxiety - can be related to believing the myth of the american dream. If you are like me, you were raised to believe (consciously or unconsciously) that if you did certain things - like getting good grades, going to college, getting a good job with benefits, starting a savings, getting married (to someone of the opposite sex of course), buying a home, having kids - you would be happy, successful, safe and at peace. You would have arrived! Yay! If that's true - why are there so many of us who followed that path that feel empty? Many reasons, yes - but one thread I keep following is how this myth of the american dream excludes the reality that we are all connected. That none of us got where we are alone. That we need each other. We are wired to be in relationship to each other. And because of this, we really cannot be at peace until we reconnt. Community connection and care is the antidote. This is where mutual aid comes in.  It's not charity.  Its not simply donating money. It's coming together to support and build a new way of being. is exactly what those in power tell us will never work. It's realizing that we are all in this mess and beauty together and that we need each other to find our way out. There is something deeply satisfying to our souls to be in community and reciprocity together. It is what those in power want us to believe will never work.  We disagree. As Margaret Mead said, “Never underestimate the power of a small group of committed people to change the world. In fact, it is the only thing that ever has.” A bit about our guests: AJ McCreary, a lifelong Portlander, a light bright or a very light Black woman, she is a community maverick, artist, curator, solo Mama, and change maker who has been working locally for 15 years. Before most titles and labels she is an artist, while being classically trained she has spent most of her artistic energy the last few years pouring into her son who is an art prodigy both visually and in dance, particularly ballet. Weaved in her activism work, it is always art, may it be flowers, abstract painting, photography, or charcoal drawings. She specializes in marketing strategies and fundraising through an Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion lens; AJ has brought her skills to such organizations as Steps PDX, MxM Bloc, and Race Talks. AJ is one of the co-founders and is the ED of Equitable Giving Circle, an org that was born out of a desire to create a model of resource distribution that is not rooted in white supremacy and transactional giving. Her day to day work shows up loudly in her creative endeavors and tend to be an informed dance back and forth. AJ is deeply passionate about mutual aid and giving with no strings attached; her work in both the arts and through community is rooted in a desire to create beauty and sovereignty for everyone. AJ's bachelor in African American history and, equally as important, her lived experience coming from a working class, interracial family in North Portland has informed the full range of her work. About LaQuisha: Activist, business owner, fundraiser, and proud Black mother of three—LaQuisha Minnieweather (she/her) believes that social justice begins with community connections. As co-founder of MxMBlocPDX and Tenacious Rose, community based groups serving marginalized families in Portland, OR, she centers Black leadership while coordinating efforts to serve our most vulnerable neighbors.  From cooking and packaging meals for houseless-youth camps and Free Fridges, to creating safe havens for mothers and children, LaQuisha inspires and mobilizes diverse communities in order to create positive, sustainable change. RESOURCES Equitable Giving Circle MxMBloc PDX Tenacious Rose PDX Spirited Justice Rose City Justice Brown Hope Article: Solidarity, Not Charity: Mutual Aid's An-archic History by Jennifer Gammage Book: Mutual Aid: Building Solidarity During This Crisis (and the Next) by Dean Spade Book: White Space, Black Hood: Opportunity Hoarding and Segregation in the Age of Inequality by Sheryll Cashin A Visual History of Mutual Aid by Ariel Aberg-Riger Video: The History and Impact of Mutual Aid by Tyesha Maddox, PhD

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Dunedin bedding bank overwhelmed by the need in the community

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 9:04


Janine Walker started up the Dunedin bedding bank in August. Since then she's been overwhelmed by the need in the community, and is already wondering how they'll get through winter next year. 

RNZ: Checkpoint
Whangārei teen campaigns for breakfast for students

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 3:56


A Whangārei Girls High School student is asking Parliament to help feed about 300 peers she says are turning up without any food, each day. Ocean Bishop-Karanga believes the equity criteria used to deliver the Ka Ora, Ka Ako Healthy School Lunches Programme, is missing some of the people who need it most. Katie Todd has the story.

The New Statesman Podcast
“It's inequality, stupid.” With Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

The New Statesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 38:04


The writer, satirist and broadcaster Armando Iannucci, returns to the New Statesman Podcast to co-host our third series of Westminster Reimagined. In six special episodes Iannucci explores parts of British public life he believes to be broken, and is joined by guests from inside and outside Westminster to work out how to fix things. In this episode, Iannucci and Anoosh Chakelian, the New Statesman's Britain editor, examine why in Britain the rich are richer and the poor are poorer than in other European countries. The income gap is the largest it has been in ten years, food-bank use has doubled since 2014 and nearly a third of low-income families are unable to heat their homes; meanwhile the richest 1 per cent of households in the UK are worth £3.6 million each. Special guests for the episode Dominic Watters, a social worker living on the breadline who campaigns against food insecurity and wrote Social Distance in Social Work: Covid Capsule One, and Adrienne Buller, director of research at the Common Wealth think tank and author of The Value of a Whale. The panel discusses living in fuel and food deserts, how hostility toward the “undeserving poor” is baked into the welfare system, and whether a minister for income inequality might be one potential solution. Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Earth Wise
Carbon Inequality | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 2:00


Everyone contributes to climate change through the generation of greenhouse gas emissions, but individual contributions vary greatly.   A study at the Paris School of Economics has determined that just 1 percent of the population is responsible for nearly a quarter of global carbon emissions growth since 1990. The study estimated emissions from individuals' consumption and […]

Rádio Escafandro
79: Os pobres de direita e o futuro da política

Rádio Escafandro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 45:53


Se a esquerda é a ideologia que mais se preocupa com os pobres, por que existem pobres de direita? No decorrer da história, inspirados sobretudo pelas teorias marxistas, boa parte dos pensadores de esquerda têm atribuído este fenômeno à manipulação e à desinformação. As classes dominantes manipulam os meios de comunicação e a opinião pública e usam ferramentas diversas para fazer as classes oprimidas acreditarem em narrativas relacionadas à meritocracia, ao estado mínimo e à liberdade de mercado. Recentemente, contudo, uma área de estudos chamada neurociência política, ou biopolítica empírica tem apontado em outra direção. Esse campo de estudos une elementos de sociologia, psicologia e neurociência. E tem mostrado que, além dos componentes culturais e históricos na inclinação ideológica, existem também componentes biológicos e genéticos. Entrevistado do episódio Davi Carvalho Cientista social, divulgador científico e doutorando em Ciência Política na Unicamp, com estágio doutoral no Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior - CB3 da Universidade de Nebraska-Lincoln, EUA. Criador do perfil do canal do YouTube e perfil do Instagram Política na Cabeça. Episódios relacionados 71: Por que votam no mito? 76: Os últimos comunistas Mergulhe mais fundo Sobre o conservadorismo aumentar com a desigualdade: Inequality and the Dynamics of Public Opinion: The Self-Reinforcing Link Between Economic Inequality and Mass Preferences Estudo sobre inclinação ideológica usando polígrafo: Political A olitical Attitudes V ttitudes Vary with Physiological T y with Physiological Traits Estudo sobre inclinação ideológica usando monitoramento do movimento ocular: The political left rolls with the good and the political right confronts the bad: connecting physiology and cognition to preferences Estudo sobre preferências políticas entre gêmeos: Are Political Orientations Genetically Transmitted? Ficha técnica Trilha sonora tema: Paulo Gama, Mixagem: João Victor Coura Design das capas: Cláudia Furnari Concepção, roteiro, e edição: Tomás Chiaverini

Please Explain
Rate rises, house prices and Australia's inequality problem

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 17:52


The reserve bank has raised interest rates again this week, taking them to a nine-year high. The rise will further increase the cost of mortgages, and hit the most vulnerable borrowers the hardest: the younger households that have struggled to get into the housing market. Culture news editor and columnist for The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald, Osman Faruqi joins digital foreign editor Chris Zappone to discuss how generational inequality has become exposed by the RBA's latest moves. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sociology Show
Interview with Chris Waugh on the topic of masculinity

The Sociology Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 38:18


In this episode, Matthew talks to Chris Waugh. Chris is a final year PhD student in Sociology at the University of Manchester. His research explores masculinity, anti-sexism and activist culture in radical left wing movements in the UK. His research has been published by Palgrave Macmillan, and he lectures in Sociology and Criminology, at the University of Manchester and the University of Law. He tweets on @classwaugh and is contactable on Chris.Waugh-2@manchester.ac.uk

RNZ: Checkpoint
Many workers with disabilities still paid $5 an hour on average

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 7:11


Three years after the government announced it would scrap minimum wage exemptions and replace them with a wage subsidy, some disabled workers are still earning an average of just $5 an hour. Information obtained by Checkpoint from the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment shows there are 169 disabled workers with the exemption. Under the Minimum Wage Act businesses can apply for an exemption to pay an employee with a dissability less than the minimum wage, on the basis they're less productive. Louise Ternouth and Nick Monro have the story.

Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
Evolution w/ Joseph L. Graves Jr

Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 68:36


In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara is joined by evolutionary biologist and geneticist Dr. Joseph L. Graves Jr. to talk about his new book, "A Voice in the Wilderness: A Pioneering Biologist Explains How Evolution Can Help Us Solve Our Biggest Problems." They discuss his incredible career, beginning as the first African American to earn a PhD in evolutionary biology, and continuing in the fight against racial and gender inequity in the sciences and society at large.

Viewpoints
African Americans in WWII

Viewpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 9:34


More than 1.3 million African Americans served as part of the U.S. military and helped with war efforts during WWII. Yet rarely is this population ever fairly represented in blockbuster movies or TV shows about this era. Matthew Delmont, a history professor at Dartmouth College, joins us this week to shed some light on the contributions of African Americans who stepped up and served despite the discrimination, bias and violence they faced. Learn More: https://viewpointsradio.org/african-americans-in-wwii/

Real Health Radio: Ending Diets | Improving Health | Regulating Hormones | Loving Your Body

The post Rebroadcast: Health Inequality appeared first on Seven Health: Intuitive Eating and Anti Diet Nutritionist.

Alchemize Life
John "Badass Vegan" Lewis | Fueling Your Body, Fasting, Food Inequality & Creating Positive Change | Episode 22

Alchemize Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 95:11


Are you willing to work on yourself, become the best version of yourself & impact the world positively? In this episode, John "Badass Vegan" Lewis guides people on how to shift their mindset and enjoy the health benefits of a plant-based lifestyle. He inspires others to think differently about their food choices and live their best life. John points out that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to the vegan lifestyle, and people should find what works best for them. He emphasizes the importance of daily self-talk and accountability, and how this can help to build a positive self-image. Tune in and uncover why loving yourself is the key to it all! John Lewis aka the Badass Vegan is a serial entrepreneur, an icon in the Vegan Movement, an author, speaker, filmmaker & much more! Key Highlights: [00:01 - 15:22] Opening Segment The analogy of drugs and processed food John's entrepreneurial journey  The Badass Vegan Understanding the importance of networking [15:23 - 30:12] The Impact of Your Dietary Choices John and Justin's outlook on p90x What Bad Ass Vegan did and does now Empowering people to take control and live their best lives How John became vegan [30:13 - 46:38] The Vegan Lifestyle Why do people give up on the vegan lifestyle? Find the vegan version of your favorite meals Introducing the book Badass Vegan: Fuel Your Body, Ph*ck the System, and Live Your Life Right Concentrate on the small things to make the bigger picture easier [46:39 - 1:00:40] Feeling in Love with Food You can eat tasty food and still be in shape Breaking down the old stereotype The importance of finding what your vegan lifestyle looks like John's advice for people who want to start fasting [1:00:42- 1:20:12] The Lens of Hip Hop & Urban Culture Your body needs to stay in motion Your brain thinks better when you move They're Trying to Kill Us - The documentary [1:20:13 -1:35:27] Closing Segment John talks about his upcoming app John's Fit Rich Vegan life Connect with John through Instagram, Facebook & TikTok. Visit his website, be cool and still be a vegan! Key Quotes: “To go Vegan, there is no special club, there's no entry fee, there is no application.” - John Lewis “Just because you live a healthy life doesn't mean you can't enjoy being healthy.” - John Lewis “Humans are such perfectionists that they don't want to try anything because they're so used to the old thing, and no matter how bad that old thing is for them, it's comfortable.” - John Lewis Resources Mentioned: Badass Vegan: Fuel Your Body, Ph*ck the System, and Live Your Life Right WANT TO LEARN MORE? Follow my personal website: https://alchemizelife.com/ Follow my Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook, Youtube, & Twitter Show Notes: www.alchemizelife.com/podcast/ Sponsors: Are you ready to get in the best shape of your life, double your income, and 10x your savings/investments? I'm incredibly passionate about fitness & money and have reached a strong degree of mastery in these domains and built an incredible coaching program to help you. Head to www.fitrichvegan.com, sign up for a Free Consultation, or DM me on Instagram with the words "Fit Rich Vegan" to discover if it'd be a good fit for you! For something like you've never had before and to get into an almost euphoric state of Focused Flow & Productivity, try Feel Free by Botanic Tonics! Go to www.botanictonics.com and use code DRAGON to save 40% off your first order! If you desire to lead a happy, healthy, fit life, go to www.vedgenutrition.com/dragon, and grab all of your key supplements. Use the code DRAGON and get 15% off! I often get asked what my favorite Vegan Protein Bars are for when I'm on the go and without a doubt, they are the No Cow Protein Bars which have THE BEST MACROS out there -- High Protein with great amount of Fiber to keep you feeling full & Low-Fat (most protein bars & actually Fat Bars in disguise). The newly released "Dipped" Now Cow Protein Bars taste so good! Use code DRAGON to save 15% on all of your orders. Thanks for tuning in!   If you liked my show, LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW, like, share, and subscribe!

EWA Radio
Increasing Inequality: How 'Ivy-Plus' Colleges Are Part of the Problem

EWA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 25:25


Evan Mandery, an award-winning author of eight books, talks to EWA Public Editor Kavitha Cardoza about the staggering inequality in "Ivy-plus" higher education institutions.  In his latest book, “Poison Ivy: How Elite Colleges Divide Us,” Mandery argues that colleges like Harvard, Yale and Princeton have deep, structural problems that help develop and maintain an “apartheid education system" that close off opportunities to low-income students, he explains. Mandery says elite colleges being a force for good is a myth. He writes, “It's as misleading as those television commercials from Shell and other energy giants that advertise their commitment to clean energy alternatives – not a lie exactly, but fundamentally misleading.” Additionally, Mandery talks about the shocking statistics that made him realize things were far worse than he thought. He also explains why he no longer goes to his Harvard reunions and why he's hopeful things can change.

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Wendell Pierce On The Timeless Themes Of Inequality In "Death of a Salesman"

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:56 Very Popular


Wendell Pierce stars in a new Broadway production of "Death of a Salesman," in which his character Willy Loman is African American, serving to heighten the play's message about institutional violence and the unattainable American Dream. "Death of a Salesman" is playing now at the Hudson Theater. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cato Daily Podcast
Evaluating California's Progress on Poverty and Inequality

Cato Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:17


Cato's Project on Poverty and Inequality in California is a year old, so how has the Golden State changed in that time? Cato's Michael Tanner comments. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Capital Record
Episode 89: Inequality in Math and Honesty with Phil Gramm

Capital Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 48:47 Very Popular


A Bit More Complicated
Episode 13 - How inequality gets under the skin with Dr. Keely Muscatell

A Bit More Complicated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 52:59


In the beginning of the episode we discuss the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion policy from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP): https://spsp.org/events/demonstrating-our-commitment-anti-racism-through-programming-and-events We reference a statement written by Jonathan Haidt and Lee Jussim complaining about this policy: https://unsafescience.substack.com/p/mandatory-diversity-equity-and-inclusion Finally, we quickly discuss a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS): https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2210412119 Dr. Muscatell's TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpCvLXtMqiw&ab_channel=TEDxTalks Social status and stress: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/57d17e77b8a79bfa4e31641d/t/5e8e35ba40223918dabc35e5/1586378180841/Cundiff%2C+Boylan%2C+Muscatell_2020_Current+Directions.pdf Social status and inflammation: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814496/

Keen On Democracy
Nicholas Dawidoff: How the Story of a 2006 Murder Captures the Tragic Complexity of Inequality, Class, and Violence in 21st-Century America

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 39:25


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Nicholas Dawidoff, author of The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice, and the American City. Nicholas Dawidoff is the critically acclaimed author of five books, including The Catcher Was a Spy and In the Country of a Country. He is a Pulitzer Prize finalist and has also been a Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, and Art for Justice Fellow. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Love Anarchy
Ep. 67 - Inequality, Marriage & Parenting

Love Anarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 46:50


Even in the 21st century, while strides have been made in affording women the opportunity to pursue an education and a career, there are still remains a major imbalance in parenting responsibility. Andrea and her Guest Maria Yakimchuk discuss the enormous burden that is placed on women to be the primary caretaker in families. This along with postpartum depression, anxiety and past trauma emerging is something not discussed in our culture. Many couples new to the pressures of child rearing are unaware of the need to discuss and how to create an equitable parenting plan. Website:https://loveanarchypodcast.buzzsprout.comFacebook@LoveAnarchyPodcast

Free Range with Mike Livermore
Jonathan Colmer on Environmental Inequality

Free Range with Mike Livermore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 61:34


On this episode of Free Range, Mike Livermore speaks with Jonathan Colmer, an Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia's Department of Economics and the Director of the Environmental Inequality Lab. His research interests are in environmental economics, development economics, and the distributional impacts of environmental policy. Colmer begins by discussing a recent paper of his that examines the distributional characteristics of air pollution in the United States and how they have changed over time. Tracking exposure temporally and spatially, they concluded that while there have been air pollution reductions in the last four decades, the disparities have persisted in the same affected areas. (0:40 – 4:15) Livermore and Colmer discuss the implications of this work for understanding environmental inequality. Colmer explains that the proportional reductions have implications on the allocation of resources we expend on reducing pollution. He also note that reducing total pollution levels also reduces absolute disparities of racial gaps in air pollution. (4:16 – 13:00) Livermore notes that addressing harms in areas with the highest pollution concentrations would provide the cheapest reductions and the most harm reduction benefits. The two discuss different policies to cut pollution and their distributional effects. (13:02 – 18:35) Colmer notes that one limitation of his prior work is that they are measuring place rather than individual exposure. The Environmental Inequality Lab, which he directs, has the goal of moving from a place-based to a person-based understanding of environmental inequality. The lab is building a data infrastructure that provides detailed information on the distribution of exposure from many different environmental hazards. Colmer explains how they use confidential data from the U.S. Census Bureau and I.R.S. to deeper understand environmental inequality and the causes of these disparities. (18:40 – 26:15) Livermore and Colmer discuss the idea of ecological fallacy in Colmer's research, observing whether or not the inferences made about individuals using place-based data still hold strong when they move to the individual level. (26:20 – 30:57) Colmer discusses the questions that arise about the causes of these air pollution disparities from an economic standpoint – is it income? Is it racial discrimination or other considerations? He discusses work in progress that shows how results on disparities differ between geographic-level results and individual-level results. (31:02 – 40:55) The conversation segues from discussing the descriptive to the causal relationships with pollution. Colmer discusses a core causal question they are examining: how much does environmental inequality contribute to income inequality? (40:56 – 56:35) Livermore closes the discussion by pointing out how historically, we focus on the primary benefit of air quality improvements by the reduction of mortality risk which affects a small concentrated category of people. However, the work Colmer is doing focuses on effects that are more widely shared over a larger population, which may have important consequences for how policies that address environmental pollution are perceived. (56:36 – 1:01:18)

The Fix with Michelle King
Colleen Ammerman: 3 Workplace Biases That Derail Midcareer Women

The Fix with Michelle King

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 24:26


In today's episode of The Fix, we are going to unpack the specific challenges that women face at the midpoint in their careers, with Coleen Ammerman, the director of the 'Gender Initiative' at Harvard Business School and coauthor, with Boris Groysberg, of 'Glass Half-Broken: Shattering the Barriers That Still Hold Women Back at Work'. Colleen shares why the barriers to women's advancement at work are greatest around the midpoint in their careers. Inequality is particularly challenging for women managers because of the continued acceptance and denial of negative gender norms at work. For example, according to one study outlined in Michelle's book, 'The FIX: How to Overcome the Invisible Barriers That Are Holding Women Back at Work', about 82% of the 350 male CEOs surveyed agree that the key barrier women face at work is a lack of general or supervisory experience. However, only 47% of the 461 female leaders surveyed agree that this is a key barrier. This difference comes down to the widely held belief, established through the patriarchy and that women are simply less capable than men. This shows up when men say things like “She needs more time to round out her experience” or even “She needs more time to prove herself”, about women who are just as experienced as their male colleagues. Experience is not the issue here. Women must overcome the widespread belief that they are just not as competent as men. Colleen explains the scrutiny women encounter at the midpoint in their careers when it comes to performance. During our discussion, Colleen shares with us some key actions she believes we need to take to remove the barriers women face at work.   Action One: Acknowledge that inequality is a workplace issue. We need to fix the processes and systems that create inequality by removing the biases in how companies hire, develop, reward and promote women.   Action Two: We need managers to be committed to being objective and making decisions which both recognize and remove their own biases. This starts with leaders becoming aware of how their beliefs about competence and leadership could negatively impact the judgments they make about women at work.   Action Three: You have the power to advocate for yourself and your colleagues. When decisions are made in your workplace about women or minorities that limits them or their advancement, always ask why. Why is this requirement used for promotion decisions? Why are we not asking the same of men? Why do women need to do more to be considered for a promotion? Why can't mothers lead? Why are there so few women leaders in our organization? If you are ever unsure about whether to ask why or whether the situation is an example of an invisible barrier, consider if the situation is something a man is likely to experience. Would men's promotability be limited if they got married? Is a man's leadership capability questioned when he becomes a father? If the answer is no, then push back. Keep asking why until the real problem surfaces.   Colleen Ammerman Glass Half-Broken: Shattering the Barriers That Still Hold Women Back at Work. 

Truth Caviar
Victimhood, Identity Politics, War on Merit and Excellence, National Decline

Truth Caviar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 72:54


Victimhood is America's currency of the day. There are fake victims everywhere---from Jussie Smollett to Naomi Osaka to Rachel Dolezal to Michelle Obama to Stacey Abrams. Victimhood is the fastest path to garner sympathy, and to use that sympathy to greater money and influence in America today. There's a difference between victimhood and hardship. Everyone encounters hardship. But one chooses to be a victim.Victimhood breeds mediocrity, incompetence, economic disaster, and national decline. Victimhood and identity politics are tools used by elites to avoid accountability. All empires eventually fall. Some are defeated by foreign enemies; some are debased by domestic greed and power.The downward spiral of victimhood leads nowhere good---to a country where identity groups subjugate each other depending on who's in power. Victimhood breeds more victimhood as groups try to stick it to their so-called oppressors. That's not equality. That's not freedom. That's tyranny masquerading as social justice.Our society is corrupted by Orwellian use of language used by the ruling class to gaslight us. Conformity is "diversity." Inequality is "equity." Racism is "anti-racism." Exclusion is "inclusion." These linguistic lies are used to disempower individuals and empower woke elites and totalitarians.We discuss and connect the dots on victimhood, identity politics, merit, excellence, and the future of the country.No bias. No fear. Just hard truths.Substack: https://truthcaviar.substack.comTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/truthcaviarInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/truthcaviarRumble: https://rumble.com/user/TruthCaviarYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFNODTlmM_KykW1G6JTF6swBuy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/truthcaviarGoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-us-make-a-world-a-better-placeVadim's Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/stat4realBrent's Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bmeastwoodBrent's book: https://amzn.to/3dmrVdkNation of Victims book: https://amzn.to/3CWxGIq Support the show

RNZ: Morning Report
50th anniversary of Equal Pay Act

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 7:15


The day was October 20, 1972. Parliament passed the Equal Pay Act, a move met with jubilation by those lobbying for equality. But 50 years on, those celebrations are largely muted. Māori, Pasifika, women and those with disabilities continue to be underpaid. Women's liberation movement in New Zealand leader Sue Kedgley, and Mind the Gap spokesperson Dellwyn Stuart spoke to Guyon Espiner.  

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Why modern males are not doing well

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 26:16


The boys are not alright. As a scholar who focuses on equality and opportunity at the Brookings Institute, Richard Reeve knew it.  . He uses data to layout the issues and solutions in his new book.

Let's Appreciate
Cathie Wood & Clay Gardner - The Challenge of Democratizing Finance

Let's Appreciate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 29:49


So what does democratizing VC really mean? Full interview here: https://fintwitsummit.com 00:00 - Intro 01:09 - Democratizing VC 05:16 - Retail Investors 07:51 - Fee Structure 10:26 - Inequality 14:24 - Optimism 17:35 - Founders 21:34 - Personal Outlooks 25:02 - Macro 29:24 - Bye! Blog: https://kyla.substack.com Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kylascanlon/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@kylascan? Twitter: https://twitter.com/kylascan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kylascan/?h... All materials in these videos are used for educational purposes and fall within the guidelines of fair use. No copyright infringement intended. If you are or represent the copyright owner of materials used in this video and have a problem with the use of said material, please send me an email, kyla.scanlon@outlook.com DISCLAIMER: This video does not provide investment or economic advice and is not professional advice (legal, accounting, tax). The owner of this content is not an investment advisor. Discussion of any securities, trading, or markets is incidental and solely for entertainment purposes. Nothing herein shall constitute a recommendation, investment advice, or an opinion on suitability. The information in this video is provided as of the date of its initial release. The owner of this video expressly disclaims all representations or warranties of accuracy. The owner of this video claims all intellectual property rights, including copyrights, of and related to, this video.

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health
Introducing Better Off Season 2: Home

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 1:54


What makes a healthy home? In 2022, that question feels more important than ever. What are the right foods to eat? The least-toxic shampoos and sunscreens? The best way to prevent loneliness while working from home? On Season 2 of the Better Off podcast, we'll look at the research behind some of those big questions. We'll also ask what happens to our health when “home” is a tent encampment, or a 6x9 solitary jail cell.Through six new episodes, host Anna Fisher-Pinkert will talk to leading public health experts about the questions she's had on her mind as a health communicator, a mom, and a person with more than a little skepticism about the things our culture tells us are “healthy.”Better Off: Home starts November 2. Subscribe to get episodes as soon as they drop. Visit hsph.me/better-off to learn more about this season.

Thinking in English
Why You Should Study English in Malta! w/ English Learning for Curious Minds  (English Conversation)

Thinking in English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 28:59


Support the Podcast and Join my Patreon HERE -- https://www.patreon.com/thinkinginenglish CLICK HERE TO DONATE OR SUPPORT THE PODCAST!!!! - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/donate-and-support/ Today, I'm joined by the wonderful Alastair Budge from the English Learning for Curious Minds podcast to discuss the tiny island of Malta and how it became a destination for English learners! We discussed Malta's history, what it is like to study there, and what kind of person should consider learning English in Malta. TRANSCRIPT - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/2022/10/17/why-you-should-study-english-in-malta-w-english-learning-for-curious-minds/ Check Out English Learning for Curious Minds - www.leonardoenglish.com/podcasts You may also like... Is Social Media Useful for Language Learning? w/ Stew Sensei (English Conversation) Becoming Bilingual, Feminism, and Inequality in Japan! w/ Sneakysmol (English Conversation) How to Become an Advanced Language Learner?! w/ James Brock (English Conversation) Learning English From the News?!? (with SEND7 Podcast) INSTAGRAM - thinkinginenglishpodcast (https://www.instagram.com/thinkinginenglishpodcast/) Blog - thinkinginenglish.blog Vocabulary List https://thinkinginenglish.blog/2022/10/17/why-you-should-study-english-in-malta-w-english-learning-for-curious-minds/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/support

Principle of Charity
Should We Care About Inequality?

Principle of Charity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 42:48


Internationally recognised economist, educator and host of the podcast EconTalk, Dr Russ Roberts, discusses wealth and inequality under capitalism and questions whether there is real harm in inequality. Rather, in distinguishing inequality from poverty he says it's the damage from poverty, not inequality, that's more deserving of public concern and political focus. In a wide ranging discussion, we discuss whether the rich really deserve their spoils, how rigged the system actually is, and whether economics as a discipline is able to incorporate all the crucial non monetary aspects of life, like dignity and self fulfillment. Russ RobertsRuss is the President of Shalem College in Jerusalem and the John and Jean De Nault Research Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. The author of three fiction novels, Russ sought to popularise economic ideas like wealth creation, the unseen forces that sustain economic opportunity and the morality of the marketplace. His passion for teaching and education led him into the world of rap where he produced blockbuster videos on the giants of economics, John Maynard Keynes and FA Hayek.Russ hosts the podcast EconTalk and in his latest book Wild Problems: A Guide to the Decisions that Define Us he dissects the challenge of making big life decisions - like whether to marry or have children - when there is little analytical evidence to guide us.~~ You can be part of the discussion @PofCharity on Twitter, @PrincipleofCharity on Facebook and @PrincipleofCharityPodcast on Instagram. Your hosts are Lloyd Vogelman and Emile Sherman. Find Lloyd @LloydVogelman on Linked in Find Emile @EmileSherman on Linked In and Twitter. This Podcast is Produced by Jonah Primo and Bronwen Reid Find Jonah @JonahPrimo on Instagram. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Keen On Democracy
Victor Pickard on Why American Democracy Can't Survive Without Reliable Journalism: How to Confront Our Misinformation SocietyVictor Pickard

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 37:13


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Victor Pickard, author of Democracy Without Journalism?: Confronting the Misinformation Society. Victor Pickard is Associate Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, where he co-directs the Media, Inequality & Change (MIC) Center. He is the author of America's Battle for Media Democracy and co-author of After Net Neutrality: A New Deal for the Digital Age. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Capitalisn't
[Unedited]: Thomas Piketty On Creating A More Equal Society

Capitalisn't

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 57:51 Very Popular


French economist Thomas Piketty is one of the leading intellectuals documenting inequality, with his 2013 book “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” becoming widely read and cited. His new book, "A Brief History of Equality," is more optimistic: In it, Piketty documents how our world has become relatively more equal since the end of the 18th century. In this unedited conversation, Piketty talks to Bethany and Luigi about the lessons from this movement toward equality and where it could go next – especially regarding policy choices such as taxes, reparations, and redistribution toward more racial, democratic, and global equality. Among others, they discuss: Would people favor massive redistribution? What kind of institutions would be required to oversee markets? Can true progress be achieved without equality?

Entitled
S2E6: Global Inequality: How Should Countries Share Their Wealth?

Entitled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 39:46


While borders have the ability to divide countries both politically and socially, wealth drives an even bigger wedge between us. How do we make sense of the fact that the wealthiest country in the world, the United States, borders one of the poorest countries: Mexico? Despite efforts to mitigate this, global wealth inequality still appears to be growing. According to the World Inequality Report, the poorest half of the global population owns just 2% of the total global wealth. In this episode of Entitled, Claudia and Tom learn some of the ways we could fix global wealth inequality. They speak with one of the world's leading economists focused on inequality, Branko Milanović; University of Chicago economics and political science professor James Robinson; and Rebekah Smith, executive director of Labor Mobility Partnerships.

The Marc Steiner Show
These US states are billionaire tax havens

The Marc Steiner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 30:43


The US has become a major global tax haven. For a discussion on this worrying trend and its effects on wealth inequality, Marc Steiner speaks with Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies and author of The Wealth Hoarders, along with journalist and researcher Kalena Thomhave. Studio: Cameron Granadino, Dwayne GladdenPost-Production: Dwayne GladdenHelp us continue producing The Marc Steiner Show by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer:Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-pod-mssSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/nl-pod-stGet The Marc Steiner Show updates: https://therealnews.com/up-pod-stLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Rich Zeoli
Study Suggests Liberal States Suffer from Greater Inequality Than Conservative States

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 16:34


According to a new study from the Daily Wire, which relied on recently released Census Bureau data, “the more liberal a state is, the more likely it is to be home to income inequality.” While salaries in blue states are often higher, so are the costs of living.

The Real News Podcast
The Marc Steiner Show: These US states are billionaire tax havens

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 30:43


The US has become a major global tax haven. For a discussion on this worrying trend and its effects on wealth inequality, Marc Steiner speaks with Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies and author of The Wealth Hoarders, along with journalist and researcher Kalena Thomhave. Studio: Cameron Granadino, Dwayne GladdenPost-Production: Dwayne GladdenHelp us continue producing The Marc Steiner Show by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer:Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-pod-mssSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/nl-pod-stGet The Marc Steiner Show updates: https://therealnews.com/up-pod-stLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

PH SPOTlight: Public health career stories, inspiration, and guidance from current-day public health heroes
Building a public health career across three continents and the importance of a strong support network, with Public Health Lecturer and Researcher, Ritika Tiwari

PH SPOTlight: Public health career stories, inspiration, and guidance from current-day public health heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 40:29 Transcription Available


In this episode, Sujani sits down with Ritika Tiwari, a lecturer in Public Health at the University of Greenwich. They discuss Ritika's education and career journey, her research interests, and her work in various countries around the world.You'll LearnRitika's education journey and what pushed her into the field of public healthRitika's work and research in various areas of the worldHow Ritika's background in business management and human resources connect to her work in public healthHow the pandemic has affected the public health systemWhat a day in Ritika's life looks likeRitika's experience with teaching and how her work experience has helped herThe importance of mentorship for students Tips for listeners who may be thinking of pursuing an education or career in another part of the worldRitika's goals and plans in social entrepreneurship in public healthCareer advice for early career professionals and studentsToday's GuestRitika Tiwari is a Lecturer in Public Health at University of Greenwich, United Kingdom. Ritika is teaching on the BSc in Public Health and MSc in Global Public Health courses, including modules such as Introduction to Public Health, Behaviour Change, Public Health, Policy, & Politics and Poverty, Inequality & Social Exclusion. Ritika's research mainly focuses on health workforce estimation and forecasting. She joined University of Greenwich in 2022 and previously worked at the Stellenbosch University (Cape Town, South Africa) and Public Health Foundation of India (New Delhi, India). She earned her Ph.D. degree in Health Management from Symbiosis International (Deemed University), Pune, India.ResourcesFollow Ritika on Twitter and LinkedIn  Learn more about Ritika's researchLearn more about the Public Health Foundation of IndiaWatch Arunachalam Muruganantham's Ted TalkOther PH SPOT resources:Share ideas for the podcastNever heard of a podcast before? Read this guide we put together to help you get set upBe notified when new episodes come out and receive hand-picked public health opportunities every week by joining the PH SPOT communityContribute to the public health career blogUpcoming course on infographicsLearn more about The Public Health Career ClubSupport the showJoin The Public Health Career Club: the #1 hangout spot and community dedicated to building and growing your dream public health career.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Law change to allow police to photograph people not ruled out

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 3:32


The police minister won't rule out changing the law to allow officers to keep taking photographs of adults and children. The force was called out last month for illegally taking photos and fingerprints of rangatahi, and of storing them improperly and without justification. But the minister today defending the practice, to the outrage of justice and Māori advocates. Jamie Tahana reports.

The Fix with Michelle King
Laura Bates: How To Fix Systems Of Inequality

The Fix with Michelle King

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 29:31


This week's podcast features a former guest Laura Bates, who is the founder of the Everyday Sexism Project, an ever-increasing collection of over 200,000 testimonies of gender inequality, with branches in 25 countries worldwide.  Laura writes regularly for the Guardian, Telegraph and the New York Times amongst others and won a British Press Award for her journalism in 2015. She has written numerous books, and her latest Fix The System Not The Women is near and dear to our hearts with its message.     When it comes to gender inequality, most people can agree that we need to tackle obvious forms of discrimination, like sexual harassment and sexual assault. But this agreement doesn't always extend to covert forms of discrimination, like consistently devaluing women's contributions in a team meeting, or only asking women on a team to take notes. But we have to appreciate the interrelationship between different forms of sexism and discriminatory systems. As Laura put it in a piece for the Guardian “It is vital to resist those who mock and criticize us for tackling “minor” manifestations of prejudice, because these are the things that normalize and ingrain the treatment of women as second-class citizens, opening the door for everything else, from workplace discrimination to sexual violence.” If we are going to solve inequality, we have to address the various ways that it shows up, at work and the workplace is a really important part of this equation.   Discussions like today's can feel overwhelming but there is always something we can do to effect positive change. Yes gender inequality is a systemic issue, but it's created through the beliefs, behaviors and interactions we each engage in, which means we have the power, collectively, to dismantle it.  Laura shared some important actions we can all do more of.   Action One:  Raise our voices and demand the system needs to change. Too often inequality is taken for granted as the way things are, but when we question this and call it out we raise awareness of what needs to change.   Action Two: Lend your voices to support active change, place your signature on that campaign.  For example, Laura shared that the Center for Women's Justice is running a campaign where they are pushing for a statutory inquiry into misogyny within policing. So that's something that all of us can support and lend our voices to, our signatures to that petition.   Action Three: Stop blaming others within the workplace and focusing on individuals when things happen, to dismantle inequality we all need to take small consistent acts each and every day.   The Everyday Sexism Project Fix The System Not The Women  

Trending Globally: Politics and Policy
What Does “Hispanic Heritage” Mean in 2022?

Trending Globally: Politics and Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 31:03


To mark the end of Hispanic Heritage Month, Trending Globally teamed up with the Watson Institute's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies to explore the breadth of ‘Hispanic Heritage' in 2022.   In the first part of the show, Dan Richards talks with Dr. Pablo Rodriguez about how the growing Hispanic and Latinx population in the U.S. is changing the country's electoral politics. Dr. Rodriguez is a medical doctor, public health advocate, and political commentator based in Rhode Island, and he's observed and analyzed this transformation first-hand. They discuss the wide-ranging effects of this demographic change, and why its political implications are so hard to predict.  In the second half Dan talks with Susan Eckstein, a professor of sociology at Boston University and author of Cuban Privilege: The Making of Immigrant Inequality in America. Her book tells the story of Cuban-American immigration policy since World War II, and the geographic, economic, and geopolitical quirks of history that created it. In telling this singular story, Eckstein casts a new light on all U.S. immigration policy. Questions? Comments? Ideas for topics or guests? Email us at: trendingglobally@brown.edu. https://watson.brown.edu/clacs/ (Learn more about Watson's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.)  Learn more about and purchase https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/cuban-privilege/9C816C6897367585C97EFEC03E1E8419 (Cuban Privilege: The Making of immigrant Inequality in America.) https://watson.brown.edu/news/podcasts (Learn more about the Watson Institute's other podcasts. ) https://trending-globally.captivate.fm/ (Find transcripts and more information about all our episodes on our website.) Transcript for this episode coming soon.

3-21 NoKiddin' Gambling Recovery Podcast
Gender Inequality, (Still) A Social Issue

3-21 NoKiddin' Gambling Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:13


604In this day and age, it's still surprising that gender inequality is still a social issue. Many women are still fighting for equal rights. The question that we women ask is "What do men have that women don't have?"Our guest for today's episode of 3-21 No Kiddin' is Allison Hong Merill. She is an award-winning author who shares her Chinese culture with strong storytelling skills to create empowering memoirs. During our chat, Allison shared her experiences growing up in Chinese culture. Wherein gender takes a big role in her life. There are times when she can't enjoy things just because she is a girl. When she turned 22, she became an immigrant in the US. Allison writes in both Chinese and English, doing fiction and creative nonfiction. Her book, Ninety-Nine Fire Hoops, was released in September 2021 and continues to receive literary awards. Connect with Allison:Website: https://allisonhongmerrill.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/allisonhongmerrillInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/allison.hong.merrill/Happy Friday!------------------------------------------------If you would like to participate in our 30 Day Give Up Gambling Email Challenge, click below.https://www.321nokiddin.com/30-day-give-up-gambling-challengePositivity is NO Gamble!------------------------------------------------Did you enjoy the show? Please leave us a rate and review!This helps us reach other gamblers who may need to hear recovery messages.-------------------------------------------------Get in touch with me!Email address : bobbie@321NoKiddin.comFacebook          : www.facebook.com/321NoKiddinInstagram         : www.instagram.com/bobbietheawesomestPinterest           : www.pinterest.ph/bobbiemalatestaLinkedIn            : www.linkedin.com/in/bobbiemalatestaYouTube           : www.youtube.com/channel/UCkUV58i4z2Se3jXuDldcXaAWebsite            : www.321nokiddin.com**A super special thanks to Justin Furstenfeld for granting us permission to use his music on the show!Please support and follow the Blue October band on:Facebook  : www.facebook.com/blueoctoberInstagram : www.instagram.com/blueoctoberbandTwitter       : www.twitter.com/blueoctoberYoutube    : www.youtube.com/user/blueoctoberofficialSupport the show

The New Bazaar
160 years of the racial wealth gap

The New Bazaar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 63:36


This is a special, between-the-seasons episode of the New Bazaar.Right now, the white-to-black wealth ratio in the United States is roughly 6 to 1. Which means that when you add up all the wealth that someone can own—their cash, the value of their house, their investments in the stock market, and so on—the average White American has six times the wealth of the average Black American. That figure alone should be disturbing enough. But making it even worse is that this wealth ratio of 6 to 1 is about the same as it was back in the 1950s, seven decades ago. Some of the reasons for this long-term persistence of a big racial wealth gap are probably familiar to anyone who knows even just a little about American history. Not just the history of slavery, but also what came next: Jim Crow and segregation, the numerous racist laws and policies that were passed, and the history of racial violence—all of which made it impossible for Black Americans to accumulate as much wealth, and to get the same return on their wealth, as White Americans. Maybe less understood is another cause. If you consider the immediate aftermath of emancipation and the Civil War as a starting point, Black Americans simply began with much less wealth from which to build more wealth—and that initial difference has continued to have a big lingering effect even a century and a half later. These are just some of the conclusions in a new working paper from today's guest, Ellora Derenoncourt, and from her co-authors Chi Hyun Kim, Moritz Kuhn, Moritz Schularick. Ellora is an economist at Princeton University, where she is also founder of the Program for Research on Inequality. On this episode of New Bazaar, Cardiff speaks with Ellora about this fascinating paper and about some of her other related work. Related links: Wealth of Two Nations: The U.S. Racial Wealth Gap, 1860-2020Can You Move to Opportunity? Evidence from the Great MigrationMinimum wages and racial inequality Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

GotQuestions.org Audio Pages 2017-2019
What does the Bible say about inequality?

GotQuestions.org Audio Pages 2017-2019

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022


What does the Bible say about inequality? Are there any situations in which the Bible approves of people being treated unequally?

New Books Network
Elizabeth Ellcessor, "In Case of Emergency: How Technologies Mediate Crisis and Normalize Inequality" (NYU Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 57:26


Dr. Elizabeth Ellcessor presents a much-needed look at the growth of emergency media and its impact on our lives in In Case of Emergency: How Technologies Mediate Crisis and Normalize Inequality (NYU Press, 2022). In an emergency, we often look to media: to contact authorities, to get help, to monitor evolving situations, or to reach out to our loved ones. Sometimes we aren't even aware of an emergency until we are notified by one of the countless alerts, alarms, notifications, sirens, text messages, or phone calls that permeate everyday life. Yet most people have only a partial understanding of how such systems make sense of and act upon an “emergency.” In Case of Emergency argues that emergency media are profoundly cultural artifacts that shape the very definition of “emergency” as an opposite of “normal.” Looking broadly across a range of contemporary emergency-related devices, practices, and services, Dr. Ellcessor illuminates the cultural and political underpinnings and socially differential effects of emergency media. By interweaving in-depth interviews with emergency-operation and app-development experts, archival materials, and discursive and technological readings of hardware and infrastructures, Dr. Ellcessor demonstrates that emergency media are powerful components of American life that are rarely, if ever, neutral. The normalization of ideologies produced and reinforced by emergency media result in unequal access to emergency services and discriminatory assumptions about who or what is a threat and who deserves care and protection. As emergency media undergo massive growth and transformation in response to digitization and attendant entrepreneurial cultures, Dr. Ellcessor asks where access, equity, and accountability fit in all of this. The first book to develop a typology of emergency media, In Case of Emergency opens a much-needed conversation around the larger cultural meanings of “emergency,” and what an ethical and care-based approach to emergency could entail. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
HubWonk: Income Inequality Explored: Wage Gap Overlooks Government Intervention (#124)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with John F. Early, economist and author of the newly released book, The Myth of American Inequality, about the history of income inequality, its true size, and trends. They also discuss how census data used in policy decision-making misses nearly all the effects of government intervention and distorts the truth about […]

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
Strange News: The Pentagon Will 'Review' Its Own Psyops, NPCs and Inequality, Autopsy Crimes in Kansas

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 58:09 Very Popular


A conman in Kansas has just been sent to prison for a long series of illegal autopsy schemes. Self-appointed technocrats float the idea of poor people functioning as NPCs online. The Pentagon, in a stunning damage control initiative, pledges to conduct a 'sweeping review' of their own, ongoing psyop activities -- spoiler, this last story affects you directly. All this and more in this week's Strange News. They don't want you to read our book. They don't want you to see us on tour.They don't want you to read our book.: https://static.macmillan.com/static/fib/stuff-you-should-read/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.