Podcasts about Bleep

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  • 672PODCASTS
  • 1,859EPISODES
  • 1h 13mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Bleep

Latest podcast episodes about Bleep

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week (You Won't Believe What the Socialist Party of Great Britain Said... or Will You?) || EP 564

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:35


The Socialist Party did something that's low (even for socialists) today. Also, we tried to leave Dan Price out of it this week, but he's just so dumb. Prince William wants Bezos to stop trying to save the planet with his rocket project and start saving the planet. And of course, there's even more dumb than these few examples. The Nomad Network is the #1 community for liberty minded people just like you, who want to create freeom in their lifetime by focusing on entrepreneurship, investment and income mobility. http://www.nomadnetwork.app/gml Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Peace Talk Podcast
Bleep That Bonus Teaser w/ (Deante Parker)

Peace Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:58


Bonus Teaser w/ reconnecting best friend Deante Parker. His full episode drops 10/25. ENJOY ☮

The Mark Kaye Show
How The BIDEN Stole Christmas!!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 103:30


10-14-2021 Christmas is CANCELED, What the Bleep!, Joe Rogan and Sanjay Gupta, and a bunch of your phone calls!

BMitch & Finlay
10.14.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:26


1:00- Opening up the phone lines for "Bleep You Thursday" to see what people are mad at today.  20:10- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  36:45- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Jon Gruden Fallout and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 39:06


Mac and Bone go in-depth on the Jon Gruden situation and how this could be the end of his career, reveal their 'What the Bleep?' stories of the week and discuss the Panthers loss to Eagles and the struggles of the offensive line with Frank Garcia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week (Bernie, Biden, & Fact Checkers) || EP 559

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:05


It's Dumb BLEEP of the Week! Our live members vote on the dumbest thing that happened this week. Let me warn you, it was super dumb. The Nomad Network is the #1 FREE community for liberty minded people just like you, who want to create freedom in their lifetime by focusing on entrepreneurship, investment and income mobility. http://www.nomadnetwork.app/gml Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Curiosity Public's Podcast
this is a bleep-fest! latest celebs in spirits news

Curiosity Public's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:51


Havana Club Skepta Collabhttps://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2021/09/havana-club-collaborates-with-skepta/Cardi's Whipped Creamhttps://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2021/09/rapper-cardi-b-to-launch-vodka-infused-whipped-cream/Arnold's cigar trick and barhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNQM44cKPR4Check us out on Instagram @curiosity_publichttps://www.instagram.com/curiosity_public/Watch us on YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcplnOSfcnOh5paIL2LdaAwWe have t-shirts! Grab them here:https://curiosity-public.myspreadshop.com/allStay curious!All claims made here about alcohol, whether in this podcast, in this description, or on our Youtube channel, are solely our opinions and intended only for those of legal drinking age.  All links provided here should only be accessed by those of legal drinking age.

The Mark Kaye Show
In BIDEN'S World Everything Is FAKE!!!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 103:17


10-7-2021 HIT THE (P)Sak – Peter Doocy on John Kerry, What the Bleep!, and Conspiracy Theory Thursday.

BMitch & Finlay
10.7.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:33


1:00- What are you mad at today?  20:30- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  36:45- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Darnold Providing Some Hope for the Future and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:16


Mac and Willie discuss the start to the season from Sam Darnold and if it instilling some confidence for the future, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and talk to Frank Garcia about the Panthers' loss to the Cowboys on Sunday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (Colbert, Bernie, Dan Price, & More) || EP 554

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 64:03


Saule Omarova, Dan Price, Bernie Sanders, Occupy Democrats, Steven Colbert, Recall Ron DeSantis, Joe Walsh, and Joe Biden make the list this week! Listen to see who won. https://www.youtube.com/channel/goodmorningliberty Open an IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Physical Gold & Crypto TAX-FREE! Get 1-Month FREE with Discount Code ($29.95 Savings) Link: https://rebrand.ly/libertypod Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com   Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
9.30.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:14


1:00- Opening up the phone lines to see what people are mad at today.  16:45- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  30:15- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Why We Bleep
WHY WE BLEEP 033: MAKE NOISE

Why We Bleep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 118:42


LINKS➤ Make Noise: https://www.makenoisemusic.com/ ➤ The ModDemod ad post on MatrixSynth: https://www.matrixsynth.com/2008/03/make-noise-moddemod.html ➤ Support this podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mylarmelodiesTHANKS TO SPONSORShttp://www.signalsounds.comIf you enjoyed this episode, please share it!

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Panthers Trade for C.J. Henderson, 'What the Bleep?' and Breaking Down the Dallas Cowboys

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 36:32


Mac and Bone break down the Panthers trade for C.J, Henderson, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and the guys talk about what the Panthers will be facing on Sunday in Dallas after seeing them last night. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
The Maestro of the Keyboards with Jesse Vincent

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:03


About Jesse Jesse Vincent is the cofounder and CTO of Keyboardio, where he designs and manufactures high-quality ergonomic mechanical keyboards. In previous lives, he served as the COO of VaccinateCA, volunteered as the project lead for the Perl programming language, created both the leading open source issue tracking system RT: Request tracker and K-9 Mail for Android.Links: Keyboardio: https://keyboard.io Obra: https://twitter.com/obra TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. As you folks are well aware by now, this show is at least ostensibly about the business of cloud. And that's intentionally overbroad. You can fly a boat through it, which means it's at least wider than the Suez Canal.And that's all well and good, but what do all of these cloud services have in common? That's right, we interact with them via typing on keyboards. My guest today is Jesse Vincent, who is the founder of Keyboardio and creator of the Model 01 heirloom-grade keyboard, which is sitting on my desk that sometimes I use, sometimes it haunts me. Jesse, thank you for joining me.Jesse: Hey, thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, mechanical keyboards are one of those divisive things that, back in the before times when we were all sitting in offices, it was an express form of passive aggression, where, “I don't like the people around me, and I'm going to show it to them with things that can't really complain about. So, what is the loudest keyboard I can get?” Style stuff. And some folks love them, some folks can't stand them. And most folks to be perfectly blunt, do not seem to care.Jesse: So, it's not actually about them being loud, or it doesn't have to be. Mechanical keyboards can be dead silent; they can be as quiet as anything else. There's absolutely a subculture that is into things that are as loud as they possibly can be; you know, sounds like there's a cannon going off on somebody's desk. But you can also get absolutely silent mechanical switches that are more dampened than your average keyboard. For many, many people, it's about comfort, it is about the key feel.A keyboard is supposed to have a certain feeling and these flat rectangles that feel like you're typing on glass, they don't have that feeling and they're not good for your fingers. And it's been fascinating over the past five or six years to watch this explosion in interest in good keyboards again.Corey: I learned to first use a computer back on an old IBM 286 in the '80s. And this obviously had a Model M—or damn close to it—style buckling spring keyboard. It was loud and I'm nostalgic about the whole thing. True story I've never told on this podcast before; I was a difficult child when I was five years old, and I was annoyed because my parents went out of the house and my brother was getting more attention than I was. I poured a bucket of water into the keyboard.And to this day, I'm surprised my father didn't murder me after that. And we wound up after having a completely sealing rubber gasket on top of this thing. Because this was the '80s; keyboards were not one of those, “Oh, I'm going to run down to the store and pick up another one for $20.” This was at least a $200 whoops-a-doozy. And let's just say that it didn't endear me to my parents that week.Jesse: That's funny because that keyboard is one that actually probably would have dried out just fine. Not like the Microsoft Naturals that I used to carry in the mid-'90s. Those white slightly curved ones. That was my introduction to ergonomic keyboards and they had a fatal flaw as many mid-'90s Microsoft products did. In this case, they melted in the rain; the circuit traces inside were literally wiped away by water. If a cup of water got in that keyboard, it was gone.Corey: Everyone has a story involving keyboard and liquids at some point, or they are the most careful people that are absolutely not my people whatsoever because everyone I hang out with is inherently careless. And over time I used other keyboards as I went through my life and never had strong opinions on them, and then I got to play with a mechanical keyboard had brought all that time rushing back to me of, “Oh, yeah.” And my immediate thought is, “Oh, this is great. I wonder if I could pour water into it? No, no.”And I started getting back into playing with them and got what I thought was the peak model keyboard from Das Keyboards which, there was the black keyboard with no writing on it at all. And I learned I don't type nearly as well as I thought I did in those days. And okay. That thing sat around gathering dust and I started getting a couple more and a couple more, and it turns out if you keep acquiring mechanical keyboards, you can turn an interest into a problem but you can also power your way through to the other side and become a collector. And I started building my own for a while and I still have at least a dozen of them in various states of assembly here.It was sort of a fun hobby that I got into, and for me at least it was, why do I want to build a keyboard myself? Is it, do I believe intrinsically that I can build a better keyboard than I can buy? Absolutely not. But everything else I do in my entire career as an engineer until that point had been about making the bytes on the screen go light up in different patterns. That was it.This was something that I had built that I could touch with my hands and was still related to the thing that I did, and was somewhat more forgiving than other things that I could have gotten into, like you know, woodworking with table saws that don't realize my arm it just lopped off.Jesse: Oh, you can burn yourself pretty good with a soldering iron.Corey: Oh, absolutely I can.Jesse: But yeah, no, I got into this in a similar-sounding story. I had bad wrists throughout my career. I was a programmer and a programming manager and CEO. And my wrist hurts all the time, and I'd been through pretty much every ergonomic keyboard out there. If you seen the one where you stick your fingers into little wells, and each finger you can press back forth, left, right, and down, the ones that looked like they were basically a pair of flat capacitive surfaces from a company that later got bought by Apple and turned into the iPads touch technology, Microsoft keyboards, everything. And nothing quite felt right.A cloud startup I had been working on cratered one summer. Long story short, the thing went under for kind of sad reasons and I swore I was going to take a year off to screw around and figure out what the next thing was going to be. And at some point, I noticed there were people on the internet building their own keyboards. This was not anything I had ever done before. When I started soldering, I did figure out that I must have soldered before because it smelled familiar, but this was supposed to be a one-month project to build myself a single keyboard.And I saw that people on the internet were doing it, I figured, eh, how hard could it be? Just one of those things that Perl hackers are apt to say. Little did I know. It's now, I want to say something like eight years later, and my one-month project to build one keyboard has failed thousands and thousands and thousands of times over as we've shipped thousands of keyboards to, oh God, it's like 75 or 78 countries.Corey: And it's great. It's well made. The Model 01 that I got was part of an early Kickstarter batch. My wife signed me up for it—because she knew I was into this sort of thing—as a birthday gift. And then roughly a year later, if memory serves, it showed up and that was fine.Again, it's Kickstarter is one of those, this might just be an aspirational gift. We don't know. And—because, Kickstarter—but it was fun. And I use it. It's great.I like a lot of the programmability aspects of it. There are challenges. I'm not used to using ergonomic keyboards, and the columnar layout is offset to a point where I miss things all the time. And if you're used to typing rapidly, in things like chats, or Twitter or whatnot, were rapid responses valuable, it's frustrating trying to learn how a new keyboard layout works.Jesse: Absolutely. So, we got some advice very early on from one of the research scientists who helped Microsoft with their design for their natural keyboards, and one of the things that he told us was, “You will probably only ever get one chance to make a keyboard; almost every company that makes a keyboard fails, and so you should take one of the sort of accepted designs and make a small improvement to help push the industry forward. You don't want to go do something radical and have nobody like it.”Corey: That's very reasonable advice and also boring. Why bother?Jesse: Well, we walked away from that with a very different take, which was, if we're only going to get one chance of this, we're going to do the thing we want to make.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so we did a bunch of stuff that we got told might be difficult to do or impossible. We designed our own keycaps from scratch. We milled the enclosure out of hardwood. When we started, we didn't know where we were manufacturing, but we did specify that the wood was going to be Canadian maple because it grows like a weed, and as you know, not in danger of being made extinct. But when you're manufacturing in southern China and you're manufacturing with Canadian maple, that comes on a boat from North America.Corey: There's something to be said for the globalization supply chain as we see things shipped back and forth and back and forth, and it seems ridiculous but the economics are there it's—Jesse: Oh, my God. Now, this year.Corey: Yeah [laugh], there's that.Jesse: Supply chains are… how obscenity-friendly is this podcast? [laugh].Corey: Oh, we can censor anything that's too far out. Knock yourself out.Jesse: Because what I would ordinarily say is the supply chains are [BLEEP].Corey: Yep, they are.Jesse: Yeah. This time around, we gave customers the—for the Model 100, which is our new keyboard that the Kickstarter just finished up for—we gave customers the choice of that nice Canadian maple or walnut. We got our quotes in advance. You know, our supplier confirmed wood was no problem a few months in advance. And then the night before the campaign launched, our wood supplier got in touch and said, “So, there are no walnut planks that are wide enough to be had in all of southern China. There are some supply chain issues due to the global container shortage. We don't know what we're going to be able to do. Maybe you could accept it if we did butcher block style walnut and glued planks together.”They made samples and then a week later, instead of FedExing us the samples, I got a set of photographs with a whole bunch of sad faces and crying face emojis saying, “Well, we tried. We know there's no way that this would be acceptable to your customers.” We asked, “So, where's this walnut supposed to be coming from that you can't get it?” They're like, “It's been sitting on the docks at the origin since March. It's being forested in Kentucky in the United States.”Corey: The thing that surprised me the most about the original model on Kickstarter campaign was how much went wrong across the board. I kept reading your updates. It was interesting, at some point, it was like, okay, this is clearly a Ponzi scheme. That's the name of the keyboard: ‘The Ponzi', where there's going to be increasingly outlandish excuses.Jesse: I don't think a Ponzi scheme would be the right aspersion to be casting.Corey: There's that more pedestrian scam-style thing. We could go with that.Jesse: We have a lot of friends who've been in industry longer than us, and every time we brought one of the problems that our factory seemed to be having to them, they said, “Oh, yeah, that's the thing that absolutely happens.”Corey: Yeah, it was just you kept hitting every single one of these, and I was increasingly angry on your behalf, reading these things about, “Oh, yeah. Just one of your factory reps just blatantly ripped you off, and this was expected to be normal in some cases, and it's like”—and you didn't even once threatened to burn the factory now, which I thought was impressive.Jesse: No, nobody threatened to burn the factory down, but one of the factories did have a fire.Corey: Which we can neither confirm nor deny—I kid, I kid, I kid.Jesse: Yeah, yeah, yeah. But so what our friends who had been in industry longer that said, it was like, “Jesse, but, you know, nobody has all the problems.” And eventually, we figured out what was going on, and it was that our factory's director of overseas sales was a con artist grifter who had been scamming both sides. She'd been lying to us and lying to the factory, and making up stories to make her the only trusted person to each side, and she'd just been embezzling huge sums of money.Corey: You hear these stories, but you never think it's going to be something that happens to you. Was this your first outing with manufacturing a physical product?Jesse: This was our first physical product.Corey: But I'm curious about it; are you effectively following the trope of a software person who thinks, “Ah, I could do hardware? How hard could it be? I could ship code around the world seconds, so hardware will be just a little bit slower.” How close to that trope are you?Jesse: So, when we went into the manufacturing side, we knew that we knew nothing, and we knew that it was fraught with peril. And we gave ourselves an awful lot of padding on timing, which we then blew through for all sorts of reasons. And we ran through a hardware incubator that helped us vet our plans, we were working with companies on the ground that helped startups work with factories. And honestly, if it hadn't been for this one individual, yes we would have had problems, but it wouldn't have been anything of the same scale. As far as we can tell, almost everything bad that happened had a grain of truth in it, it's just that… you know, a competent grifter can spin a tiny thing into a giant thing.And nobody in China suspected her, and nobody in China believed that this could possibly be happening because the penalties if she got caught were ten years in a Chinese prison for an amount of money that effectively would be a down payment on an apartment instead of the price of a full apartment or fully fleeing the country.Corey: It seems like that would be enough of a deterrent, but apparently not.Jesse: Apparently not. So, we ended up retaining counsel and talking to friends who had been working in southern China for 15 years for about who they might recommend for a lawyer. We ended up retaining a Chinese lawyer. Her name's [Una 00:13:36]; she's fantastic.Corey: Referrals available upon request.Jesse: Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I'm happy to send her all kinds of business. She looked at the contract we had with the factory, she's like, “This is a Western contract. This isn't going to help you in the Chinese courts. What we need to do is we need to walk into the factory and negotiate a new agreement that is in Chinese, written by a Chinese lawyer, and get them to sign it.”And part of that agreement was getting them to take full joint responsibility for everything. And she walked in with me to the factory. She dressed down: t-shirt and jeans. They initially thought she was my translator, and she made a point of saying, “Look, I'm Jesse's counsel. I'm not your lawyer. I do not represent your interests.”And three-party negotiations with the factory: the factory's then former salesperson, and us. And she negotiated a new agreement. And I had a long list of all the things that we needed to have in our contract, like all the things that we really cared about. Get to the end of the day and she hands it to me and she's like, “What do you think?” And I read it through and my first thought is that none of the ten points that we need in this agreement are there.And then I realized that they are there, they're just very subtle. And everybody signs it. The factory takes full joint responsibility for everything that was done by their now former salesperson. We go outside; we get into the cab, and she turns to me—and she's not a native speaker of English, but she is fluent—and she's like, how do you think that went, Jesse? I'm like, I think that went pretty well. And she's like, “Yes. I get my job satisfaction out of adverse negotiation, and the factory effectively didn't believe in lawyers.”Corey: No, no. I've seen them. They exist. I married one of them.Jesse: Oh, yeah. As it turned out, they also didn't really believe in the court system and they didn't believe in not pissing off judges. Nothing could help us recover the time we lost; we did end up recovering all of our tooling, we ended up recovering all of our product that they were holding, all with the assistance of the Chinese courts. It was astonishing because we went into this whole thing knowing that there was no chance that a Chinese court would find for a small Western startup with no business presence in China against a local factory, and I think our goal was that they would get a black mark on their corporate social credit report so that nobody else would do business with this factory that won't give the customer back their tooling. And… it turns out that, no, the courts just helped us.Corey: It's nice when things work the way they're supposed to, on some level.Jesse: It is.Corey: And then you solve your production problems, you shipped it out. I use it, I take it out periodically.Jesse: We'd shipped every customer order well before this.Corey: Oh, okay. This was after you had already done the initial pre-orders. This was as you were ongoing—Jesse: Yeah, there were keycaps we owed people, which were—Corey: Oh, okay.Jesse: Effectively the free gift we promised aways in for being late on shipping.Corey: That's what that was for. It showed up one day and I wondered what the story behind that was. But yeah, it was—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: They're great.Jesse: Yeah. You know, and then there was a story in The Verge of, this Kickstarter alleges that—da, da, da, da, da. We're like, “I understand that AOL's lawyers make you say ‘alleges,' but no, this really happened, and also, we really had shipped everything that we owed to customers long before all this went down.”Corey: Yeah. This is something doesn't happen in the software world, generally speaking. I don't have to operate under the even remote possibility that my CI/CD system is lying to me about what it's doing. I can generally believe things that show up in computers—you would think—but there are—Jesse: You would think. I mean—Corey: There a lot of [unintelligible 00:17:19] exceptions to that, but generally, you can believe it.Jesse: In software, you sometimes we'll work with contractors or contract agencies who will make commitments and then not follow through on those commitments, or not deliver the thing they promised. It does sometimes happen.Corey: Indeed.Jesse: Yeah, no, the thing I miss the most from software is that if there is a defect, the cost of shipping an update is nil and the speed at which you can ship an update is instantly.Corey: You would think it would be nil, but then we look at AWS data transfer pricing and there's a giant screaming caveat on that. It's you think that moving bytes would cost nothing. Yeah.Jesse: [unintelligible 00:17:53] compared to international shipping costs for physical goods, AWS transfer rates are incredibly competitive.Corey: No, no, to get to that stage, you need to add an [unintelligible 00:18:02] NAT gateway with their data processing fee.Jesse: [laugh].Corey: But yeah, it's a different universe. It's a different problem, a different scale of speed, a different type of customer, too, on some levels. So, after you've gotten the Model 01's issues sorted out, you launched a second keyboard. The ‘a-TREE-us', if I'm pronouncing that correctly. Or ‘A-tree-us'.Jesse: So Phil, who designed it, pronounces is ‘A-tree-us', so we pronounce it A-tree-us. And so, this is a super minimalist keyboard designed to take with you everywhere, and it was something where Phil Hagelberg, who is a software developer of some repute for a bunch of things, he had designed this sort of initially for his own use and then had started selling kits. So, laser-cut plywood enclosures, hand-built circuit boards, you just stick a little development board in the middle of it, spend some time soldering, and you're good to go. And he and I were internet buddies; he had apparently gotten his start from some of my early blog posts. And one day, he sent me a note asking if I would review his updated circuit board design because he was doing a revision.I looked at his updated circuit board design and then offered to just make him a new circuit board design because it was going to be pretty straightforward to do something that's going to be a little more reliable and a lot more cost-effective. We did that and we talked a little more, and I said, “Would you be interested in having us just make this thing in a factory and sell it with a warranty and send you a royalty?” And he said, but it's GPL. You don't have to send me a royalty.Corey: I appreciate that I am not compelled to do it. However—yeah.Jesse: Yeah, exactly. It's like, “No. We would like to support people who create things and work with you on it.”Corey: That's important. We periodically have guest authors writing blog posts on Last Week in AWS. Every single one of them is paid for what they do, sometimes there for various reasons that they can't or won't accept it and we donate it to a charity of their choice, but we do not expect people to volunteer for a profit-bearing entity, in some respects.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Now, open-source is a whole separate universe that I still maintain that is rapidly becoming a, “Would you like to volunteer for a trillion-dollar company in your weekend hours?” Usually not, but there's always an argument.Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have a bunch of open-source contributors to our open-source firmware and we contribute stuff back upstream to other projects, and it is a related but slightly different thing. So, Phil said yes; we said yes. And then we designed and made this thing. We launched an ultra-portable keyboard designed to take with you everywhere.It came with a travel case that had a belt loop, and basically a spring-loaded holster for your keyboard if you want to nerd out like that. All of the Kickstarter video and all the photography sort of showed how nice it looked in a cafe. And we launched it, like, the week the first lockdowns hit, in the spring of 2019.Corey: I have to say I skipped that one entirely. One of the things that I wound up doing—keyboard-wise—when I started this company four years ago and change, now was, I wound up getting a fairly large desk, and it's 72 inches or something like that. And I want a big keyboard with a numpad—yeah, that's right, big spender here—because I don't need a tiny little keyboard. I find that the layer-shifting on anything that's below a full-size keyboard is a little on the irritating side. And this goes beyond. It is—it requires significant—Jesse: Oh, yeah. It's—Corey: Rewiring of your brain, on some level.Jesse: And there are ergonomic reasons why some people find it to be better and more comfortable. There's less reaching and twisting. But it is a very different typing experience and it's absolutely not for everybody. Nothing we've made so far is intended to be a mass-market product. When we launched the Model 01, we were nervous that we would make something that was too popular because we knew that if we had to fulfill 50,000 of them, we'd just be screwed. We knew how little we knew.But the Atreus, when we launched it on Kickstarter, we didn't know if we were going to have to cancel the campaign because no one was going to want their travel keyboard at the beginning of a pandemic, but it did real well. I don't remember the exact timing and numbers, but we hit the campaign goal, I want to say early on the first day, possibly within minutes, possibly within hours—it's been a while now; I don't remember exactly—ultimately, we sold, like, 2600 of them on Kickstarter and have done additional production runs. We have a distributor in Japan, and a distributor in the US, and a distributor in the UK, now. And we also sell them ourselves directly online, from keyboard.io.So, this is one of the other fascinating logistics things, is that we ship globally through Hong Kong. Which, before the pandemic was actually pretty pleasant. Inexpensive shipping globally has gotten kind of nuts because most discount carriers, the way they operated historically is, they would buy cargo space on commercial flights. Commercial international flights don't happen so much.Corey: Yes, suddenly, that becomes a harder thing to find.Jesse: Early on, we had a couple of shipping providers that were in the super-slow, maybe up to two weeks to get your thing somewhere by air taking, I want to say we had things that didn't get there for three months. They would get from Hong Kong to Singapore in three days; they would enter a warehouse, and then we had to start asking questions about, “Hey, it's been eight weeks. What's going on?” And they're like, “Oh, it's still in queue for a flight to Europe. There just aren't any.”Corey: It seems like that becomes a hard problem.Jesse: It becomes a hard problem. It started to get a little better, and now it's starting to get a little worse again. Carriers that used to be ultra-reliable are now sketchy. We have FedEx losing packages, which is just nuts. USPS shipments, we see things that are transiting from Hong Kong, landing at O'Hare, going through a sorting center in Chicago, and just vanishing for weeks at a time, in Chicago.Corey: I don't pretend to understand how this stuff works. It's magic to me; like, it is magic, on some level, that I can order toilet paper on the internet, it gets delivered to my house for less money than it costs me to go to the store and buy it. It feels like there's some serious negative externalities in there. But we don't want to look too closely at those because we might feel bad about things.Jesse: There's all kinds of fascinating stuff for us. So, shipping stuff, especially by air, there are two different ways that the shipping weight can get calculated. It can either get calculated based on the weight on a scale, or it can get calculated using a formula based on the dimensions. And so bulky things are treated as weighing an awful lot. I'm told that Amazon's logistics teams started doing this fascinating thing where ultra-dense, super-heavy shipments they pushed on to FedEx and UPS, whereas the ultra-light stuff that saved on jet fuel, they shoved onto their own planes.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I want to follow up because it seems like, okay, pandemic shipping is a challenge; you clearly are doing well. You still have them in stock and are selling them as best I'm aware, correct?Jesse: Yes.Corey: Yeah. I may have to pick one up one of these days just so I can put it on the curiosity keyboard shelf and kick it around and see how it works. And then you recently concluded a third keyboard Kickstarter, in this case. And—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: —this is not your positioning; this is my positioning of what I'm picking up of, “Hey, remember that Model 01 keyboard we sold you that you love and we talked about and it's amazing? Yeah, turns out that's crap. Here's the better version of it.” Correct that misapprehension, please. [laugh].Jesse: Sure. So, it absolutely is not crap, but we've been out of stock in the Model 01 for a couple of years now. And we see them going used for as much or sometimes more than we used to charge for them new. It went out of stock because of the shenanigans with that first factory. And shortly before we launched the Atreus, we'd been planning to bring back an updated version of the Model 01; we've even gotten to the point of, like, designing the circuit boards and starting to update the tooling, the injection molding tooling, and then COVID, Atreus, life, everything.And so it took us a little longer to get there. But there is a larger total addressable market for a keyboard like the Model 01 than the total number that we ever sold. There are certainly people who had Model 01s who want replacements, want extras, want another one on another desk. There are also plenty of people who wanted a Model 01 and never got one.Corey: Here's my question for you, with all three of these keyboards because they're a different layout, let's be clear. Some more so than others, but even the columnar layout is strange here. Once upon a time, I had a week in which I wasn't doing much, and I figured, ah, I'll Dvorak—which is a different keyboard layout—and it's not that it's hard; it's that it's rewiring a whole bunch of muscle memory. The problem I ran into was not that it was impossible to do, by any stretch, but because of what I was doing—in those days help desk and IT support—I was having to do things on other people's computers, so it was a constant context switching back and forth between different layouts.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Do you see that being a challenge with layouts like this, or is it more natural than that?Jesse: So, what we found is that it is easier to switch between an ergonomic layout and a traditional layout, like a columnar layout, and what's often called a row-stagger layout—which is what your normal keyboard looks like—than it is to switch between Dvorak and Qwerty on a traditional keyboard. Or the absolute bane of my existence is switching between a ThinkPad and a MacBook. They are super close; they are not the same.Corey: Right. You can't get an ergonomic keyboard layout inside of a laptop. I mean, looking at the four years of being gaslit by Apple, it's clear you can barely get a keyboard into a MacBook for a while. It's, “Oh, it's a piece of crap, but you're using it wro”—yeah. I'm not a fan of their entire approach to keyboards and care very than what Apple has to say about anything even slightly keyboard-related, but that's just me being bitter.Jesse: As far as I can tell, large chunks of Apple's engineering organization felt the same way that you did. Their new ones are actually decent again.Corey: Yes, that's what I've heard. And I will get one at some point, but I also have a problem where, “Oh, yeah, you know that $3,000 laptop with a crappy keyboard, you can't use for anything? Great. The solution is to give us 3000 more dollars, and then we'll sell you one that's good.” And it's, I feel like I don't want to reward the behavior.Jesse: I hear you. I ditched Mac OS for a number of years. I live the dream: Linux on the desktop. And it didn't hurt me a lot—printing worked fine, scanning worked fine, projectors were fine—but when I was reaching for things like Photoshop, and Lightroom, and my mechanical CAD software, it was the bad kind of funny.Corey: I have to be careful, now for the first time in my life I'm not updating to new operating systems early on, just because of things like the audio stuff I have plugged into my nonsense and the media nonsense that I do. It used to be that great, my computer only really needs to be a web browser and a terminal and I'm good. And worst case, I can make do with just the web browser because there are embedded a terminal into a web page options out there. Yeah, now it turns out that actually have a production workflow. Who knew?Jesse: Yep. That's the point where I started thinking about having separate machines for different things. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm rapidly hitting that point. Yeah, I do want to get into having fun with keyboards, on some level, but it's the constant changing of what you're using. And then, of course, there's the other side of it where, in normal years, I spent an awful lot of time traveling and as much fun as having a holster-mounted belt keyboard would be, in many cases, it does not align with the meetings that I tend to be in.Jesse: Of course.Corey: It's, “Oh, great. You're the CFO of a Fortune 500. Great, let me pair my mini keyboard that looks like something from the bowels of your engineering department's reject pile.” Like, what is this? It's one of those things that doesn't send the right message in some cases. And let's be honest; I'm good at losing things.Jesse: This is a pretty mini keyboard, but I hear you.Corey: Or I could lose it, along with my keys. It will be great.Jesse: Yeah. There are a bunch of things I've wanted to do around reasonable keyboards for tablets.Corey: Yes, please do.Jesse: Yeah. We actually started looking at one point at a fruit company in Cupertino's requirements around being able to do dock-connector connected keyboards for their tablets, and… it's nuts. You can't actually do ergonomic keyboards that way, it would have to be Bluetooth.Corey: Yeah. When I travel on the road these days, or at least—well, ‘these days' being two years ago—the only computer I'd take is an iPad. And that was great; it works super well for a lot of my use cases. There's still something there, and even going forward, I'm going to be spending a lot more time at home. I have young kids now, and I want to be here to watch them grow up.And my lifestyle and use cases have changed for the last year and a half. I've had an iMac. I've never had one of those before. It's big screen real estate; things are great. And I'm looking to see whether it's time to make a full-on keyboard evolution if I can just force myself over the learning curve, here. But here's the question you might not be prepared to answer yet. What's next? Do you have plans on the backburner for additional keyboards beyond what you've done?Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have, like, three more designs that are effectively in the can. Not quite ready for production, but if this were a video podcast, I'd be pulling out and waving circuit boards at you. One of the things that we've been playing with is what is called in the trade a symmetric staggered keyboard where the right half is absolutely bog-standard normal layout like you'd expect, and the left side is a mirror of that. And so it is a much more gentle introduction to an ergonomic-style keyboard.Corey: Okay, I can almost wrap my head around that.Jesse: Because if you put your hands on your keyboard and you feel the angles that you have to move on your right side, you'll see that your fingers move basically straight back and forth. On the left side, it's very different unless you're holding your hand at a crazy, crazy angle.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so it's basically giving you that same comfort on the right side and also making the left side comfy. It's not a weird butterfly-shaped keyboard; it is still a rectangle, but it is just that little bit better. We're not the first people who have done this. Our first prototype of this thing was, like, 2006, something like that. But it was a one-off, like, “I wonder if I would like this.” And we were actually planning to do that one next after the Model 01 when the Atreus popped up, and that was a much faster, simpler, straighter-forward thing to bring to production.Corey: The one thing I want from a keyboard—and I haven't found one yet; maybe it exists, maybe I have to build it myself—but I want to do the standard mechanical keyboard—I don't even particularly care about the layout because it all passes through a microcontroller on the device itself. Great. And those things are programmable as you've demonstrated; you've already done an awful lot of open-source work that winds up being easily used to control keyboards. And I love it, and it's great, but I also want to embed a speaker—a small one—into the keyboard so I can configure it that every time I press a key, it doesn't just make a clack, it also makes a noise. And I want to be able to—ideally—have it be different keys make different noises sometimes. And the reason being is that when we eventually go back to offices, I don't want there to be any question about who is the most obnoxious typist in the office; I will—Jesse: [laugh].Corey: —win that competition. That is what I want from a keyboard. It's called the I-Don't-Want-Anyone-Within-Fifty-Feet-Of-Me keyboard. And I don't quite know how to go about building that yet, but I have some ideas.Jesse: So, there's absolutely stuff out there. There is prior art out there.Corey: Oh, wonderful.Jesse: One of the other options for you is solenoids.Corey: Oh, those are fun.Jesse: So, a solenoid is—there is a steel bar, an electromagnet, and a tube of magnetic material so that you can go kachunk every time you press a key.Corey: It feels functionally like a typewriter to my understanding.Jesse: I mean, it can make it feel like a typewriter. The haptic engine in an iPhone or a Magic Trackpad is not exactly a solenoid but might give you the vaguest idea of what you're talking about.Corey: Yeah, I don't think I'm going to be able to quite afford 104 iPhones to salvage all of their haptic engines so that I can then wind up hooking each one up to a different key but, you know, I am sure someone enterprising come up with it.Jesse: Yeah. So, you only need a couple of solenoids and you trigger them slightly differently depending on which key is getting hit, and you'll get your kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk.Corey: Yeah, like spacebar for example. Great. Or you can always play a game with it, too, like, the mystery key: whenever someone types in the hits the mystery key, the thing shrieks its head off and scares the heck out of them. Especially if you set it to keys that aren't commonly used, but ever so frequently, make everyone in the office jumpy and nervous.Jesse: This will be perfect for Zoom.Corey: Oh, absolutely, it would. In fact, one thing I want to do soon if this pandemic continues much longer, is then to upgrade my audio setup here so I can have a second microphone pointed directly into my keyboard so that people who are listening at a meeting with me can hear me typing as we go. I might be a terrible colleague. One wonders.Jesse: You might be a terrible colleague, but you might be a wonderful colleague. Who knows?Corey: It all depends on the interests we have. I want to thank you for taking the time to walk me through the evolution of Keyboardio. If people want to learn more, or even perhaps buy one of these things, where can they do that?Jesse: They can do that at keyboard.io.Corey: And hence the name. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about all this. I really appreciate it.Jesse: Cool. Thanks so much for having me. I had fun.Corey: I did, too. Jesse Vincent—obra on Twitter, and of course, the CTO of Keyboardio. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, but before typing it, switch your keyboard to Dvorak.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week (Whip It Good)! || EP 549

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 54:57


What a dumb week it was! We covered "Missing white woman syndrome," border patrol agents whipping their horses, Joe Biden not caring about the trillionaires (that don't exist), the ACLU changing Ruth Bader Ginsburg's words to gender neutral, and AOC crying yet again! DHS seeks contractor to run migrant detention facility at Gitmo, guards who speak Haitian Creole https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/immigration/biden-admin-seeks-contractor-run-migrant-detention-facility-gitmo-guards-n1279886 Open an IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Physical Gold & Crypto TAX-FREE! Get 1-Month FREE with Discount Code ($29.95 Savings)   Link: https://rebrand.ly/libertypod   Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml   Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com   Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/   Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com   Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
9.23.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 36:29


2:00- Opening up the phone lines to see who we are bleeping today.  18:40- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  34:50- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nightside With Dan Rea
Cluster-bleep at the Border (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 38:47


The Biden Administration is facing severe backlash for its handling of Haitian migrants swarming the U.S. Southern Border, after images of mounted Border Patrol agents using aggressive tactics went viral this week. Meanwhile Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says he is resorting to "unprecedented" methods to deter migrants from crossing into the state, including parking National Guard and DPW vehicles for miles along the border to create a "steel barrier." Former Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan joins Dan to discuss.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Panthers Hype After Win and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 38:03


Mac and Bone try to figure out why people are trying to take away some steam from the Panthers' win, reveal their 'What the Bleep?' stories of the week and welcome in Frank Garcia to find out where he is on this defense right now after two strong performances. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast
#199 Shooting a photographer's wedding and anyone want to buy our bleep machine? It's over!

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 86:58


Shooting a wedding for an established professional wedding photographer. How does that feel? This week we find out from our special guest Anna McCarthy who shot our own Mullins' big day. We also talk about personal photographic style. Is it real? There's advice on lens upgrades, Kev and Neale consider truck driving again and we talk about upgrading your X100 camera to become become an infrared version! Also, we're 'selling' the bleep machine, asking how secure your kit is on the road and wondering why local authorities don't open up unused shops to be places of art. Book of the week is Genesis by Sebastiào Salgado.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Urban Meyer Already Frustrated and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 37:19


Mac and Bone talk about the cracks that we are already starting to see with Urban Meyer and the Jacksonville experiment and why Matt Rhule is different, reveal their 'What the Bleep?' stories of the week and discuss the Panthers Week 1 win over the Jets with Frank Garcia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lour After Hours
PPG - 9.13.21 - Beep Don't Know Bleep

Lour After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 54:57


On this episode of PPG, the group talks about tattoos, bad foods, and a new segment called Beep Don't Know Bleep. Beep hasn't watched football since 2017, so the crew tests his knowledge. It went exactly how you'd expect. #LourRangerLineup @Fleminem_raps @BeepCount @HalloweenBasic @str8cashhomie88 @stupacarmy790 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Starfleet Underground
I'm Glad I Wore Underwear

Starfleet Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:56


This week there's an epic party, but Mariner's not on the list. Tendi and Rutherford blow up the cutest warp core you've ever seen. Becky's Back in Town with a case full of bubble bath, and Boimler's riding shotgun. Find out what a Doopler is, and how not to duplicate it. And, our Number One is back from Star Trek Day, and yes that was him in the video, probably violating the prime directive. -Brought to you by Section 31- 00:00 Episode 88 00:45 Captain's Mount 01:00 Who's Saint Andrews? 01:50 Hide your kids, but bring your wife 02:10 A Tribble Incident 02:30 No more Dooplercating 02:45 No Photocopying with the Warp Drive 03:08 Playing with myself - Cards 03:50 Star Trek Day News - Discovery Season 4 Starts 11/18/21 04:20 Nana Visistor's New Book! 05:50 Number One's Away Mission at Star Trek Day 07:35 Number One sighted! 08:40 Strange New Worlds Cast 09:00 Standing O 09:54 The Orchestra was phenomenal - and Isa Briones 10:45 Bad Slur? 11:30 Hosts? 11:45 Ricardo who? 12:55 Starfleet Acadamey 13:30 Where's our Section 31? 13:35 Star Trek Prodigy 10/28/22 = Looks Good 14:15 Pew Pew Pew! 15:00 Can I call you Captain? 15:22 That's in a different Holodeck 15:29 Star Trek: Lower Decks S2E5 - "An Embarrasment of Dooplers" 15:53 Act I - "The DOH-pler Effect" 16:00 Emissionary, Emissions, what? 17:25 Richard Kind 17:49 Dooplercating 18:03 WTF is a Doopler? 18:50 Drop a fork 19:10 There's no forking around 19:30 Stacking Crates 20:00 Getting Torn Up 20:30 Replicated Water 21:10 Model with phasers 21:30 Mariner looking sexy, Boimler Skant. 22:26 Who's Becky? OMG, Becky look at 22:55 Quark's 23:27 Act II - "Dooplercating" 23:59 There were some Lores in there 24:25 Tom Kenny 25:00 Star Trek Actors 26:10 Corrections! 26:50 If you're Boim Boim, you like the Voy Voy 27:00 Ceti Alhpa 27:30 BF and GF? 28:30 Spirking 29:20 The Silent Treatment 29:35 Rutherford has no chill 30:22 Constipated Cop? 31:45 Dabo! 32:00 We're not people! 32:30 Rutherford competes with his own ghost 33:20 Seminar with Ed 33:53 Still Alive 34:20 Bubble Bath www.ebay.com/itm/252767662145 35:36 https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1313&_nkw=star+trek+bubble+bath&_sacat=0 36:12 After the Horn Rub 36:37 https://twitter.com/StarfleetUnderG/status/1434577352940531723?s=20 36:50 Act III - "Pissedopplers" 38:55 I'm glad I wore underwear for this 39:55 Tough-Ass Bouncer 41:01 Riding on your shoulders 41:50 Cute Warp Core Ejection 42:30 Doopler Listeners? 43:20 Bleep, Bleep Bleep, Your Bleeping Face! 44:15 Prune Juice Spritz 44:40 Picard is not a golem? 46:25 Jennifer Lewis 46:50 Free Shots! 47:15 DJ Outrageous Okana 48:00 Dive Bar Decorations 48:30 Crawling things Bleep up your Bleep 49:00 DS9 Model! 49:15 Self-referencing and easter eggs 51:20 You're Number One! 51:50 A Beard 52:30 One little gripe 53:20 Ratings 54:00 Insulting Tribbles Thanks for listening! Now on Patreon! patreon.com/starfleetunderground Email: thecollective@starfleetunderground.com Website: starfleetunderground.com Twitter: twitter.com/StarfleetUnderG Instagram: instagram.com/starfleetunderground Facebook: facebook.com/starfleetunderground YouTube: www.youtube.com/Qtsy16 Explicit

The Howie Carr Radio Network
It's Going Viral. No, Not COVID...*Bleep* Joe Biden Chants- 9.13.21 - Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 38:32


The 'Bleep' Joe Biden chants are going viral, more and more sporting events seem to be super spreading their disdain for our 'beloved' Dementia Joe. Also Howie reacts to the Chumpline.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week (Vaccine Mandates) || EP 541

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 65:21


We vote on the dumbest things of the week! Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-business-health-coronavirus-pandemic-executive-branch-18fb12993f05be13bf760946a6fb89be One in 5,000 https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/07/briefing/risk-breakthrough-infections-delta.html Open an IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Physical Gold & Crypto TAX-FREE! Get 1-Month FREE with Discount Code ($29.95 Savings)   Link: https://rebrand.ly/libertypod   Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml   Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com   Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/   Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com   Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bat Minute
Bat Minute & Robin - Minute 36: Bleep the Pain Away (with Courtney Coulson and Simon Haynes)

Bat Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 41:21


FOLLOW YOUR OWN STAR! LIVE LAUGH LOVE! All with the power of telescopes, of course. Apparently Bruce has been seeing Julie forever at this point. We seem to have entered a time slip, but Julie seems pretty damn keen! Back on the case once again is the Engineer of audio Paradise, Courtney Coulson of 'Alien Prequels by Minute'! Teaming up with her once more due to his Prime Directive is her Robocop Minute co-host, Simon Haynes! You'd buy this for a dollar, right? After this, our guests sadly have to go - somewhere there is a crime happening. The next episode follows on Monday. Same Bat Pod, different Bat Minute! Join us on Facebook at the Bat Minute Listener's Cave! The Bat Minute theme song is by the band Rat Bit Kit and Ash Lerczak (aka Doc Horror) of Zombina & The Skeletones and Double Echo. Courtney Coulson Travian Designs - Website - Patreon Alien Prequels by Minute - Website - Facebook   Simon Haynes 60 Seconds to Comply - Website - Facebook - Twitter - Instagram Fandom Crossing - Facebook Helios Photography - Facebook  

BMitch & Finlay
9.9.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 38:28


1:00- Opening up the phone lines to hear about who people are mad at today.  20:00- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT and week one in the NFL.  32:45- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First."   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

It's All Been Done Radio Hour
Pymer Labs: Bleep and Blorp

It's All Been Done Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 2:35


It's All Been Done Radio Hour Commercial #151  Pymer Labs #4 "Bleep and Blorp"    Two aliens would like you to worship them.    A comedy radio show originally performed Saturday, September 12, 2020 streaming online.   STARRING  Samantha Stark as Bleep  Seamus Talty as Blorp  Joe Morales as Jimmy    Narrated by Darren Esler  Foley Artist Seamus Talty   Podcast edited by Chris Allen  Written by Jerome Wetzel Directed by Samantha Stark Music Director Kristin Green  Theme Songs by Nathan Haley and Jerome Wetzel   Technical Director Shane Stefanchik    Visit our website iabdpresents.com   Please support us at http://patreon.com/IABD    Follow us on social media @IABDPresents   When you post about us, hashtag #IABD 

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: ACC Week 1 Struggles, What the Bleep? and Panthers Preseason Projections Hate

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 41:58


Mac and Bone determine whether or not ACC Week 1 showing should be something that people should be concerned about going forward, reveal their 'What the Bleep?' stories of the week and react to the hate that the Panthers are receiving in preseason projections. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (de Blasio, Joe Walsh, Bernie & More) || EP 537

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 51:01


It's Dumb Bleep of the Week! The day where we get to count down the dumbest things we saw over the last week, and take a vote on the dumbest! Open an IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Physical Gold & Crypto TAX-FREE! Get 1-Month FREE with Discount Code ($29.95 Savings) https://rebrand.ly/libertypod Code: LIBERTY Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Teams Who Bust Up the CFP, What the Bleep? and Fitty Remaining Aggressive

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 37:05


Mac and Bone talk about which teams they believe can bust up the College Football Playoff this season, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and discuss the aggressive mindset that Scott Fitterer has come out of the gate in Charlotte. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Anything Goes
26 Writers Perform Their Songs II

Anything Goes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 34:25


Part two of a special program featuring some of Broadway's greatest composers and lyricists talking about and performing their own songs. This episode includes performances by Cy Coleman, Peter Link, Harold Rome, Micki Grant, Frank Loesser, Stephen Schwartz, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Alan Menken, and Jule Styne. Featured songs: “A Moment of Madness,” “King Of Hearts,” “Sing Me A Song Of Social Significance,” “One Big Union,” “Who's Gonna Teach The Children How To Sing?” “Bloop, Bleep,” “Prestidigitation,” “You Can Always Catch Our Act At The Met,” “Pink Fish,” and “Stay With The Happy People.” Originally produced and broadcast in 1986. For more information go to AnythingGoesPL.com or BPN.FM/AnythingGoes. Theme music arranged by Bruce Coughlin. Sound mixing by David Rapkin. Associate producer Jeff Lunden. Anything Goes – Backstage with Broadway's Best – is produced and hosted by Paul Lazarus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Here for the Wrong Reasons
You Can't [Bleep] A [Bleep]

Here for the Wrong Reasons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 65:32


BIP 7 E2-3: Lance Bass serves up tongue and tripe. Brendan serves up a word salad to tell Demi he wants to see other people. Victoria P gets served for dating someone outside of Paradise. Follow us @forwrongreasons. Send feedback and glowing praise to hereforthewrongreasons@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kill The Bottle
Crystal Marie Denha

Kill The Bottle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 50:38


Crystal and Eddie give Megan dating advice.  We learn that Crystal doesn't BLEEP. Crystal tells the story of her BLEEP BLEEP BLEEP BLEEP while we sip on Marques De Riscal Rioja. Theme music by " The Zetas" produced by Ethan Carlson and Omar Tavarez

Screaming in the Cloud
Saving Vowels and Upping Security with Clint Sharp

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 33:41


About ClintClint is the CEO and a co-founder at Cribl, a company focused on making observability viable for any organization, giving customers visibility and control over their data while maximizing value from existing tools.Prior to co-founding Cribl, Clint spent two decades leading product management and IT operations at technology and software companies, including Splunk and Cricket Communications. As a former practitioner, he has deep expertise in network issues, database administration, and security operations.Links: Cribl: https://cribl.io Cribl sandbox: https://sandbox.cribl.io Cribl.cloud: https://cribl.cloud Jobs: https://cribl.io/jobs TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part my Cribl Logstream. Cirbl Logstream is an observability pipeline that lets you collect, reduce, transform, and route machine data from anywhere, to anywhere. Simple right? As a nice bonus it not only helps you improve visibility into what the hell is going on, but also helps you save money almost by accident. Kind of like not putting a whole bunch of vowels and other letters that would be easier to spell in a company name. To learn more visit: cribl.ioCorey: And now for something completely different!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest this week for this promoted episode is Clint Sharp, the CEO and co-founder of a company called Cribl. Clint, thank you for joining me, and let's get the big question out of the way first: what is Cribl?Clint: Yeah, so Cribl makes a stream processing engine for log and metric data. And that sounds really dry and boring, but what it really means is, we help connect, in the observability and security world, lots of log and metric sources, so you can take stuff from anywhere and put it to anywhere. And you can think of it like ETL or you can think of it like middleware; it sits there in this particular space, and it's built for SRE and security people.Corey: Now, I looked into this a little bit previously, and I had a sneaking suspicion when I started kicking a few of the tires on this, that there's probably going to be an economic story of optimization and saving money because of a couple things. One, that's what I do; I pay attention to things that save customers money in the end run, and to your company's called Cribl—that's C-R-I-B-L. That should probably have another L and certainly, you should buy a vowel to go in there somewhere, but that's someone optimizing but still keeping things intact enough to be understood slash pronounceable. It really does feel like in this space, saving money on vowels is a notable tenet for companies that focus on saving money.Clint: Yeah, so what's interesting about enterprises is they care about money, and then they don't care about money. And so it's a really good way to get a meeting. We definitely do help people save a ton of money, but ultimately, I think what the value people get out of the product is helping connect all the things that they have. And so one of the biggest problems that we see in the spaces is, “Hey, I have all these agents deployed.” Maybe it's Fluentd or Fluent Bit, or Elastic Beats or Splunk's Forwarder.And I want to get this data over to my fancy new data lake, or over to my machine learning and AI systems, and maybe I want to put it on a Kafka Topic, but it's only designed to work with the thing it's designed to work with. So, if I have Beats deployed, it works with Elastic. Okay, great. How do I also use that same data elsewhere? And really, that's the big problem that we end up solving for our customers.Corey: It's the many-to-many problem. There's a lot of work that's implemented multiple times in multiple ways; it feels like it's effectively you're logging the same thing 15 different times in 15 different ways.Clint: Well, then you look at the endpoint, and you find, “Oh, hey, we've got, like, eight agents rolled out here,” which is, you know, one from each vendor, they're all collecting the same thing. And then people are like, “Oh, man, this is chewing up a ton of resources and we're spending 20 or 30% of every box just, like, collecting security data and IT data. And couldn't that be better?” And then oh, by the way, each one of those agents has their own security surface area, so you have to make sure that those agents themselves are secure because they're often making outbound connections; they're listening for inbound connections. So, we really kind of help at the edge, help people reuse existing resources.Corey: One thing you said a few sentences ago caught me a little bit off guard and I want to dive into that a little bit. You talked about the observability and security world. Now, every time I talk to folks in one of those two spaces, they're sort of tangentially aware of the other one exists, on some level, but they're always framed as two very distinct universes. And you talk about them as if they're effectively one and the same. Was that intentional?Clint: Well, the data is the same. And it starts there because we're collecting log data, and that log data may go into a SIEM tool, and people are using that to try to understand their security posture, and malicious actors, and threats. Oh, and by the way, that same log data is also used for understanding the performance and availability of your systems. The same type of metric data is used in both, the same type of catalogs that say, hey, what is my inventory, and what assets do I have, and where are they deployed? And all of that is relevant for both sides.And the tooling often ends up being very similar, if not identical. And I used to work in Splunk many years ago; that's a tool that's well known for being popular in both camps. And so I developed this decade-long perspective of like, man, I'd show up and actually, they're sitting right next to each other; there's DevOps—DevSecOps now, which are now trying to marry those things. And so certainly, there's just a ton of overlap.Corey: It's still all just sparkling systems administration, but people fight me on that one.Clint: Oh, yeah. Well, yeah, so SRE is sysadmin plus, plus, plus, plus, plus.Corey: Now, I've told it—what is it, it's SRE if it's in the Mountain View region of Silicon Valley. Otherwise, it's just sparkling DevOps? Yep. Same story. It's from my perspective, we called ourselves sysadmins, and then if we called ourselves DevOps, but, “I know, but DevOps isn't a job title.”Great, but it is a 40% raise so I'm going to be quiet about the purity of titles and take the money was my approach back then. And now there are 10 or 15 different ways you can refer to people who are more or less doing the same job and there's no consistency between company to company in many respects. They almost become buzzwords and trite at some point, but it's easier than trying to have a 15-minute conversation in response to, “So, what do you do at whatever company you work at?”Clint: Well, also the grizzled sysadmin persona very much now a security person as well, right? So, you know, coming out of that sysadmin lineage, now I have to learn a whole bunch of new words, and security very much as a discipline, what I would criticize as saying, is very gatekeeper-y in terms of, “Okay, we're going to come up with their own vernacular so that we know that you're not one of us.” That's one of my big criticisms of security. But the skill set, the same people who were sysadmin 20 years ago are definitely becoming security specialists, they're becoming SREs. And so if you share the same lineage, then you're really not all that different.Corey: Well, that's why I launched Last Week in AWS security newsletter podcast combo that just as just recently started launching as of the time that this airs because, “Security is everyone's job,” but strangely, they don't pay everyone like that. And it ties into an entire ecosystem of folks who have to care about security, but the word security doesn't appear in their job title. And most security products seem to be pitched at the executive level where they use the same tired wording that you'll see on airport ads everywhere, or they're talking to InfoSec practitioners—whatever those might look at—and tying into, in some cases, a very hostile community. In other cases, they're talking extensively about the ins and outs of how to overcome and defeat particular attack styles, or the—worst of all worlds—where it just reduces down into compliance and auditing checkboxes, which no one gets super excited about. I'm not interested in any of that.I want to tell stories about, okay, as someone who has other work to get done, what's the security impact of what's happening lately? How do you round it up and distill it down into something useful, instead of something that winds up just acting as a giant distraction and becoming a budget justifier?Clint: Well, security detection, I think, is a really fascinating area. You're seeing a lot of consolidation now between traditional SIEM companies that—Splunk would be in there, but then you've got newer players like Exabeam, you got newer players like CrowdStrike who are coming from the EDR space, and they're coming very strongly and saying, “Hey, look, I own the endpoint but really what I need to be able to do is analyze all this data.” And that's where really these things are combining because tell me that XDR is not fundamentally the same—like, I keep using the word lineage, but the same type of product that I was building a SIEM from before. And most people I talked to are having a really hard time. Like, “What's the difference between XDR and SIEM? Aren't these things largely the same?”But at the same time, then when you look at observability, it's the same problem; I need to be able to ask and answer arbitrary questions of data. And security detection is fundamentally the same problem, I have all this data that's being egressed from my complex systems, all my endpoints, all of my VMs, my containers, all of my infrastructure, all my applications, and I need to be able to detect when someone is doing something wrong, like, some malicious actor is doing something wrong. Tell me that's not observability.Corey: Of course it is. And the same problems apply to both where, if I have something happened in my application and my observability tooling doesn't tell me for 20 minutes, that's kind of a problem in the same way that you have that in the security space. Yet somehow, AWS's CloudTrail takes about that, on average, to wind up surfacing various things that are happening in the environment. In many cases, the entire event can be over by the time CloudTrail says, “Hey, there's a thing going on.” For those who aren't familiar, CloudTrail effectively captures management events that happen talking to the AWS APIs.So, someone creates something, someone accesses something, et cetera, et cetera. That's useful when you need that, but if you're going to take action based on that, you want to know sooner rather than later. Same story with any sort of monitoring tool that, “Oh, yeah, the site's taking an outage and our system will let us know in only 20 short minutes.” Oh, I assure you customers will tell us long before then.Clint: That's sort of dovetails into some of the things that we see in the marketplace that we help with which are—talk about CloudTrail, people say all data is security relevant but I have to pay for all that data, too, so that data has to go somewhere. Do I care about every cloud—of course, I don't care about every CloudTrail event; I care about some subset of those.Corey: And honestly, in the full sweep of time, you really care about that one specific CloudTrail thing, but it's the needle in the haystack.Clint: And so AWS, this is a constant conflict between people who have to observe and secure systems need all the data because I may not know in advance what question I want to ask, but at the same time, I do know that not all of that is necessarily interesting right now, and so there's a fundamental tension between, okay, the developer says, “Well, look. You can't ask a question of data that's not there, so I'm going to put everything in the log. Literally every byte of data, everything that I could ever think of, I'm going to put in that log.”And then the receiver of that says like—I'll give a good example. We've been talking about EDR. CrowdStrike EDR logs, phenomenal data source, have a ton of really interesting information about the security of your endpoints, and they also have an extra 100 fields that nobody gives a crap about. So, what do I do with that data? Do I pay to ingest all that data because all my vendors are charging me based off the bytes of data that are going into their platforms? And so there's a real optimization potential there to have a really strong opinion on what good data is.Corey: Part of the problem, too, is that you absolutely want the totality of everything captured around the specific event you care about. But by and large, we've all been in environments where we have a low-traffic app, and we see giant piles of web server logs. “Okay, great. Let's take a look at what those web server logs are.” And by volume, it's 98% load balancer health checks showing up.It seems to me there might either be a way to strip them out entirely or alternately express those in a way that is a lot more compact and doesn't fill things out. I still feel like there's some terrible company somewhere where their entire way of getting signal from noise is to pay a whole bunch of interns to read the entire log by hand. I like to imagine that is me speaking hyperbolically, but I'm kind of scared it's not.Clint: Yeah. And then the question is, well, then how do I achieve a goal of actually getting the right data to the right place? So, that's something that we help out about. I think that the—I feel a lot for the persona of this kind of sysadmin, this type of security person because they're caught in this tension: like, do I go write code? My skill set as an SRE or my skill set as a security person is being an expert in the data itself.I know that event is good, and I know that event is bad. Am I also supposed to be a person who then needs to go write a bunch of pipelines and Lambda functions, and how do I actually achieve the goal because there's always way more demand than there is capacity to be able to onboard all of this data. So fundamentally, how do we get the right thing to the right place?Corey: That's, on some level, a serious problem. I will say that looking at what you do and how you do it, you take a whole bunch of different disparate data sources, and then effectively reduce all of those into passing through the Cribl log stream, and then sending the data out to exactly where it needs to go. And I have to imagine that when you talk about what you're doing to typical VCs and whatnot, their question is, “Ah, but what if AWS launches a thing to do that?” To which I can only assume that your response must have been, “You're right, if AWS does learn to speak coherently and effectively across all of their internal service teams, we're going to have a serious problem.” At which point, I can only imagine that your VCs threw back their heads, you shared a happy laugh, and then they handed you another $200 million, which you have just raised. Congratulations, by the way.Clint: Thank you so much. It's, you know, people say a lot of times in startup-land, like, “Oh, we shouldn't celebrate the fundraising.” I'll tell you, as a person who's done it a few times, I celebrate. That's a shitload of work.Corey: Oh, absolutely. I looked into it in the very early days of, okay, as I'm building out what would become The Duckbill Group, do I talk to VCs and the rest? And I did a little bit of investigation, and it's, wow, that it's so much work to build the pitch deck and have all the meetings and wind up doing all of that. I'd rather just go and sell things to customers and see how that works. And oh, that turned out to raise money that I don't have to repay.Okay, that seems like a different path. And there are advantages and disadvantages to every approach you can take on this. I mean, yeah, no shade here on how you decide to build out a technology company using VC-backed up resourcing, which is a sensible way to do it, but it's a different style. And the sheer amount of work that very clearly goes into raising a fundraising round is just staggering to me. And that's for seed-level rounds; I can only imagine down the path. This is not your first round.Clint: Yeah, I mean, it's a validation, I think, of where we're going, and really, kind of, our vision because we've been talking a lot about how data moves, but I think one of the other key concepts that we're advocating for that there's a net-new concept in the industry is this concept of an observability lake. And back to that tension of there's always way more data, S3 as an example provides excellent economics, but very few people provide a way for you to use just raw data that I end up going and dumping into S3. And that's really the fallback for it. Like, if I don't know what to do with this data, I don't want to delete it because what if it becomes security relevant? Let's talk about the SUNBURST SolarWinds attack.Everybody in the industry wishes that they had every flow log, every log from every endpoint dating back two or three years so that they could actually go do a detailed investigation of, “Okay. That SolarWinds box got breached, and what all was it talking to?” And they can actually build a graph from that and go understand that. But most people have deleted all that data. They've decided that I can't afford to have it anymore.And so really, this concept of a lake is like, well, look, I can finally at least put it somewhere as an insurance policy and make sure that's actually going to be relevant. And then eventually what's going to be happening is people are going to go help you make use of that data—and we will as well—be going out there to help you take petabytes and petabytes and petabytes of logs data, metric data, trace data, observability data and give you the ability to analyze that effectively.Corey: My constant complaint about the term ‘data lake'—because I've seen this happen in various client environments, AWS will release something that specifically targets data lakes, and I'll talk to my client about that service. “This is a data lake solutions, but it would be awesome.” And they look at me like I'm very foolish and say, “Yeah, we don't have a data lake.” To which my response is, “Great. What's that eight petabytes of data sitting in S3?” “Oh, it's mostly logs.”And I don't think that they're foolish, I don't think I'm foolish, but very often talking to folks who have data lakes do not recognize what they have as being a data lake because that feels almost like it's a marketing term that has been inflicted on people. Like, they would consider it—because we all consider it this way—as more of a data morass. You're not really sure what's in there; you're told by your data science teams, who are incredibly expensive, that one day we'll unlock value in all of those web server logs, the load balancer health checks dating back to 2012, but we just don't know what that is yet. But do you really want to risk deleting it? And it becomes this, effectively, deadstock that sits there.So, you want to retain it, particularly if you have compliance obligations. There's—theoretically at least—business value locked up in those things and you need to be able to access that in a reasonable way. And anytime I see tooling that winds up billing based upon amount of data stored in it, so just cut retention significantly. It feels like it cuts against the grain of what they're trying to do.Clint: I mean, yeah, retention, I mean, especially for security people—this is the difference between security and operations because operations is like, “Last 24 hours a data, I need. Pretty much after that, give me some aggregated statistics and I'm good.” Security people want full-fidelity data dating back years. But I think one of the other important concepts that we haven't seen in the industry, and part of what we're trying to change is, you know, I put data into a tool today. It's that tool's data, right?So—and it doesn't matter which tool it is that I'm put—they're all the same. But fundamentally, I put data into a metrics or time-series database and put data into a logging tool, and that data is now owned by that vendor. And the big difference that we see in the concept of a lake is raw data at rest in S3 buckets—or other object storage depending on your cloud provider, depending on who, on-prem, is providing you that interface—in a way in which I can choose in the future, what tool is going to use to analyze that and I'm no longer locked in. And I think that's really what we've been trying to advocate as an industry is that every enterprise I've talked to has everything. They've got one of every single tool and none of them are going away.There is no such thing as a single pane of glass; that's a myth that we've been talking about for 30 freaking years and it's just never actually going to happen. And so really, what you need to be able to do is integrate things better and just make sure that people can actually use the tool that they want to use to analyze the data in the way that they see fit, and not be bound by the decision that was made six months ago as to which tool to put it in.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Thinkst. This is going to take a minute to explain, so bear with me. I linked against an early version of their tool, canarytokens.org in the very early days of my newsletter, and what it does is relatively simple and straightforward. It winds up embedding credentials, files, that sort of thing in various parts of your environment, wherever you want to; it gives you fake AWS API credentials, for example. And the only thing that these things do is alert you whenever someone attempts to use those things. It's an awesome approach. I've used something similar for years. Check them out. But wait, there's more. They also have an enterprise option that you should be very much aware of canary.tools. You can take a look at this, but what it does is it provides an enterprise approach to drive these things throughout your entire environment. You can get a physical device that hangs out on your network and impersonates whatever you want to. When it gets Nmap scanned, or someone attempts to log into it, or access files on it, you get instant alerts. It's awesome. If you don't do something like this, you're likely to find out that you've gotten breached, the hard way. Take a look at this. It's one of those few things that I look at and say, “Wow, that is an amazing idea. I love it.” That's canarytokens.org and canary.tools. The first one is free. The second one is enterprise-y. Take a look. I'm a big fan of this. More from them in the coming weeks.Corey: I can tell this story—why not. I don't imagine it was your direct fault, but nine years ago, now—so I should disclaim this. I am not even suggesting this is the way it is today. I was at a startup and we reached out to Splunk to look at handling a lot of our log analysis needs because it turned out we had a bunch of things that were spewing out logs. Nothing compared to what most sites look at these days, but back then for us, it felt like a lot of data.And we got a quote that was more than the valuation of the company at the time. Because it seems like their biggest market headwind at the time was the rise of democracy basically making monarchies go out of fashion, and there were fewer princesses that we could kidnap for ransom in order to pay the Splunk bill. And, to their credit, they reached out every quarter and said, “Oh, have your needs change any?” “No, we have not massively inflated the value of this company so we can afford your bill. Thank you for asking.”But the problem that I had is when I pushed back on them on this—because it's not just one of those make fun of it and move on stories because Splunk was at the time very much the best-of-breed answer here—their response was, “Oh, just go ahead and log less and that brings your bill back into something that's a lot more cohesive and understandable.”Clint: Which destroys the utility of the whole tool to begin with.Corey: Exactly. The entire reason to have a tool like that is to go through vast quantities of data and extract meaning from it. And if you're not able to do that because you have less data, it completely defeats the value proposition of what it is you're bringing to the table. Because in the security space, in many ways in the observability space, and certainly in my world of the cost optimization space, it's an optimization story. It does not speed your time to market, it does not increase revenue in almost every case, so it's always going to be a trailing function behind things that do.Companies are structured top to bottom in order to increase revenue and enter new markets with the right offerings at the right times and serve customers because that can massively increase the value of the company. Reduction and, I guess, the housekeeping stuff is things people get really excited about for short windows of time and then not again. It's inconsistent.Clint: Yeah, about every time the bill comes due is when they get really excited about it.Corey: Exactly. And I have to assume on some level, this was one of those, “Okay, first start using it. You'll see how valuable it becomes, and then you'll start logging more data.” But it didn't feel right because it's either being disingenuous, or it's saying that, “Oh, don't worry. You'll find the money somehow.”Which is not true in that scenario. Now, they've redone their pricing multiple times since then. There are other entrants in the market that help us look at data in a bunch of different ways, but across the board, it's frustrating seeing that there are all these neat tools that I wanted to use and I was perfectly positioned to use back then, and now nine years later, when someone says, “Oh, we use Splunk.” My immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, wow. You must have a lot of money to spend on services.” Which is not necessarily even close to reality in some cases, but first impressions like that really stick around a long time.Clint: Oh, absolutely. They stick around often because they're reaffirmed multiple times throughout [laugh] people's continued interactions. And I think there's just really a fundamental tension in the marketplace where the value proposition is massive amounts of data. And massive is different, depending on the size of your organization: if you're a big Fortune 100, massive might be, you know, a 100 petabytes at rest and a petabyte a day of data moving; or for you, massive might be a terabyte a day moving, and maybe a 50 terabytes at rest. But—and by the way, that's not going down.So, some of the bigger trends that we're seeing with the advent of zero trust, with the advent of remote work, with just in general growth of cloud containerized workloads, microservices, people are seeing a lot more data today than they were seeing two years ago, three years ago. And by the way, it's not like IT went from 2% of the budget to 10% of the budget. The budget's the same, so I got to do more with less. And it's a tension between data growth and cost and capacity. And so we got to get smarter.Corey: I like the fact that you're saying that you have to get smarter as you think about this from a tool perspective of being able to serve your customers, as opposed to a lot of tooling out there seems to inherently and intrinsically take the world view—and I don't know if this is an actual choice or just an unfortunate side effect—of, “Yeah, we have to educate our customers because right now, our customers are fairly dumb and we'd like it if they were smarter. If you were smart enough to appreciate how we do things, then things will go super well.” And I always found that to be a condescending attitude that doesn't serve customers super well. And it also leaves a lot of money on the table because for better or worse, you have to meet customers where they are: at their level of understanding, at their expression of the problem. And I've talked to a number of folks over at Cribl and, similar to certain large cloud providers, one of the things that you focus on is the customer; it's clearly a value of the company. How do you think about that?Clint: I'm a thousand percent agree with you. And for us, what I found after having been a practitioner for a decade and then working my way over to the vendor side, it's really nothing specific about one particular employer. Being a vendor is so complex. There's all these things that you're trying to con—you have investors, and you have the press, and analysts, and you have people who are constantly trying to influence where it is that you're—“I need to be in the upper right of the Gartner Magic Quadrant, so I have to make sure that those analysts really believe what it is that I'm saying.” And then pretty soon, just nobody even talks about the customer anymore.It's like, well, do people actually want to buy it? Is this thing actually solving real problems? And so from the beginning, me and my co-founders, we just wanted to make sure that the concept of the customer was embedded at the core of the company. And every time that an employee at Cribl is interacting and talking about what should we do next, and what features should we build, and how should we market, and how should we sell, let's make sure the customer is there. Customers first always is the value, including in how we sell.We actively leave money on the table when it's not in the customer's right interest because we know that we want them to come back and buy from us again, later. When we market, we try to make sure that we're speaking to our customers in a language that is their language. When we're building a product, we use the product, we try to make sure that this is actually everyday, we don't look at, hey, it needs to look like this and have these features to meet these criteria and be called this. It's just like, “Well, does it actually help the customer solve a real problem for them? If so, let's build it. And if not, then who gives a [BLEEP]?”Corey: Exactly. It's understanding what your customers' pain points are. I mean, I ran into some similar problems when I was starting my consultancy where I—it turns out that I knew people who were more or less top of their class when it came to AWS bill understanding, reconciliation, and the rest. And those are the people I reached out to because I assumed that they knew what they're doing. There must be lots of people like them, everyone must be like these folks.And I talked to them about how they looked at their AWS bill. And, okay, “They said I would—I'd love to hire you to come in and do this as a consultant, but I would expect this, this, this, this, and this.” And, “Okay, I better come loaded for bear.” And so I did. And it turns out there's a lot more people out there who have never heard of a savings plan or a reserved instance before or, “Wait. You mean continues to charge me even after I'm still using it if I don't turn it off?” Yes, that is generally how it works.There's nothing wrong with that level of understanding of these things—well, there are several things wrong but that's beside the point—but understanding where folks are and understanding how you can meet them where they are and get them to a better place is way more important than trying to prove that I'm the smartest kid in town when it comes to a lot of the edge case, and corner cases, and nuanced areas. And so many tools seem to have fallen in love with their own tooling, and in love with how smart they are, and how clear their lines of thought leadership are, that they've almost completely forgotten that there are people in the world who do not think like that, who do not have the level of visibility or deep thought into the problem space; they just know that the logs are unmanageable, or the bill for this thing is really expensive, or whatever their expression or experience of that problem is, there are tools out there that can help them, but all of the messaging, all of the marketing distills down to, “Oh, you must be at least this smart to enter,” like it's an amusement park ride with a weird sign.Clint: Software is fundamentally a people business and when you end up implementing a tool—what's become fascinating to me as I've become the CEO of this company, rather than just kind of a product guy, so now I've had to sell it and I've had to market it, and I had to start very much from scratch, is that this stuff doesn't just get implemented by magic; even if they download the tool and is the easiest to use tool that you've ever used, they still don't have the time to learn all the details and intricacies of your product, and so hey, they actually want some professional services people to come and go install that; they want a salesperson to help them understand the value. I know a lot of people, especially coming from my background in, like, SRE or sysadmin from when I was doing it, kind of, “Oh, salespeople.” But, like, they do a real job; they help you articulate the value of this thing so that your bosses understand what you're actually buying. The sales engineers help you understand what those features are. And so having a customer-aligned company means that every interaction that they have with you needs to be a really, really great interaction so that they want to interact with you again because fundamentally, even though the bits are really awesome and they solve this really awesome technology challenge, nobody really cares about it.Ultimately, they're buying from people, they're implementing software built by people, and they're calling for support—which is another important part—from people who fundamentally care about them as well. So, in every interaction, fundamentally software is a people business, and you got to have the best people and the people that care.Corey: I wish more people took that philosophy because, frankly, it's missing from an awful lot of different expressions of what companies do. It's oh, if we can make the code just a little bit smarter, a little bit more predictive, then we never have to talk to the customer at all. It's, “No. You shouldn't write a line of anything before doing a whole bunch of customer research to validate that your understanding of the problem space aligns with theirs.”Clint: A good way to find out that doesn't work is to fail for a while, too. So, [laugh] so we did our fair share of that, too, and kind of pontificating and trying to figure out what we thought was best at the market, and it turned out that really what you needed to be able to do was to work closely with customers and understand their problems and tightly pair that sales cycle, that marketing messaging, that product all towards customer pain. And if you do that, customers are great because they see the people who care, and they will reward you by becoming your customer and continuing to advocate for you and talk about you. And it's so rewarding if you can take the right perspective.Corey: So, we've covered a fair number of things: your philosophy on the world of security versus observability; we've talked about meeting customers where they are; we've talked about AWS being so inept at communicating internally and cross-functionally that you're able to raise staggeringly large rounds, and we've talked about, I guess, how we wind up viewing the world of log collection, for lack of a better term. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you get there, where can they find you?Clint: Yeah, go to cribl.io. If you're a hands-on product person and you just want to see what we do, you can go to sandbox.cribl.io. And there's an online learning course, takes about an hour, walk you through the product. We'd love for you to try it.Corey: Oh, I don't have to speak to a salesperson?Clint: No, you don't have to talk to anybody. You can download the bits, you can try our cloud product for free at cribl.cloud. We are all about making sure that engineers can get access to the product before you have to talk to us. And if you think that's valuable, if this helps you solve a problem, then and only then should you engage with us and we'll see if we can figure out a way to sell you some software.Corey: Customer-focused. I'm also going to take a spot check here. I'm going to guess that given your recent funding news, you're also aggressively hiring.Clint: We are hiring across every function, and if you are interested in working for our customers-first software company and this sounds refreshing, please check out cribl.io/jobs, and we've hiring everywhere.Corey: I can endorse. We used to hang out, back before you wound up starting this place, and you were kicking around this idea of, “I have an idea for a company,” and my general perception is, “Eh, I don't know. Doesn't sound like it has legs to me.” And well, here we are. I sure can pick them. Badly. Clint, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Clint: Thanks, Corey. It's been a pleasure.Corey: Clint Sharp, CEO and co-founder of Cribl. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment telling me exactly why I'm wrong about the phrase ‘data lake' and tell me how many petabytes of useless material you have sitting in S3.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Cam Newton's Case to Start in New England Takes a Blow, What the Bleep and Jameis' Big Night

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 39:23


Mac and Bone talk about the latest twist in Cam Newton's quest to start for the Patriots, reveal the 'What the Bleep' stories for this week and discuss whether or not Jameis' strong performance last night should have Panther fans worried. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Show is All About You
Everyone Just Calm the <BLEEP> Down

This Show is All About You

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 27:28


Episode 33: “Everyone Just Calm the Down” JDK takes a deep breath after a very full and challenging week. And, thanks to a short conversation with a fellow author, he remembered and reconnected with the importance of historical perspective and staying calm. With that in mind, he discusses the centrality of Calm in our daily lives and in overcoming the challenges we face - even global ones.

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Sunday, August 22, 2021 - Anagrams Galore!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 13:29


A perfect Sunday crossword by Stephen McCarthy, with some extraordinary anagrams. For your consideration we offer 5A, It might be put on for stage PAGEANTRIES, GREASEPAINT, and 42A, You might be MARVELING AT this as it whizzes by, MAGLEVTRAIN. These are just two of the 10  jaw-droppingly good anagram-related clues that grace this puzzle. The other clues weren't too shabby either. Who could resist 106A , Five-letter word that replaces a four-letter word? BLEEP, or 22A, Member of a noble family, XENON (not BARON!)? A great way to end the weekend, we give this a 5 squares on the JAMCR scale 

The Mark Kaye Show
BIDEN LIES A LOT! AND NOT JUST IN BED..

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 102:37


8-19-2021 Biden is a "do nothing" president and he has to go., US wasn't prepared for Afghan collapse, and we play Conspiracy Theory Thursday! Also, What the Bleep!

BMitch & Finlay
8.19.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 38:01


2:00- It's time to open up the phone lines and hear what people are mad at today.  19:45- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about Washington sports.  35:20- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First".  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Kirk Herbstreit, What the Bleep and Sitting Players in the Preseason

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 40:31


Mac and Bone talk with Kirk Herbstreit about his new book and his road to being one of the most well known sports analysts in the world, run through their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and whether or not the Panthers are doing the right thing by sitting players in the preseason.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Sky Astrology Podcast
091 | Virgo Season & Mercury Enters Libra: What the (Bleep)?

Big Sky Astrology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 32:13


April and Jen gear up for an action-packed (expletive deleted) two weeks! The Sun moves into meticulous Virgo, marking the midpoint between eclipse seasons, while Mercury enters genteel Libra (and not a moment too soon). Double your Moonwatch pleasure with an(other) Aquarius Full Moon and the Gemini Last Quarter, and stand back as unpredictable Uranus turns retrograde. Also: Mercury and Mars initiate a new dance to Neptune's dreamy tune, the Sun and Jupiter size each other up, and there are more trines than you can shake a stick at! Plus: our second annual Podathon, bossy podpets, and rocking out! Podpals: Please note that we are releasing episodes every two weeks for the summer! The next episode will drop on Sept. 13! But if you find you're missing us, let us know! https://www.BigSkyAstroPod.com Read a full transcript of this episode: https://www.bigskyastrology.com/transcript-ep-91/ 00:30 – Podathon is coming!! Daily episodes coming your way the week of Sept. 20-24! Leave us your 60 second question at https://www.speakpipe.com/bigskyastrologypodcast! . 03:04 – A reminder: We have a lighter summer schedule and are releasing episodes every 2 weeks! If you'd like weekly updates, sign up for April's newsletter! https://bit.ly/3hK8MBt . 03:28 – April is teaching classes this fall! Registration is open! Learn more at  https://bit.ly/37A2KgM. . 04:54 – Count to ten: Mercury joins Mars at 12.48 Virgo (Aug. 18) on the Sabian symbol, “A strong hand supplanting political hysteria.” A cool, rational approach can overcome a heated situation. This is the first of three; the other two are in Libra (Oct. 9) and Scorpio (Nov. 10). . 08:17 – Don't get too comfortable! The Sun, at 27.13 Leo, opposes Jupiter in Aquarius (Aug. 19) on the symbols “Little birds on the limb of a large tree,” and “A tree felled and sawed.” This is the revelation point of a cycle that began Jan. 28, 2021. (Revisit Ep 66 https://www.bigskyastrology.com/episode-66/. To receive our hilarious bingo card, contribute $5 or more at https://www.bigskyastrology.com/support-the-podcast/!) . 10:06 – Uranus turns retrograde at 14.47 Taurus (Aug. 19, then direct Jan. 18). Then Mercury (Aug. 20) and Mars (Aug. 21) trine the innovative planet. . 12:37 – We welcome harvest season and a renewed devotion to what's important to us as the Sun enters Virgo (Aug. 22)! . 14:03 – Why does Virgo rule pets? . 15:32 – April is teaching classes in September! Registration is open until Aug. 30! https://bit.ly/37A2KgM. . 16:59 – *MOONWATCH * We have a second water-bearer Full Moon (FM) at 29.37 Aquarius (Aug. 22) on the symbol, “The field of Ardath in bloom.” This is a beautiful FM, with connections to the Aug. 8 2021, Feb. 11 2021, and Feb. 23 2020. . 21:35 – Week two begins here with a Last Quarter Moon at 7.08 Gemini (Aug. 30/31). . 23:04 – As Venus trines Saturn (Aug. 23, 8.39 Libra/Aqu), this might be the time to make relationship commitments or improve financial stability. . 24:00 – Mercury opposes Neptune (Aug. 24, 22.19 Virgo/Pisces). If you lost your temper at the end of March, now is the time to reconcile. . 24:34 – Focus! Mercury trines Pluto at 24:41 Capricorn (Aug. 26). . 25:16 – The Sun squares the Lunar Nodes on Aug. 28; we are halfway between eclipse seasons! . 26:10 – Mercury enters Libra (Aug. 29–Nov. 5), and head's up: Mercury will be retrograde Sep. 27-Oct. 18! . 29:38 – Big thanks to donors LINDSEY VIERA, WILD LUNA CREATIONS, CONNIE CAMERON, MAGDALENE OBOYLE, TAMMY DOLLAR, ELLIOTT MAYER, and ELIZABETH BROWN! If you like the show, you can always contribute at https://bit.ly/2VS1MtK. (If you donate $5 or more, we'll send you our recent Cancer Solstice episode and our bingo card!) You can also read show notes and transcripts and leave comments at our site! See you in two weeks!

Why We Bleep
WHY WE BLEEP 032: DANIEL MILLER & GARETH JONES - SUNROOF

Why We Bleep

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 75:21


LINKS➤ Listen and buy Sunroof's album Electronic Music Improvisations Vol 1 here: https://mute.com/mute/sunroof-daniel-miller-gareth-jones-announce-debut-album ➤ Support this podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mylarmelodiesTHANKS TO SPONSORShttp://www.signalsounds.comhttp://www.tinycrushmixing.com If you enjoyed this episode, please share it!

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! || EP 524

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 52:59


Eviction Moratoriums Libertarian from CATO says mandatory vaccines are okay? "Vaccines should be as easy as buying guns" US sends 3k troops back to Afghanistan Covid vaccines are "free" because they are paid for with taxes CEO vs. Worker pay Get your news from Ground News ground.news/gml Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade?  Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! Patreon.com/goodmorningliberty Like our intro song?  https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mark Kaye Show
HUNTER LOST ANOTHER LAPTOP?!?!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 102:29


8-12-2021 Hunter Buden's Confession to a Hooker, What the Bleep!, and Conspiracy Theory Thursday

Inner Truth with David Newell
Amit Goswami Ph.D. & Valentina Onisor MD: The Quantum Mind

Inner Truth with David Newell

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 62:40


Theoretical Quantum Physicist Dr. Amit Goswami is a revolutionary amongst a growing body of renegade scientists who, in recent years, has ventured into the domain of the spiritual in an attempt both to interpret the seemingly inexplicable findings of curious experiments and to validate intuitions about the existence of a spiritual dimension of life. A prolific writer, teacher, and visionary, Dr. Goswami has appeared in the movies What the Bleep do we know!?, Dalai Lama Renaissance, as well as the award winning documentary, The Quantum Activist. In his new book - The Quantum Brain- Amit and consciousness researcher Valentina Onisor explain the great exploratory power of consciousness-based quantum science, and minutely describe its numerous implications for scientific disciplines such as neuroscience, medicine, and psychology. Goswami and Onisor also show how this new science can change our lives for the better. 

Spout Lore
8-5 - Consequences

Spout Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 73:07


The gang returns to the city in search of the druids living there and discover how Makaal's residents have been fairing after the destabilization of the Light Guard. [Content Warning: Bleep, Bleep, Bleep] Bonus Content: https://www.patreon.com/spoutlore Discord Community: https://discord.gg/6cAQxeQM2t

Michael and Us
PREVIEW - #258 - What The Bleep Is This Shit!?

Michael and Us

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 2:57


PATREON EPISODE - https://www.patreon.com/posts/54650386 It was Homer Simpson who said, "What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind." This aphorism is much more useful than anything in WHAT THE BLEEP DO WE KNOW!? (2004), the pseudo-science docu-fiction movie that blew a lot of minds during the Bush era. We analyze the film's brand of hokum, which exists somewhere between The Secret and Scientology. The Superdelegate patron class forced us to watch this one, gang!

BMitch & Finlay
8.5.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 37:08


1:00- It's time to call in and give us your bleep you's to whatever is bothering you today.  20:40- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk Washington sports.  33:20- The guys give their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First".  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark Kaye Show
BIDEN SAYS THE DARNDEST THINGS!!!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 105:14


It's Conspiracy Theory Thursday, the fourth day of Christmas in July, andddd we played What the Bleep. Oh, and I shared some history of what happened today in American History!