Podcasts about Bleep

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  • 709PODCASTS
  • 1,950EPISODES
  • 1h 12mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Bleep

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Latest podcast episodes about Bleep

Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast with Nick Cattles
What the (bleep) was that in Buffalo?

Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast with Nick Cattles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 47:40


On this episode of the Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast w/ Nick Cattles, Greg is joined by Brendan Glasheen to recap the Patriots' 47-17 blowout loss to the Bills in the AFC Wild Card game. They discuss what went wrong for New England and what need to be fixed moving forward. The Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast w/ Nick Cattles is brought to you by BetOnline and LinkedIn Talent Solutions. Go to BetOnline.ag and use Promo Code: CLNS50 for a 50% Welcome Bonus On Your First Deposit! Visit Linkedin.com/BEDARD to post your first job for free! LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to faster. Did you know every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn. 0:30 Patriots defense was pathetic and passive 5:00 How did it get to this point? + Impact of Gilmore Trade 12:00 What was up with Matt Judon? 16:30 Belichick being conservative on 4th downs 21:30 3 Down/3 Up 30:00 Patriots teams aren't finishing seasons strong 37:00 What happened after the BYE Week 42:30 Jonnu Smith, Trent Brown, Isaiah Wynn & Davon Godchaux ... will they return? 45:00 BSJ member question of the day: What's the depth chart beyond Dave Ziegler in that black ops Pats front office ? Check us out over at www.bostonsportsjournal.com, for 39.99 on our annual plan. Not only do you get top-notch analysis of all the Boston pro sports, but if you're a Patriots junkie — and if you're listening to this podcast, you are — then a membership at BSJ gives you access to a ton of video analysis Bedard does on the coaches film, and direct access to him in weekly chats.

Is It An X-Man?
I'm the Juggernaut, [bleep]!

Is It An X-Man?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 61:43


This is basically our Juggernaut episode. We will not be taking questions at this time.We're still reading comics! Imagine that!! This week, we dig into Uncanny X-Men issues 12, 13, and 14.We'll be continuing our journey about once a month going forward, and you can expect the same level of intensive study and deep analysis as you always receive when listening to a new IIAXM episode. Which is to say, we mostly laugh at our own jokes and yell at Xavier for constantly mentioning his “powerful mutant brain.”*Support us on Patreon for monthly bonus episodes!We're on Instagram, Twitter, and AO3 @isitanxman.Email us at isitanxman@gmail.comSee you #xmenmonday!

Super Retro Throwback Reviews: The Audio Files
S10E179 - Urine Idiot if you Suck (Bleep) for Coke

Super Retro Throwback Reviews: The Audio Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 84:43


Episode Notes Episode 179 is here and the guys break down the latest Pop Culture News (including paying homage to 90's icon and everyones favorite dad, comedian, and badass comedian Bob Sagat) as well as bringing you the Latest and Outrageous in their What the Hell is That Segment, next the guys bring you their Trailer Talk Discussion on Jackass Forever, Steven brings you his review on “Being the Ricardos” and finally the guys bring you their Throwback Movie Review on “Bridge over the River Kwai” Segment Times: Opening/Announcements: 00:00 - 7:55 Pop Culture News: 11:10 - 37:57 Trailer Talk Discussion - Jackass Forever: 38:08 - 42:04 Current Movie Review - Being the Ricardos: 42:36 - 47:28 Throwback Movie Review - Bridge Over the River Kwai: 48:55 - 54:33 What the Hell is That/Close Show: 55:14 - 1:24:44 This episode is brought to you by Deadly Grounds Coffee [link] https://deadlygroundscoffee.com (The official Sponsor of The Dorkening Podcast Network and Super Retro Throwback Reviews), this episode is also brought to you by Connecticut Cult Classics [link] https://www.connecticutcultclassics.com, and JPO Productions LLC. [link] http://www.jpoproductions.com Also Welcome our NEWEST Sponsor to The Dorkening Podcast Network “Silk City Hot Sauce” Check them out and use the Promo Code “DORK” and get 20% off your Order. [link] https://www.levinskystopshelf.com/silk-city-hot-sauce You can Follow us on Social Media, Buy Our Merch, Listen to our Shows below:  [link] https://allmylinks.com/superretropodcast Get your Super Retro Merch Here: [link] https://super-retro-store.creator-spring.com Check out our Twitch: Twitch.com/superretrothrowbackreview Support Us on Patreon, we have updated our Tiers and we want to thank our Patreon Backers: [link] https://www.patreon.com/SuperRetroPodcast Also Check us out on The Dorkening Podcast Network [link] https://www.thedorkeningpodcastnetwork.com Check our Website [link] [https://superretrothrowbackreviews.com](https://superretrothrowbackreviews.com%5C) Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/the-new-and-improved-super-retro-throwback-reviews/de8e67e3-4c6d-40f1-a7ed-976136c2d0bc This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

A Little Bit Culty
Silver Fox: Mark Vicente Part 1

A Little Bit Culty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 61:33


A Little Bit Culty – A wise man once said: “Nobody joins a cult, they join a good thing.” A Little Bit Culty kicks off Season 3 with the wise man himself, Mark Vicente. The epic whistleblower and stone-cold silver fox joins Sarah and Nippy to get the band back together in the first of two episodes. The trio catches up on life after making headlines and what it was really like to see the whole shitshow play out on HBO's “The Vow.” Expect a metric fuck ton of ass chapping anecdotes, and to love Mark even more than you already did.More about today's guest: Author, speaker, and award-winning director Mark Vicente was behind the sleeper hit “What The Bleep Do We Know?!” Born in South Africa in 1965, Mark took his first photograph at age four and discovered his passion for being behind the camera. After working his way up the ranks of the camera department, his first big break came as Cinematographer on the musical “SARAFINA,” starring Whoopi Goldberg. In 1992, he relocated to Los Angeles to shoot his first studio picture for Disney entitled “FATHERHOOD” From a very young age he found himself propelled to question beliefs about the human condition. His filmmaking activism led him to make a number of films, including ‘Encender el Corazon', about the rampant kidnapping epidemic in Mexico. It was a bittersweet victory; the film touched people deeply, but was by association supporting NXIVM. He made the difficult decision to pull the film from distribution and, with a small band of whistleblowers, expose their criminal enterprise. Mark's since developed a keen interest in exposing the coercive and duplicitous environments of high-control groups. His memoir: ‘QUEST' or ‘How the BLEEP did that happen?!' will be released shortly. It chronicles the many untold stories of what occurred in NXIVM , as well as he and his wife Bonnie's harrowing campaign to escape and expose the organization. He's also in production on a film about malignant narcissism, narcissistic abuse, and trauma bonding. He's still looking for real life stories for his film and anyone who would like to share theirs can reach out to him at his official website.instagram.com/markvicentetwitter.com/markvicentefacebook.com/markvicentetiktok.com/@mark_vicente~The views and opinions expressed on A Little Bit Culty do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the podcast. Any content provided by our guests, bloggers, sponsors or authors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, group, club, organization, business individual, anyone or anything.~A Little Bit Culty is proud to support the #IGOTOUT project, which empowers survivors of cultic abuse to share their stories online as a catalyst for education, prevention, and healing. Learn more at igotout.org~For more information on A Little Bit Culty and co-hosts Sarah Edmondson and Nippy “Anthony” Ames, visit our official website at alittlebitculty.com. Follow us on Instagram & Twitter @alittlebitculty~CREDITS: Executive Producers: Sarah Edmondson &

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (Rogan, Kimmel, Warren & More!) || EP 636

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 50:40


270 health experts to Spotify: Joe Rogan's Covid misinformation is ‘a sociological issue of devastating proportions'https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/14/experts-confront-spotify-over-misinformation-in-joe-rogan-podcast.html Trulia to drop neighborhood crime data from home listings, after Redfin speaks out against practice https://www.geekwire.com/2021/trulia-to-drop-neighborhood-crime-data-from-home-listings-after-redfin-speaks-out-against-practice/ Hawaii's famed Waikiki Beach could disappear by the end of the century. It's not the only one. https://www.sfgate.com/hawaii/article/Hawaii-Waikiki-Beach-could-be-gone-16770300.php Martin Luther King Jr.'s family calls for 'no celebration' of MLK Day without action on voting rights legislation https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/15/politics/mlk-day-voting-rights-legislation/index.html Fact Check-Pfizer CEO's comments on limited COVID-19 vaccine protection refer to the Omicron variant https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-bourla-omicronprotection/fact-check-pfizer-ceos-comments-on-limited-covid-19-vaccine-protection-refer-to-the-omicron-variant-idUSL1N2TT29Z Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (Jan 6 & Sotomayor) || EP 629

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 43:14


Kamala Harris compares 1/6 to 9/11 and Pearl Harbor. Justice Sotomayor says 100k kids are in serious condition and many on vents due to Covid, & more! Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
Bleep U Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Baker Mayfield to DC?

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:10


Hour 4 - Future President Jeff Walker? JP has a terrible experience at the drug store, Peter Rosenberg for ESPN New York talks about the Washington Football Team, could Baker Mayfield head to DC next year? Plus heard it here first

The Power Trip
HR. 3 - Marney's Bleep - The Power Trip

The Power Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 42:07


The film Napoleon Dyanamite is talked about and Rosie talks about Tots, Cory has Headlines featuring a tribute to Betty White and Gophers VOX Mike Grimm goes In The Box!

Garage Logic
MNST: Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:51


MNST: Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Reusse Unchained
MNST: Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Reusse Unchained

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:51


MNST: Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Monday Night Sports Talk with Patrick Reusse and Joe Soucheray
Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Monday Night Sports Talk with Patrick Reusse and Joe Soucheray

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:51


Reusse was transfixed on the level of horse (bleep) ness in last night's Vikings game!!

Good Morning Liberty
The People Have Spoken - This is Dumb BLEEP of the Year! || EP 623

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:06


The live group voted, and we have the results. We count down the final 4 Dumb Bleeps of the year and tell you who the winner is! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb Bleep of the Week! (Biden x3 + Price Controls?) || EP 622

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:53


It's the last DBOTW before we hit the new year! This was a crazy one. Marxists claimed that Capitalism has killed 1.6 billion, Biden said so many dumb things, and The Guardian thinks we need price controls! Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
Bleep You Thursday

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 16:33


Opening up the phone lines to hear what people are mad at today? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BMitch & Finlay
12.30.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 35:26


1:00- Opening up the phone lines to hear who people are mad at today.  18:45- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  32:30- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Hornets Annihilate the Rockets and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 41:02


Bone and Flounder dive into the Hornets big win in their return home over the Rockets from last night, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and talk to Frank Garcia about Matt Rhule's job status and the issues the team has in the trenches. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Roberson Media Presents.....

If you haven't been listening to this podcast PLEASE continue that trend. This one was.....interesting @Translightskin Explained Drake Vs. Jay Z Insecure "30 Hours" Sitting out bowl games And as always ALOT more. Just because you don't listen doesn't mean you cant SUBSCRIBE!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/michael-roberson/message

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the YEAR (Round 7) || EP 618

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 37:36


The countdown/recap continues to DBOTY! Joseph Stalin was a great listener 2A doesn't authorize gun ownership Eviction Moratorium and housing for the poor NYC Mayor DeBlasio says 1 shot can get you into restaurants day of   Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the YEAR (Round 6) || EP 618

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 23:59


Today's recaps are: The suggestion that people attracted to kids should be added to LGBTQ+ A congressman from TX asks if moving the Moon would help fight Climate Change There's nothing good about White people The 2nd Amendment gave THE GOVERNMENT the right to own guns! Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the YEAR (Round 5) || EP 617

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 29:13


We're continuing the recap as we lead up to Dumb Bleep of the YEAR! Mexican racist murderer cop Humans are stupid. Be more like animals! We've never tried Marxism! AOC is now a war veteran Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the YEAR (Round 4) || EP 616

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 21:20


We are out until after Christmas but we are recapping the DBOTW winners as we count down to Dumb Bleep of the YEAR! Is eating meat racist? Should we have trials in America? Should police allow knife fights to continue? Does money really come from thin air? Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hunt the World
HTW-91 Our 2021 Christmas Wish Lists

Hunt the World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 32:05


This week on Hunt the World Brian, Brad, Bryan and Bleep give you their top three or four things on their Christmas wish list. So... even if you're listing in the middle of July you can still hear about products that the RBO crew think are valuable additions to your hunting toolbox and wardrobe. From all of us at Rolling Bones Outdoors - THANK YOU for listening in 2021 and we want to wish everyone a Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and all the best during this holiday season. Stay safe and enjoy the reason for the season.

Jim and Them
Budd Dwyer Reaction Face - #707 Part 2

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 80:13


Lord of the Rings Rap: Stephen Colbert dropping more cringe with a new Lord of the Rings rap song featuring Elijah Wood, Snoop Dogg, Killer Mike and many more.Youtube Face: Was Kevin McCallister on the Home Alone poster the original Youtube face!? Also can we finally make our Youtube thumbnail reaction faces.Totinos: WARNING, someone shit on the Totinos in the freezer at the grocery store.SO FUCKING COOL!, PLAY SOME RAP MUSIC!, THE LAST BOY SCOUT!, RANCID!, ROOTS RADICALS!, LITTLE LORD JESUS SLEEP IN YOUR GAY!, GIRTHY HOG!, GOING HOGGIN'!, WHEN YOU SAY FUCK OFF IN A MOVIE!, HEY JEFF, FUCK YOU!, IN A MOVIE!, THE MOMENT!, NORMIES!, SHIT JUST GOT REAL!, TONE!, STAND UP TO A BULLY!, INNER CIRCLES!, OTHER F WORD!, MOVIE SITUATION!, SUCCESSION!, COUSIN GREG!, TOM!, BLEEP!, COBRA KAI!, DANIEL!, DIMITRI!, MR. MIYAGI!, QUIT BEING SUCH A BEEP!, GYM TEACHER!, RING FINGER!, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE!, DOUBLE DOWN!. LEAN INTO IT!, STEPHEN COLBERT!, WHITE PEOPLE RAP!, WHITE GANGSTA RAP!, LORD OF THE RINGS!, TOLKIEN!, CELEBRITY CAMEOS!, NERD CRED!, DOMINIC MONAGHAN!, SEAN ASTIN!, VIGGO!, BLING!, LONELY ISLAND!, CHRONICLES OF NARNIA!, STAR WARS!, GODFATHER!, THE HOBBIT!, ANNA KENDRICK!, PITCH PERFECT!, SNL!, INSTITUTIONS!, COOTER!, JIMMY FALLON!, ARIANA GRANDE!, DICKPALL MATTHEWS!, SHITSTAIN SAMPSON!, HARMONY!, POP SONG!, VAX SCENE!, SCREAM PAINTINGS!, HOME ALONE!, YOUTUBE REACTION FACE!, THUMBNAIL!, CLICKBAIT!, THE ETERNALS!, I NEED TO KNOW WHAT THIS GUY THINGS!, SPORTS BLOOPERS GONE WRONG!?, SOYJACK FACE!, BUDD DWYER!, SUICIDE!, TREASURER!, SKATER!, HIT BY CAR!, ATTEMPTED MURDER!, POTTED PLANT!, TOTINOS PIZZA ROLLS!, SHIT ON!, FREEZER!, CREST FOODS!, DEFECATED!, DIARRHEA!, FECES!, ON MY HAND!, PISS WHILE SHITTING!, NAME AND SHAME!, SECURITY CAMERA FOOTAGE!, GAY AS A BITCH!, VOICE OVER!, GEEKING!, THAT'S A WHOLE DUDE!, TWO DUDES!, VADER NO!, SLOW MOTION!, MCDONALDS!, MY MY MOM AND MY DAD!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Hornets Issues, What the Bleep and Matt Rhule Blames Cam

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 39:31


Mac and Bone look at the biggest issues with the Hornets and how the team can adjust, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and discuss how bad of a look it is for Matt Rhule to keep throwing Cam under the bus. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Putting the “Fun” in Functional with Frank Chen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 35:42


About FrankFrank Chen is a maker. He develops products and leads software engineering teams with a background in behavior design, engineering leadership, systems reliability engineering, and resiliency research. At Slack, Frank focuses on making engineers' lives simpler, more pleasant, and more productive, in the Developer Productivity group. At Palantir, Frank has worked with customers in healthcare, finance, government, energy and consumer packaged goods to solve their hardest problems by transforming how they use data. At Amazon, Frank led a front-end team and infrastructure team to launch AWS WorkDocs, the first secure multi-platform service of its kind for enterprise customers. At Sandia National Labs, Frank researched resiliency and complexity analysis tooling with the Grid Resiliency group. He received a M.S. in Computer Science focused in Human-Computer Interaction from Stanford. Frank's thesis studied how the design / psychology of exergaming interventions might produce efficacious health outcomes. With the Stanford Prevention Research Center, Frank developed health interventions rooted in behavioral theory to create new behaviors through mobile phones. He prototyped early builds of Tiny Habits with BJ Fogg and worked in the Persuasive Technology Lab. He received a B.S. in Computer Science from UCLA. Frank researched networked systems and image processing with the Center for embedded Networked Systems. With the Rand Corporation, he built research systems to support group decision-making.Links: Slack: https://slack.com “Infrastructure Observability for Changing the Spend Curve”: https://slack.engineering/infrastructure-observability-for-changing-the-spend-curve/ “Right Sizing Your Instances Is Nonsense”: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/right-sizing-your-instances-is-nonsense/ Personal webpage: https://frankc.net Twitter: @frankc TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Several people are undoubtedly angrily typing, and part of the reason they can do that, and the fact that I know that is because we're all using Slack. My guest today is Frank Chen, senior staff software engineer at Slack. So, I guess, sort of… [sales force 00:00:53]. Frank, thanks for joining me.Frank: Hey, Corey, I have been a longtime listener and follower, and just really delighted to be here.Corey: It's one of the weird things about doing a podcast is that for better or worse, people don't respond to it in the same way that they do writing a newsletter, for example, because you receive an email, and, “Oh, well, I know how to write an email. I can hit reply and send an email back and give that jackwagon a piece of my mind,” and people often do. But with podcasts, I feel like it's much more closely attuned to the idea of an AM radio talk show. And who calls into a radio talk show? Lunatics, and most people don't self-describe as lunatics, so they don't want to do that.But then when I catch up with people one-on-one or at events in person, I find out that a lot more people listen to this show than I thought they did. Because I don't trust podcast statistics because lies, damn lies, and analytics are sort of how I view this world. So, you've worked at a bunch of different companies. You're at Slack now, which, of course, upsets some people because, “Slack is ruining the way that people come and talk to me in the office.” Or it's making it easier for employees to collaborate internally in ways their employers wish they wouldn't. But that's neither here nor there.Before this, you were at Palantir, and before this, you're at Amazon, working on Amazon WorkDocs of all things, which is supposedly rumored to have at least one customer somewhere, but I've never seen them. Before that you were at Sandia National Labs, and you've gotten a master's in computer science from Stanford. You've done a lot of things and everything you've done, on some level, seems like the recurring theme is someone on Twitter will be unhappy at you for a career choice you've made. But what is the common thread—in seriousness—between the different places that you've been?Frank: One thing that's been a driver for where I work is finding amazing people to work with and building something that I believe is valuable and fun to keep doing. The thing that brought me to Slack is I became my own Slack admin, [laugh] when I met a girl and we moved in together into a small apartment in Brooklyn. And she had a cat that, you know, is a sweetheart, but also just doesn't know how to be social. Yes, you covered that with ‘cat.' Part of moving it together, I became my own Slack admin and discovered well, we can build a series of home automations to better train and inform our little command center for when the cat lies about being fed, or not fed, clipping his nails, and discovering and tracking bad behaviors. In a lot of ways this was like the human side of a lot of the data work that I had been doing at my previous role. And it was like a fun way to use the same frameworks that I use at work to better train and be a cat caretaker.Corey: Now, at some point, you know that some product manager at Amazon is listening to this and immediately sketching notes because their product strategy is, “Yes,” and this is going to be productized and shipping in two years as Amazon Prime Meow. But until then we'll enjoy the originality of having a Slack bot more or less control the home automation slash making your house seem haunted for anyone who didn't write the code themselves. There's an idea of solving real world problems that I definitely understand. I mean, and again, it might not even be a fair question entirely. Just because I am… for better or worse, staggering through my world, and trying—and failing most days—to tell a narrative that, “Oh, why did I start my tech career at a university, and then spend time in ad tech, and then spend time in consulting, and then FinTech, and the rest?” And the answer is, “Oh, I get fired an awful lot, and that sucked.”So, instead of going down that particular rabbit hole of a mess, I went in other directions. I started finding things that would pay me and pay me more money because I was in debt at the time. But that was the narrative thread that was the, “I have rent to pay and they have computers that aren't behaving properly.” And that's what dictated the shape of my career for a long time. It's only in retrospect that I started to identify some of the things that aligns with it. But it's easy to look at it with the shine of hindsight and not realize that no, no, that's sort of retconning what happened in the past.Frank: Yeah, I have a mentor and my former adviser had this way of describing, building out the jankiest prototype you can to prove out an idea. And this manifested in his class in building out paper prototypes, or really, really janky ideas for what helping people through technology might look like. And I feel like it a lot of ways, even when those prototypes fail, like, in a career or some half baked tech prototype I put together, it might succeed and great, we could keep building upon that, but when it fails, you actually discover, “Oh, this is one way that I didn't succeed.” And even in doing so, you discover things about yourself, your way of building, and maybe a little bit about your infrastructure, or whatever it is that you build on a day-to-day basis. And wrapping that back to the original question, it's like, well, we think we're human beings, right, we're static, but in a lot of ways we're human becomings. We think we know what the future might look like with our careers, what we're building on a day-to-day basis, and what we're building a year from now, but oftentimes, things change if we discover things about ourselves, the people we work with, and ultimately, the things that we put out into the world.Corey: Obviously, I've been aware of who Slack is, for a long time; I've been a paying customer for years because it basically is IRC with reaction gifs, and not having to teach someone how to sign into IRC when they work in accounting. So, the user experience alone solved the problem.Frank: And you've actually worked with us in the past before. [laugh]. Slack, it's the Searchable Log for all Content and Knowledge; I think that backronym, that's how it works. And I was delighted when I had mentioned your jokes and you're trolling [a folk 00:07:00] on Twitter and on your podcast to my former engineering manager, Chris Merrill, who was like, oh, you should search the Slack. Corey actually worked with us and he put together a lot of cool tooling and ideas for us to think about.Corey: Careful. If we talk too much, or what I did when I was at Slack years ago, someone's going to start looking into some of the old commits and whatnot and start demanding an apology, and we don't want that. It's, “Wow, you're right. You are a terrible engineer.” “Told you.” There's a reason I don't do that anymore.Frank: I think that's all of us. [laugh]. An early career mentor of mine, he was like, “Hey, Frank, listen. You think you're building perfect software at any point in time? No, you're building future tech debt.” And yeah, we should put much more emphasis on interfaces and ideas we're putting out because the implementation is going to change over time, and likely your current implementation is shit. And that is, okay.Corey: That's the beautiful part about this is that things grow and things evolve. And it's interesting working with companies, and as a consultant, I tend to build my projects in such a way that I start on day one and people know that I'm leaving with usually a very short window because I don't want to build a forever job for myself; I don't want to show up and start charging by the hour or by the day, if I can possibly avoid it. Because then it turns into eternal projects that never end because I'm billing and nothing's ever done. No, no, I like charging fixed fee and then getting out at a predetermined outcome, but then you get to hear about what happens with companies as they move on.This combines with the fact that I have a persistent alert for my name, usually because I'm looking for various ineffective character assassination from enterprise marketing types because you know, I dish it out, I should certainly be able to take it. But I found a blog post on the Slack engineering blog that mentioned my name, and it's, “Aw, crap. Are they coming after me for a refund?” No, it was not. It was you writing a fairly sizable post. Tell me more about that.Frank: Yeah, I'm part of an organization called Developer Productivity. And our goal is to help folk at Slack deliver services to their customers, where we build, test, and release high quality software. And a lot of our time is spent thinking about internal tooling and making infrastructure bets. As engineers, right, it's like, we have this idea for what the world looks like, we have this idea for what our infrastructure looks like, but what we discover using a set of techniques around observability of just asking questions—advanced questions, basic questions, and hell, even dumb questions—we discover hey, the things that we think our computers are doing aren't actually doing what they say they're doing. And the question is like, great. Now, what? How can we ask better questions? How can we better tune, change, and equip engineers with tooling so that they can do better work to make Slack customers have simple, pleasant, and productive experiences?Corey: And I have to say that there's a lot that Slack does that is incredibly helpful. I don't know that I'm necessarily completely bought into the idea that all work should happen in Slack. It's, well, on some level, I—like people like to debate the ‘should people work from home? Should people all work in an office?' Discussion.And, on some level, it seems if you look at people who are constantly fighting that debate online, it's, “Do you ever do work at all?” on some level. But I'm not here to besmirch others; I'm here to talk about, on some level, what you alluded to in your blog post. But I want to start with a disclaimer that Slack as far as companies go is not small, and if you take a look around, most companies are using Slack whether they know it or not. The list of side-channel Slack groups people have tend to extend massively.I look and I pare it down every once in a while, whenever I cross 40 signed-in Slacks on my desktop. It is where people talk for a wide variety of different reasons, and they all do different things. But if you're sitting here listening to this and you have a $2,000 a month AWS bill, this is not for you. You will spend orders of magnitude more money trying to optimize a small cost. Once you're at significant points of scale, and you have scaled out to the point where you begin to have some ability to predict over months or years, that's what a lot of this stuff starts to weigh in.So, talk to me a bit about how you wound up—and let me quote directly from the article, which is titled, “Infrastructure Observability for Changing the Spend Curve,” and I will, of course, throw a link to this in the [show notes 00:11:38]. But you talk in this about knocking, I believe it was orders of magnitude off of various cost areas within your bill.Frank: Yeah. The article itself describes three big-ish projects, where we are able to change the curve of the number of tests that we run, and a change in how much it costs to run any single test.Corey: When you say test, are you talking CI/CD infrastructure test or code test, to make sure it goes out, or are you talking something higher up the stack, as far as, “Huh, let's see how some users respond when, I don't know, we send four notifications on every message instead of the usual one,” to give a ridiculous example?Frank: Yeah, this is in the CI/CD pipelines. And one of these projects was around borrowing some concepts from data engineering: oversubscription and planning your capacity to have access capacity at peak, where at peak, your engineers might have a 5% degradation in performance, while still maintaining high resiliency and reliability of your tests in order to oversubscribe, either CPU or memory and keep throughput on the overall system stable and consistent and fast enough. I think, with spend in developer productivity, I think, both, like, the metrics you're trying to move and why you're optimizing for it at any given time are, like, this, like, calculus. Or it's like, more art than science in that there's no one right answer, right? It's like, oh, yeah—very naively—like, yeah, let's throw the biggest machines most expensive machines we can at any given problem. But that doesn't solve the crux of your problem. It's like, “Hey, what are the things in your system doing?” And what is the right guess to capitalize around how much to spend on your CI/CD [unintelligible 00:13:39] is oftentimes not precise, nor is this blog article meant to be prescriptive.Corey: Yeah, it depends entirely on what you're doing and how because it's, on some level, well, we can save a whole bunch of money if we slow all of our CI/CD runs down by 20 minutes. Yeah, but then you have a bunch of engineers sitting idle and I promise you, that costs a hell of a lot more than your cloud bill is going to be. The payroll is almost always a larger expense than your infrastructure costs, and if it's not, you should seriously consider firing at least part of your data science team, but you didn't hear it from me.Frank: Yeah. And part of the exploration on profiling and performance and resiliency was, like, around interrogating what the boundaries and what the constraints were for our CI/CD pipelines. Because Slack has grown in engineering and in the number of tests we were running on a month-to-month basis; for a while from 2017 to mid 2020, we were growing about 10% month-over-month in test suite execution numbers. Which means on a given year, we doubled almost two times, which is quite a bit of strain on internal resources and a lot of dependent services where—and internal systems, we oftentimes have more complexity and less understood changes in what dependencies your infrastructure might be using, what business logic your internal services are using to communicate with one another than you do your production.And so, by, like, performing a series of curiosity-driven development, we're able to both answer, at that point in time, what our customers internally were doing, and start to put together ideas for eliminating some bottlenecks, and hell, even adding bottlenecks with circuit breakers where you keep the overall throughput of your system stable, while deferring or canceling work that otherwise might have overloaded dependencies.Corey: There's a lot to be said for understanding what the optimization opportunities are, in an environment and understanding what it is you're attempting to achieve. Having those test for something like Slack makes an awful lot of sense because let's be very clear here, when you're building an application that acts as something people use to do expense reports—to cite one of my previous job examples—it turns out you can be down for a week and a majority of your customers will never know or care. With Slack, it doesn't work that way. Everyone more or less has a continuous monitor that they're typing into for a good portion of the day—angrily or otherwise—and as soon as it misses anything, people know. And if there's one thing that I love, on some level, seeing change when I know that Slack is having a blip, even if I'm not using Slack that day for anything in particular, because Twitter explodes about it. “Slack is down. I'm now going to tweet some stuff to my colleagues.” All right. You do you, I suppose.And credit where due, Slack doesn't go down nearly as often as it used to because as you tend to figure out how these things work, operational maturity increases through a bunch of tests. Fixing things like durability, reliability, uptime, et cetera, should always, to some extent, take precedence priority-wise over let's save some money. Because yeah, you could turn everything off and save all the money, but then you don't have a business anymore. It's focused on where to cut, where to optimize in the right way, and ideally as you go, find some of the areas in which, oh, I'm paying AWS a tax for just going about my business. And I could have flipped a switch at any point and saved—“How much money? Oh, my God, that's more than I'll make in my lifetime.”Frank: Yeah, and one thing I talk about a little bit is distributed tracing as one of the drivers for helping us understand what's happening inside of our systems. Where it helps you figure out and it's like this… [best word 00:17:24] to describe how you ask questions of deployed code? And there a lot of ways it's helped us understand existing bottlenecks and identify opportunities for performance or resiliency gains because your past janky Band-Aids become more and more obvious when you can interrogate and ask questions around what is it performing like it used to? Or what has changed recently?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: It's also worth pointing out that as systems grow organically, that it is almost impossible for any one person to have it all in their head anymore. I saw one of the most overly complicated architecture flow trees that I think I've seen in recent memory, and it was on the Slack engineering blog about how something was architected, but it wasn't the Slack app itself; it was simply the [decision tree for ‘Should we send a notification?' 00:18:17] and it is more complicated than almost anything I've written, except maybe my newsletter content publication pipeline. It is massive. And I'll throw a link to that in the [show notes 00:18:31] as well, just because it is well worth people taking a look at.But there is so much complexity at scale for doing the right thing, and it's necessary because if I'm talking to you on Slack right now and getting notifications every time you reply on my phone, it's not going to take too long before I turn off notifications everywhere, and then I don't notice that Slack is there, and it just becomes useless and I use something else. Ideally, something better—which is hard to come by—moderately worse, like, email or completely worse, like, Microsoft Teams.Frank: I tell all my close collaborators about this. I typically set myself away on Slack because I like to make time for deep, focused work. And that's very hard with a constant stream of notifications. How people use Slack and how people notify others on Slack is, like, not incumbent on the software itself, but it's a reflection of the work culture that you're in. The expectation for an email-driven culture is, like, oh, yeah, you should be reading your email all the time and be able to respond within 30 minutes. Peace, I have friends that are lawyers, [laugh] and that is the expectation at all times of day.Corey: I married one of those. Oh, yeah, people get very salty. And she works with a global team spread everywhere, to the point where she wakes up and there's just a whole flurry of angry people that have tried to reach her in the middle of the night. Like, “Why were you sleeping at 2 a.m.? It's daytime here.” And yeah, time zones. Not everyone understands how they work, from my estimation.Frank: [laugh]. That's funny. My sweetheart is a former attorney. On our first international date, we spent an entire day-and-a-half hopping between WiFi spots in Prague so that she could answer a five minute question from a partner about standard deviations.Corey: So, one thing that you link to that really is what drew my notice to this—because, again, if you talk about AWS cost optimization, I'm probably going to stumble over it, but if you mention my name, that's sort of a nice accelerator—and you linked to my article called Why “Right Sizing Your Instances Is Nonsense.” And that is a little overblown, to some extent, but so many folks talk about it in the cost optimization space because you can get a bunch of metrics and do these things programmatically, and somewhat without observability into what's going on because, “Well, I can see how busy the computers are and if it's not busy, we could use smaller computers. Problem solved,” versus, the things that require a fair bit of insight into what is that thing doing exactly because it leads you into places of oh, turn off that idle fleet that's not doing anything is all labeled ‘backup,' where you're going to have three seconds of notice before it gets all the traffic.There's an idea of sometimes things are the way they are for a reason. And it's also not easy for a lot of things—think databases—to seamlessly just restart the thing and have it scale back up and run on a different instance class. That takes weeks of planning and it's hard. So, I find that people tend to reach for it where it doesn't often make sense. At your level of scale and operational maturity, of course, you should optimize what instance classes things are using and what sizes they are, especially since that stuff changes over time as far as what AWS has made available. But it's not the sort of thing that I suggest as being the first easy thing to go for. It's just what people think is easy because it requires no judgment and computers can do it. At least that's their opinion.Frank: I feel like you probably have a lot more experience than me, and talked about war stories, but I recall working with customers where they want to lift-and-shift on-prem hardware to VMs on-prem. I'm like, “It's not going to be as simple as you're making it out to be.” Whereas, like, the trend today is probably oh, yeah, we're going to shift on-prem VMs to AWS, or hell, like, let's go two levels deeper and just run everything on Kubernetes. Similar workloads, right? It's not going to be a huge challenge. Or [laugh] everything serverless.Corey: Spare me from that entire school of thought, my God.Frank: [laugh].Corey: Yeah, but it's fun, too, because this came out a month ago, and you're talking about using—an example you gave was a c5.9xlarge instance. Great. Well, the c6i is out now as well, so are people going to look at that someday and think, “Oh, wow. That's incredibly quaint.”It's, you wrote this a month ago, and it's already out of date, as far as what a lot of the modern story instances are. From my perspective, one of the best things that AWS has done in this space has been to get away from the reserved instance story and over into savings plans, where it's, “I know, I'm going to run some compute—maybe it's Fargate, maybe it's EC2; let's be serious, it's definitely going to be EC2—but I don't want to tie myself to specific instance types for the next three years.” Great, well, I'm just going to commit to spending some money on AWS for the next three years because if I decide today to move off of it, it's going to take me at least that long to get everything out. So okay, then that becomes something a lot more palatable for an awful lot of folks.Frank: One thing you brought up in the article I linked to is instance types. You think upgrading to the newest instance type will solve all your challenges, but oftentimes it's not obvious that it won't all the time, and in fact, you might even see degraded resiliency and degraded performance because different packages that your software relies upon might not be optimized for the given kernel or CPU type that you're running against. And ultimately, you go back to just asking really basic questions and performing some end-to-end benchmarking so that you can at least get a sense for what your customers are doing today, and maybe make a guess for what they're going to do tomorrow.Corey: I have to ask because I'm always interested in what it is that gives rise to blog posts like this—which, that's easy; it's someone had to do a project on these things, and while we learn things that would probably apply to other folks—like, you're solving what is effectively a global problem locally when you go down this path. It's part of the reason I have a consulting business is things I learned at one company apply almost identically to another company, even though that they're in completely separate industries and parts of the world because AWS billing is, for better or worse, a bounded problem space despite their best efforts to, you know, use quantum computers to fix that. What was it that gave rise to looking at the CI/CD system from an optimization point of view?Frank: So internally, I initially started writing a white paper about, hey, here's a simple question that we can answer, you know, without too much effort. Let's transition all of our C3 instances to C5 instances, and that could have been the one and done. But by thinking about it a little more and kind of drawing out, while we can actually borrow a model for oversubscription from another field, we could potentially decrease our spend by quite a bit. That eventually [laugh] evolved into a 70 page white paper—no joke—that my former engineering manager said, “Frank, no one's going to [BLEEP] read this.” [laugh].Corey: Always. Always, always. Like, here's a whole bunch of academically research and the rest. It's like, “Great. Which of these two buttons do I press?” is really the question people are getting at. And while it's great to have the research and the academic stuff, it's also a, “Great we're trying to achieve an outcome which, what is the choice?” But it's nice to know that people are doing actual research on the back end, instead, “Eh, my gut tells me to take the path on the left because why not? Left is better; right's tricky friend.”Frank: Yeah. And it was like, “Oh, yeah. I accidentally wrote a really long thing because there was, like, a lot of variables to test.” I think we had spun up 16-plus auto-scaling groups. And ran something like the cross-section of a couple of representative test suites against them, as well as configurations for a number of executors per instance.And about a year ago, I translated that into a ten page blog article that when I read through, I really didn't enjoy. [laugh]. And that template blog article is ultimately, like, about a page in the article you're reading today. And the actual kick in the butt to get this out the door was about four months ago. I spoke at o11ycon rescources which you're a part of.And it was a vendor conference by Honeycomb, and it was just so fun to share some of the things we've been doing with distributed tracing, and how we were able to solve internal problems using a relatively simple idea of asking questions about what was running. And the entire team there was wonderful in coaching and just helping me think through what questions people might have of this work. And that was, again, former academic. The last time I spoke at a conference was about a decade earlier, and it was just so fun to be part of this community of people trying to all solve the same set of problems, just in their own unique ways.Corey: One of the things I loved about working with Honeycomb was the fact that whenever I asked them a question, they have instrumented their own stuff, so they could tell me extremely quickly what something was doing, how it was doing it, and what the overall impact on this was. It's very rare to find a client that is anywhere near that level of awareness into what's going on in their infrastructure.Frank: Yeah, and that blog article, right, it's like, here's our current perspective, and here's, like, the current set of projects we're able to make to get to this result. And we think we know what we want to do, but if you were to ask that same question, “What are we doing for our spend a year from now?” the answer might be very different. Probably similar in some ways, but probably different.Corey: Well, there are some principles that we'll never get away from. It's, “Is no one using the thing? Turn that shit off.” That's one of those tried and true things. “Oh, it's the third copy of that multiple petabyte of data thing? Maybe delete it or stuff in a deep archive.” It's maybe move data less between various places. Maybe log things fewer times, given that you're paying 50 cents per gigabyte ingest, in some cases. Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. There's a lot to consider as far as the general principles go, but the specifics, well, that's where it gets into the weeds. And at your scale, yeah, having people focus on this internally with the context and nuance to it is absolutely worth doing. Having a small team devoted to this at large companies will pay for itself, I promise. Now, I go in and advise in these scenarios, but past a certain point, this can't just be one person's part-time gig anymore.Frank: I'm kind of curious about that. How do you think about working with a company and then deprecating yourself, and allowing your tools and, like, the frameworks you put into place to continue, like, thrive?Corey: We're advisory only. We make no changes to production.Frank: Or I don't know if that's the right word, deprecate. I think… that's my own word. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's fair. It's a—what we do is we go in and we are advisory. It's less of a cost engagement, more of an architecture engagement because in cloud, cost and architecture are the same thing. We look at what's going on, we look at the constraints of why we've been brought in, and we identify things that companies can do and the associated cost savings associated with that, and let them make their own decision. Because it's, if I come in and say, “Hey, you could save a bunch of money by migrating this whole subsystem to serverless.”Great, I sound like a lunatic evangelist because yeah, 18 months of work during which time the team doing that is not advancing the state of the business any further so it's never going to happen. So, why even suggest it? Just look at things that are within the bounds of possibility. Counterpoint: when a client says, “A full re-architecture is on the table,” well, okay, that changes the nature of what we're suggesting. But we're trying to get away from what a lot of tooling does, which is, “Great. Here's 700 things you can adjust and you'll do none of them.” We come back with a, “Here's three or four things you can do that'll blow 20% off the bill. Then let's see where you stand.” The other half of it, of course, is large scale enterprise contract negotiation, that's a bit of a horse of a different color. I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really do appreciate it. If folks want to hear more about what you're up to, and how you think about these things. Where can they find you?Frank: You can find me at frankc.net. Or at me at @FrankC on Twitter.Corey: Oh, inviting people to yell at you at Twitter. That's never a great plan. Yeash. Good luck. Thanks again. We've absolutely got to talk more about this in-depth because I think this is one of those areas that you have the folks above a certain point of scale, talk about these things semi-constantly and live in the space, whereas folks who are in relatively small-scale environments are listening to this and thinking that they've got to do this.And no. No, you do not want to spend millions of dollars of engineering effort to optimize a bill that's 80 grand a year, I promise. It's focus on the thing that's right for your business. At a certain point of scale, this becomes that. But thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Frank: Thank you so much, Corey.Corey: Frank Chen, senior staff software engineer at Slack. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that seems to completely miss the fact that Microsoft Teams is free because it sucks.Frank: [laugh].Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (Joy Reid or Nancy Pelosi?) || EP 613

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:12


Who said the dumbest thing this week? Is Musk like Stalin & Hitler? Is Joy Reid an Idiot? Does Nancy know we don't live in a Free Market? Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EarzUp!
EarzUp! | The Christmas Special and 200th Episode Celebration

EarzUp!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 85:03


Once again we are taking the last EarzUp! show of the year to goof off and celebrate not only Christmas, but our 200th episode! Taren came up with a fun game called "What the Bleep?", we read our letters to Santa Chapek, and our good friend Dave from DaveLandWeb stopped by to give us the lowdown on HolidayLand. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mark Kaye Show
Hey Liz, Show Us Your Texts!!!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 103:53


12-16-2021 Kraft cream cheese shortage, What the Bleep, and Conspiracy Theory Thursday.

BMitch & Finlay
BMitch & Finlay Hour 4 (12.16.21) Bleep you Thursday, Peter Rosenburg, H.I.H.F

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 38:29


Hour 4 kicks off with Bleep You Thursday! Peter Rosenburg joins the show to talk WFT's COVID outbreak. To wrap things up, Heard It Here First.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb Bleep of the YEAR (Round 3) || EP 610

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 22:21


You already know Dumb Bleep of the Week, but now it's time to consider Dumb Bleep of the Year! This is just round 1, covering 4 of the 48 contestants. Listen back to how we discussed these topics as they happened, and join our Locals to get in on the voting action! Why would you need guns for defense if guns are banned? Is Texas going to outlaw masks? Biden is just like Jesus, right? Libertarians are obviously just white men with guns who want to control you! Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Join LOCALS & chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Hornets Road Trip Expectations, What the Bleep and Two Matt Rhule Takes That Are Angering Mac

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 38:27


Mac and Bone discuss what the expectations for this Hornets road trip should be after last night's loss, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and talk about the two takes around Matt Rhule that are getting Mac angry. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
12-13-21 Tobin and Leroy Part 4 - "*Bleep* the NCAA"

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 41:49


Dan Lambert, a Hurricanes' booster and the creator of the MMA academy "American Top Team", blasts the NCAA over investigation on NIL violations. We go off on a tangent about various Disney media properties before acknowledging Erik SWOLEstra. We close today the only way we know how, with "Alright!, Oh no!". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Year (Round 2) || EP 608

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 33:13


It's that time of year again! Since we are unable to do a live episode today we're bringing you past winners of DBOTW, so we can do our vote for Dumb Bleep of the Year in a couple weeks! Enjoy Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Vote for Dumb Bleep & chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb Bleep of the YEAR (Round 1) || EP 607

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 30:43


You already know Dumb Bleep of the Week, but now it's time to consider Dumb Bleep of the Year! This is just round 1, covering 4 of the 48 contestants. Listen back to how we discussed these topics as they happened, and join our Locals to get in on the voting action! Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Join LOCALS & chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
12.9.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday. Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:03


1:00- Opening up the phones to hear what people are mad at today 19:45- Peter Rosenberg joins the show to talk about Washington sports.  31:00- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, How the Hornets Lost and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 37:06


Mac and Bone look at the reasons behind the Hornets loss last night to the Sixers, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the day and talk with Frank Garcia about the Panthers move to fire Joe Brady and other Panther storylines. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week (Forced Vaxx?) || EP 603

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 58:28


Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
12.2.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 37:08


1:00- Opening up the phone lines to hear what people are mad at today.  20:15- Petere Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  31:10- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Y94 Morning Playhouse
Censored Lyrics: We Bleep Your Favorites

Y94 Morning Playhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:03


Lady Gaga, Twenty One Pilots, MGK, Olivia Rodrigo - nobody is safe when The Playhouse hits the bleep button.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Roddy Jones, Hornets Fall to the Bulls and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:44


Mac and Bone look back at the Hornets loss to the Bulls last night, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and the guys talk about the coaching moves and the Tar Heels setback season with Roddy Jones. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Striking a Balance on the Cloud with Rachel Stephens

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:11


About RachelRachel Stephens is a Senior Analyst with RedMonk, a developer-focused industry analyst firm. RedMonk focuses on how practitioners drive technological adoption. Her research covers a broad range of developer and infrastructure products, with a particular focus on emerging growth technologies and markets. (But not crypto. Please don't talk to her about NFTs.)Before joining RedMonk, Rachel worked as a database administrator and financial analyst. Rachel holds an MBA from Colorado State University and a BA in Finance from the University of Colorado.Links: RedMonk: https://redmonk.com/ Great analysis: https://redmonk.com/rstephens/2021/09/30/a-new-strategy-r2/ “Convergent Evolution of CDNs and Clouds”: https://redmonk.com/sogrady/2020/06/10/convergent-evolution-cdns-cloud/ “Everything is Securities Fraud?”: https://cafe.com/stay-tuned/everything-is-securities-fraud-with-matt-levine/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/rstephensme TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinkstCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. The last time I spoke to Rachel Stephens over at RedMonkwas in December of 2019. Well, on this podcast anyway; we might have exchanged conversational tidbits here and there at some point since then. But really, if we look around the world there's nothing that's materially different than it was today from December in 2019, except, oh, that's right everything. Rachel Stephens, you're still a senior analyst at RedMonk, which hey, in this day and age, longevity at a company is something that is almost enough to occasion comment on its own. Thanks for coming back for another round, I appreciate it.Rachel: Oh, I'm so happy to be here, and it's exciting to talk about the state of the world a few years later than the last time we talked. But yeah, it's been a hell of a couple years.Corey: Really has, but rather than rehashing pandemic stuff because I feel like unless people have been living in a cave for the last couple of years—because we've all been living in caves for the last couple of years—they know what's up with that. What's new in your world? What has changed for you aside from all of this in the past couple of years working in one of the most thankless of all jobs, an analyst in the cloud computing industry?Rachel: Well, the job stuff is all excellent and I've had wonderful time working at RedMonk. So, RedMonk overall is an analyst firm that is focused on helping people understand technology trends, particularly from the view of the developer or the practitioner. So, helping to understand how the people who are using technologies are actually driving their overall adoption. And so there has been all kinds of interesting things that have happened in that score in the last couple of years. We've seen a lot of interesting trends, lots of fun things to look at in the space and it's been a lot.On a personal side, like a week into lockdown I found out that I was pregnant, so I went through all of locking down and the heart of the pandemic pregnant. I had my maternity leave earlier this year and came back and so excited to be back in. But it's also just been a lot to catch up on in the space as you come back from leave which I'm sure you are well familiar with.Corey: Yes, I did the same thing, slightly differently timed. My second daughter Josephine was born at the end of September. When did your kiddo arrive on the scene to a world of masked strangers?Rachel: So, I have an older daughter who just turned four, and then my youngest is coming up on his first birthday. He was born in December.Corey: Excellent. It sounds like our kids are basically the same age, in both directions. And from my perspective, at least looking back, what advice would I give someone for having a baby in a pandemic? It distills down to ‘don't,' just because it changes so much, it's no longer a trivial thing to have a grandparent come out and spend time with the kid. It's the constant… drumbeat of is this over? Is this not over?And that manifested a bunch of different ways. And I'm glad that I got the opportunity to take some time off to spend time with my family during that timeframe, but at the same time, it would've great if there were options such as not being stuck at home with every rambunctious—at the time—three-year-old as I went through that entire joy of having the kid.Rachel: Yeah. No, for the longest time, my thing was like, okay, like, there's no amount of money you could pay me to go back to middle school. I would never do it. And my new high bar there is no amount of money that you could pay me to go back to April 2020. That was the hardest month of my entire life was getting through that, like, first trimester, both parents at home, toddler at home, nowhere to go, no one to help. That was a [BLEEP] hard month. [laugh] that was bad.Corey: Oh, my God, yes, and we don't talk about this because we're basically communicating with people on social media, and everyone feels bad looking at social media because they're comparing their blooper reel with everyone else's highlights. And it feels odd on some level to complain about things like that. And let's be very clear as a man, I wind up in society getting lauded for even deigning to mention that I have children, whereas when mothers wind up talking about anything even slightly negative it's, “Oh, you sound like a bad mom.” And it is just one of the most abhorrent things out there in the world, I suppose. It's a strange inverted thing but one of the things that surprised me the most when I was expecting my first kid was looking at the different parenting forums, and the difference in tone was palpable where on the dad forums, everyone is super supportive and you got this dude it's great. You're fine. You're doing your best.Sure, these the occasional, “I gave my toddler beer and now people yell at me,” and it's, “What is wrong with you asshole?” But everyone else is mostly sane and doing their best. Whereas a lot of the ‘mommy' forums seem to bias more toward being relatively dismissive other people's parenting choices. And I understand I'm stereotyping wildly, not all forums, not all people, et cetera, et cetera, but it really was an interesting window into an area that as a stereotypical white man world, I don't see a lot of places I hang out with that are traditionally male that are overwhelmingly supportive in quite the same way. It was really an eye-opening experience for me.Rachel: I think you hit on some really important trends. One of the things that I have struggled with is—so I came into RedMonk—I've had a Twitter account forever, and it was always just, like, my personal Twitter account until I started working at RedMonk five years ago. And then all of a sudden I'm tweeting in technical and work capacities as well. And finding that balance initially was always a challenge.But then finding that balance again after having kids was very different because I would always—it was, kind of, mix of my life and also what I'm seeing in the industry and what I'm working on and this mix of things. And once you started tweeting about kids, it very much changes the potential perception that people have of who you are, what you're doing. I know this is just a mommy blogger kind of thing.You have to be really cognizant of that balance and making sure that you continue to put yourself in a place where you can still be your authentic self, but you really as a mom in the workspace and especially in tech have to be cognizant of not leaning too far into that. Because it can really damage your credibility with some audiences which is a super unfortunate thing, but also something I've learned just, like, I have to be really careful about how much mom stuff I share on Twitter.Corey: It's bizarre to me that we have to shade aspects of ourselves like this. And I don't know what the answer is. It's a weird thing that I never thought about before until suddenly I find that, oh, I'm a parent. I guess I should actually pay attention to this thing now. And it's one of those once you see it you can't unsee it things and it becomes strange and interesting and also more than a little sad in some respects.Rachel: I think there are some signs that we are getting to a better place, but it's a hard road for parents I think, and moms, in particular, working moms, all kinds of challenges out there. But anyways, it's one of those ones that is nice because love having my kids as a break, but sometimes Mondays come and it's such a relief to come back to work after a weekend with kids. Kids are a lot of work. And so it has brought elements of joy to my personal life, but it has also brought renewed elements of joy to my work life as really being able to lean into that side of myself. So, it's been a good year.Corey: Now that I have a second kid, I'm keenly aware of why parents are always very reluctant to wind up—the good parents at least to say, “Oh yeah, I have X number of kids, but that one's my favorite.” And I understand now why my mom always said with my brother and I that, “I can't stand either one of you.” And I get that now. Looking at the children of cloud services it's like, which one is my favorite?Well, I can't stand any of them, but the one that I hate the most is the Managed NAT Gateway because of its horrible pricing. In fact, anything involving bandwidth pricing in this industry tends to be horrifying, annoying, ill-behaved, and very hard to discipline. Which is why I think it's probably time we talk a little bit about egress charges in cloud providers.You had a great analysis of Cloudflare's R2, which is named after a robot in Star Wars and is apparently also the name of their S3 competitor, once it launches. Again, this is a pre-announcement, yeah, I could write blog posts that claim anything; the proof is really going to be in the pudding. Tell me more about, I guess, what you noticed from that announcement and what drove you to, “Ah, I have thoughts on this?”Rachel: So, I think it's an interesting announcement for several reasons. I think one of them is that it makes their existing offering really compelling when you start to add in that object store to something like the CDN, or to their edge functions which is called their Workers platform. And so, if you start to combine some of those functionalities together with a better object storage story, it can make their existing offering a lot more compelling which I think is an interesting aspect of this.I think one of the aspects that is probably gotten a lot more of the traction though is their lack of egress pricing. So, I think that's really what took everyone's imaginations by storm is what does the world look like when we are not charging egress pricing on object storage?Corey: What I find interesting is that when this came out first, a lot of AWS fans got very defensive over it, which I found very odd because their egress charges are indefensible from my point of view. And their response was, “Well, if you look at how a lot of the data access patterns work this isn't as big of a deal as it looks like,” and you're right. If I have a whole bunch of objects living in an object store, and a whole bunch of people each grab one of those objects this won't help me in any meaningful sense.But if I have one object that a bunch of people grab, well, suddenly we're having a different conversation. And on some level, it turns into an interesting question of what differentiates this with their existing CDN-style approach. From my perspective, this is where the object actually lives rather than just a cache that is going to expire. And that is transformative in a bunch of different ways, but my, I guess, admittedly overstated analysis for some use cases was okay, I store a petabyte in AWS and use it with and without this thing. Great, the answer came out to something like 51 or $52,000 in egress charges versus zero on Cloudflare. That's an interesting perspective to take. And the orders of magnitude in difference are eye-popping assuming that it works as advertised, which is always the caveat.Rachel: Yeah. I remember there was a RedMonk conversation with one of the cloud vendors set us up with a client conversation that want to, kind of, showcase their products kind of thing. And it was a movie studio and they walked us through what they architecturally have to do when they drop a trailer. If you think about that thing from this use case where all of a sudden you have videos that are all going out globally at the same time, and everybody wants to watch it and you're serving it over and over, that's a super interesting and compelling use case and very different from a cost perspective.Corey: You'll notice the video streaming services all do business with something that is not AWS for what they stream to end-users from. Netflix has its own Open Connect project that effectively acts as their own homebuilt CDN that they partner with providers to put in their various environments. There are a bunch of providers that focus specifically on this. But if you do the math for the Netflix story at retail pricing—let's be clear at large scale, no one pays retail pricing for anything, but okay—even assuming that you're within hailing distance of the same universe as retail pricing; you don't have to watch too many hours of Netflix before the data egress charges cost more than you're paying a month than subscription. And I have it on good authority—read as from their annual reports—that a much larger expense for Netflix than their cloud and technology and R&D expenses is their content expenses.They're making a lot of original content. They're licensing an awful lot of content, and that's way more expensive than providing it to folks. They have to have a better economic model. They need to be able to make a profit of some kind on streaming things to people. And with the way that all the major cloud providers wind up pricing this stuff, it's not tenable. There has to be a better answer.Rachel: So, Netflix calls to mind an interesting antidote that has gone around the industry which is who can become each other faster? Can HBO become Netflix faster, or can Netflix become HBO faster? So, can you build out that technology infrastructure side, or can you build out that content side? And I think what you're talking to with their content costs speaks to that story in terms of where people are investing and trying to actually make dents in their strategic outlays.I think a similar concept is actually at play when we talk about cloud and CDN. We do have this interesting piece from my coworker, Steve O'Grady, and he called it “Convergent Evolution of CDNs and Clouds.” And they originally evolved along separate paths where CDNs were designed to do this edge-caching scenario, and they had the core compute and all of the things that go around it happening in the cloud.And I think we've seen in recent years both of them starting to grow towards each other where CDNs are starting to look a lot more cloud-like, and we're seeing clouds trying to look more CDN-like. And I think this announcement in particular is very interesting when you think about what's happening in the CDN space and what it actually means for where CDNs are headed.Corey: It's an interesting model in that if we take a look at all of the existing cloud providers they had some other business that funded the incredible expense outlay that it took to build them. For example, Amazon was a company that started off selling books and soon expanded to selling everything else, and then expanded to putting ads in all of their search portals, including in AWS and eroding customer trust.Google wound up basically making all of their money by showing people ads and also killing Google Reader. And of course, Microsoft has been a software company for a lot longer than they've been a cloud provider, and given their security lapses in Azure recently is the question of whether they'll continue to be taken seriously as a cloud provider.But what makes Cloudflare interesting from this approach is they start it from the outside in of building out the edge before building regions or anything like that. And for a lot of use cases that works super well, in theory. In practice, well, we've never seen it before. I'm curious to see how it goes. Obviously, they're telling great stories about how they envision this working out in the future. I don't know how accurate it's going to be—show, don't tell—but I can at least acknowledge that the possibility is definitely there.Rachel: I think there's a lot of unanswered questions at this point, like, will you be able to have zero egress fees, and edge-like latencies, and global distribution, and have that all make sense and actually perform the way that the customer expects? I think that's still to be seen. I think one of the things that we have watched with interest is this rise of—I think for lack of a better word techno-nationalism where we are starting to see enclaves of where people want technology to be residing, where they want things to be sourced from, all of these interesting things.And so having this global network of storage flies in the face of some of those trends where people are building more and more enclaves of we're going to go big and global. I think that's interesting and I think data residency in this global world will be an interesting question.Corey: It also gets into the idea of what is the data that's going to live there. Because the idea of data residency, yes, that is important, but where that generally tends to matter the most is things like databases or customer information. Not the thing that we're putting out on the internet for anyone who wants to, to be able to download, which has historically been where CDNs are aiming things.Yes, of course, they can restrict it to people with logins and the rest, but that type of object storage in my experience is not usually subject to heavy regulation around data residency. We'll see because I get the sense that this is the direction Cloudflare is attempting to go in, and it's really interesting to see how it works. I'm curious to know what their stories are around, okay, you have a global network. That's great. Can I stipulate which areas my data can live within or not?At some point, it's going to need to happen if they want to look at regulated entities, but not everyone has to start with that either. So, it really just depends on what their game plan is on this. I like the fact that they're willing to do this. I like the fact they're willing to be as transparent as they are about their contempt for AWS's egress fees. And yes, of course, they're a competitor.They're going to wind up smacking competition like this, but I find it refreshing because there is no defense for what they're saying, their math is right. Their approach to what customers experience from AWS in terms of egress fees is correct. And all of the defensiveness at, well, you know, no one pays retail price for this, yeah, but they see it on the website when they're doing back-of-the-envelope math, and they're not going to engage with you under the expectation that you're going to give them a 98% discount.So, figure out what the story is. And it's like beating my head against the wall. I also want to be fair. These networks are very hard to build, and there's a tremendous amount of investment. The AWS network is clearly magic in some respects just because having worked in data centers myself, the things that I see that I'm able to do between various EC2 instances at full network line rate would not have been possible in the data centers that I worked within.So, there's something going on that is magic and that's great. And I understand that it's expensive, but they've done a terrible job of messaging that. It just feels like, oh, bandwidth in is free because, you know, that's how it works. Sending it out, ooh, that's going to cost you X and their entire positioning and philosophy around it just feels unnecessary.Rachel: That's super interesting. And I think that also speaks to one of the questions that is still an open concern for what happens to Cloudflare if this is wildly successful. Which, based off of people's excitement levels at this point, it's seems like it's very potentially going to be successful. And what does this mean for the level of investment that they're going to have to make in their own infrastructure and network and order to actually be able to serve all of this?Corey: The thing that I find curious is that in a couple of comment threads on Hacker News and on Twitter, Cloudflare's CEO, Matthew Prince—who's always been extremely accessible as far as executives of giant cloud companies go—has said that at their scale and by which they he's referring to Cloudflare, and he says, “I assume that Amazon can probably get at least as decent economics on bandwidth pricing as we can,” which is a gross understatement because Amazon will spend years fighting over 50 cents.Great, but what's interesting is that he refers to bandwidth at that scale as being much closer to a fixed cost than something that's a marginal cost for everything that a customer uses. The way that companies buy and sell bandwidth back and forth is complex, but he's right. It is effectively a fixed monthly fee for a link and you can use as much or as little of that link as you want. 95th percentile billing aficionados, please don't email me.But by and large, that's the way to think about it. You pay for the size of the pipe, not how much water flows through it. And as long as you can keep the links going without saturating them to the point where more data can't fit through at a reasonable amount of time, your cost don't change. So, yeah, if there's a bunch of excitement they'll have to expand the links, but that's generally a fixed cost as opposed to a marginal cost per gigabyte.That's not how they think about it. There's a whole translation layer that's an economic model. And according to their public filings, they have something like a 77% gross margin which tells me that, okay, they are not in fact losing money on bandwidth even now where they generally don't charge on a metered basis until you're on the Cloudflare Enterprise Plan.Rachel: Yeah. I think it's going to just be really interesting to watch. I'm definitely interested to see what happens as they open this up, and like, 11 9s of availability feels like a lot of availabilities. It's just the engineering of this, the economics of this it feels like there's a lot of open questions that I'm excited to watch.Corey: You're onto my favorite part of this. So, the idea of 11 9s because it sounds ludicrous. That is well within the boundaries of probability of things such as, yeah, it is likely that gravity is going to stop working than it is that's going to lose data. How can you guarantee that? Generally speaking, although S3 has always been extremely tight-lipped about how it works under the hood, other systems have not been.And it looks an awful lot like the idea of Reed-Solomon erasure coding, where for those of us who spent time downloading large files of questionable legality due to copyright law and whatnot off of Usenet, they had the idea of parity files where they'd take these giant media files up—they're Linux ISOs; of course they are—and you'd slice them into a bunch of pieces and then generate parity files as well.So, you would wind up downloading the let's say 80 RAR files and, oh, three of them were corrupt, each parity file could wind up swapping in so as long as you had enough that added up to 80, any of those could wind up restoring the data that had been corrupted. That is almost certainly what is happening at the large object storage scale. Which is great, we're going to break this thing into a whole bunch of chunks. Let's say here is a file you've uploaded or an object.We're going to break this into a hundred chunks—let's say arbitrarily—and any 80 of those chunks can be used to reconstitute the entire file. And then you start looking at where you place them and okay, what are the odds of simultaneous drive failure in these however many locations? And that's how you get that astronomical number. It doesn't mean what people think of does. The S3 offers 11 9s of durability on their storage classes, including the One Zone storage class.Which is a single availability zone instead of something that's an entire region, which means that they're not calculating disaster recovery failure scenarios into that durability number. Which is fascinating because it's far, like, you're going to have all the buildings within the same office park burn down than it is all of the buildings within a hundred square miles burn down, but those numbers remain the same.There's a lot of assumptions baked into that and it makes for an impressive talking point. I just hear it as, oh yeah, you're a real object-store. That's how I see it. There's a lot that's yet to be explained or understood. And I think that I'm going to be going up one side and down the other as soon as this exists in the real world and I'm looking forward to seeing it. I'm just a little skeptical because it has been preannounced.The important part for me is even the idea that they can announce something like this and not be sued for securities fraud tells me that it is at least theoretically economically possible that they could be telling the truth on this. And that alone speaks volumes to just how out-of-bounds it tends to be in the context of giant cloud customers.Rachel: I mean, if you read Matt Levine, “Everything is Securities Fraud?“ so, I don't know how much we want to get excited about that.Corey: Absolutely. A huge fan of his work. Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: So, we've talked a fair bit about what data egress looks like. What else have you been focusing on? What have you found that is fun, and exciting, and catches your eye in this incredibly broad industry lately?Rachel: Oh, there's all kinds of exciting things. One of the pieces of research that's been on my back-burner, usually I do it early summer, and it is—due to a variety of factors—still in my pipeline, but I always do a piece of research about base infrastructure pricing. And it's an annual piece of looking about what are all of the cloud providers doing in regards to their pricing on that core aspect of compute, and storage, and memory.And what does that look like over time, and what does that look like across providers? And it is absolutely impossible to get an apples-to-apples comparison over time and across providers. It just can't actually be done. But we do our best [laugh] and then caveat the hell out of it from there. But that's the piece of research that's most on my backlog right now and one that I'm working on.Corey: I think that there's a lot of question around the idea of what is the cost of a compute unit—or something like that—between providers? The idea of if I have this configuration will cost me more on cloud provider a or cloud provider B, my pet working theory is that whenever people ask for analyses like that—or a number of others, to be perfectly frank with you—what they're really looking for is confirmation bias to go in the direction that they wanted to go in already. I have yet to see a single scenario where people are trying to decide between cloud providers and they say, “That one because it's going to be 10% less.” I haven't seen it. That said I am, of course, at a very particular area of the industry. Have you seen it?Rachel: I have not seen it. I think users find it interesting because it's always interesting to look at trends over time. And in particular, with this analysis, it's interesting to watch the number of providers narrow and then widen back out because we've been doing this since 2012. So, we used to have [unintelligible 00:26:24] and HPE used to be in there. So, like, we used to—CenturyLink. We used to have this broader list of cloud providers that we considered that would narrow down to this doesn't really count anymore.And now why do you need to back out? It's like, okay, Oracle Cloud you're in, Alibaba, Tencent, like, let's look at you. And so, like, it's interesting to just watch the providers in the mix shift over time which I think is interesting. And I think one of just the broad trends that is interesting is early years of this, there was steep competition on price, and that leveled off for solid three, four years.We've seen some degree of competitiveness reemerge with competitors like Oracle in particular. So, those broad-brush trends are interesting. The specifics of the pricing if you're doing 10% difference kind of things I think you're missing the point of the analysis largely, but it's interesting to look at what's happening in the industry overall.Corey: If you were to ask me to set up a simple web app, if there is such a thing, and tell you in advance what it was going to cost to host, and I can get it accurate within 20%, I am on fire in terms of both analysis and often dumb luck just because it is so difficult to answer the question. Getting back to our earlier conversational topic, let's say I put CloudFront, Amazon's sorry excuse for a CDN, in front of it which is probably the closest competitor they have to Cloudflare as a CDN, what'll it cost me per gigabyte? Well, that's a fascinating question. The answer comes down to where are you visiting it from? Depending where on the planet, people who are viewing my website, or using my web app are sitting, the cost per gigabyte will vary between eight-and-a-half cents—retail pricing—and fourteen cents. That's a fairly wide margin and there's no way to predict that in advance for most use cases. It's the big open-ended question.And people build out their environments and they want to know they're making a rational decision and that their provider is not charging three times more than their competitor is for the exact same thing, but as long as it's within a certain level of confidence interval, that makes sense.Rachel: Yeah, and I think the other thing that's interesting about this analysis and one of the reasons that it's a frustrating analysis for me, in particular, is that I feel like that base compute is actually not where most of the cloud providers are actually competing anymore. So, like, it was definitely the interesting story early in cloud.I think very clearly not the focus area for most of us now. It has moved up an abstraction layer. It's moved to manage services. It has moved to other areas of their product portfolio. So, it's still useful. It's good to know. But I think that the broader portfolio of the cloud providers is definitely more the story than this individual price point.Corey: That is an interesting story because I believe it, and it speaks to the aspirational version of where a lot of companies see themselves going. And then in practice, I see companies talking like this constantly, and then I look in their environment and say, “Okay, you're basically spending 70% of your entire cloud bill on EC2 instances, running—it's a bunch of VMs that sit there.”And as much as they love to talk about the future and how other things are being considered and how their—use of machine learning in the rest, and Kubernetes, of course, a lot of this stuff all distills down to, yeah, it runs in software. It sits on top of EC2 instances and that's what you get billed for. At re:Invent it's always interesting and sad at the same time that they don't give EC2 nearly enough attention or stage time because it's not interesting, despite it being a majority of AWS bill.Rachel: I think that's a fantastic point, well made.Corey: I'll take it even one step further—and this is one where I think is almost a messaging failure on some level—Google Cloud offers sustained use discounts which apparently they don't know how to talk about appropriately, but it's genius. The way this works is if you run a VM for more than in a certain number of hours in a month, the entire month is now charged for that VM at a less than retail rate because you've been using it in a sustained way.All you have to do to capture that is don't turn it off. You know, what everyone's doing already. And sure if you commit to usage on it you get a deeper discount, but what I like about this is if you buy some reserved instances is or you buy some committed use discounting, great, you'll save more money, but okay, here's a $20 million buy. You should click the button on, people are terrified to click at that button because I don't usually get to approve dollar figure spend with multiple commas in them. That's kind of scary. So, people hem and they haw and they wait six months. This is maybe not as superior mathematically, but it's definitely an easier sell psychologically, and they just don't talk about it.It's what people say they care about when people actually do are worlds apart. And the thing that continually astounds me because I didn't expect it, but it's obvious in hindsight that when it comes to cloud economics it's more about psychology than it is about math.Rachel: I think one of the things that, having come from the finance world into the analyst world, and so I definitely have a particular point of view, but one of the things that was hardest for me when I worked in finance was not the absolute dollar amount of anything but the variability of it. So, if I knew what to expect I could work with that and we could make it work. It was when things varied in unexpected ways that it was a lot more challenging.And so I think one of the things that when people talked about, like, this shift to cloud and the move to cloud, and everyone is like, “Oh, we're moving things from the balance sheet to the income statement.” And everyone talked about that like it's a big deal. For some parts of the organization that is a big deal, but for a lot of the organization, the shift that matters is the shift from a fixed cost to a variable cost because that lack of predictability makes a lot of people's jobs, a lot more difficult.Corey: The thing that I always find fun is a thought exercise is okay, let's take a look at any given cloud company's cloud bill for the last 18 to 36 months and add all of that up. Great, take that big giant number and add 20% to it. If you could magically go back in time and offer that larger number to them as here's your cloud bill and all of your usage for the next 18 to 36 months. Here you go. Buy this instead.And the cloud providers laugh at me and they say, “Who in the world would agree to that deal?” And my answer is, “Almost everyone.” Because at the company's scale it's not like the individual developer response of, “Oh, my God, I just spent how much money? I've got to eat this month.” Companies are used to absorbing those things. It's fine. It's just a, “We didn't predict this. We didn't plan for this. What does this do to our projections, our budget, et cetera?”If you can offer them certainty and find some way to do it, they will jump at that. Most of my projects are not about make the bill lower, even though that is what is believed, in some cases by people working on these projects internally at these companies. It's about making it understandable. It's about making it predictable, it's about understanding when you see a big spike one month. What project drove that?Spoiler, it's almost always the data science team because that's what they do, but that's neither here nor there. Please don't send me letters. But yeah, it's about understanding what is going on, and that understanding and being able to predict it is super hard when you're looking at usage-based pricing.Rachel: Exactly.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me. If people want to hear more about your thoughts, your observations, et cetera, where can they find you?Rachel: Probably the easiest way to get in touch with me is on Twitter, which is @rstephensme that's R-S-T-E-P-H-E-N-S-M-E.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:08]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Rachel: Thanks for having me. This was great.Corey: Rachel Stephens, senior analyst at RedMonk. I'm Cloud Economist, Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment, angrily defending your least favorite child, which is some horrifying cloud service you have launched during the pandemic.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Hunt the World
HTW-Ep-87 Hunting Traditions and Thanksgiving

Hunt the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 71:04


Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Rolling Bones Outdoors. If you're a big game hunter you probably remember your first buck? In this episode of Hunt the World Brian, Brad and Bryan, along with Bleep, tell the story of their first buck and also Thanksgiving traditions that often involved hunting stories - as well as squirrel pie, spaghetti and roast duck. And later in the podcast they do a quick recap of hunting conditions and reports they are hearing from the field this year. 

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Frank Garcia, Most Impressive Part of the Hornets Win and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:28


Mac and Bone look at the most impressive parts of the Hornets win over the Wizards last night, reveal their 'What the Bleep?' stories of the week and talk about what went wrong for the Panthers against the WFT with Frank Garcia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Rittenhouse Verdict Reactions + Dumb BLEEP of the Week! || EP 592

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:43


Kyle Rittenhouse Found Not Guilty https://www.dailywire.com/news/breaking-kyle-rittenhouse-found-not-guilty Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BMitch & Finlay
11.18.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Peter Rosenberg, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:09


1:00- Opening up the phone lines to hear what people are mad at today.  19:00- Petere Rosenberg joins the show to talk about the WFT.  31:30- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First.' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 2: Paul Finebaum, Who Should Start on Sunday and What the Bleep?

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 38:31


Mac and Bone discuss the latest group of people that believe PJ Walker should start on Sunday, reveal their 'What the Bleep' stories of the week and talk to Paul Finebaum about the biggest storylines around the SEC and college football. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning Liberty
Dumb BLEEP of the Week! (Everything Is Racist, and Covid Morality) || EP 587

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:22


The Nomad Network is the #1 community for liberty minded people just like you, who want to create freedom in their lifetime by focusing on entrepreneurship, investment and income mobility. http://www.nomadnetwork.app/gml Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Let's Talk Sports with Kanoa Leahey & Jordan Helle

After a "forced" two week hiatus, we talk football through the lens of the sports gambler with our buddy Matt Youmans, Vegas Stats and Information Network editor, who breaks down UH vs UNLV, the topsy-turvy NFL season, and his most painful bad beat. Plus, Kanoa and Jordan discuss the current status of Rainbow Warriors football, the season debut of 'Bows basketball and the Saint Louis Crusaders' march to an ILH football championship. And back by popular demand, the "What the (Bleep)?!" segment makes a return. As always, the show concludes with our "Best and Worst".

The Mark Kaye Show
It's VETERAN'S DAY!! BIDEN Honor Dog's Doctor!!

The Mark Kaye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 104:24


11-11-2021 Message to Veterans from President Trump, Kyle Rittenhouse Case, What the Bleep!, and Conspiracy Theory Thursday.

BMitch & Finlay
11.11.21 Hour 4- Bleep You Thursday, Wes Hall, Heard it Here First

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 36:12


2:00- Opening up the phone lines to see who people are mad at today.  19:45- Wes Hall joins the show to talk about the Washington Wizards.  31:00- The guys make their sports bets for the night in "Heard it Here First." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.