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General term for rules, including delegated legislation and self-regulation

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Best podcasts about regulations

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Latest podcast episodes about regulations

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 48: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 29, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:01


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 29, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: House votes to cap veterans' flight training benefits, jet sales climb, piston aircraft steady, support GA on Giving Tuesday, Baker awarded First Flight Society honorary membership, and AOPA's Mike Collins honored with a posthumous award.

Seattle News, Views, and Brews
2022 Episode 44: Budget Aftermath, City Land Swap, No Homeless Count, New Sheriff, New Council Regulations

Seattle News, Views, and Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 29:52


Learn about the latest in local public affairs in about the time it takes for a coffee break! Brian Callanan of Seattle Channel and Kevin Schofield of Seattle City Council Insight take a final look at the approved 2022 city budget, and an impending land swap between the city and King County. Plus, a look at why the new King County Regional Homelessness Authority will not be doing a "point-in-time" count of homeless residents, a new sheriff selection process, and a new set of regulations for the City Council. Also: a reflection on the deliciousness of tartlet season. If you like this podcast, please support us on Patreon! 

Is That Even Legal?
Can Your Employer Stop You From Getting Your Next Job?

Is That Even Legal?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 35:19


Restrictive covenants. Non-competes. Some states allow their enforcement. Some states don't. In an increasingly mobile employment environment and in a time when the "Great Resignation," is sweeping the country, the Federal Government is paying a lot of attention to trying to "promote competitive labor markets and worker mobility."  This effort is in response an Executive Order by President Biden in July, urging the Federal Trade Commission to "curtail the unfair use of non-compete clauses...that may unfairly limit worker mobility."On December 6th and 7th, the FTC and the DOJ will host a virtual workshop to inform the rulemaking process.  This episode tees up the issue looking at restrictive covenants from all sides, with guest litigation attorney David Williams.Have you ever been laid off only to find that you can't get a job in your field due to a non-compete? Have you ever had an employee walk off with your customer list or your "secret sauce?  As an employee, are you free to leave for a competitor?  As an employer, are your trade secrets protected.? If you aren't sure, this episode of Is That Even Legal is for you.More on the December Workshop. See also https://www.justice.gov/atr/events/public-workshop-promoting-competition-labor-markets#informationAccording to the FTC, Over the two days (12/6 and 12/7) a series of panels, presentations, and remarks will address competition issues affecting labor markets and the welfare of workers, including: labor monopsony; the increased use of restrictive contractual clauses in labor agreements, including non-competes and non-disclosure agreements; information sharing and benchmarking activity among competing employers; the role of other federal agencies in ensuring fair competition in labor markets; and the relationship between antitrust law and collective bargaining efforts in the “gig economy.”  Panelists will be invited to discuss potential steps antitrust enforcers can take to better target enforcement resources, improve public guidance, and pursue a “whole of government” approach to ensuring fair competition for workers and consumers by leveraging interagency resources.The FTC and the DOJ Antitrust Division invite comments from the public on the topics covered by this workshop. Interested parties may submit public comments online now through Dec. 20, 2021, at Regulations.gov.

Continuum Podcast Network
Managing hiring, recruiting, regulations and company culture

Continuum Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 47:43


Human resources continues to be a challenge for many MSPs. On our last podcast, Arlin Sorenson hosts a panel with ConnectWise Invent vendors Connectstrat, Insperity, MSP Toolshed and Password Boss to discuss this important topic. Join us as we discuss current hiring trends, the rise of the remote workforce, managing government regulations and best practices for a strong company culture. Host: Arlin Sorenson, VP of Brand & Ecosystem Evangelism at ConnectWise

ChillChat
COVID-related Travel Regulations and Policies: what's new?

ChillChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 29:27


You can ACCESS the study material / show note at

Gains with Andy Giersher
Bitcoin City, Crypto Regulations & Staking

Gains with Andy Giersher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 47:11


On today's episode Bill Ulivieri joins us to discuss cryptocurrency regulations, ways to earn rewards through staking, and the role played by miners on the blockchain. He also discusses El Salvador's plans to create 'Bitcoin City.'   Bill Ulivieri  Owner of  Cenacle Capital Management  Glenview, IL  CenacleCapital.com  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Berlin Briefing
24.11.2021 - Regulations, 3G at work, 3G on public transport

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:01


- Regulations - 3G at work - 3G on public transport ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donate: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update
We Have COVID-19 Vaccines Because Trump Swept Away Regulations

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:44


RUSH: The CDC, the Centers for Disease Control, urging everybody to do nothing, go nowhere, stay home during Thanksgiving. By all means, don't do anything. Stay where you are. Stay hunkered down. That's what Americans are known for. They hunker down in the corner. Find the cubbyhole where you live where the Navy SEALs have to be thrown in there to get you out if they can't find you. Make sure you protect yourself by hiding from everything. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Food Safety Matters
Ep. 108. STOP Foodborne Illness and AFDO: Joining Forces for Recall Modernization

Food Safety Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:28


Mitzi Baum joined the team at Stop Foodborne Illness as the Chief Executive Officer in May 2019. Prior to beginning her tenure at Stop, Mitzi cultivated a 23-year career at Feeding America beginning as a network services representative rising to the senior level position of managing director of food safety. Mitzi holds a Master of Science in Food Safety and a certificate in Food Law from Michigan State University. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH. Steve Mandernach is the executive director of the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO), which unites high-level regulatory officials, industry representatives, trade associations, academia, and consumer organizations. Prior to becoming executive director in 2018, Steve was the bureau chief for food and consumer safety at the Iowa Department of Inspections. He is a past president of AFDO and current co-chair of the Association's Laws and Regulations committee. He has a J.D. from Drake University Law School. Steve is also a member of Food Safety Magazine's Editorial Advisory Board. Jennifer Pierquet joined the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) in May 2019 as a Project Manager to oversee two support and maintenance contracts for 20 state inspection systems. Jenny leads the recall modernization project and Co-Chairs AFDO's Food Protection and Defense Committee. Formerly, she worked for the Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals, Food and Consumer Safety Bureau as the Manufacturing Foods Regulatory Program Standards Coordinator and was involved in Iowa's Rapid Response Team. Prior to Iowa, she worked for the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. Jenny received a Master's in Public Health from the University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, and is a proud alumnus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Mitzi, Steve, and Jennifer [17:41] about: How the recall process has worked for the last 20 years Some of the problems associated with how recalls are currently handled Identifying gaps in the recall process for consumers The complexity of recalls and recall fatigue STOP's working group and their recommendations to FDA AFDO's recommendations to FDA Are recalls happening fast enough – too fast? Priorities for change that could be implemented quickly Training Using consistent language between agencies Viewing recalls as urgent public health issues News Study Examines Role of Dust Particles in Transferring Pathogens to Produce FSIS Releases FY2020 Foodborne Illness Outbreak Investigations Summary Report FDA Releases New Food Fraud Website We Want to Hear from You! Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@foodsafetymagazine.com

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 47: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 22, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:09


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 22, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: Why pilot hiring is increasing exponentially, a final rule that eases the single-engine ATP path, older pilots continue to report negative treatment from insurance companies, avionics market trends are up, and 5 tips to avoid air travel delays during the holidays.

RNZ: Morning Report
Angry farmers continue to protest over 'unworkable' regulations

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 4:52


Angry farmers took to the streets on Sunday in their utes and tractors, blocking traffic to protest regulations they say are unworkable. In Auckland, some vehicles displayed New Zealand flags and signs bearing slogans such as "No No No to the Three Waters reform" and "F F S - for farmers' sakes". Groundswell NZ leader Laurie Paterson says the protests are not about the left or the right of the political spectrum - but about middle New Zealanders who are working hard to feed the country.

Talking Tax
Window Open for Tax Measures to Curb Climate Change

Talking Tax

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:40


A landmark meeting on curbing climate change didn't do much to address the role that tax measures might play, but financial-climate consultants and academics still think they can contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The COP26 conference agreed on long-awaited rules for global emissions trading markets, one key form of carbon pricing meant to help provide financial incentives for reducing emissions. But carbon taxes—direct levies that increase the price of carbon fuels or the emissions that result from them—weren't dealt with in that agreement. And with the U.S. Congress also not taking action on carbon taxes, some advocates are concerned an opportunity to slow climate change with aggressive policies are falling out of reach. There are still ways taxes could make a difference in the climate arena, however. On this week's episode of Talking Tax, Frank Eich, an economist with U.K. consultancy CRU, spoke to Bloomberg Tax's Michael Rapoport about the COP26 developments and the future of carbon taxes. And Sanjay Patnaik, director of the Brookings Institution's Center on Regulations and Markets, spoke to Bloomberg Tax's David Hood about what's happening in the U.S. Have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

American Conservative University
Eric Metaxas Talks to Columnist John Zmirak. Every Citizen Must Push Back Against Tyrannical Rules and Regulations.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:05


Eric Metaxas Talks to Columnist John Zmirak. Every Citizen Must Push Back Against Tyrannical Rules and Regulations. The Eric Metaxas Show John Zmirak  Nov 08 2021   John Zmirak takes over the hour with his latest articles from Stream.org -- don't miss what John has to say about life in fundamentally-transformed America. The Eric Metaxas Show John Zmirak (Continued)  Nov 08 2021   John Zmirak continues discussion of his latest pull-no-punches articles, emphasizing the need for every citizen to push back against the current tyrannical rules and regulations. The Eric Metaxas Show- https://metaxastalk.com/podcasts/ The Eric Metaxas Show

American Conservative University
Eric Metaxas Talks to Columnist John Zmirak. Every Citizen Must Push Back Against Tyrannical Rules and Regulations.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:05


Eric Metaxas Talks to Columnist John Zmirak. Every Citizen Must Push Back Against Tyrannical Rules and Regulations. The Eric Metaxas Show John Zmirak  Nov 08 2021   John Zmirak takes over the hour with his latest articles from Stream.org -- don't miss what John has to say about life in fundamentally-transformed America. The Eric Metaxas Show John Zmirak (Continued)  Nov 08 2021   John Zmirak continues discussion of his latest pull-no-punches articles, emphasizing the need for every citizen to push back against the current tyrannical rules and regulations. The Eric Metaxas Show- https://metaxastalk.com/podcasts/ The Eric Metaxas Show

U.S. National Privacy Legislation Podcast
Data Industry Leader Addresses Privacy and Cybersecurity Challenges

U.S. National Privacy Legislation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 37:19


Contact us:Jerry Buckley | jbuckley@buckleyfirm.comJody Westby | westby@globalcyberrisk.comADCG | info@adcg.org

CISO Stories Podcast
Which Approach Wins: Compliance or Risk? - Mark Burnette - CSP #44

CISO Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:19


Cybersecurity programs have evolved from the early days of compliance with regulations. Regulations are important and provide the necessary motivation for many organizations to implement security controls that may not otherwise be present, but is this enough? Is it really security? Join this podcast as the differences between compliance and true security are discussed.   To view the article from the CISO COMPASS Book that sparked this interview, please visit: https://securityweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/CISOSTORIES_Mark_Burnette_ArticleV1.pdf   Burnette, M. 2019. The Benefits of Focusing on Risk vs Compliance. In CISO COMPASS: Navigating Cybersecurity Leadership Challenges with Insights from Pioneers, 1st Ed, pg 18. Fitzgerald, T. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fl. www.amazon.com/author/toddfitzgerald   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/csp44 This segment is sponsored by Cybereason. Visit https://www.cybereason.com/cisostories to learn more about them!   Visit https://securityweekly.com/csp for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/cyberleaders Follow us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cybersecuritycollaborative/

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 46: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 15, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 4:45


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 15, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: Why corporate aviation hiring demand is high, winglet maker disputes NTSB findings, experimental cross-section weather product has new features, FAA proposes second class medical for balloon pilots, and AOPA honors staff who have served.

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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Coast Bible Church
Bad Religion, Pt 2: Rules and Regulations - Audio

Coast Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 33:11


What purpose did God have when He gave us rules and regulations? What place do rules and regulations have in a believer's life? Are all rules and regulations bad?

On The Brink with Castle Island
Weekly Roundup 11/12/21 (Inflation hits 6.2%, Discord dithers on Web3, Is is really about the supply chain?) (EP.259)

On The Brink with Castle Island

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 36:50


Matt and Nic return for news and deals of the week. In this episode:  Circle launches an early stage venture fund SEC targets American CryptoFed DAO LLC The SEC references Nic's paper on DeFi risks Should DeFi teams be more aggressive in disclosing admin key risks? What would a DeFi disclosure regime look like? BlockFi files for a spot Bitcoin ETF Bitwise withdraws its futures-based ETF NYC mayor Eric Adams says NYC schools should teach about cryptocurrency Miami will airdrop BTC to residents Inflation prints at 6.2% annualized Why the 'supply chain' explanation for inflation obscures the underlying dynamics Is inflation really a supply chain issue? Real interest rates are as low as they were in the 1970s Why we have entered monetary repression Discord dithers on Web3 BrinkDAO Could tungsten rods in space improve on nuclear weapons? Content mentioned in this episode:  SEC, Statement on DeFi Risks, Regulations, and Opportunities Michael Greenwald, The Digital Asset Olympics 21Shares, Q3 Report  Nic Carter and Linda Jeng, DeFi Protocol Risks Sponsor notes: This show supported by Coinbase Prime, an integrated solution that provides advanced multi-venue trading, custody, and prime services for institutions. For more information see coinbase.com/prime Corporations and institutions can allocate cash into Circle Yield to gain crypto lending exposure and earn superior returns compared to traditional markets. It's secured, overcollateralized and built on the leading dollar digital currency. Visit circle.com/yield to book a meeting

What a Hell of a Way to Die
Your Honor, The Regulations Annoyed Me

What a Hell of a Way to Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 60:06


We get to the point at 17:51! This week, we discuss adventures in soundproofing, how to de-Ba'ath-ify yourself from the effects of the military making you react emotionally, Veterans' Day, the 5-year anniversary of this podcast, and much more. However, we also focus specifically on a story about a metallurgist in Tacoma who faked the test results of decades' worth of Navy metal castings for submarines because she thought the test standards were ‘stupid.' It's the most relatable thing we've ever heard--read the story here: https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/11/09/metallurgist-admits-faking-steel-test-results-navy-subs.html   For week's bonus, Francis speaks with Task and Purpose reporter Hayley Britzky (@halbritz) about brigades in the 82nd Airborne trying out this new thing called 'exercise science' and 'nutrition science' and 'perhaps not destroying soldiers' bodies with terrible exercise routines that have been out of date for 40 years.' Get it on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/58342578   *SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT* We now have a storefront to sell the patches, buttons, and magnets that we also give out as flair for our $10 tier. Buy some sweet gear here:  https://www.hellofawaytodie.com/shop We have a YouTube channel now -- subscribe here and get sweet videos from us in which we yell in our cars like true veterans: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwlHZpNTz-h6aTeQiJrEDKw You can follow the show on Twitter here: @HellOfAWay Follow Nate here: @inthesedeserts Follow Francis here: @ArmyStrang

The Great Battlefield
EveryAction M&A and Texting Regulations for Politics with Max Kamin-Cross

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:39


Max Kamin-Cross joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about the recent acquisitions at EveryAction and the looming texting regulations for campaigns.

The KWOS Morning Show with Austin Petersen and John Marsh
California Regulations To Blame For Supply Shortage

The KWOS Morning Show with Austin Petersen and John Marsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 7:24


Austin Petersen speaks to trucker Reed Coverdale about the reasons for the supply shortages in the United States.

Berlin Briefing
10.11.2021 - Corona regulations, Fines, Wages

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 8:14


- Corona regulations - Fines - Wages ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donate: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

ASC Podcast with John Goehle
Episode 145 - ASC Podcast with John Goehle - Vaccine Mandates, 2022 CMS Final ASC/HOPD Payment Rule - November 7, 2021.

ASC Podcast with John Goehle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:15


On this Episode of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle,   we discuss the Vaccine Mandate Movement, and review the Final CMS 2022 Payment Rule for ASCs and HOPDs    This episode sponsored by Surgical Information Systems and  Ambulatory Healthcare Strategies.  Resources from this Episode: CMS Vaccine Mandate:https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/press-releases/biden-harris-administration-issues-emergency-regulation-requiring-covid-19-vaccination-health-care https://www.cms.gov/files/document/cms-omnibus-staff-vax-requirements-2021.pdf OSHA Mandate:https://www.osha.gov/coronavirus/ets2 Mandate on Hold 2022 Final Rule:Federal Register Fact Sheet Conditions for Coverage:https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=42:3.0.1.1.3&idno=42#se42.3.416_150 Interpretive Guidelines for ASCshttps://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_l_ambulatory.pdf Policy & Memos to States and RegionsCMS Quality Safety & Oversight memoranda, guidance, clarifications and instructions to State Survey Agencies and CMS Regional Offices. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/SurveyCertificationGenInfo/Policy-and-Memos-to-States-and-Regions Other Resources from the ASC Podcast with John Goehle: Visit our website at ascpodcast.com for a list of all of our virtual conferences.  Get a copy of John's newest book - the 2020 Edition of The Survey Guide - A Guide to the CMS Conditions for Coverage & Interpretive Guidelines for Ambulatory Surgery Centers  Visit the ASC Podcast with John Goehle Website Benefits of Becoming a Patron Member Purchase John's Books Go to the ASC Podcast Store Patron Members of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle have access to ASC Central - an exclusive membership website that provides a one-stop  ASC Regulatory and Accreditation Compliance, Operations and Financial Management resource for busy Administrators, nurse managers and business office managers.   Become a member today!

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 45: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 8, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:05


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 8, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: How a planned 5G rollout risks aviation safety, aviation groups support alternative fuels program, AOPA's High School Aviation STEM Symposium set for Nov. 16, Brig. Gen. Charles McGee receives Reagan Distinguished American Award, and the Air Race Classic announces the 2022 route.

The Brave Marketer
Crypto Marketing: Risks, Regulations and Major Opportunities

The Brave Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 23:00


Episode Description: Shiran Herzberg, Head of Media at eToro, discusses the complexities of crypto marketing and how he's navigating the industry when buying media. Shiran also shares what he thinks are the biggest opportunities in crypto marketing and what he's found to be the best performing channels.  In this episode we also discuss: How crypto marketing differs from digital advertising and promotions in other industries  What rules to keep in mind when marketing on channels like Google and Facebook Best practices when buying media
 to reach the crypto market Guest Bio: Shiran Herzberg is the Head of Media at eToro, where he's worked for the last 10 years, leading the media buying and performance team, along with helping with eToro's brand marketing.  Brave Pick: This week's Brave Pick of the Week is Columbia Sportswear. Check out their website here. --------------------------------------------------------------------- About this Show: Brave is at the forefront of a new online privacy frontier and has unique insight into the future of marketing and advertising in a cookieless world. If you're an agency, brand marketer or entrepreneur challenged by the changes in ethical advertising, consumer privacy and buyer expectations, this podcast will provide a backstage view of how influential marketers at top brands and agencies are responding to what's next.   Music by: Ari Dvorin Hosted by: Donny Dvorin

ASC Podcast with John Goehle
Episode 144 - ASC Podcast with John Goehle - Special Episode - New York ASC Association September 2021 Annual Conference - November 4, 2021

ASC Podcast with John Goehle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 108:28


On this Special Episode of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle,   we visit the NYS Association of ASCs fall conference on September 29-30, 2021 in Tarrytown, NY and meet with leaders to discuss current issues in the ASC Industry in New York.    This episode sponsored by Surgical Information Systems and  Ambulatory Healthcare Strategies.  Resources from this Episode: New York State Association of ASCs Web Site Conditions for Coverage:https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=42:3.0.1.1.3&idno=42#se42.3.416_150 Interpretive Guidelines for ASCshttps://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_l_ambulatory.pdf Policy & Memos to States and RegionsCMS Quality Safety & Oversight memoranda, guidance, clarifications and instructions to State Survey Agencies and CMS Regional Offices. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/SurveyCertificationGenInfo/Policy-and-Memos-to-States-and-Regions Other Resources from the ASC Podcast with John Goehle: Visit our website at ascpodcast.com for a list of all of our virtual conferences.  Get a copy of John's newest book - the 2020 Edition of The Survey Guide - A Guide to the CMS Conditions for Coverage & Interpretive Guidelines for Ambulatory Surgery Centers  Visit the ASC Podcast with John Goehle Website Benefits of Becoming a Patron Member Purchase John's Books Go to the ASC Podcast Store Patron Members of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle have access to ASC Central - an exclusive membership website that provides a one-stop  ASC Regulatory and Accreditation Compliance, Operations and Financial Management resource for busy Administrators, nurse managers and business office managers.   Become a member today!

ASC Podcast with John Goehle
Episode 143 - ASC Podcast with John Goehle - Special Episode - Ohio ASC Association September 2021 Annual Conference - November 4, 2021

ASC Podcast with John Goehle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 77:49


On this Special Episode of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle,   we visit the Ohio State Association Annual Meeting on September 27-28, 2021 in Columbus Ohio and meet with leaders to discuss current issues in the ASC Industry in Ohio.  This episode sponsored by Surgical Information Systems and  Ambulatory Healthcare Strategies.  Resources from this Episode: Ohio Association of Ambulatory Surgery Centers Website Conditions for Coverage:https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=42:3.0.1.1.3&idno=42#se42.3.416_150 Interpretive Guidelines for ASCshttps://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_l_ambulatory.pdf Policy & Memos to States and RegionsCMS Quality Safety & Oversight memoranda, guidance, clarifications and instructions to State Survey Agencies and CMS Regional Offices. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/SurveyCertificationGenInfo/Policy-and-Memos-to-States-and-Regions Other Resources from the ASC Podcast with John Goehle: Visit our website at ascpodcast.com for a list of all of our virtual conferences.  Get a copy of John's newest book - the 2020 Edition of The Survey Guide - A Guide to the CMS Conditions for Coverage & Interpretive Guidelines for Ambulatory Surgery Centers  Visit the ASC Podcast with John Goehle Website Benefits of Becoming a Patron Member Purchase John's Books Go to the ASC Podcast Store Patron Members of the ASC Podcast with John Goehle have access to ASC Central - an exclusive membership website that provides a one-stop  ASC Regulatory and Accreditation Compliance, Operations and Financial Management resource for busy Administrators, nurse managers and business office managers.   Become a member today!

KUNC's Colorado Edition
New state budget; loopholes to methane regulations

KUNC's Colorado Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:53


Today on Colorado Edition, we learn how Gov. Jared Polis plans to spend the state's recently unveiled budget proposal. And we learn how some oil and gas companies in Colorado are able to skirt methane emission rules.

Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast
Episode 116: Open Table Mahi Regulation Discussion: Do We Need New Regs? | Action Spotter Podcast

Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 20:14


In this special episode of the Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast, we get the experts together and tackle the topic of mahi regulations. Do you think mahi need tighter regs? Sign the Save the Mahi Petition here: https://www.floridasportsman.com/editorial/new-dolphin-regs-petition/452262 Do you have a question about fishing in your area? Email rick@floridasportsman.com and we'll answer your questions on the air! Download for the best tips of the trade right in your pocket, any time, anywhere. Subscribe to get notified when a new episode drops each week. Follow us on social media for daily fishing reports, we may even share yours!

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Loosening the Regulations for Doctors and Lawyers is a Good Thing (Really!)

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 9:51


In the past, the idea of loosening the licensing requirements for doctors and lawyers has been met with a hugely negative response. But the R Street Institute's Shoshana Weissmann says the pandemic has changed that. She joins Boyd to talk about how these reforms would improve improve our health care and justice systems.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coin World Podcast
EP136: Peter Tompa updates antiquities regulations and its effect on numismatists

Coin World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 55:09


Jeff and Larry speak with Peter Tompa about import guidelines and ancient coins as well as discuss the recently discovery bullion mule.Contact info:Jeff Starck: jstarck@amosmedia.comLarry Jewett: ljewett@amosmedia.comTo Sponsor the Coin World Podcast:Brian Hertel: bhertel@amosmedia.comor contact your Coin World sales representative.This episode of the Coin World Podcast was sponsored by Coin World+:Manage your inventory, digitally authenticate coins, create your Wantlist, buy & sell coins and much more. Learn more at CoinWorldPlus.com, or download the app now at Google Play or the App Store.

LOMAH Special Needs Podcast
#155 - Supporting Families in Rural Settings

LOMAH Special Needs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 48:33


Families living in rural and frontier setting may live hours away from the nearest specialist and have a small pool of therapists and providers from which to choose. How can a support system and work force be formed for these families? Links to Mentioned Content: Telehealth and telepractice regulations vary by state. Therapy-focused national associations track these regulations, by state. AOTA State Actions Affecting OT in Response to COVID-19 Virtual School-based Services via Telehealth ASHA Tracking of State Laws and Regulations for Telepractice and Licensure Policy Telepractice Services and Coronavirus/ COVID-19 ----- The National Bureau of Health Workforce  ECHO – Extension for Community Health Outcomes:  Find your state Assistive Technology Program F2Fs  Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs)  LEND programs  About the Guests: Molly Kimmel, OTR-L & Martin Blair, PhD Molly Kimmel is the Program Director of MonTECH, within the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities in Missoula, Montana. MonTECH provides technology, support, and services that focus on improving the quality of life for individuals with disabilities across the state. After graduating from Gonzaga University and an early career in adult education, Molly decided to pursue occupational therapy (OT) as an avenue to help adults and children more fully participate in meaningful, necessary, and valuable activities. She received her master's degree in OT from the University of Washington in 2010 and has practiced at Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula for nearly 11 years. Molly transitioned to the role of Program Director at MonTECH in April of 2020 and has carried the program forward, managing pandemic-related challenges while still meeting the evolving assistive technology needs of Montana families. In addition to her role at MonTECH, Molly is the Montana State Coordinator and OT faculty for URLEND (Utah Regional Leadership and Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities), a collaborative and interdisciplinary training program for students and professionals working with children with special health care needs. In April of 2021, Molly was elected as the President of the Montana Occupational Therapy Association. She is passionate about neurodevelopmental rehabilitation, building connections to provide best practices in care, and helping people achieve greater independence in all aspects of life. Understanding a work/life balance is the cornerstone of any good OT, so Molly also spends plenty of time traveling, floating down Montana rivers, and tending her community garden.  Dr. Martin Blair began his career as a special education teacher. Following that experience, he spent the next two decades at Utah's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD), as director of the Utah Assistive Technology Program, Chair of Utah's Interagency Outreach Training Initiative, the policy director of the National Center on Disability and Access to Education, the Associate Director of the Center for Technical Assistance for Excellence in Special Education, and the CPD's Assistant Director for Policy and Development. In these various roles he has built trusting, collaborative relationships with colleagues from a variety of disciplines in university, community, state and national circles. In 2013, Dr. Blair assumed leadership of the University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities, Montana's UCEDD. Dr. Blair has presented over 60 papers to national and international audiences and authored dozens of professional articles. He has generated nearly $25 million in grant and contract funds to support his efforts. He currently serves as a Co-Chair of the Public Policy Committee of the Association of University Centers on Disability. Dr. Blair's work is focused on improving the quality of services and supports for individuals with disabilities and their families by working closely with trainees, Center staff, university faculty and administration, state and federal legislators and administration officials, and those who are the primary beneficiaries of the services and supports that he and his colleagues provide.

Registry Matters
RM200: New SORNA regulations (Again)

Registry Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


We revisit the soon-to-be-implemented SORNA regulations (Again). We talk about the Adam Walsh Act pending regulatory guidelines that are actually going to become final very soon here. We did this on RM138 (https://www.registrymatters.co/podcast/rm138-sorna-explained/) over a year ago. We have a special guest from the great state of West Virginia that’s going to be balancing my...

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
Big Crypto News - Wrapped XRP (wXRP) - Aaron Rodgers Bitcoin - Biden Stablecoin Regulations - DCG $10B

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 22:24


Wrapped XRP (wXRP) on the Ethereum will be live in December which is great news for those that want to access XRP within Ethereum wallets, DeFi, and smart contracts. NFL player Aaron Rodgers will be paid in Bitcoin. Stablecoins are a compelling payment option, but they need to be regulated, Biden administration report says. Grayscale-parent Digital Currency Group tops $10 billion valuation with SoftBank, Alphabet investments.Hext trust CEO Interviews - https://youtu.be/BeAlL6a5tSI & https://youtu.be/dWxkj5vJgDQ

Land Line Now
Regulations, not suggestions – the leasing rules

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:57


LLN (11/1/21) – Your carrier may think they can do whatever they want when you lease on. But there are rules, and the regulations are built into federal law. We'll have a rundown on all the particulars. Also, workers are burned out, fed up and fried. Sound familiar? It's something truckers have yelled from the rooftop for years. Now much of the country is going through the same thing. We'll discuss coverage of the topic in the latest issue of Land Line Magazine. And Congress continues to wrangle over a budget reconciliation bill, which is creating a roadblock for the bipartisan infrastructure bill. We'll cover where things stand and what's next. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:14 – Federal leasing regulations. 25:07 – Burned out, fed up and fried. 40:03 – Congress struggles to get bills over finish line.

Pilot Briefing
Season 3 Episode 44: Pilot Briefing - Week of Nov. 1, 2021

Pilot Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 4:01


Thanks so much for tuning into the Pilot Briefing Podcast for the week of Nov 1, 2021. In this episode you will learn more about: U.S. updating its COVID-19 policy for international air travel, the FAA's approval of hundreds more engines to use unleaded fuel, Connecting Aviators launches to bring pilots together, AOPA's November Pilot Passport Challenge, and 'Flying Farmer' Charles 'Charlie' Kulp was 96.    

Understanding Congress
What is the Congressional Review Act? (with Bridget Dooling)

Understanding Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:06


The topic of this episode is, "What is the Congressional Review Act?" My guest is https://regulatorystudies.columbian.gwu.edu/bridget-ce-dooling (Professor Bridget C. E. Dooling) of George Washington University's Regulatory Studies Center. She has a deep background in regulation. Previously, Bridget worked for the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget. She also has clerked for an administrative law judge and worked in the U.S. Department of Justice. Kevin Kosar: Welcome to Understanding Congress, a podcast about the first branch of government. Congress is a notoriously complex institution, and few Americans think well of it, but Congress is essential to our republic. It's a place where our pluralistic society is supposed to work out its differences and come to agreement about what our laws should be. And that is why we are here: to discuss our national legislature and to think about ways to upgrade it so it can better serve our nation. I'm your host, Kevin Kosar, and I'm a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a think tank in Washington, DC. It is to Professor Dooling we turn to learn about the http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid%3AUSC-prelim-title5-chapter8&saved=%7CKHRpdGxlOjUgc2VjdGlvbjo4MDEgZWRpdGlvbjpwcmVsaW0pIE9SIChncmFudWxlaWQ6VVNDLXByZWxpbS10aXRsZTUtc2VjdGlvbjgwMSk%3D%7CdHJlZXNvcnQ%3D%7C%7C0%7Cfalse%7Cprelim&edition=prelim (Congressional Review Act), a tool for Congress to abolish regulations. Welcome to the show. Bridget Dooling: Thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. Kevin Kosar: Before we get into the Congressional Review Act, or CRA, let's start with something basic. What are regulations, and why do they matter? Bridget Dooling: Regs are great, and studying them is even better. Regulations are everywhere. They shape our world, but not necessarily in obvious ways. Knowing about regulations is like having a decoder ring for why certain things are the way they are. Like, why do you need prescriptions for some things, but you can help yourself to whatever supplements like vitamins that you want? It's because there's a regulatory line there. You can't see it when you're in the drugstore, but it absolutely affects the way you live. Kevin Kosar: Yeah. Regulations really, to a degree, I guess they're specifications of laws, particular applications. Is that a fair characterization? Bridget Dooling: Yep. Kevin Kosar: Now, if listeners want to see these things, these regulations, where should they go? Where can they find a list or collection of regulations? Bridget Dooling: Yeah, there's a few ways. One is that you can look at legislation, because that's where Congress tells the agencies what they're allowed or required to do. And then you can also look at what the agencies themselves produce. So for rules that are in the process of being made, there's a website called https://www.regulations.gov/ (regulations.gov). That's a great place to start, so if you hear that a rulemaking is coming down the pike, that's a great place to go check its status and see if it's open for public comment, for example. So that's regulations.gov. And for rules that are already on the books, you'd want to look at something called the https://www.ecfr.gov/ (Code of Federal Regulations), which pulls all that regulatory text into one place so you can read it all in one spot. Kevin Kosar: Excellent. Now our listeners know. So let's turn to the Congressional Review Act. Congress enacted it in 1996. Democrats and Republicans alike voted for it. President Bill Clinton signed it into law. In most basic terms, what is the CRA? Bridget Dooling: The Congressional Review Act allows Congress to disapprove federal agency rules using fast track procedures, during a special window of time following the rule's issuance. And perhaps the most important of these special fast-track procedures is that resolutions of disapproval can't be...

Banking on Digital Growth
138) #InsideDigitalGrowth: It's Time to Go ALL-In on Human-Centered Growth

Banking on Digital Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 22:32


Do different markets require a different approach to digital growth? Yes and no. Regulations, economies and cultures may be different. But human-centered growth is universal. In this solo episode, I'll be answering a question about Fintech deployment in Latin America — but the answer transcends borders. I cover: - How to focus on the uniqueness of emerging markets like those in Latin America - Human-centered growth - Why you need to go ALL-in on your digital growth You can find this interview and many more by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Banking on Digital Growth in your favorite podcast player.

The Art Law Podcast
How Anti-Money Laundering Regulations are Hitting the Art Market in the United Kingdom and What Participants Can Do to Comply

The Art Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:37


Steve and Katie talk to Susan Mumford and Chris King, co-founders of ArtAML, about the recent roll out of AML regulations covering art market participants in the United Kingdom, who is implicated, how they can comply, and what this means for art businesses and the culture of secrecy in the art market generally. The requirement to determine and seek documentation of the ultimate beneficial owner on each end of the transaction is something financial institutions have long done, but not art dealers. ArtAML is an online platform designed to help art market participants comply with their legal obligations of due diligence and documentation. This conversation is of particular interest to those in the United States as the United Kingdom is the second largest art market outside the United States, and we expect AML regulations to roll out to the art market in the United States soon.

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz
Florida Agriculture Commissioner Calls Out State Dept Of Health For Discriminatory Cannabis Licensing Regulations

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:16


Today in cannabis news: The Florida state Agriculture Commissioner calls out the Department of Health for discriminatory medical cannabis licensing regulations; the governor of New Jersey expresses open-mindedness to adding home cultivation provisions to the state's cannabis legalization legislation; and a panel of South Dakota state legislators pass a bill to allow for recreational cannabis legalization. It's Friday, October 29 and TRICHOMES.com is bringing you the top cannabis news from around the web. You can also listen on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify–search TRICHOMES and subscribe!

Land Line Now
California emission regulations nationwide? Senators say yes

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 51:15


LLN (10/28/21) – Three U.S. senators have asked the president to use California's emission regulations nationwide. OOIDA has informed them of all the ways that's a bad idea. Also, people in the workforce, including many truckers, are soon expected to face one of two COVID vaccination mandates. But confusion between the two mandates is leaving many wondering what the facts are – so we'll explain. And New York may get a lot more serious about removing “bad actors” from the household goods market. Meanwhile, Michigan lawmakers want to reduce red tape for local road funding. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:14 – Vaccine mandates explained. 25:07 – New York targets bad bed buggers. 40:03 – Senators want California emission regulations nationwide.

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
Alex Mashinsky Interview - Celsius Network $400M Funding Raise - US Crypto Regulations - BTC & ETH Price Predictions

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 38:54


Alex Mashinsky is the founder and CEO of Celsius Network. We discuss Celsius recent $400 Million funding, crypto lending versus selling, us crypto regulations, Bitcoin and Ethereum price predictions. https://celsius.network/

State of Identity
Cracking Down on Evolving Crypto Regulations

State of Identity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:53


The crypto regulatory landscape is continuously evolving and establishing compliance is quickly becoming a competitive advantage. This week host, Cameron D'Ambrosi, is joined by Alice Nawfal, Notabene Co-Founder & COO, to tackle counterparty risk and why this spooks the regulators. You'll also learn what you need to know about the Crypto Travel Rule — what it is, how it's being enforced, and how crypto companies can stay ahead of regulations.

Be Wealthy & Smart
Why Banks Are Exploring How to Hold Cryptocurrency

Be Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 11:54


Learn why banks are exploring how to hold cryptocurrency. Three bank regulators are determining rules around holding crypto. Central Bank Digital Assets are coming soon! The article is here. Are you investing well for financial freedom...or not? Financial freedom is a combination of money, compounding and time (my McT Formula). How well you invest, makes a huge difference to your financial future and lifestyle. If you only knew where to invest for the long-term, what a difference it would make, because the difference between investing $100k and earning 2% or 10% on your money over 30 years, is the difference between it growing to $181,136 or $1,744,940, an increase of over $1.5 million dollars. Your compounding rate, and how well you invest, matters!  INTERESTED IN THE BE WEALTHY & SMART VIP EXPERIENCE? -Asset allocation model with ticker symbols and % to invest -Monthly investing webinars with Linda -Private Facebook group with daily insights -Weekly stock market commentary email -Lifetime access -US and foreign investors, no minimum $ amount required Extending the special offer, enjoy a 50% savings on the VIP Experience by using promo code "SAVE50" at checkout. More information is here or have a complimentary consultation with Linda to answer your questions. For an appointment to talk, click here. PLEASE REVIEW THE SHOW ON ITUNES If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review. I love hearing from you! I so appreciate it! SUBSCRIBE TO BE WEALTHY & SMART Click Here to Subscribe Via iTunes Click Here to Subscribe Via Stitcher on an Android Device Click Here to Subscribe Via RSS Feed WEALTH HEIRESS TV Please subscribe to Wealth Heiress TV YouTube channel (it's not just for women, it's for men too!), here. PLEASE LEAVE A BOOK REVIEW Leave a book review on Amazon here. Get my book, “You're Already a Wealth Heiress, Now Think and Act Like One: 6 Practical Steps to Make It a Reality Now!” Men love it too! After all, you are Wealth Heirs. :) Available for purchase on Amazon. International buyers (if you live outside of the US) get my book here. WANT MORE FROM LINDA? Check out her programs. Join her on Instagram. WEALTH LIBRARY OF PODCASTS Listen to the full wealth library of podcasts from the beginning. Use the search bar in the upper right corner of the page to search topics. TODAY'S SPONSOR Get Think and Grow Rich or another book on Amazon from my recommended financial books list, and be sure to get started checking off the books you have read. Be Wealthy & Smart,™ is a personal finance show with self-made millionaire Linda P. Jones, America's Wealth Mentor.™ Learn simple steps that make a big difference to your financial freedom.  (Some links are affiliate links. There is no additional cost to you.)

Dust Safety Science: Improving Combustible Dust Safety in the Workplace
DSS151: Early Textbooks & Regulations on Combustible Dust in North America

Dust Safety Science: Improving Combustible Dust Safety in the Workplace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 27:21


In this episode, we go over early combustible dust textbooks and regulations to understand the history of both explosion incidents and corrective measures.

WSJ Tech News Briefing
Snap CEO on Kids Safety Online, Regulations and AR at WSJ Tech Live

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 15:05


Snap CEO Evan Spiegel sat down with WSJ Senior Personal Tech Columnist Joanna Stern at WSJ's Tech Live event this week to discuss how the company thinks about the impact of social media on young users, what role regulation plays and why it's betting on augmented reality over the metaverse. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ask Drone U
ADU 01223: Drone Rules and Regulations – How to Correctly Interpret Them

Ask Drone U

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:04


Drone Rules and Regulations - How to Interpret Them and Effectively Communicate with Law Enforcement Officers Today's show is about drone rules and regulations, and how to correctly interpret them. Our caller for today, Donald if in a fix. He wants to be a responsible, law-abiding drone pilot. But like many, he is confused by the airspace regulation language that is open to multiple interpretations.  You will learn how to perform an intelligent risk/reward assessment so that you can determine when (and when not) to push the envelope. You will learn how to have meaningful and more effective conversations with law enforcement officers in today's show. If you are also finding yourself flummoxed by the airspace laws, going through our Drone Advocacy Kit will surely help you out. Do not miss this one! Get Your Biggest and Most Common Drone Certificate Questions Answered by Downloading this FREE Part 107 PDF Make sure to get yourself the all-new Drone U landing pad! Get your questions answered: https://thedroneu.com/. If you enjoy the show, the #1 thing you can do to help us out is to subscribe to it on iTunes. Can we ask you to do that for us real quick? While you're there, leave us a 5-star review, if you're inclined to do so. Thanks! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ask-drone-u/id967352832. Become a Drone U Member. Access to over 30 courses, great resources, and our incredible community. Follow Us Site – https://thedroneu.com/ Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/droneu Instagram – https://instagram.com/thedroneu/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/thedroneu YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/c/droneu Timestamps [01:09] Today's question is about the drone rules and regulations, and how they are susceptible to multiple interpretations [04:58] How are local authorities enforcing drone laws? [06:30] Should you push the envelope when it comes to drone regulations? Learn how to conduct a risk/reward assessment [08:12] How can Drone U help you communicate more effectively with law enforcement authorities? Check out our Drone Pilot Advocacy Kit today! [11:22] Flying responsibly and doing your bit for safer skies

EconTalk
Arnold Kling on Reforming Government and Expertise

EconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 63:59


Economist and author Arnold Kling talks about improving government regulation with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Kling suggests ways to improve the administrative state--the agencies and regulatory bodies that often write the regulations that they enforce. The conversation concludes with Kling's idea for holding public intellectuals accountable for their pronouncements.