Podcasts about obsessive compulsive disorder

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Disorder that involves repeated thoughts (obsessions) that make a person feel driven to do something (compulsions)

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  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
obsessive compulsive disorder

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Best podcasts about obsessive compulsive disorder

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Latest podcast episodes about obsessive compulsive disorder

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 218 The Danger of Catastrophization

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 17:24


In today's episode, Kimberley Quinlan talks about the importance of identifying catastrophic thinking. The reason this is so important is that this type of cognitive distortion or cognitive error can increase one's experience of anxiety and panic, making it harder to manage it at the moment. Kimberley talks about the importance of mindfulness and self-compassion when responding to catastrophization also.  In This Episode: What is Catastrophization? Why is it important that we catch how we catastrophize? How to manage Catastrophization? How correcting our thoughts can help, sometimes..but not always. Links To Things I Talk About: ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 218. Welcome back, everybody. How are you doing? How are you really? Just wanted to check in with you first, see how you're doing. We're friends, so it's my job to check in on you and see how you are. Thank you for being here with me again. I do know how important your time is, and I am so grateful that you spend it with me. Thank you. That is such a joy and it's such a wonderful experience to know that I am spending time with you each week. This week, we are talking about the danger of catastrophization. Now, I'll talk with you a little bit more about what that means here in a second, but basically what I want to do in this episode is really to take off from the very first episode of this year, which was the things I'd learned in 2021. One of the points that I made there was to really take responsibility for your thought errors, right? And I wanted to pick one of the thought errors that I see the most in my clients. In fact, in the last couple of weeks, it's been an ongoing piece of the work we do. It's not all of the work, but it's a piece of the work, is for me just to be, I'm still doing teletherapy. So, we're sitting across from the screen and just reflecting and modeling back to them some of the ways in which they speak to themselves and really looking at how helpful that is and how that impacts them. So, before we get into that episode, I want to offer to you guys to submit your “I did a hard thing.” Today, as I went to prepare for this episode, I checked the link and we'd actually used up all of the ones that were submitted probably in August of 2021. And so I'm going to encourage you guys to submit your “I did a hard thing” so I can feature you on the podcast. When we first submitted, we had like 70 submissions, and I've used all of them up. And I would love to get new ones to share with you and have you be featured on the show. So, if you want to go over, you can click on the show notes for the link, or if you want, you can go to kimberleyquinlan-lmft.com. So, that's Kimberley Quinlan - L for License, M for Marriage, F for Family, T for Therapy.com. Click on the podcast link, which is where we hold all of our podcasts, and you could submit your “I did a hard thing.” And I'd love to have you on the show. It actually is probably my favorite part. I could easily just have a whole show called “I did a hard thing” and it could be just that. All right. So, let's get into the episode. Today, I want to talk with you about the danger of catastrophization, and let me share with you how this shows up. So, I want to be clear that you cannot control your thoughts, your intrusive thoughts that repetitively show up, and you can't show your fear up. You cannot change your feelings. So, you can't tell yourself not to be sad if you're sad and you can't tell yourself not to be anxious if you're anxious and you can't not panic if you're panicking. But you can change how you react and how you behave. That is a common CBT rule. Now often, when you have an intrusive thought, a lot of my patients or clients will report having anxiety or having a thought or having a feeling or having an urge or having an image that shows up in your head – because that's what I do, right? People come to me with a problem. The problem is usually a thought, feeling, sensation, urge, or image. That's what I do. And what I try to do is change the way they respond. That is my job, right? Now, what often happens is, there is a thought or a feeling or a sensation or urge, impulse, whatever it may be that shows up, and they often will respond to that by framing it in a way that is catastrophic. I'll give you some examples. So, when they have the presence of anxiety in their body, they may frame it as: “I'm freaking out.” That's a catastrophic thought. When they had a lot of anxiety or maybe they had a panic attack, they frame it or they assess it by saying, “Kimberley, I almost died. I had the biggest panic attack of my life. I almost died.” Or “It nearly killed me. The anxiety nearly killed me,” or “The pain nearly killed me.” They may have tried to do an exposure or they may have tried to reach a goal that they had set, and they'll say, “I failed miserably. It was a total disaster.” They are trying to recover from a mental illness or a medical illness, and they'll say, “I'll never amount to anything. I'll never get better.” Or they're suffering. We have different seasons in our lives. We have seasons where things go really, really well and we're like winning at life. And then we have seasons where things are hard and we just have hurdle after hurdle, after hurdle, and they'll say, “There's no point, my life is not worth living,” or “I'm never going to be able to solve this.” Now, first of all, if you've thought any of these things, I am sending you so much love. Your thinking is not your fault. I'm not here to place blame on you like, “Oh, you're bad at this,” because our brains naturally catastrophize, because our brain wants to make sense of things and put them in little categories because that is the easiest, quickest way to understand our world. So naturally, we do this to make sense of the world. If I said to my daughter, “How are you doing with math?” She'd go, “Oh, it totally sucks,” because it's easier to say, “It totally sucks,” than to say, “There are some things that I'm doing well with and some things that I am not. I am struggling with this thing, but I'm finding this part really enjoyable.” That takes a lot of energy to say that, and it takes a lot of energy to hold opposing truths. We've talked about this in the past. It's not the fastest, efficient way to live when you're living in those types of ways. So, what we often will do, particularly if we are having a lot of strong emotions, is we catastrophize. Now often a client will say some of these or many others. There's many ways we can catastrophize, which is to make a catastrophe out of something. When they say it, I don't say, “That's wrong. You're bad for thinking that.” I'll just say, “I'm wondering what percent of that is correct. Like I almost died. Okay, I'm interested to know a little bit about that. Did you almost die?” And they'll be like, “No.” I'm like, “Okay.” And I'm not there to, “I really want to model to you.” I'm never across the screen or across the office with my patient, trying to tell them how wrong they are. Never. That's never my goal. But I want them to start to acknowledge that the way in which they think and they frame an experience can create more problems. Now if they said to me, “Kimberley, I want to think this way. I like it. It makes me happy. It brings me joy. I'm fulfilled this way,” I have nothing to fix. But often, once we reflect, and I often will then ask my patients, “So when you say ‘I totally freaked out.' You had anxiety and you said, ‘I totally freaked out,' how does that feel?” And often they'll say, “Not good.” They'll say, “It actually makes me feel more anxious.” Or if they had an intrusive thought, let's say they had OCD and they had an intrusive thought and we can't control intrusive thoughts, and then their response was, “I'm a horrible human being who doesn't deserve to be a mom for having that thought,” I'll say, “How does it feel to respond to your intrusive thought that way? How does that have you act?” And they're like, “Well, it makes me feel terrible and not worthy. And then I don't want to do anything, or then I just want to hide, or then I have so many emotions. I start freaking out even more. And now it's a big snowball effect.” So then we start to gently and curiosity-- sorry guys. Then we begin to gently and curiously take a look at what are the facts or what actually lands to be true and helpful. I want to be clear. We do not replace catastrophization with positive thinking. I would never encourage a client to replace “I am freaking out” with “I am feeling wonderful” because that's not true. They're actually experiencing discomfort. They are experiencing panic. They had an intrusive thought. They're having an urge to pick or pull. They're having an urge to binge. They're having depression. They're having self-harm thoughts. So I'm not here to, again, change those particularly. But I really encourage them to look at how you frame that experience, how you respond to that experience. What would bring you closer to the goal that you have for yourself? Because usually, when people come to me, they'll say, “I want to feel less anxious,” or “I want to do less compulsions,” or “I want to pick my skin less,” or “I want to binge less,” or “I want to love my life. I want to feel some self-esteem and worth. I want to take my depression away.” So, we want to really look at catastrophization and look at the danger of continuing to use that pattern. Now, let me get you in on a little trick here. I titled this podcast “The Danger of Catastrophization” because the title in and of itself is a catastrophization. Did you pick that up? That's a lot of what happens in social media, is they use catastrophic words to peak your interest. It sells a lot of things. In fact, some businesses sell on the principle of catastrophization. They tell you what catastrophe will happen if you don't buy their product. They might say, “You'll have wrinkles. Terrible, old wrinkles if you don't buy our product.” And that may feel like a catastrophe because they're trying to sell you their product. They may say, “If you don't buy this special extra filter for your car, it could explode on the highway.” That's a catastrophe. “Okay, I'll buy it.” So, even my naming of it, I want you to be aware of how it piques your interest, the catastrophes, and how it draws you in because nobody wants a catastrophe. But for some reason, we think in this way. So I made a little trick there. I tricked you into listening. I try not to use it as a tool, but I thought today it would be really relevant to bring it up and see whether you caught that catastrophization that I did to get you onto this episode. I'm a naughty girl, I know. There it is. I want you to catch how you frame things and how you tell stories about things that you've been through or about the future and catch the catastrophization that you do. If you have a supportive partner or friend or somebody in your life, a loved one, and you trust them, you may even ask them to just give you a little wink every time they catch you using a catastrophization. Sometimes you don't catch it until someone brings it to your attention. Because again, our brain works on habit. Our brain works on what it knows, and it doesn't really like to change because that means you have to use more energy. But I promise you. I promise, promise, promise you, this is the energy you want to use. This little extra piece of energy is totally worth it, because think about it. If I said to you, “I had a panic attack, it was really uncomfortable. I rode it out. There were some moments where I felt really confident and some moments where I was struggling, but it did go away eventually,” ask yourself how that feels. And then I'm going to tell you a different version: “I was totally freaking out. I totally thought I was going to die. It was so bad. I really think it was the most painful thing I've ever been through in my whole entire life.” How does that feel? It feels terrible. A lot of panic comes from people catastrophizing, using language that feels really dangerous. The danger of catastrophization – remember, it feels dangerous when we use catastrophization. So, just be aware of it. Catch it if you can. Okay? All right. Before we finish up, I want to do the review of the week. This is by Dr. Peggy DeLong and she said, “Wonderful practices!” She gave it a five-star review and said, “I appreciate that you highlight these skills as practices. Coping with anxiety is not a one-and-done deal. Practicing these skills, even on good days, especially on good days, helps to promote long-term well-being. Thanks for providing this service!” Thank you so much, Dr. Peggy DeLong. I am so grateful for your reviews. Please, go and leave a review if you have some time. I would be so grateful. It really helps me reach people who, let's say, look at the podcast and think to themselves, would this be helpful to me? And if there's lots of reviews, it helps build trust for them that they would then click, and then hopefully I can help them. Okay? All right. Sending you all my love. One quick thing to remember is if you go over to cbtschool.com, we actually have a full training on this, on correcting the way that you think. Again, the goal is not to change your intrusive thoughts, but the goal is to work on how you reframe things. So you can go there for that training. All right. All my love to you guys. Have a wonderful day. It is a beautiful day to do hard things.

SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford | Mental Health | Depression | Perfectly Hidden Depression | Anxiety | Therapy
266 SelfWork: Working With Your Obsessions and Compulsions: A Conversation with Kimberley Quinlan

SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford | Mental Health | Depression | Perfectly Hidden Depression | Anxiety | Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 43:15


We have a huge treat for you today, and her name is Kimberly Quinlan. She specializes in anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, eating disorders, and body focused, repetitive behaviors.. She also provides one-on-one treatment, and offers free online courses at the school she founded, The CBT School. . And I really recommend that any of you who struggle listen to her podcast, Your Anxiety Toolkit. But today, I'm interviewing her about her new book, The Self-Compassion Workbook for OCD: Lean Into Your Fear, Manage Difficult Emotions and Focus on Recovery. I read it cover to cover, and have already recommended it to a client of my own who struggles with OCD. I know you'll love how Kimberly approaches treatment,  She stresses that self-compassion is vital due to the frequent presence of intense self-loathing in OCD. So in this episode, once again sponsored by the great folks at BetterHelp, let's hear the wisdom of Kimberley Quinlan. BetterHelp, the #1 online therapy provider, has a special offer for you now! You can hear more about this and many other topics by listening to my podcast, SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford. Subscribe to my website and receive my weekly newsletter including a blog post and podcast! If you'd like to join my FaceBook closed group, then click here and answer the membership questions! Welcome! My book entitled Perfectly Hidden Depression has been published and you can order here! Its message is specifically for those with a struggle with strong perfectionism which acts to mask underlying emotional pain. But the many self-help techniques described can be used by everyone who chooses to begin to address emotions long hidden away that are clouding and sabotaging your current life. And it's available in paperback, eBook or as an audiobook! And there's another way to send me a message! You can record by clicking below and ask your question or make a comment. You'll have 90 seconds to do so and that time goes quickly. By recording, you're giving SelfWork (and me) permission to use your voice on the podcast. I'll look forward to hearing from you!

All The Hard Things
#91 - Perinatal and Postpartum OCD with Megan Giacomino

All The Hard Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 51:15


In this episode, I talk with Megan, a mom of two and a nurse who experienced perinatal and postpartum OCD. We talk about .. - how her symptoms showed up both in the perinatal and in the postpartum period - difficulties associated with OCD including a sense of urgency, how symptoms snowball and get worse, and the intolerance of uncertainty - barriers, red flags, and frustrations about the maternal mental health/medical system For OCD treatment, check out NOCD - head to www.treatmyocd.com and schedule your free 15 minute phone call to get connected with a licensed therapist who specializes in Exposure and Response Prevention. NOCD is a mobile therapy platform and includes video sessions with a therapist, in addition to peer support, ERP tools, and more. This podcast should not be substituted, nor is meant to act as a substitute, for legitimate mental health treatment/a legitimate mental health treatment provider. This podcast and any information in it is solely the reflection of general knowledge and cannot be taken as a personal therapeutic recommendation. To find a therapist near you to work more directly with these issues, head over to IOCDF.org, psychologytoday.com, or nami.org. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jennaoverbaugh/support

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes
#615 Parenting Type 1 with OCD

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 83:09


Jaime's child has type 1 diabetes and Jaime struggles with OCD, control and trauma. Show notes for people who are Bold with Insulin Learn about the Dexcom CGM You may be eligable for a free 30 day supply of the Omnipod DASH  Get Gvoke Glucagon  Learn about Touched By Type 1 CONTOUR NEXT ONE smart meter and CONTOUR DIABETES app Tak the T1DExchange survey A full list of our sponsors  How to listen, disclaimer and more Apple Podcasts> Subscribe to the podcast today! The podcast is available on Spotify, Google Play, iHeartRadioRadio Public, Amazon Music and all Android devices The show is now available as an Alexa skill. My type 1 diabetes parenting blog Arden's Day Listen to the Juicebox Podcast online Read my award winning memoir: Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal: Confessions of a Stay-At-Home Dad The Juicebox Podcast is a free show, but if you'd like to support the podcast directly, you can make a gift here or buy me a coffee. Thank you! Follow Scott on Social Media @ArdensDay @JuiceboxPodcast Disclaimer - Nothing you hear on the Juicebox Podcast or read on Arden's Day is intended as medical advice. You should always consult a physician before making changes to your health plan.  If the podcast has helped you to live better with type 1 please tell someone else how to find the show and consider leaving a rating and review on iTunes. Thank you! Arden's Day and The Juicebox Podcast are not charitable organizations.

Sharing Her Journey
Mental Illness & Me|Katie Davies

Sharing Her Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:28


We loved our interview with Katie Davies! Her journey is a beautiful one of self acceptance and learning to live with her mental illness. We talk about her OCD/PD/GAD and Scrupulosity. How to recognize signs, the spectrum of differences in OCD diagnosis, how to support those with the illness. We learn about Exposure Therapy and how she used this specific type of treatment.  We discuss how to help mental health awareness go "from a whisper to a song" and how talking openly and freely is so important. Katie shares about her wedding being postponed, twice. Two were canceled. One permanently, one from covid. She shares how hard this was for her and how she handled the circumstances. We chat about life as a single lady in a culture that encourages marriage. She shares her experience of "35 dates by 35". (You will not believe what one guy did on a date!)  Katie shares what it's like going from working full time as a choir teacher, single and living in Salt Lake City...to a married lady, in a rural Wyoming community to a step mom of 4. She transitioned to being SAHM and now has a new little baby boy! We love all she does advocating for mental health awarness by sharing on her podcast, "Mental Health & Me". She talks about how starting the podcast helped to foster healing and bring hope to others.  Katie has always felt supported by her family through her Mental Health Journey. She has an instagram account where her and her 2 sisters share how to have a JOYOUS, HEALTHY, & HAPPY life. We talk about the time they had an IG Reel goes viral. (Another funny story!) You can find more of Katie: @joyouslifehealthylife and @mentalillnessandmekt ------------------------ Be sure to follow us on... Facebook Instagram And join our Facebook Group

Let's Talk Supply Chain
242: Blended - OCD: Uncovering the Truth

Let's Talk Supply Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:23


It's episode 16 of Blended: I'm joined by another amazing panel of guests and we're talking about OCD – obsessive compulsive disorder. This is a really interesting topic because it's a name I think a lot of people recognize, but I'm not sure it's something that as many people really understand. And that is why we do this show. Today we'll be diving into our guests personal experiences with OCD; the impact of the media; issues around stereotypes and assumptions; and the panel will be sharing their advice for creating more supportive and inclusive workplaces.   IN THIS EPISODE WE DISCUSS:   [0.37] Introductions to our Blended panellists. Miguel – Student of finance and accounting India – OCD expert, speaker and trainer [02.04] An explanation of what OCD is, and how it impact a person's life. “The OCD brain is highly analytical.” India [07.14] The panel share their own stories and personal experiences of OCD. Emergence in childhood Biological, psychological and social combination of factors Genetic component Links to factors such as strep virus or trauma Impact on others “It impacted my marriage – it was taking me four or five hours to get into bed because of my rituals. It can be very confusing and disempowering for a partner.” India [15.49] The group discuss inaccurate assumptions around OCD, both in the media and in wider society. Personal experiences of other's understanding, or lack of Stereotypes Different OCD manifestations Lack of belief and accusations that people are exaggerating their condition More education Stop using OCD as an adjective Trivializing OCD and presenting it as comical “OCD is incredibly serious, it's often very dark and it's often so abhorrent, so disgusting and revolting for the person experiencing the thoughts, that it results in these extreme and bizarre behaviours.” India [24.28] The panel reflect on the prevalence of OCD within society, compared with the lack of understanding. International OCD Foundation statistics Destigmatizing mental ill health Raising awareness Media impact and social media – double edged swords Empathy and not leaping to judgement Seeking help “Many people think that mental health is exaggerated, that people want attention – but mental health is just as important as physical health.” Miguel [41.43] The group discuss OCD in the workplace, and the impact on both person and business. Why people don't inform workplaces Why Miguel shares his diagnosis upfront Discrimination Workplace support – eg training, extended deadlines and time off Education for management and HR Creating safe spaces “The key is in respect and understanding, without judging in a hasty way.” Miguel [57.12] The panellists sum-up their thoughts from today's discussion.   RESOURCES AND LINKS MENTIONED:   You can connect with India and Miguel over on LinkedIn. Head over to OCD Excellence's website to find out more and discover how they could help. You can also connect with OCD Excellence and keep up to date with the latest over on Instagram or YouTube. Check out our other podcasts HERE.  

PLAYING-IT-SAFE
38. Dr. Z and Seth J. Gillihan

PLAYING-IT-SAFE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 36:40


"You must be vulnerable to be sensitive to reality. And to me being vulnerable is just another way of saying that one has nothing more to lose. I don't have anything but darkness to lose. I'm way beyond that."- Bob Dylan.We often play-it-safe by hiding, avoiding, minimizing, and acting as if we're not struggling. But it's human to struggle; it's human to ask for compassion; it's human to be embarrassed; it's human to be vulnerable.In the first part of this conversation with Seth Gillihan, Ph.D., he kindly shares:- His health struggles- How he uses behavioral steps to navigate his day- How he uses mindfulness to distinguish what he has control of and what he doesn't- How he deals with shameful feelings.In the second part of this conversation, Seth shares how he and his daughter collaborated together to write the CBT Deck for Kids and Teens.I hope you find this conversation helpful and hope it motivates you to be more compassionate with yourself.__IMPORTANT NEWS: ACT beyond OCD is happening, JANUARY, 2022!ACT beyond OCD, a live, and cohort-based, online class for any person struggling with OCD is opening its doors in January. If you want to learn how to tackle pesky obsessions using Acceptance and Commitment Skills and Exposure,, make sure to register in the waitlist:www.actbeyondocd.comPlease keep in mind that we only run this class twice a year! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Johnjay & Rich On Demand
JJVE - OCD ADD ADHD WTF

Johnjay & Rich On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 77:38


Please let me know when you decode that. TODAY ON THE SHOW: We've got a BIG announcement.. someone is leaving the show FOREVER! 2nd DATE UPDATE! Grant's new tv show! Rich has SMARTEST IN THE ROOM! We want to know YOUR superstitions! PLUS, so much more!!

The OCD Stories
The OCD Camp (UK) is back

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 3:43


The OCD Camp is back in the UK this June. Applications are now open and they close on February 6th.  To find out more or to apply, head to https://theocdcamp.com/  Thanks for listening! 

Gay Therapy LA with Ken Howard, LCSW
Episode 100: Gay Male Relationships and the ADD/OCD Syndrome

Gay Therapy LA with Ken Howard, LCSW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:16


Ken discusses the challenges in gay male relationships when one partner has traits of ADD/ADHD and the other has traits of OCD/OCPD, and how to create harmony. 

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive
OCD, Anxiety, and a Hidden Gluten Sensitivty w/ Courtney Hayes

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:32


Funny enough, Courtney and Detective Ev grew up only 20 minutes from each other, but wouldn't meet until years later through mutual friends in Florida. Go figure! Add to that is that they have VERY similar health stories, especially when it comes to their early manifestation of mental health symptoms that were not trauma related. About Courtney: After a 15 year battle with her own health, which was both physical and mental, Courtney took matters into her own hands and discovered what a 180 degree change of healing looks like through the use of holistic nutrition. Courtney studied at the Institute of Integrative Nutrition, becoming a certified holistic health coach in 2019. After years of failed doctors visits, medications, and lifestyle habits that had her running in circles with her own health, she finally gathered the tools to not only help her turn her OWN life around, but also help other women do the same. Socials/website: Instagram: @courthayes_ Website: courthayes.com Other mentioned links (Dad's website/biz): glutendude.com

Alter Your Health
#271 | MM - Mind Body Freedom from the Symptom Imperative

Alter Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:45


Symptom Imperative?It's the symptom that occurs when pain changes location or when it's replaced by another symptom or conditioin that may also become chronic. We (mainly Dr. Susanna) have been diving into a deeper understanding of the mind-body phenomenon of tension myositis and the work of Dr. John Sarno. You can go back to Episode 267 for more of an overview. In this episode we continue the conversation delving into topics near and dear to our hearts.Physical health and healing is so complex and it is so very empowering to approach our healing process from a deep understanding of body, mind, and the multidimensional nature of our experience.If you'd like to join these conversations live, be sure to Subscribe to the Alter Health YouTube Channel! https://www.youtube.com/alterhealthSome highlights from today's MM episode...The Symptom Imperative is the tendency for symptoms to recur or evolve (like whacking a mole!)Why psychogenic symptoms are imperative in distracting the person from experiencing the fullness of "unacceptable emotions"Symptoms may shift throughout the body in the process of “healing”, but will not fully resolve until an underlying issue is addressedSymptoms may include: Pain anywhere, tension headaches, digestive issues, allergies, immune issues - really anything! Obsessive or numbing behaviors can also serve the role of distracting someone from their emotions (Drugs, alcohol, OCD, eating disorders)How we can BREAK FREE from these limiting thoughts and patternsThe power of vulnerability, radical honesty, and self-compassionLinks to some more good stuff-  Join Alter Health on Locals: https://alterhealth.locals.com/- Cleanse with Us during the next Alter Health Cleanse: https://www.alter.health/cleanse- Work with us in the Thrive on Plants program: https://www.alter.health/thrive-on-plants- ATTN Health Practitioners! Learn more and apply to the Plant Based Mind Body Practitioner Program: https://www.alter.health/pbmb-practitionerPeace and Love.

Your Anxious Child
Expert Interview #29 Cammie McCovern author of Hard Landings: Looking into the Future for a Child with Autism

Your Anxious Child

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:47


Cammie McGovern is the author of three novels for adults and two for young adults. Say What You Will is her YA book that includes a character struggling with OCD. Her book Hard Landings explores the territory for children with autism once they age out of disability services at 21. Every parent with an anxious child struggles with how much to push their child and how to find the right balance between protecting and preparing their child for adulthood. Knowing the environment you are "pushing your child into" is helpful in conveying the confidence to your child that they can master the next step. Hard Landings is a discussion of the wider context in which young adults with autism may live and it speaks to the importance of a fit between the child and their environment. 

OCD Straight Talk
What's the Difference between CBT and Ex/RP?

OCD Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 21:03


Chris discusses subtle difference between classical Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Exposure and Ritual Prevention (Ex/RP) in the treatment of OCD. The two have a good deal in common, as Ex/RP is really the "grandchild" of CBT; and both are based upon the cognitive model. Feel free to reach out with any questions you might have. Chrisleins04@gmail.com. If you have found OCD Straight Talk helpful, feel free to give us a 5-star rating, or support the podcast to help us to produce more content. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chris-leins/support

Six Weeks To Fitness
The Importance of Self-Care for your Body, Mind and Spirit Ep. 189 Kita Richards

Six Weeks To Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 45:14


Kita Richards is a former AAU, USA and high school track and field coach. Teaching basic and advanced movements to young adults was always her passion along with helping people to meet and exceed their physical and mental capabilities. It was this passion that prompted Kita to become a personal and group fitness trainer, transforming her two car garage into her first training space. She has now expanded her brand and has launched two fitness clubs, one in Greenwood, South Carolina, and the other in Greenville, South Carolina.  During the interview, Kita will discuss what life was like growing up in Greenwood, South Carolina, and how the last words of her mother, who lived a very active life until she succumbed to colon cancer, gave her the drive and motivation to live life to the fullest.  She will also share her fitness journey which included losing close to 80 pounds of body fat with the help and guidance of her husband and changing her diet.  Kita believes that each of us is connected in divine space and that we should share our gifts with the world, something Kita is doing on a daily basis with everyone she comes in contact with.  This was a most inspiring interview.  Vince Ferguson: Thank you so much for coming on the show. Kita Richards: Thank you for having me. Vince Ferguson: Before we discuss your career as CEO of these two fitness clubs, tell my listeners and viewers where did you grow up and what was your childhood like? Kita Richards: I grew up right here in Greenwood, South Carolina in the south, which is so interesting now that I look back at it. I grew up running around in the dirt. Vince Ferguson: Running around in the dirt? Kita Richards: In the dirt. Vince Ferguson: Really? Really? So you must have been very active? Kita Richards: Yeah. It was because this is a small town, this is a small town. It's bigger now, but it was definitely a lot smaller when I was a lot younger. So it was small and it's basically a football city. So it's all about football here. Everything else is secondary. Vince Ferguson: Everything else is secondary to football. But family came first, but family came first. Right? Kita Richards: Especially back then. Everything else was secondary. Vince Ferguson: Wow. Nice. But were you always active, always healthy even to your adult life? Kita Richards: Well as a kid, the challenge as a kid was, especially growing up, because we were active as children. I was an active child. My inactivity didn't start until I got older. So I was, but my mom was active. So I have to tell you about her. She was very active. My mom played a lot of sports even as we grew up. So I grew up with a very active mom. She played softball for one, it was nothing for her to be on those teams. She was on teams, and she would travel. So I grew up watching her do that. Kita Richards: And of course she did what people in the south do, bowl. So she did a lot of bowling and different things like that. So that's how we grew up. I grew up with a mom that even as I had my kids, she rode bikes. She would ride bikes with them. And she was one of the first women around the area, because people still talk about it because like I said, I live in a small town, that rode a motorcycle. So she was extremely active too. Vince Ferguson: Is Myrtle Beach near you? Kita Richards: No it takes us about three hours to get to Myrtle Beach. Vince Ferguson: I hear so much about Myrtle Beach motorcycle. You know what I'm saying? But was there a aha moment for you when you decided, you know what, my health is going down the tubes and I need to get it together? Kita Richards: Well, I think the backstory is my mother was really active, but my mother died of pancreatic/colon cancer. And so with that being said, I knew she was active much more active than me. I was getting overweight. I took care of her. And then when she was passing away, she said to me something, some words that I never will forget. She said, "Do what you want to do, and have a good time on this side because when you're leaving, you never want to regret what you didn't have time to do and what you wanted." So that launched me into just taking a deeper look at who I had become. Vince Ferguson: So you feel that motivated you and drove you to be the person you are today? Kita Richards: I know it did. I know it did. It just became one of those things that watching, if you ever watch someone pass away and you never took care of anyone passing away of colon cancer and watching everything fail. Life begins to look a little different for you. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. And when you say it looks a little different, you start to see it out of a different prism, different window. Kita Richards: You start to cherish it and cherish the moments. You start to cherish life like never before. Even when my clients come in, I have this thing, because I cherish my moments with everybody now. I see life now as everybody being divinely connected to one another in that we are sharing space. And when we're sharing those spaces, we should be sharing, not only our passion, but our love for one another. And so that's what changed about me. I knew at that point that I needed to share whatever gifting, whatever divine gifting that I had with other people. I knew that then at that moment. I knew that that was going to bring me joy. And I know that sounds weird, but I knew I also needed to take care of me. And I knew that I could never go to the next level, or I never could get there without self-care. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. Makes sense. Very, very profound. Kita Richards: Because you could never pour from an empty cup, and back then I was an empty cup. I was an empty cup, and I could never give what I didn't have. When people say I gave 100% to a person, you should never give 100% to anybody. Always give people the surplus of what you have. Because if you give 100% of your energy, then you have nothing for yourself. And if you have nothing for yourself, you never can grow anything that's worth giving anyone else. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. Very profound. Very awesome. So this is interesting because you speak so much wisdom, and you look like a person of 22. Kita Richards: I thank you. I promise you need to add some to that though. Vince Ferguson: Well, we add a couple years, you know what I'm saying? But what motivated you to become a trainer? Kita Richards: So back to what my mom said, you're never going to... When I was in my twenties, I was taking it was step aerobics. It was step aerobics there. Vince Ferguson: Step aerobics. Kita Richards: I absolutely love step aerobics. But there was a problem. There was a problem. The problem was I had a degree in computer science. So I had a really nice job. Vince Ferguson: Yes, I bet. Kita Richards: Are you going to make this, or are you going to make this? Vince Ferguson: What happened? Kita Richards: There was a problem here. And so I got the opportunity to actually get licensed doing that, and I didn't even take it. Because by that time I had my first kid, I had the first child. And so I was like, no, no, no. I know better now. I know better now. But back then, and life is a growing process, but back then I was like, no, this is not a good financial decision to be making. Vince Ferguson: So you feel that knowing what you know now, you would've still taken the leap before? Kita Richards: If I had of known what I know now, yeah. I would've literally left what I was doing, and did this because I've learned that joys in life, that you should enjoy your life. And what I mean by that, I have this saying that I always say. People don't understand. And what you have to gravitate and learn that in your purpose, you will always have prosperity, and you will have mental prosperity, spiritual prosperity, and financial and emotional prosperity. And you need all of those. Back then, I was only looking for financial prosperity. Vince Ferguson: But now you don't only have one child, you have four? Kita Richards: Yes. Right. Vince Ferguson: And four adult children? Kita Richards: Four adult children. Vince Ferguson: And you don't look like an adult yourself. That's a beautiful thing. But again, you had the strength and fortitude to go out there and make this happen. But why the fitness space? What do you feel you can contribute to people in the fitness space? Kita Richards: Fitness is one of those great, wonderful things. And here's what, because it's more than the outward. Because before you ever make a decision, before you ever become physically fit, there is a mental that happens. You actually have, because it's so optional, that you have to gravitate there in your mind first. Vince Ferguson: So it's mind first, then body? Kita Richards: Always mind first. And the challenge, and then I love the challenge of it. I love the challenge of because even when I have my clients, and I'll talk to my clients. I always tell them you've made the first step to the best version of you. And here was the first step. You made up in your mind to make a change. So fitness, I think I chose it because not only was it challenging, it was mentally challenging too. Because if we back up, I didn't look like this. I can promise you. I lost 80 pounds like this. I hadn't been doing anything. And so I tell my clients, I know what they felt. I know exactly what they feel like. I remember not being able to touch my toes. Kita Richards: I remember what that felt like. And I remember even though I was taking care of kids, and I was getting bigger, I just remember what it felt like. I remember being exhausted. I remember, just to be honest with you, I remember just being tired. And then I remember suffering health, other health issues. Because as women, when you have more weight than you need to have on you, there's other things that come along with your health. There's hormonal imbalances that you end up with. For me, I had several different things happening. I actually ended up with a liver issue, and I found out later it was actually fatty liver. Vince Ferguson: Fatty liver? Kita Richards: It was fatty liver. And this was from my diet of, I love sugar. Now I'm not going to lie to you. I used to love some sugar. So I love eating sugar. And I wasn't a big fried food eater, and that's what most people are like, I don't eat much fried food. But I love some donuts and cakes and cookies and stuff like that. And I ate a lot of that back then. Vince Ferguson: So you were, you said, about 89 pounds heavier than you are now? Kita Richards: About 80. I was 80. Vince Ferguson: About 80. What did you do to take it off? What's that secret sauce? Kita Richards: Make up my mind first that it needed to come off. You know what? And the first thing I did is I decided I wasn't going to make an excuse. Vince Ferguson: No excuses? Kita Richards: Yeah. I was like, I'm not going to make an excuse. I'm not going to blame it on my age or anything. You know what I said to myself? I'm responsible. I just took full responsibility. I did. I said, I'm responsible. And my first trainer was my spouse. Vince Ferguson: Your husband? Kita Richards: My husband, who was army. So I learned to lift first, and I learned to lift, and he was patient with me to a certain extent because he drove it. He would just come in like, are you going to do it today or not? You can leave the gym if you want to, or you can stay in it. But it's going to be your choice. I'm not going to make you stay. And I remember just because at that point, now that two car garage that I started in, it was actually I made it into a home gym because I was serious about it. I was like, I'm going to be serious. So first I made up in my mind, second I said no more excuses. Kita Richards: Third, I changed that space into a home gym. And that was crazy because that meant no excuses. I went out there and he worked like 12 hours, and then it took him an hour to get to work and an hour to get home. So it was 13 hours. So I had to work out with him at night. At night. When people wanted to go to sleep, I had to be working out. No excuses. And I still had to get up to the next day. Because at that time I still had one in high school, one in middle school and then I had two grown. So because my fitness journey back to being fit, didn't start until I was 40, 41 1/2. Almost 42. Vince Ferguson: And were you still working at computer science? Kita Richards: I was actually not this is because I was at that point when I decided to be fit, I actually owned a photography, videography business. Vince Ferguson: Really? A photography, videography business? Kita Richards: I was doing some of that. And then all of a sudden I decided I wasn't going to do it in this. I was like, I ain't doing that no more. Vince Ferguson: Wow. So you start training ferociously, training with your spouse. Kita Richards: With my husband. With my husband at night. At night. Understand because he worked early in the morning, and it was at night. So what did I do? I didn't just train one time a day. I trained with him, and anything I couldn't do, anything I struggle with, during the day or in the morning I go practice it. Vince Ferguson: You go back practice it? Kita Richards: I would go practice it. Whatever I couldn't do. As long as I didn't need a spotter, I practiced it. Vince Ferguson: Now but what role besides the exercise, what role did nutrition play? Kita Richards: Oh, huge. Huge. That was another thing. The first thing I had to do was give up sugar. I had to give up the sugar because I was a sugar addict. I had made up in my mind, I'm going to give up sugar. And that was the hardest thing, because I didn't have, some people have a caffeine addiction. No, I had a sugar addiction. So sodas wasn't even a problem. It was sugar for me. So I gave up sugar first. I gave up sugar, and you're not going to believe this, I gave up cheese. Vince Ferguson: Cheese? Kita Richards: I love cheese. Cheese was my first two things that I said I was done with. Vince Ferguson: It had to be hard to do because you also have kids around the house. So how did you do that? Just cold turkey stopped or- Kita Richards: I stopped. And most people, most women asked me because I am the cook of the family. I am the cook of the family and I'll be launching some recipes soon. But I am a cook up the family. And so what I had to do was I cook their food, but I cooked my food. Because I said I wasn't going to make an excuse. I wasn't going to say I got to cook for them. No, I was standing in the kitchen anyway. And so I would cook their food the way they wanted it and would cook mine at the exact same moment. Vince Ferguson: And that was the temptation to eat some of theirs? Kita Richards: It was there, but here's what I would say to myself. I would say to myself, you know what? There's life and death in the power of the tongue, and there's going to be life or death in this food. So you better be choosing which one. And so that was my thing. And it got so bad, I was label things life or death so much. I'm choosing life. I'm choosing life. And that's the way I would eat. Because remember I was a sugar addict, and I still had to go to the grocery store. And when I go to the grocery store, what happens when you go get in the checkouts? Because you can avoid the cookie on the aisle of cookies, but the checkout has the candy, and all of the quick snacks. Vince Ferguson: For a reason. Yes. Kita Richards: So I would pull up my buggy inside of there and I would look, and my mind, I would label them in my head. I would be like, death. And that would be my two things, life or death. And I would leave there without the candy bars, which was so interesting because understand, I was the person that drove, that went through their buggy through the thing. And I would bring everybody back their favorite candy bar, including my own. .It was so bad that my husband, there's a particular store that has a particular type of candy that I like whenever he would go into that particular town, he would buy me four of those candy bars because I couldn't get them locally. So the moment I asked him to stop bringing me the candy bars, he knew something was real because I like don't bring me the candy bars. Don't bring me the candy bars. Kita Richards: But I was making choices. And what I was doing is I was making the choices at that moment. I wasn't trying to live outside of the window. I wasn't trying to say, tomorrow I'll do better. I was like, I'm going to do it the now. I'm going to experience the now moment. So that's what I was doing. Vince Ferguson: Do it now. Are you now a vegan? Kita Richards: I am. Vince Ferguson: Really? Plant based? Kita Richards: That was interesting. Vince Ferguson: Yes. How did that transition go? Kita Richards: That was about like the same. That was the same for me. The big problem wasn't for me the meat, it wasn't the meat. It really wasn't. Although I would tell people, they were like what would be the thing that would that draw you? Because I love what I would love. And I've always loved bison burgers. There's a particular place in Texas that I just absolutely love, and now I don't eat that. But that's not where it got me. That is probably the one thing, but the other was eggs. I absolutely love eggs. And I was eating a lot of eggs in one day. I said, oh, I told my husband, I'm going to become a vegan, and I'm not going to eat the eggs anymore. And he was like- Vince Ferguson: Did he ask for a divorce. Kita Richards: No. He was like, he's very supportive. He was like, so you're not going to eat the eggs? Do you not know within a couple days he cooks eggs? Because he's the breakfast person. So he cooked the eggs, and they look so light and fluffy. And I walked past the stove, and I looked at the eggs, and then I said, I want the eggs. And then I said, no, no, no. You chose, you made the choice to not eat the eggs. So just make the choice. And something in the back of my head said, but nobody's looking so nobody's going to know you ate the eggs. But then I said, I would know that I ate the eggs. And so I'm going to know that I ate the eggs, so I'm not going to eat. And it was enough of them. I could have just tasted them when I was like, I'm not going to eat these eggs. Kita Richards: And I didn't eat the eggs. And I sit at breakfast, and this was the thing, with my family because we are a family that eat together. We actually eat together. So it's not like I go take my plate and not see their food. And I saw them eat, and I did not touch them. And I felt victorious. Not that you have to give up eggs in your fitness journey or your whatever, but for me, I felt victorious. Everybody asked me do I feel like that I have such a restricted diet? No. I feel like I'm in charge of my life. Food can no longer control me. I'm in control of me. I take my power back. Food is not supposed to control me anyway. Vince Ferguson: But food seems to control most of us. And that's why you have the obesity, diabetes, all these chronic illnesses in the community because of how we eat. So your clients, who are your ideal clients? Kita Richards: Well my ideal clients are, most people think that most of my clients are vegan, and they're not. My ideal clients are people that just want more control. And I shouldn't say control, more clarity in their life. Because I told people my thing is always I want to help you find your strong point. I want to help you meet your goal. I always told people also this studio is when they come in, we greet each other. Just, I say, hey, how are you doing today? And they told me how they doing. They say, oh, I'm doing great. So my ideal, my avatar client is the people that just want the best out of their life. They want to find the joy in being them and whatever they do. Because really and truly, you are not your body. And I told people that you are not your body, but your body is a manifestation of what you've done. It's a journal. Vince Ferguson: It reveals. Kita Richards: Can be changed. Vince Ferguson: It can be changed. Interesting. Very, very, very good. So what programs do you offer at your, before you even tell me that, what are the names of your gyms? Kita Richards: So this one actually has hero on the wall, but this one is She Rocks Fit. Vince Ferguson: She Rocks Fit. Kita Richards: She Rocks Fit brand. And then the other one is hero. Vince Ferguson: Hero. Kita Richards: I'm going to tell you about the She Rocks Fit because it seems a little weird. If you look inside of She Rocks Fit, you see the name hero. Vince Ferguson: Yes. I like that very much. Very much. What programs do you offer at these two facilities? Kita Richards: Okay. So at the studio style one, it's group fitness. I do a lot of group fitness here. We do the weight lifting, the calisthenics, parts of yoga, functional training. I'm big on functional training because I think you just, you should be able to move your body. I do a lot of body weight. I do a lot of body weight, a lot of body weight. But we do some lifting here. At the other gym it is really and truly a full service gym. So it has all your machines, you have your ellipticals, you have your treadmills, you have the spin bikes, and then you have the studio side of it. And then that one, there is, I think there's about nine other trainers there. Vince Ferguson: Oh, wow. Really? Kita Richards: Yeah. There's nine, about nine. I think we're at nine other trainers there. And they train clients there as well. So they're training clients, and whether it's personal and there is actually, we have, there's a boxer there too. And he actually teaches boxing. So there's a variety of stuff going on at the other one. Vince Ferguson: So one is called She Rock Fit, which is where you are today. And the other one is called? Kita Richards: Hero. Vince Ferguson: Hero, just hero? And do you have group fitness programs? Kita Richards: I do. I do. I do my group fitness because that's what I trained. That's what I specialize in, in group fitness. My group fitness, like I said, will range from different things. So I have steps. We may do steps. Let me tell you what kind of trainer I am. If we had to classify, if we really had to put a label on my training style, I would say it's OCD. Vince Ferguson: OCD? Kita Richards: It's very OCD. So how my whole program works is you walk into my gym. There is not an ab day. There is not. There is not a we're going to do back day. You walk in, and you don't know what I'm going to do and here's why. Because people don't come because it's a certain day, and they don't like to work that particular. But I found out people don't like to work where they're weak. Most people don't like to work the weak side. So what I do is I vary the training where you don't know, it's a mystery. A mystery. And I'm going to be honest with you. You know what they do? They peek up under the door to see what is laying in the- Vince Ferguson: What's going on? Kita Richards: They're like, oh my God, what is she going to do? But you know, it works for them because they understand why I do it. I used to announce what I was going to do, but I did find that people would cheat and not come. The also the other part of the gym, a part of the studio side of it is accountability. So I was huge on accountability. I don't know if it's because my husband was military. I actually know where people are supposed to be, in which class they're supposed to be. If you miss a class and you have not contacted wonderful trainer and said, I won't be in, I have something going on, whatever, I text you. We have an app. I will message you in the app, and I will personally text you. You're lucky if you get away with 2 sessions back to back. I'm getting in contact with you. Vince Ferguson: Is that right? Interesting. So you have that personalized approach. That personalized approach, you hold people accountable, which is awesome. Now can someone join your class virtually? Kita Richards: Yes I do. I do virtual. So I have this app. Well we have this app and in the app everything comes through. But as soon as the virtual classes open up, it's usually a link that appears within your app within 30 minutes telling you the virtual schedule, but it reminds you that there's a virtual coming up. And here's the cool thing about it. If you are in for that day, you can join any class. So mine is set up like this. Basically, if you are in for the week, let's say you say, I want to do virtual or I think I want to join you and I'm going to pay for a week or I'm going to pay for a month. You're not only that one class, you can join in into any class that happens because you are getting links that's telling you. So if you are stuck in traffic, so you ain't making this one, you just click the next link that appears and you make the next one. Vince Ferguson: So you still make it. Awesome. Awesome. That's really good that you're doing that. That's actually amazing. Now that you told me who your ideal clients are, do you give them personalized nutrition guidance? Kita Richards: I do. I do. Vince Ferguson: You do? Kita Richards: So my meal plans being a vegan is interesting. So what I do is the way I build my meal plans are, I shouldn't say simple, but they are built on levels. So when I say levels are different styles. So the base of every one of my meal plans is always vegan. It's always vegan. So it starts out at vegan. And then you see this list of other things. You, I list the eggs that you can have in the amount. And then I list your meats here so you can add back this list. So that's how it lists outs. Not only is that is every, it all has the calorie counts beside it. So, and when I say that is, I actually put recipes in because I'm a cook. I like to cook. Kita Richards: I like to cook. And I don't like eating the same. So recipes come with all my meal plans. So basically if I'm telling you that I want you to eat this, I'm actually giving you the recipe to eat it. Vince Ferguson: To eat it. Kita Richards: So you can meal prep. You can be able to meal prep that. But then for those who say, well, I don't have time because you have all these options. There is also those quick items. You can go get your frozen vegetables and you just do some roasted vegetables. Or if you out, I even help you if you're eating out. We discuss how to eat out. What do I choose? What's a good choice. I found that if people understand their choices, they can make better choices. Vince Ferguson: Better choices. Kita Richards: My thing is, I like to be your guide, but I want you to walk away from me with knowledge to be empowered. So I do give you the meal plan, but there's so many instructions even in inside of the app. I think I would walk over and show you my board. My board tells you the different vegetables that can help you detox your liver, because I want you to learn it. I want you to walk away with knowledge because here's what I'm thinking. I'm thinking to myself, if you walk away with that knowledge, not only will it impact your life, it impacts now your family life. And now it impacts the next generation. Because I have a family, and I want you, not only my client to be healthy, I want them to be impactful within their environment. Kita Richards: Because like you said before, there's so many. There's diabetes, there's blood pressure problems. How do you come at that? We can come out at it one person at a time, but I get that. I can touch you. But even if I'm touching you, then what you do is you touch your family. And then your family will touch other people, and it grows from there. I think that's the only way that we're ever going to be healthy as a community. Vince Ferguson: Hmm. Awesome. Yes. Most definitely. Educate the community and share that knowledge, share that love. And now obviously I can talk forever with you because you have so much knowledge and wisdom to share, but I want a couple more things that I just one to ask you. Because you're so busy, you have two facilities there and you're working with people, how do you manage your family life and your business? Because you have a spouse. So that's and four kids. Kita Richards: And four kids. Vince Ferguson: How do you do it? Kita Richards: So I'm going to let you in on how I manage. First of all, how I manage my personal relationship. My personal relationship with my spouse. We actually have one day one, well, we have dinner. We decide, he actually asks me, when do I have time to have dinner? So we try to have dinner once a week together. Vince Ferguson: Once a week? Kita Richards: Yeah. Once a week dinner without the kids, we try to go out without the, we go out. This is ours. Dinner and maybe a movie or something. We have a date. We have to have that. On the date, I disconnect unless it's the kids trying to contact me or grave emergency, then my focus is not outside of that. It wasn't, and I'm going to be honest with you. I'm going to be honest with you. It wasn't like that before, because trying to be a business owner, sometimes you can get out of balance, and I've been out of balance. Kita Richards: So this helps balance the scale. It tells your spouse or it tells that significant other, that you are important. So this time it's dedicated to us. And so I try to make sure that I do that. For my kids, they're all grown. And it's amazing. We actually have what's called a group chat. And so everybody's in this group chat on their phones. It's message. We have it on Facebook, and then we have it on our phones. We have chat, we talk to each other. We have our own little group text every morning. And I don't know if somebody did it this morning, someone says good morning. And we are all over the place. So my daughter, like I said, is in Korea, and she's military. So she may be anywhere, but we have this chat and it says good morning. Kita Richards: And at least a couple times a week, because I write affirmations every morning. I send over affirmation to my family. And I send over my affirmation to my clients to just remind them to be the best version of them. But also to say, I love you. And everybody piggybacks inside of that for my family. So whatever is happening within the family, we actually can pick up the phone and just text and we are all in the same space at that time. Kita Richards: And so we do that, and about every week or so, we do FaceTime each other. And oh yeah I have grands by the way, I have grands. So we do FaceTime with everybody and that's how I manage having the kids. So we feel close even though we are in different cities. We feel close. We feel that close and we reach out to each other via that. So I have that with them. And then with each of them, I have my own little, like the girls in the family because I have three girls. We only have our own little group thing. Also we have that. And then we have the whole thing. And then they have the sibling chat where it's only the- Vince Ferguson: The kids. Kita Richards: So that's how we manage it. Vince Ferguson: That's how you manage. Kita Richards: So that's how I manage my personal. And so that makes sense to me with technology. It just makes sense to, but it makes them feel as though they are important as well. Vince Ferguson: Which they are. But what about self-care when it comes to you? Kita Richards: I'm big on self-care. I'm big on that one. Vince Ferguson: Make time for that? What do you do? Kita Richards: I make time for myself. So one of the things that I do, and all my clients know it here. One of the things I do is I rise. My clock goes off at 3:45 AM. Vince Ferguson: Really? What? Kita Richards: Yes. I know. It goes off at 3:45 AM. And one thing that happens at 3:45 is I wake up, and I always listen to some type of meditation. I always brighten up the day. That's how I wake up. That's my time. And when I'm sitting there or when I'm laying there, I don't focus on being awake because I have other alarms. My alarm rings again at 4:43. Now if I wake all the way up, that's fine. I wake up. But if I don't wake all the way up at that 4:43 AM, I go into my own meditation. That's my time. That's my time to pour into me. And then about 5:25, because at that time I get up, I do about 15 minutes of that. I get up and I'm getting dressed, I'm moving around. Kita Richards: And, but those are my moments. That's my morning moments. That's my time to be filled up because I want to feel joy, and peace and love so that when I get in the gym at 6:20, at about 6:15 because that's when our class start. I want to already be present, and that's what I do to get present. So that's my first thing. At night I disconnect. Everybody knows it. At a certain time at night, I literally pull the plug on everybody else. That is my time, and I take that time for myself. And it's usually a little later at night. I take the time for myself where I may read a book. I may be reading or listening to something. I may decide that I just want to watch something. I don't watch a lot of TV, but I may decide I want to watch something. Kita Richards: And I just spent that moment doing that. So that's how I run that. And then on Fridays, I never work a full day on Fridays. I told people that. I don't care. I've had people to tell me, can I get a session with you? Can you open up this? I'm like, no, no. On Fridays, I'm done. When I get done, I'm done, and I'm done until Monday. I'm done until Monday. I'll chat with them. I'll chat with people within texts and stuff like that. But I'm done. I'm done. Even if it's a business call, it's got to be an emergency. It's going to wait until Monday. So I do that. And then Wednesday, you catching me here on a Wednesday. Wednesday is very important too, because Wednesday is also my slow day because I'm back and forth to Greenville on most days. Kita Richards: But Wednesday is the day that I don't go to Greenville. I normally stop about 10:00, and I don't start back until about 4:20. And that time, if I want to have a hair appointment, my nails done, I want to have a massage, if I want to just lay in the floor and think about nothing. That's really, truly my time. And I spend it well. My husband will even tell you, everybody knows my schedule because they will tell you. And some people are so afraid of hurting other people's feelings, but I can be really, really blunt. My thing is hurting myself first is not what you want to do. So I tell people, create a space and an atmosphere that's conducive to your growth. Sometimes that requires me to set boundaries. This is my time. And then you have to say it is okay to have it because you are worthy of it. And that's the way I feel. I feel that I am worthy of time. The same value I give to everyone else, I give to myself. Vince Ferguson: Yourself. Beautiful. Very well put. I couldn't have said it better because that's not my reality. That's yours, but that is beautiful. Now how can my listeners and viewers find out more about you, Kita Richards. Kita Richards: I'm so easy to contact. You can always go to my website, which is www.sherocks.fit. and message me there. Or you can hit me up even on the other one, which is a www.bornherofitness. You can get that one, bornherofit.com. And if you message you'll get me again or you can just do what's easy. Hit me up on Facebook. It's Kita Richards. Instagram is Killa_Kita. They gave me that name. I didn't do it. My clients gave me that name. Vince Ferguson: Really? Killer. Kita Richards: You can do that as well. I'm so easy to contact that. It's really strange. And I try my best really to answer people's questions. I have a certain time of day that I just sit down, and I just start to text other people. So I'm very easy. I'm very easy to contact. And I always say too, if you ever, because I believe we're all interconnected. So I try to always give my best to those who are trying to contact me. Vince Ferguson: Very good. Very good. Kita Richards. So on behalf of Body Sculpt of New York, that's my nonprofit program and Six Weeks of Fitness. I truly want to thank you for coming on this show today. Kita Richards: Well thank you for having me. Thank you so much. And can I say one more thing to your listeners? Vince Ferguson: Please. Kita Richards: I just want to remind people that always strive to be the best version of you. That's going to mean you got to take time for yourself. You got to love yourself properly. You got to show every part of you, your bodies, you got to show your body up. Yeah, it's going to fade away. Here's the thing. Once you take care of your body, your mental, your spirit, and you feed it properly, then that produces not only fruit, but it also produces seed. And when that seed, and when you talk, and we become peaceful, when that seed in your voice begin to flow on other people's thoughts. And then they get to produce seed. So remember that you are impactful in your environment, and you're never out of the wrong season. You're always in the divine timing, and there are really no true mistakes. There are only purposes. So just remind yourself that you are being the best version of you. And today is a good day But guess what? Tomorrow, your tomorrow will be even better. And the day after would be better than that. So just keep going, being your very best self. Vince Ferguson: Wow. Awesome. Beautiful. Beautiful. To my listeners and viewers. I truly hope this program was informative, encouraging, and I know it was inspiring and that you will continue tuning in to my Six Weeks of Fitness podcast. And if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for the show, please leave them in the comment section below, and don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any future episodes. And remember you don't stop exercising because we grow old. We grow old because we stop exercising.

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching
Can you dislike your body AND live comfortably in it? Positive Body Image: What is it and how to get there interview with Dr. Erica Castleberry

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:54


Today I have a very special guest returning to the podcast: Dr. Erica Castleberry! Dr. Castleberry joins Fuel Her Awesome for a second time to continue our conversation about body image. Last time we chatted about the body image spectrum and coming to a place of "body neutrality". Today we finish the conversation by talking about body positivity! What is body positivity and how do we get there?  Having a positive outlook on your body seems almost impossible at times, especially in our society. Today we are here to declare not only is it possible, but you can get there TODAY! Dr. Castlberry and I have 3 mindful exercises that you can practice to find that space of body positivity, and over time be able to have that self confidence that you've been seeking for (even when you don't love everything about your body).  Dr. Erica Castleberry is a psychologist and therapist, treating eating disorders, body image, anxiety, OCD, depression and interpersonal concerns for years. If you live in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area and are interested in learning more about body image you can sign up for Dr. Castleberry's body image group referenced in today's show. The group begins January 25th and runs through April 12th. To contact Dr. Erica Castleberry please reach out to her clinic at (505) 884-2004.  Here is the reference for the article we reviewed today: Tylka, TL, Wood-Barcalow NL. What is and what is not positive body image? Conceptual foundations and construct definitions. Body Image. 14 (2015) 118-129.    Cheers friends, and happy eating!  Jess    

The Tragedy Academy
Special Guest: Michael Anthony - Think Unbroken

The Tragedy Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:16


In this episode of the Tragedy Academy, Jay brings trauma survivor and life coach, Michael Unbroken, on to the show. Michael is the host of his own podcast, “Think Unbroken”, where he invites experts, researchers, psychologists, and therapists to discuss healing from trauma and childhood PTSD. Michael himself is no stranger to this healing process. Growing up with two abusive parents, Michael was trapped in a nightmare familiar to many of his listeners. Having overcome his past to choose a brighter future of his own making, Michael hopes to inspire others to do the same.Key Points✊

Solo Cleaning School
Perfection is the Enemy

Solo Cleaning School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 7:48


 This is an unintentional third part to the Perfection Series. In the first episode, "Excellence Vs. Perfection", I share some stories from struggling solo cleaners as they clean. The takeaway is this. Perfection is selfish. You are trying to make something so clean to scratch the itch you have. You are doing it to please you, not the customer. Here's an example. If perfection represents a 10 in cleaning, excellence is around 8. You can get to an 8 quickly and efficiently. But taking an 8 to a 10 may add hours. These extra hours costs you money and inconvenience for the customer. The irony is that you'll never get to 10 anyway. Go for excellence, which is learning what makes the customer happy and accomplish it every time.  Part two of the perfection series was a revisit of perfection from the mental health side. In "Accept the Uncertainty", I unpack a therapist's tool for helping OCD patient's break free from the perfection. Some of you that struggle with perfectionism also deal with OCD or other mental health. If you can treat your mental health and learn some tools like accepting the uncertainty, you will be able to clean at the excellence level and be okay with it.In this third part, I'm taking another look at perfection. I'll even go as far as to say that perfection is the enemy! Craig Rochelle is a Christian pastor and leadership coach. He uses the term GETMO, which stands for Good Enough to Move On. We've already covered this in the first two podcasts for cleaning. GETMO is excellence. What is good enough? What is the level of cleaning and customization to each customer that makes them mostly happy. Figure this out, do it, and MOVE ON. That's GETMO. That's excellence. Do you GETMO it?Let's move this concept of GETMO vs. perfection into the area of building a team. I'm way past perfection in cleaning, but team-building is a different story. I know the exact type of person, personality profile, professional status, and such that I'm looking for. I have designed filters an hoops in my hiring process to eliminate the wrong ones and attract the right ones. This is great and over time may yield the team I'm looking for. There are some problems. I haven't built a team, so how do I know for certain all of the variable I think I know?I have a short time to delegate my entire business so I can take my family to Florida for a month. Can I get by with less than perfect team members?Am I chasing away the right people with too many hoops? Is my process too tight?Coach Josh has been pushing me on this. He wants me to move away from perfection and use discernment in hiring. In my world of systems and being an engineer, I want the right people to filter through my mechanical process like robots. But people are not robots and I may be losing great people because of the perfection that I'm after. Does this trigger anything for you? What is your next goal for your team? You may be like me where my next goal requires team A, but my longer term goal requires a entirely different team B. Why should I perfect my process for team B members when I just need GETMO team A to get 'er done? Read the rest of this article at the Smart Cleaning School website

The Anxiety Coaches Podcast
787: Has Anxiety Got You Seeking Reassurance

The Anxiety Coaches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 20:53


In today's episode, Gina discusses the behavior of excessively seeking reassurance. Anxiety sufferers often find comfort in seeking reassurance and fall into excessive behavior. Learn how to identify excessive reassurance seeking and how to remedy it! Episode supported by Ned If you want to check out Ned and try their CBD for yourself, we have a special offer for the Anxiety Coaches Podcast audience. Go to https://www.helloned.com/ACP or enter ACP at checkout. Thank you, Ned! Please visit and support today's sponsor! Better Help is bringing you thousands of counselors for your therapy needs and 10% off your first month! https://betterhelp.com/acp discount code acp Link to paper mentioned in the episode https://bit.ly/3Khgsai Find even more peace and calm with our Supercast premium access membership! https://anxietycoaches.supercast.com/ Here's what's included for $5/month: ❤ New Ad-Free episodes every Sunday and Wednesday ❤ Access to the entire Ad-free back-catalog with over 600 episodes ❤ Premium meditations recorded with you in mind ❤ And more fun surprises along the way! All this in your favorite podcast app! To learn more go to: https://www.theanxietycoachespodcast.com Join our Group Coaching Full or Mini Membership Program  Learn more about our One-on-One Coaching What is anxiety? Quote: Our sorrows and wounds are healed only when we touch them with compassion. -Buddha

The OCD Stories
Dr Steven Phillipson: Character Indictment OCD (#312)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 61:07


In episode 312 I chat with Dr Steven Phillipson. Steven is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for OCD. Steven is the Clinical Director at the Center for Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy in New York. We discuss what is character indictment, the varied emotions behind OCD, confessing as a common compulsion of this theme, a different way to look at the concept of being a good or bad person, feeling like you don't deserve nice things, what the brains trying to do with OCD, how we demonstrate to the brain we are safe, Steve gives examples of character indictment OCD, and much more. Hope it helps.  Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/dr-steven-phillipson-312 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

The Jamie Grace Podcast
How to Survive Your 20s

The Jamie Grace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 26:52


Today's episode is dedicated to everyone turning 20 -- someday! Haha. I've been there. And I am still learning a LOT about life. But here are a few things I've picked up along the way. Thanks for listening to my podcast and my music - truly!! Be sure to check out my YouTube channel (below) for more lofi chill/study music like what you heard in today's episode. --------------------------------------------------------- CONNECT http://instagram.com/thejamiegracepodcast http://youtube.com/jgracepro Patreon: http://patreon.com/jamiegrace What I've Been Reading: https://amzn.to/3CYEYIL Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thejamiegracepodcast/message “hi! im bella. thank you so much for listening to my mommy's podcast. leave a review on spotify. and sponsor the show on patreon. and stream my mommy's music. thanks for listening! k bye.” —Isabella --------------------------------------------------------- Online Therapy - http://faithfulcounseling.com/jamiegrace Use the link above to learn more about Faithful Counseling and get 10% OFF of your first month. It's where I personally go for therapy and I genuinely benefit from what they have to offer. #sponsor --------------------------------------------------------- Thank you for listening :) Love, Jamie Grace B.S. Child & Youth Development Diagnosis: Tourette Syndrome, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, OCD, ADHD --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thejamiegracepodcast/message

Marvelous with Kirsten Tyrrel
Part 1: Who's to Blame For Our Obsession With Excellence?

Marvelous with Kirsten Tyrrel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 19:24


This week I'm getting "real" sharing my struggle with anxiety, OCD and ADHD, and where I think one of the big root causes is for our suffering. Have we really done this to ourselves? Who's to blame? I'm breaking it all down on this Part one of a series dedicated to helping us find our peace in the midst of a chaotic world. 

Women's Maximum Fitness
Mom Squad w/ Abbie Overbeek and Katie Beck

Women's Maximum Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 91:45


We are back with another episode of The Women's Fittest Podcast: Mom Squad!In this episode #98 Abbie, Katie, and I once again lay it all out with a variety of topics such as:What are you a little OCD about?Should you charge your kid rent if they come home to live with you after college? Why don't kids pick up after themselves (no answers just examples)Newborns: what we liked and didn't likeOne trip: carrying groceries and how toilet paper messes up the one trip bc it's awkward and bulky not heavy!Toddlers: what we love about this stage Exercise advice for seniors How changing your physique doesn't heal an emotional trigger that caused emotional eating, disordered eating etc The problems with thinking bariatric surgery will fix your overeating and the importance of counseling dovetailing with any physical goal to achieve itNews years fitness resolution mistakes and Abbies love of dark chocolate The balance between adherence and optimal when assessing your goals and the behaviors that move you towards them Katie shares about her recent decision to leave social media for now and we all chime in about the benefits Mentions:@gymglamapparel (Code buffcake10)@shortfitneverquit@katiebeck_ifbbpro@buffcake22Abbie coaches and trains moms through pre and/or postpartum both in person and on line and you can contact her via Instagram @shortfitneverquit or https://linktr.ee/amoverbeek Debra sells training programs and has a private Facebook group for purchasers! Email buffcake22@gmail.com for more info and check out this link for the podcast directories, newsletter, and Amazon shop https://linktr.ee/Buffcake22Subscribe to The Women's Fittest podcast wherever you find podcasts for Athlete Interviews, The Mom Squad, and Chick Chat editions as new episodes drop every Monday and throughout the week. Your reviews are appreciated and truly matter! Thank you in advance for your efforts towards the growth of The Women's Fittest podcast. Also find clips these episodes in video form on YouTube: Buffcake22

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 217 The Benefits of Meditation for Anxiety & OCD

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:39


SUMMARY:  Today we have Windsor Flynn talking about how she realized the benefits of meditation for anxiety and OCD in her recovery. Winsdor brought her lived experience and training to the conversation and addressed how meditation has helped her in many ways, not just with her OCD and mental health. In This Episode: The benefits of meditation for general anxiety The benefits of meditation for OCD The roadblocks to practicing meditation How Mindfulness and mediation help with daily stress (especially through COVID-19) Links To Things I Talk About: Instagram: @windsormeditates Instagram: @Windsor.Flynn Website: www.windsorflynn.com (Windsor is certified to teach the 1 Giant Mind 3 Day Learn Meditation course). ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 217. You guys, 217. That's a lot of episodes. I'm very excited about that. Today, we have with us the amazing Windsor Flynn. I cannot tell you how incredibly by inspired I am with Windsor. She is very cool and has so much wisdom and so much kindness to share. Today, we have her on to talk about having anxiety and learning the importance of meditation. Now, Windsor speaks specifically about having OCD and how much it has helped her to take up a meditation practice. She goes over the couple of main key points, which is number one, anyone can meditate. And that meditation can be user-friendly for people, even with OCD. And she said, “Especially for people with OCD.” And she actually gives us the amazing gift of a guided meditation at the end, that just helps you bring your attention to the present and learn to drop down into your compassion and your body. And then the third point she makes is that meditation can be integrated into your life, even if you feel like you don't have time, or even if it's really uncomfortable. And she shares some amazing experiences and examples of where she really struggled and how she got through those difficulties. So, I'm going to quickly first do the “I did a hard thing” and then I'm going to let you guys get right into the amazing conversation with Windsor Flynn. So, today's “I did a hard thing” is from Anonymous, and they said: “I wear a dress that has been sitting in my closet for months. I was always scared to show my skin since breaking out in hives over my social anxiety. I felt proud for the first time in a long time.” This is so cool. You guys, I love this so much. They're really talking about showing up imperfect and all, or letting people judge them and going and doing what you want to do anyway. And that is what this podcast is about. It's about living the life that you want, not the life that anxiety wants you to have. And often, anxiety will keep your life very small if you only listen to it and only follow its rules. And so, anonymous is doing this work, walking the walk, not just talking the talk. So, yes, I'm so, so in love with this. Now you guys, you can go over to my private practice website, which is where the podcast lives. It's Kimberley Quinlan - L for License, M for Marriage, F for Family, and T for Therapist – I had to think there – .com. So, KimberleyQuinlan-lmft.com. And then you can click on the podcast and right there is a link for you to submit your “I did a hard thing” and you can be featured on the show. So, go do that, but not right away. First, I want you to listen to this amazing, amazing episode. Kimberley: Welcome. I am so excited for this episode. I have a reason for being so excited, which I'll share with you in a second, but first, I want to introduce to you Windsor Flynn. She is incredible. I have watched you grow over the last what? A year or two years since I've known you. It is so wonderful to have you on, so thank you for coming. Windsor: Yeah. Thank you for inviting me. This is so cool because I've spent a lot of time listening to your podcast and, I don't know, just hoping to be on Monday, but I didn't know for what. So, this is really cool for me. Kimberley: Yeah, this is so cool. So, you're coming on to talk about meditation. And the reason that this is so exciting for me is that is actually what this podcast was originally for – was to bring mindfulness and meditation practice to people who have anxiety. And I did a lot of meditations at the beginning and then I lost my way. So, I feel like you coming here is full circle. We're going back to the roots of the show to talk about mindfulness and meditation. Do you want to share a little bit about your story with mental health and why you landed on this as being your passion project? Windsor: Yeah, sure. So, I started-- I guess my mental health story goes way back, but I'll just start at the beginning when I first came to my OCD diagnosis. I had been experiencing anxiety. Looking back, I will say it was pretty debilitating, but I was sort of just powering through it. I was a new mom. I didn't have a lot of mom friends, the first in my group to have kids. My parents are across the ocean in Hawaii. I'm in California, in San Francisco with my boyfriend who is shocked at being a dad. So, I'm very anxious, but I'm doing all the things. And I had started experiencing intrusive thoughts, which I didn't know were intrusive thoughts. I was just really worried that I was going to become a headline for like moms that murder. I hate moms that kill because I had heard of this story. I'm sure so many people who grew up at the same time as me were really familiar with the Andrea Yates story. I don't need to go full into detail, but she had some mental health issues and she ended up killing her kids. It's a very, very sad story, but I had attached to that because I was just so, so scared that that would happen to me. And I don't know why I was nervous that this would happen to me. But ever since I was little, I just always thought that anything drastic, it would happen to me. I would be there for the end of the world. I would be there to witness a mass murder, or I would be a victim of a serial killer. All these things, I just thought it had to be me. I don't know why. So, of course when I have a baby, I'm thinking, “Oh no, this horrible thing, it's bound to happen to me. I need to pay attention.” So, that's when the hypervigilance started, all of these things that I now have language for, but I wasn't quite sure how to explain, and I also didn't want to explain it to anyone because it sounds unhinged. So, I was doing this alone. I was trying to keep myself very busy. I was doing all the classic compulsory activities that happen when you're trying to avoid intrusive thoughts and avoid this massive discomfort in fear. And eventually, we moved out of the city. So, not only was I mothering by myself-- not really by myself. I had a partner, but he was working a lot just with his schedule. So, he was sleeping most of the day and gone all night. So then we moved across the bay to Alameda and then I just didn't even have friends anymore. So, I was all alone. So, I was thinking, “Wow, if there's ever going to be a time that I'm going to just completely go off, it'll be now.” And then it just snowballed. It spiraled into this thing where I couldn't not be scared and I didn't know what was going to happen. I was convinced that I was going to kill my son for no other reason. Then I just had a feeling that something bad was going to happen. So, I looked up postpartum mood disorders because somehow, I knew those existed. And I was hoping that this had something to do with it. I still had hope that there was an explanation. And I found something that said Postpartum OCD, and anxiety. And of course, I hit every single track mark. It wasn't mild symptoms. I was just, yup. Check, check, check, check, check. And so, I felt a little okay. Not really, right? And I finally saw someone who ended up being-- she said she was a postpartum specialist, which was great. I signed up with her. We talked. She told me I had OCD. It was cool. But she didn't give me any tools. She was doing the root cause stuff, which is probably really helpful in other circumstances, not necessarily for OCD. But she reassured me enough that I was cool with my OCD. I was like, “Well, I'm not going to kill anyone. That's fine. I can go home. I can continue being a mom as long as you're telling me I'm not a murderer.” Just like, “No, you're not a murderer.” I was like, “Great, well, we're done here, I guess.” And I got pregnant again. And of course, I was so scared. I was like, “That's going to happen again. I'm going to have postpartum OCD.” So, I couldn't pause my whole pregnancy, but it was in the name of preparedness. So, I didn't know that I was making my symptoms worse and worse and worse until I had the baby. This time I'm not scared I'm going to kill anyone. I'm just scared that now I think she's the devil, which I did not know how to recognize it. So, finally, I'm experiencing a whole different subset of OCD symptoms. I didn't know, but I just thought, well, it was OCD the first time. I'm just going to check. And luckily, I landed on my therapist. I still see-- even though this was four years ago, I still see her every two weeks. I love her. She's the best. She's given me all the tools I needed to manage my mental health, got me to a place where not only was I totally understanding the disorder, but I felt really comfortable sharing and sharing in a way that I thought would be helpful to other people. So, that's when I started advocating for maternal mental health and OCD, and that's how we know each other, through the internet, social media space. And I guess that was a mouthful, but that was how I landed onto the advocacy part. And eventually, I switched to meditation because I felt like this was a tangible way that I could offer a service that I know to be helpful for the management of mental health. And I know how much resistance there is towards starting this meditation practice because I too went through a number of years where I absolutely said no to this idea of meditation. But once I started, I realized, wow, I don't know why I didn't do this sooner. There's really something to it. And it's very teachable. And I know from firsthand experience how beneficial it is. Kimberley: I love that. I actually don't think I've heard your entire story. So, thank you for sharing that with me and everybody. I didn't realize there were two waves of OCD for you and two different subtypes, which I think is common, for a lot of people. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: I love that. So, I think what you're saying, and can you correct me if I'm wrong? So, the first wave was reassurance, what you used to get you through. And then the second you used ERP? Windsor: Yes. Kimberley: Okay, great. And then from there, the third layer of recovery or however you want to say it, was it meditation, or were there other things you did to get to the meditation place? Windsor: Well, I was doing ERP and that really helped with my OCD management. I was able to recognize whenever I had a new obsession, and I feel like I could recognize anyone's new obsession. At this point, I was like, ‘Oh, that's this, that's this. It's tied into this.” So, I had a really great understanding, and that was cool. But I still have two kids, we're still in a pandemic, I still have communication issues with my partner – all these normal things that ERP doesn't necessarily help with. So, it was really just about finding that balance between working on myself and stress management and really getting to be that calm, chill person that I've always wanted to be. Even when I was doing the best with my OCD, I was still not so relaxed because I had a lot of attachments to how I wanted people to perceive me, how my children were behaving, not necessarily in a controlling way, but just really feeling a lot of responsibility over everything. And so, the meditation was just this next step that I was hoping would get me there, because I was feeling a lot of stress, not even related to my OCD, just in general. And I wanted to be able to find something that would help me get through that stress so that I could start really figuring out what it is I wanted to do, just even for fun again, instead of just only feeling this overwhelmed. Kimberley: Yeah. No, I really resonate with that. All I can say for me is, while I had a different story, I had an eating disorder, I was trying to do meditation during that, but the thoughts and everything was just too big for it. And it was hard for me to access actual meditation without it just being an opportunity to ruminate, sitting there, just cycling. So, the main thing I really want to ask you, if you're willing to share, is let's say specifically someone with OCD, what were some of the struggles that you had with meditation? Because I know so many people with OCD are really resistant to it because the thoughts get louder when you sit still and so forth. So, what were some of the things that you had to work through to be able to sit on a cushion? Windsor: Yeah. That's such a great question because I feel like, had I not figured out that I had OCD and then done all this work with ERP to really learn how to acclimate myself to the presence of intrusive thoughts, I don't know that I would've been successful in meditation. Actually, I know that I wasn't because I had tried it before, and it was too hard. So, I really-- even with ERP, once I started the meditation journey, the first few weeks were pretty challenging for me because as someone with OCD, every time I close my eyes and I'm not occupied, or my brain is not occupied, it's like prime time. This is OCD's favorite. It's like the time to shine. It's like, “Okay, here I am. What can we throw out to you today?” And so, knowing that this was a possibility, even when I signed up to learn meditation, I was like, “Okay, I'm going to do this. I'm going to try, I'm going to give college a try.” Then my OCD was like, “No.” You close your eyes, something could happen, like you could have a breakdown or you could make all these realizations that you are a psycho killer. And then you'll just definitely kill everyone. Thank God you tried meditation. Now your true self can come out. And I was like, “Okay, I'm going to just do it anyways. I'm just going to meditate because I have to see, not even in a compulsory way, I have to see if this is true. But I can't-- knowing now what OCD does, I couldn't-- it was almost I took it as a personal challenge. Kimberley: Like an exposure, right? It was like an exposure, like, “Okay, fine. I'm going to-- let's see.” Windsor: I signed up to learn meditation as a true exposure because now I had this fear that if I come to all these realizations, it won't be cool. It will be devastating for everyone around me. So, I was like, “Well, I'm going to try. I'm going to try to meditate.” And do you know what? I cried and panicked the first time. I had to turn off my camera because I did not want the teacher to see. Kimberley: So you did it live. Windsor: I did it live. It was so hard. It was like a total exposure because this was in front of-- I think there were 25 people in the course and everyone was closing their eyes, I'm assuming. But 20 minutes is a long time to meditate. So, I know people were going to be opening their eyes. So, I was live having this fear that I was going to turn into a psycho killer on the camera. So, I was crying because it was hard. But you know what? I'm so glad I did because also ERP showed me that crying is fine. We can cry when we do hard things. I was doing the hard thing and I was proud of myself. I even shared afterwards. We were like, “Who wants to share?” And I was like, “Me.” I cried and I had a panic attack. Kimberley: See. That is so badass in my mind. That is so cool that you did that. You rode that wave. Windsor: Yeah. And it was great because if I didn't do that or purposely put myself into the situation to cry and do this hard thing, I wouldn't have been able to get to the good part of meditation, which I love. I like to talk about the good part of meditation. But having OCD makes starting the hardest part. Kimberley: Yeah. What is the good part of meditation for you? Because I think that no one wants to do hard things unless they know there's some kind of reward at the end. Everyone's going to be different, but for you, what is the why? Why would you do such a thing? Windsor: Well, because I learned this thing, right? That was so valuable. Someone told me, we don't gauge the benefits of meditation for how we feel when our eyes are closed. We're more interested in what happens while our eyes are open. How is it impacting? And I noticed almost right away that when tensions were high, when I usually would be the first to participate-- because I'm really affected by the way other people's moods are. I feel responsible or I have to change it. I became dysregulated really easily. I noticed almost right away that when other people were feeling their feelings around me, I was able to observe them instead of participate in that, which was really cool. And it was just so much nicer to be able to be supportive instead of become one of those people who also needed support in that moment. And I also noticed right away that I had a higher tolerance for loud noises and just disruptions, because I'm pretty sensitive to lots of different noises at once. It gets me pretty anxious and agitated. So, having kids at home all day isn't ideal for that. And so, the meditation really helped me a lot with that. I was able to recover more quickly from periods of dysregulation. Maybe I would become dysregulated, but I could calm down quicker. And so, I really loved that. And I noticed that as before where I would be like, I need wine at 4:30 or whatever time it was. Once I started meditating for a few weeks, then wine just became something that tasted good that I liked in the afternoons. I didn't need it. Sometimes I would be like, “Wow, we're having dinner. Oh my God, kids, I didn't even have wine.” And they were like, “Wow, you're right.” And so, I would pour myself a glass just because I like it. Kimberley: Right. Not because you needed it to get through the afternoon. Windsor: Yeah. And so, I really liked all those changes. And it just is really restful, which I wasn't expecting. The practice itself, the one that I practice, it's twice a day. And I find that doing those two meditations really gives me more energy because I'm not a coffee person. So, yeah, I just feel like what started as a thing that I wanted to feel more rested and less stress, it has actually become a tool that I can use to help maintain a busier lifestyle, which as much as I don't love for everyone, I can't avoid it. Anyway. Kimberley: That is so cool. I mean, how amazing that this practice came to you. So, you are talking about this specific meditation practice that you use and the benefits. Do you want to share a little about what specifically you use? I'm sure some people here have heard from me of self-compassion meditations and mindfulness meditations, but do you want to share specifically what practices you are interested in practicing? Windsor: Yeah. So, the practice that I find the most success and enjoyment out of is a silent meditation, which actually was the most intimidating for me, but I love it. It's the one giant mind being technique. It's called a being technique because, I guess the focus of the meditation is to connect with your being, which I guess if you say it without sounding too woo-hoo or anything like that, we're just connecting to your true self apart from all the thoughts and the ideas and all the conditioning we have. Just getting back to you, which is something that I really wanted, especially after having two kids and being confused in the state of life that's not really developed yet. So, I love that part. And since I didn't have to focus on anything like someone else's voice, or trying to follow a guided meditation, sometimes I feel that takes more energy because I still have to pay attention to something. A silent meditation allowed me to really find that rest and allowed my brain to just slow down. Kimberley: Yeah. I too. I mean, I love guided meditations for people who are starting off and need some instructions. But I find the silent meditation once I got the hang of it, I could practice it in a minute between clients. I could just sit for-- I could quickly go into that and then come out. Or if I'm presenting and I'm listening to someone, I could just drop down into that. So, I really love the idea of this as well because it's something you can practice in small pieces.  Not so formally, but drop into just connecting down out of your head into your body kind of thing. Okay, so the biggest question I'm guessing people have is, are you “successful” with your meditations daily? What does it look like day-to-day? Are there ups and downs? How is it for you? Windsor: Yeah. This is something that comes up a lot when people ask, because we know that, yes, all meditation is helpful. But we also know that to get the most benefit out of meditation, it's best to have a regular practice. And this could mean meditating once a day, or with this particular technique, meditating twice a day. And it sounds a lot. And I would love to say I meditate twice a day every day, no matter what. But I have OCD, so I allow myself to be a little bit more flexible. I don't really love rigidity when it comes to things like that because I have a tendency to really grab onto them. So, I do allow myself to skip it sometimes, either for reasons like I forget, or the day just gets ahead of me. As important as meditation is, there's a lot of things that trumpet, like do my kids need something? Do I have to pick someone up? Is everyone being fed? There's all these things that are also really important. So, I do try to meditate twice a day. Most days I do. Sometimes I don't. But that's okay because I did what I had to do to keep everything going. Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Windsor: What, excuse me? Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Is that an up and a down process? Do you have “good days” and “bad days” with it or is it pretty consistent for you now? Windsor: Well, I don't like to talk about the meditations as being good or bad. Some are really gratifying and some are less gratifying, because even the less gratifying meditations are really good for you. You're still going to benefit from them, even though it wasn't necessarily easy or didn't feel good. But that's just like a lot of things. Meditation can be categorized as something like that, like maybe brushing your teeth or exercising. Maybe you don't love it all the time, but you do it because it's good for your body and it helps you reach certain goals. And sometimes it's really hard for me to get to a good juicy place, and that's okay. I've just started to not expect a certain experience when I go into the meditation. And that makes everything a lot easier because then I'm not letting myself down or I'm not feeling disappointed or I'm not crushing a goal. I don't go into the meditation feeling like I'm going to feel so relaxed and cool. I just say, “Oh, I'm going to close my eyes and we'll just see what happens during this session.” Kimberley: And that's why I love what you're saying because it's so in line with recovery, like dropping the expectations, dropping just the good feelings, dropping goals, having these big goals all the time. I think that's-- sometimes I have found, what happens in your meditation is like a metaphor for life, right? Like, okay, today is a busy brain day. There's going to be days like that. And I think that it's a great way to just practice the tools in a small setting that you would be practicing in the day anyway. Windsor: Exactly. That's why I love it for people with OCD too because let's say you commit to doing it 20 minutes a day or 20 minutes twice a day. During that 20 minutes, you know that any thoughts can come up, any feelings can come up, and you're just going to let them be there. And this is excellent practice for when you're going about your daily life and you have no control ever over what comes into your mind or what happens. But since you've been practicing this in your meditations, those responses to accept and let go become more automatic. So, not only are you having great meditation experiences or anything, but in your life, you can use those same tools. It's not just adding another thing. It all works together. The meditation is so helpful in every aspect. Kimberley: Right. It's like we go to the gym to strengthen our muscles and we meditate to strengthen our brain muscles, right? Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Yeah. I love that. So, one thing I didn't ask you ahead of time, but I'm wondering, would you be interested in leading us through a couple of minute meditation to get us experiencing that? Windsor: Yeah. And you know what? I was thinking of like, maybe I should think of something to say in case she asks it, but I don't think she will. So, yeah, we can just do a short-- what I do sometimes when I don't do the whole 20 minutes is I just do a short mini one, like a minute or two. Kimberley: Would you lead us? Windsor: Yeah. Okay. So, for everyone listening and for Kimberley, I just want to show you a little bit about what it looks like to connect to your being and to practice a silent meditation, just for a short little grounding experience in the middle of a busy day or before a meeting, anytime you need to. So, what I like to do before I meditate is to just get into a comfortable spot. You don't necessarily have to be on a fancy cushion. You just have to have your lower back supported. And go ahead and close your eyes. And what I like to do before I start any meditation is take a few deep belly breaths. So, we'll just breathe into our noses right now. Feel your belly. Feel your chest... And release through the mouth. One more deep breath into the nose... into your belly... and release. And one more deep breath into the nose. Feel your belly... and release. So, now you just want to let your breath settle into its own natural rhythm. This isn't a breathing meditation. We're not going to focus on our breath. And you can scan your body for any tension that you might be holding. A commonplace is in your neck and your shoulders. Make sure you drop your shoulders, can wiggle your jaw a little bit, and just let all of that tension go. So, when we're meditating, we don't want to put a focus on any thoughts that might come into our mind. But when they do come in, we just want to acknowledge them and recognize that this is a normal part of meditation. We never want to resist any thoughts or feelings that we might have. These are all important. And just continue following your natural breath. And has any thoughts come into your mind, just remember that we don't have to engage with them. It's okay to just witness them and let them pass through you. Maybe you might notice a sound outside or a body sensation. That's okay. Just be a witness to that too. Now you can take another deep breath into the nose... Into your belly... and breathe out. And you can start to bring your awareness back to your body and see how it feels to be where you are. You can start to bring your awareness back into the space. And slowly, when you're ready, you can open your eyes. Kimberley: Oh, what a treat. Windsor: And that's a little meditation, but I was really feeling it for a second. Kimberley: Yeah. I just kept smiling because it was such a treat. What a treat that I get to have my own little meditation instructor in the middle of a podcast. It's my favorite. What a gift. Thank you so much. Windsor: You're welcome. Kimberley: Yeah. Thank you. I think I love-- I just want to highlight a couple of things you said, which is, for those who have anxiety, meditation is not the absence of thoughts and feelings, right? You highlighted that and that was so helpful, just to acknowledge that thoughts and feelings will happen, sensations will happen, but we just become an observer to them, which I think again, not only helps us with meditation, but it helps us with response prevention, during our exposures. It helps us during panic. Such a great tool. So, I'm so grateful for you sharing that. Windsor: Cool. Well, thanks for letting me. I love to talk about it when I have the chance. Kimberley: Yeah. Okay. So, I want to ask one final question, which is, what do you really want people to know? If there's something we've missed today or if you want to drive home the main point, what is your main message that you're wanting people to take away from today's podcast? Windsor: I guess what I really want people to know about meditation is that you don't have to be a certain type of person to do this. You don't need to be a specific personality type or have certain interests to make meditation work for you. You can just be yourself and come as you are and treat this practice as a gift that you're giving yourself, that you deserve to take part in because it offers such deep rest and relaxation. That meditation can be a part of a modern, busy lifestyle. You don't have to be common Zen all the time to do it. I think that meditation is for everybody. Kimberley: I love that. I always remember, I think I could be killing this here, but the Dalai Lama says, and this always gets me laughing because he always says, if you don't have time for meditation, you are the one who needs to meditate the most. Windsor: Yeah. I love that one. Kimberley: I killed the way that he said it, but for me, so often I'm like, “Oh, I don't have time. Oh, I didn't get time today.” And he really keeps nagging me in my mind in terms of knowing the more busy you are, the more you may want to prioritize this. Of course, like you said, that happens and priorities happen. But for me, that was the main message I had to keep reminding myself when it came to meditation. So, I loved that. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Well, thank you so much. This is just delightful. Really it is. It has brought such joy to me today because like I said, it feels full circle to be coming back and talking more about meditation and doing more of that here. Where can people get a hold of you and hear about your work? Windsor: So, I have my Instagram, @windsor.flynn, and that's my OCD one. I talk a little bit about meditation on there, but I know that not everyone is necessarily ready for that. So, I do have my other Instagram, @windsormeditates. And that's when I focus a little bit more on the meditation. And if you're interested in taking any of my group courses or private meditation sessions, you can just go to my website, windsorflynn.com. All very easy, just search my name on the internet, and then you'll find some links for those. Kimberley: And we'll have all the links in the show notes as well. So, if people are listening on, they should be able to connect to that. So, amazing. I'm so-- pardon? Windsor: I was just going to say thank you so much for having me. I'm a big fan of yours and I love the work that you're doing and I feel so honored that I get to be on your podcast. Kimberley: No, I feel likewise. I love what you're doing. There's so many things I wish I could focus on. And I love when somebody like you will come along and they focus on that one thing. It just makes me really happy because I just love when people are finding little areas, particularly in the OCD and mental health space where it's like, we need these sources. So, I'm so happy that you're doing that work. Thank you. Windsor: Cool. Thank you so much. Kimberley: My pleasure. And like I said, go follow Windsor. She's amazing, and I'm just honored to have you here. Windsor: Thank you. ----- Okay. So, before we finish up, thank you so much for being here and staying till the end. Before we finish, I want to share a review of the week. This one is from Cynthia Saffel and she said: “I'm so excited to share these podcasts with my clients.” She gave it a five-star review and said, “I first was introduced to Kimberley's clear and compassionate teaching style when I took the ERP school course for therapists.” For those of you who don't know, we have a CEU approved course called ERP School, where you can learn how to treat OCD using ERP. And she went on to say, “In the past 3 weeks since taking the course I recommended both the course and podcasts to my clients.” Thank you so much, Cynthia, for your review. And for everyone who leaves a review, it is the best gift you can give me in return for these free resources. So, if you have the time, please do go over and leave a review and have a wonderful day. It is a beautiful day to do hard things. Have a wonderful day, everybody.

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 14, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022


Topics: Blended Families, Siblings, Confrontation, Newlyweds, Anger, Emotional Abuse, Parenting, ADHD, OCD Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Becky Brown, Milan Yerkovich Caller Questions: My sister is my mother's favorite and doesn't treat me well; do I tell her that she has a different father?  My wife of 4mos is verbally, emotionally, and physically abusive; what do I do?  I have a 16yo who has OCD and ADHD--is there The post New Life Live: January 14, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

Ask Kati Anything!
Why do I test my therapist's boundaries? AKA 95

Ask Kati Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 74:29


Ask Kati Anything mental health podcast episode 951. I've got a question about boundaries. Why am I testing the boundaries of my therapist? I don't want to do it but it's just happening and I get irritated at myself for doing it. Do you have any tips and do you get annoyed as a therapist when your client is testing your boundaries?2. I hope you're doing well! How do I appreciate the happy moments where my depression disappears when all I can think in the back of my mind is ‘when will it get bad again'3. How can I stop idealizing my therapist?  I really idealize my therapist and keep telling my t how much I love her and how I never want her to leave me. Maybe it doesn't have anything to do with it but my therapist seems so perfect to me even if I know on a rational level she isn´t but I´m so focused...4. I am in counseling for depression and anxiety. However, I find I have a strong reluctance around getting better. I think there are a variety of reasons - depression defines me, so without it I'm not sure who I am, and it gives me a lot of excuses as to why I'm not successful or more active. When I am...5. I am curious as to how you would prepare your clients/patients for when you were out of the office for a vacation or such? I mean, for those going in weekly, are there any tips that you provide for coping if a session cannot be held weekly? I have weekly sessions and the idea of not going in...6. I was wondering how to stop being sick on the day of therapy? It can be hours after and I'll be sick every time without fail. I don't think things are going too fast but I'm now getting nauseous when very anxious too. I don't know why this keeps happening? I'm in the process of getting a diagnosis for ptsd by the way. Thank you for all that you do7. How do we move past our trauma when we have to return to it? I had a very traumatizing experience at college over a year ago, and I had to withdraw from school this year after trying to return because it was too overwhelming. I feel like I can't return to my dream school because of...8. I have BPD (borderline personality disorder) and I'm wondering how does one not get so dependent on their FP (favorite person). I'm very dependent on this person. Whenever they are in a bad mood or upset it makes me in a bad mood or upset.9. Could you talk more about the less common symptoms of OCD? I will re-do things if it doesn't “feel right” or have to touch the surface of everything before I place anything down. I find myself not being able to NOT do it. Sometimes I don't even know what the “obsession” would be because...10. I was wondering about thoughts of self harm. I got really focused on an object. I wanted to buy it. I didn't hurt myself but I really wanted to. Now I feel shitty. Like I fell and can not get back up. How can I feel better when situations like this keep happening to me. I haven't hurt myself since...Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/katimorton)

Alive and Free
Un-Worrying

Alive and Free

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 25:05


Humans are weird. We worry about our kids, our jobs, our relationships, our finances, and everything in between. But we don't have control over these things most of the time.  Do you worry around the clock over things big and small? Worrying sends you down a vicious cycle that makes you less capable of fixing whatever you're worrying about. And often, you even worry about being worried.  The result? You aren't as happy and fulfilled as you could be.  But there's an easy way to stop worrying in its tracks. It instantly reduces your stress levels, clears your head, and helps you make better decisions.  In this episode, you'll discover simple ways to stop worrying by using your body.  Listen to the episode now and make all your worries disappear.  Show highlights include: Your brain's pattern recognition “glitch” which creates unnecessary stress and worry (and how to reverse this glitch) (4:27)  How worrying poisons your body, disrupts your thinking processes, and turns your emotions up to “11” (6:23)  Why worrying about your kids makes you less capable to help them (even if it's out of love) (6:35)  The insidious “Worry Cycle” trap that creates a never-ending loop of anxiety and erodes your happiness (13:50)  The “Inner Exuberance” secret for ending your constant worrying, anxiety, and even OCD (15:09)  How to make your internal environment zing with joy (even when everything's going wrong in your life) (19:15)  Why simple movements like stretching and yawning build a bonfire of wellbeing inside you that lasts all day (20:12)  If you want to radically change how much control you have over your emotions in as little as 20 days, you can go to https://thefreedomspecialist.com/feelbetternow and sign up for the Choose Your Own Emotion course.  If you or somebody you know is looking to drop the ‘F' Bomb of freedom in your life and break free from addiction, depression, anxiety or anything that's making you feel flat-out stuck, head over to https://thefreedomspecialist.com/ and book a call where we can look at your unique situation and give you the roadmap you've been missing. If you'd like to buy a copy of my book, Is That Even Possible?: The Nuts and Bolts of Energy Healing for the Curious, Wary, and Totally Bewildered, you can find it on Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/That-Even-Possible-Healing-Bewildered/dp/1512336041

Doing Time
Ep 48 - Carly Spielberg: Battling Addiction in Silence

Doing Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 69:19


Drew Loryn sits down with one of her best friends from Jewish Summer Camp, Carly Spielberg. Carly discusses her experience of growing up with paranoia as a child and being put into therapy since she was 10 years old. She also talks about having OCD as a child and what is was like growing up with divorced parents and being put in the middle of them. Towards the end of the podcast Carly opens up about her brother passing away from a heroin overdose. She discusses how it impacted her, her family, and how she bonded with Drew over siblings battling heroin addiction. Trigger Warning: The follow content may contain references to self harm, drugs, addiction, violence, mental health disorders, and more. Follow Drew on Instagram: @drew.loryn
Follow Carly on Instagram: @notgnarlycarly Follow Doing Time on Instagram: @doingtimepodcast

What the F**k Happened Podcast
This Is How We Do Things Over Here (Thoughts on THE Virus, Decision Paralysis and the Porn Dilemma) with Sam Conrad + Richard Raymond II

What the F**k Happened Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 116:41


Episode:Your host Sam, and her partner Rick are here to welcome you into 2022! They open the episode by explaining about their experience and thoughts on THE virus after contracting it over the holidays. They also talk about how they called in the new year and their resolutions/plans. Rick and Sam explore the concept of decision paralysis in the dating world and mourning the loss of the perfect partner. Rick opens up about his struggle with rOCD symptoms and Sam explains its affect on her and their relationship. They chat about their decision to start a family and conception sex! Rick and Sam then have a somewhat heated conversation about porn and its addictive qualities + appropriateness in a relationship. Connect with Rick:To connect for mixing + mastering services, contact @richard_raymond_ii on Instagram.For Rick's music, follow @welcometolimeforestFollow us!@wtfh.podcast on Instagram. Follow Sam @samantharosewellness.Intro Song by: Conrad RichardsAlbum Art by: Sam ConradMixing & Mastering by Richard Raymond II

Specialty Stories
214: Child Psychiatry: Looking At The Bigger Picture

Specialty Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 30:38


Dr. Wang is a community child psychiatrist who specializes in Anxiety and OCD. Let's chat about what it takes to be a great family psych doctor!

CERTIFIED MAMA'S BOY with Steve Kramer
EP. 422: Explaining Marijuana

CERTIFIED MAMA'S BOY with Steve Kramer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 46:37


Certified Mama's Boy Merch is NOW AVAILABLE! Shop now Become a Certified Fan! Help support the podcast! Vote for “Certified Mama's Boy” in the Podcast Magazine Hot 50 Listen to my other podcast, “Kramer and Jess Uncensored”! Refer Certified Mama's Boy for prizes!   On Today's Show: How do you get a stupid stain out of stone?! OCD attack! MOM-TENT: Everyday Items Dirtier Than a Toilet Seat A Moment In Kramer History: Explaining Marijuana  Today's Quote: “If you attach to the negative behavior of others it brings you down to their level.” – Guru Singh Our Amazing Partners: DONE DONE is the most affordable & efficient way you can get help managing your ADHD from the comfort of your home.We want to break the stigma and motivate people to have real conversations about mental health and ADHD, most importantly empowering those that are struggling to look for help. Get 50% off your initial visit by visiting https://get.donefirst.com/certifiedmb MANSCAPED MANSCAPED™ Is the leader in men's below-the-waist grooming and they have served more than 4 million men worldwide. Get 20% off + Free Shipping at MANSCAPED.com with code KRAMER20 BETTER HELP I want you to start living a happier life today. As a listener, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting BetterHelp.com/Kramer Join over 1 million people taking charge of their mental health. Again, that's BetterHelp.com/kramer Love You Forever! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes
How Diet Affects Your Mental & Physical Health w/Dr. Uma Naidoo EP 1214

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 66:37


Today's guest is Dr. Uma Naidoo. She's described as the world's first “triple threat” in the food and medicine space as a Harvard trained psychiatrist, Professional Chef, and a trained Nutrition Specialist. Dr. Naidoo founded and directs the first hospital-based Nutritional Psychiatry Service in the United States and is the best-selling author of This Is Your Brain On Food, where she shows the cutting-edge science explaining the ways in which food contributes to our mental health and how a sound diet can help treat and prevent a wide range of psychological and cognitive health issues, from ADHD to anxiety, depression, OCD, and others.In this episode we discuss the best and worst foods for your health, the benefits and negative effects of different types of foods, how to optimize your brain health, how to develop strong nutritional habits and drop the unhealthy habits and so much more!For more go to: www.lewishowes.com/1214Get Dr. Naidoo's book: https://book.umanaidoomd.comThe Wim Hof Experience: Mindset Training, Power Breathing, and Brotherhood: https://link.chtbl.com/910-podA Scientific Guide to Living Longer, Feeling Happier & Eating Healthier with Dr. Rhonda Patrick: https://link.chtbl.com/967-podThe Science of Sleep for Ultimate Success with Shawn Stevenson: https://link.chtbl.com/896-podSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians
Mari Fong: Living with Depression & Hormone Imbalance Recovery with Dr. Gary Donovitz (Founder, BioTE)

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 64:35


Mari Fong is interviewed by musician Kat Jensen on living with depression and hormone balance recovery with Dr. Gary Donovitz, founder of BioTE, a customize bioidentical hormone replacement therapy.  We begin the 3rd season of the CHECK YOUR HEAD Podcast with your host Mari Fong sharing how hormone imbalance and stress were triggers for bouts of depression and anxiety throughout her life.  After finding the right antidepressant and hormone pellet therapy, Fong finally recovers and appreciates life more than ever. Musician Kat Jensen interviews.Next, we have international speaker, author and 20 year researcher on bioidentical hormone therapy, Dr. Gary Donovitz. A board-certified OBGYN, Dr. Donovitz shares the risks and benefits of hormone optimization, how hormones can affect our mental and physical health, and the difference with BioTE, a customized hormone pellet therapy for both men and women. “Be brave, ask for help, and be persistent in finding the mental help that you need.” For free and affordable solutions for mental health and addiction recovery, visit: http://checkyourheadpodcast.com/* Donate to our mission at checkyourheadpodcast.com or on our patreon.com page. Every dollar is appreciated, every listener is appreciated.THANK YOU for following us on social media @checkyourheadpodcastWatch and subscribe to our YouTube Channel:  checkyourheadpodcast.youtubeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/checkyourheadpodcast)

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast
BONUS: Ted Lasso and Mental Health with Corey Hirsch & Dr. Diane McIntosh

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 50:04


Welcome back to the Crown & Anchor, Greyhounds! In this bonus episode, Christian has a conversation about Ted Lasso and mental health with former NHL goalkeeper Corey Hirsch and psychiatrist Dr. Dianne McIntosh. Corey and Dr. McIntosh co-host the Blindsided podcast from The Players Tribune, where they interview professional athletes about mental health.The wide-ranging discussion touches on Ted Lasso's panic attack, Roy Kent's identity crisis when he leaves professional soccer, Corey's mental health journey living with anxiety and OCD, and Dr. McIntosh's experience improving the quality of care for people diagnosed with mental illness. More extensive show notes will soon be available on our website: http://www.tedlassopod.comRichmond Til We Die is an episode-by-episode conversation about the Apple TV+ show Ted Lasso, where we explore the characters, their relationships to each other, and how they're able to make us laugh until we can hardly breathe one moment and then feel with the deepest parts of our hearts the next. When you're here, you're a greyhound!

Dear Family,
Dr. Raghu Appasani- Psychiatrist and Neuroscientist Bridging the Gap Between Western and Eastern Health Practices Including Microdosing and Nutrition

Dear Family,

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 45:32


Dr. Raghu Kiran Appasani is an Integrative Psychiatrist, Neuroscientist, and Social Entrepreneur focused on bridging the gap between western and eastern practices to create a wholesome society by taking a proactive approach to health. He was born and raised in the Boston area, living in rural India with his grandparents for two formative years when he was young. His father, a biochemist at Harvard Medical School, opened up his labs for him to do research before going to Wesleyan to study neuroscience. He graduated from The University of Massachusetts with his Medical Doctorate in 2018, where he received the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.  He is currently the Chief Resident of Integrated Care Services at LA County + USC Medical Center and in private practice taking a holistic integrative approach to care. Dr. Appasani is the Chief Medical Officer at PYM Health, which stands for Prepare Your Mind. Partnering with Robin Williams' son, Zak Williams, PYM is the first neurotransmitter company focused on nutritional psychiatry through mood chews that target the body's neurotransmitter and amino acid levels to decrease anxiety and stress.   Dr. Appasani is CEO of The MINDS Foundation, a mental health nonprofit he founded that has been globally recognized. Through his extensive scientific research, he's published over 35 peer-reviewed articles, edited five books, and is a sought-after speaker and writer on mental health, entrepreneurship, global health, and consciousness. Throughout his medical career, he's focused on the impact of mental health in physicians, developing initiatives at medical institutions to combat suicide and build resilience, working extensively with Graduate Medical Education leadership.    Clinically, Dr. Appasani is trained in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy, Cognitive Processing Therapy for Trauma, Motivational Interviewing, Group Therapy, and Exposure Response Prevention. He's currently a Health Equity Scholar in the MAPS MDMA Psychotherapy Program. His clinical interests lie in mood disorders (depression, bipolar), addiction, anxiety disorders, OCD spectrum, eating disorders, trauma, and personality spectrum conditions.    His passion lies at the intersection of mental health literacy, consciousness, global psychiatry, mindfulness, digital health, personalized medicine, psychedelics, wellness, and social entrepreneurship. Dr. Appasani believes that we all have mental health and therefore believes that healing occurs through the integration of psychotherapy, medication management, supplementation with natural sources, nutrition, and physical fitness. Above all else, he believes building community is very important in his own and everyone's healing journey.   SHOW NOTE LINKS: MINDS Foundation  PYM- Mood Chews Dr. Raghu Appasani on Instagram Dr. Raghu Appasani on Facebook CONNECT WITH US! *Dear Family, Podcast Page *Write Now Rachel Website *Rachel's Blog @Medium *Rachel's Twitter *Facebook *Instagram   PLEASE JOIN: *Dear Family Members, the Private Facebook Group     WAYS TO HELP THE PODCAST: *PLEASE Leave a 5-Star Review and Subscribe! Thank you! Your support means the world to me. Wishing you love, happiness, and good mental health always.      

Your Life In Process
How ACT Can Help You Be A High Achiever Without Losing Yourself With Dr. Patricia Zurita Ona

Your Life In Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 50:19


How can you be a high achiever and reach for big goals while still holding on to your values? What do you do when there are just too many good things to choose from in your life? Diana chats with Dr. Patricia Zurita Ona about strategies from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) to help you skillfully strive toward meaningful pursuits. Diana and Dr. Z share their personal experiences with striving and talk about letting go of the outcome in service of the process. About Dr. Patricia Zurita OnaDr. Zurita Ona, Dr. Z, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who has significant experience working with children, adolescents, and adults with OCD, trauma, anxiety, and emotional regulation problems. Dr. Z is the founder of the East Bay Behavior Therapy Center, a boutique therapy practice, where she runs an intensive outpatient program integrating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) to support clients getting stuck from obsessions, figure out what they care about, and do stuff that matters to them. Dr. Z is a behavioral therapist with a passion for evidence-based practices including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Her clinical work is dedicated to helping all her clients to get “unstuck” and live the life they want to live. She is the author of numerous books including Acceptance and Commitment Skills for Perfectionism and High-Achieving Behaviors: Do Things Your Way, Be Yourself, and Live a Purposeful Life, Living Beyond OCD Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Workbook for Adults, and Escaping the Emotional Roller Coaster: ACT for the Emotionally Sensitive. Episode Segments[00:00] - Introduction [01:52] - About Patricia Zurita Ona [02:53] - Sponsor: Lightfully Behavior Health [03:53] - What Does Dr. Z Care About That Brought Her To This Work? [07:35] - Perfectionism Isn't Binary [13:19] - Diana's Body-based Practice For Healthy Striving [16:53] - Dr. Z's Journey With High Achieving Behaviors [20:19] - The Upside Of Uncertainty [22:46] - How To Relate To Relate To Your Perfectionism Differently [28:12] - Check Out Diana's Foundations of ACT Course [28:42] - Competitive Drive Can Be Painful [26:24] - Seeing Your Mind For What It Is [31:02] - Saying No In The Name Of Your Values [38:24] - Seasonal Striving [44:16] - Your Daily Practice [49:32] - Connect With The Show Key TakeawaysYou can live out your values in many different ways. Values are qualities of action, not outcomes Perfectionism and high achieving behaviors are not good or bad  You can pay attention to your body to tell the difference between when you are caught in stressful striving versus values-based striving Build self-trust by allowing for things to go wrong, living your values and, letting go of outcome We need to be willing to say no, even to good things, to honor your values Humans are mini-ecosystems. We are good at producing and consuming, but it's also important we remember to decompose. Relevant Resources Mentionedhttps://drdianahill.com/extras/ (Download your Daily Process for Episode 5 Here) Read Dr. Z's book https://bookshop.org/books/acceptance-and-commitment-skills-for-perfectionism-and-high-achieving-behaviors-do-things-your-way-be-yourself-and-live-a-purposeful-life/9780367369224 (Acceptance and Commitment Skills for Perfectionism and High-Achieving Behaviors: Do Things Your Way, Be Yourself, and Live a Purposeful Life) Learn more about Dr. Z and work with her at https://eastbaybehaviortherapycenter.com/ ( East Bay Behavior Therapy ) Try ACT in your daily life with the https://drdianahill.com/book/ (ACT Daily Journal) Want to dive deeper into ACT? Take Diana's course: https://courses.drdianahill.com/courses/foundations-of-ACT?_ga=2.10043261.917674935.1641323412-277337094.1634184861 (Foundations of ACT) Listen to Diana's conversation with Radhule Weininger about Longstanding Recurring Painful Patterns (LRPPs). Thank you for...

Thought Spiral
Test Show #239

Thought Spiral

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 103:07


Andy drinks with the newscasters on NYE, talk radio shame, Josh pops a Sorkin cork, Andy's 80's Ladies, how Josh's surgery affected Andy's OCD, beer vendors as a trigger, listener questions, and much more Spiraling.

Damsels in the DMs
What Is Relationship OCD?

Damsels in the DMs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 33:37


Have you been following the social media craze of Relationship OCD? Same. That's why we get into what it is, symptoms of it, and how to distinguish relationship OCD vs red flags in a relationship. There's a fine line between normal anxiety that can turn into self-sabotage when dating a good person and real concerns one can have that should be listened to. Let's take a dive in and figure out the difference in this week's episode, shall we?

On The Hard Days
Ep. 66 Mom Ellenia Lyons on Bringing Awareness to Severe Mental Health Struggles in Children Through Honesty and Advocacy

On The Hard Days

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 53:30


*Trigger Warning* Mention of Child's Suicide AttemptsAbout This Episode: Wow - this mom, Ellenia Lyons, is a powerhouse. She and her family have had to endure a lot of trauma and struggles - including dropping her then 9-year old off at a psychiatric facility.  Instead of shying away, Ellenia is here to discuss how she consistently shows up for her kids through honesty and advocacy. This one is not to be missed. Here are just some of the things we discussed:-Finding the right treatment in the right setting-Raising a child with OCD and intrusive thoughts-Medication-sensitivity in kids-Supporting the whole child-Ending the stigma around mental healthPlease shower Ellenia with love and support by SHARING this episode with your mom friends and groups!MORE:-Want to be a part of my support group community, Mothers Together? Send me a message on IG or FB and I'll tell you how to sign up!-Subscribe to On The Hard Days via Apple, Spotify, or however you get your podcasts.  *Please leave a review*  to spread the word to other moms around the world!

The OCD Stories
Dr Sam Greenblatt: Cancel culture (OCD), & the overutilisation of porn to cope with OCD (#311)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 60:58


In episode 311 I chat with Dr Sam Greenblatt. Sam is a licensed clinical psychologist. We discuss his own OCD setback and the learnings he got from it, we discuss the fear of being cancelled, cancel culture more generally, how the worry of cancel culture started with the ‘me too' movement, how some people's OCD has latched on to this, using exposure and response prevention therapy (ERP) for this worry, we discuss the importance of focusing on the uncertainty not the themes, we then discuss pornography over utilisation to cope with OCD, and much more. Hope it helps.   Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/dr-sam-greenblatt-311 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 216 5 Things I learned in 2021

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 24:57


SUMMARY:  Today, I wanted to dedicate an entire episode to the five things that I learned in 2021. I have found 2021 to be one of the harder years, but probably the most transformational for me, and that is one of the things I'll talk about here very, very soon. The 5 Things I learned this Year: Recovery goes smoother when you slow down and act intentionally Life is not supposed to be easy It is my responsibility to manage my mind Catch your thought errors I am not for everyone Links To Things I Talk About: Changed our name on Instagram Lots of exciting information on cbtschool.com ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 216. Hello, my friends. Happy 2022! Oh my goodness, it is crazy to say that. I'm excited for 2022, to be honest. I've had enough with 2021, I'm not going to lie. And I'm guessing that you are in the same boat. I'm grateful for 2021. Absolutely, I'm not going to lie, but I'm really happy to be here in 2022. Today, I wanted to dedicate an entire episode to the things that I learned in 2021. I have found 2021 to be one of the harder years, but probably the most transformational for me, and that is one of the things I'll talk about here very, very soon. Before we do that, you may notice that the show looks a little different. We have new podcast cover art. If you follow me on Instagram, there's a ton of different visual and aesthetic changes there as well, as well as that we have changed the name to Your Anxiety Toolkit instead of being Kimberley Quinlan. I will explain a little bit about why I've made these changes here in a very little moment. Before we get into the good stuff of the show, the bulk of the show, I want to give you the very best stuff, which is the “I did a hard thing” segment. So here we go. For those of you who are new, every week, people submit their “I did a hard thing” and we talk about it, and we share it and we celebrate the big and the small and the medium wins. This one is from Kboil, and it says: “I went to work for the first time in five weeks after a horrendous meltdown where I wanted to take my own life. I am still struggling daily with my anxiety and panic attacks, but I am doing it. XO.” This is the work, you guys, that may be triggering for some people. But the truth is we have to talk about how impactful our mental illnesses can be and how important mental health is, because if we don't take out care of our mental health, it can get to the place where people are feeling suicidal. Let me also reframe that. Sometimes we get to those really difficult places and dark places. Not because you're not taking care of yourself, but for multiple reasons, daily stresses, genetics, medical struggles, grief, trauma, high levels of anxiety. Kboil is really bringing the most important piece of mental health discussions, which is, when we're really, really struggling, number one, it's important to celebrate your wins, and number two, nothing is off-limits. We must be willing to talk about these really difficult topics. Thank you, Kboil. I am just so honored that you shared this and so excited that you're taking baby steps, and I really wish you well. I know it says you're still struggling, so I'm sending you every single ounce of my compassion and love to you. Ugh, it's so good. My heart just swells for you all when you write in those “I did a hard thing's.” Okay. Let's go over to the five things I learned in 2021. The first one is probably the most important, and it does explain why I've made certain changes in the way that I run my business, the way that I show up on social media and here on the podcast, and why I really want to make some changes in 2022. Be very intentional. First of all, this is proof that people can change their mind. It's okay to change your mind. Actually, that's probably the sixth thing I learned. Number one is, it's okay to change your mind. But really the number one was, it's important to act intentional. I did a whole episode on whacking things together, how it's okay to whack things together. I did that because I found myself becoming very perfectionistic. I am still a massive fan of the whack-it-together model, which is ultimately to practice not being perfect and just getting things done. But what I think I did is I went a little too far in the whack-it-together model and I wasn't being as intentional. I was doing too much and not doing a great job of the things I was doing. I mean, it was still great and I was still helping people and I was still showing up and I'm so proud of what I did in 2021. But what I really learned is sometimes when you get into moving too fast and pushing too fast and too hard that you lose the intentionality. And when you lose the intentionality, you often lose the real lesson and the growth. If you're in recovery for anxiety or an OCD-related disorder or an eating disorder, or a body- focused repetitive behavior, if you're rushing through and pushing through and wrestling with things instead of slowing down and being really intentional in your practices, chances are, you're going to miss a lot of opportunity for real growth and real recovery. So slow down and be very intentional. Some question you may ask is: What is it that I'm trying to achieve here? For me, often I'm like, because I'm trying to reach a certain goal or so forth, it's like, well, is this rushing? Is this behavior actually moving the needle forward? If it comes to recovery, particularly if you're having anxiety, I'm going to encourage you to ask: What am I trying to achieve here? Am I trying to get away from anxiety? Or am I trying to be with my anxiety? Because if you're intentional and you're trying to be with your anxiety, your recovery will benefit. Now, how does this apply to me and you guys and us together is, I really don't want to be as much on social media anymore. One of the things I really learned this year is that it's not good for my mental health when I push it like I was, and I found that I was showing up on social media. Even here on the podcast, I'm not afraid to admit, I would sometimes sit down and just throw myself into it instead of actually stopping and doing what I originally did, which is I used to, and I used to do this all the time, but I think I fell out of the practice, which was to stop, and before I did anything, get really clear on like, who am I speaking to? What do they need to hear? How can I show up and serve them in a way that also serves me? Am I just showing up here to say that I showed up and recorded an episode so I can say that I did a weekly episode? That's not how I want to be anymore. I really want to move towards being intentional and engaging in behaviors that actually push the needle forward and that are healthy for me. I've moved Instagram from Kimberley Quinlan to Your Anxiety Toolkit because for some reason, every time I got onto Instagram, I felt like it was about me, even though I know it's not. And I don't want it to be about me. I want it to be about mental health and anxiety and tools to help you. So, that's how it's going to shift. We've got a ton of amazing guests happening, which I've already pre-recorded. And then after that, I think I may even take a little break from having guests and just practice sitting down with you and really talking about the important stuff I want you to know. Like this stuff that sits on my heart, that I really want you guys to know. So, that's number one, is become a little more intentional if you can. Don't become perfectionistic, but move towards being intentional. Life is not supposed to be easy. This is a huge one that I learned early in 2021. I was learning from a public speaker, and she constantly says, “Life is 50/50.” And that used to bug me so bad. It used to really make me angry because I'd be like, “No, life is not 50/50. It's like 80/20. It's like 80% good and 20% bad.” Until I was like, “Wait, if I'm really honest with myself, it is 50/50.” I think a lot of the suffering that I was experiencing, and I'm guessing a lot of the suffering that you were experiencing is trying to get it to be 80/20 or 90/10, because life is not supposed to be easy. Life happens. Life is hard. Bad things happen to good people, and that was a big lesson to me. A friend of mine was going through a really hard time. I kept thinking, this is crazy. Why is this bad stuff happening to good people? Until I was like, that's an era in my thinking. When did I learn that bad things shouldn't happen to good people? Because bad things do happen to good people, and it's not their fault. Sometimes when we can give ourselves permission to drop the expectation of the 80/20 or the 100% or the 90/10 and just let everything be 50/50, it's so much easier. Even as I parent my children, I think I was parenting them with this expectation that I'm supposed to be really, really good at it. But when I accepted that things will be 50/50, they're not going to like when I ask them to pick up their room. They're not going to like when I serve them vegetables that they don't like to eat, and I can't be disappointed when they're disappointed about the vegetables I've served them because life is 50/50. One of the best lessons I can give them is for them not to expect too much either. I'm not saying drop your standards and accept terribleness at all. What I'm saying is, do the best you can. Go for your dreams. Love your life. But still come back to the fact that you still have to brush your teeth and we break things and we spill things and we have to pay taxes and we are exhausted at the end of the day after having a great day at work. You might have some negative parts of it too. There's pros and cons to everything. So, that was really powerful for me, is life is not supposed to be easy. I've talked about this before. I think it was in the summer of 2019, where I would catch myself throwing mental tantrums in my head like, “It's not fair. It shouldn't be this hard.” And I'm like, “That is exactly the problem. Those mental tantrums that I have in my brain.” The other one, let me add, is I actually had a whole therapy session about this, which was about this entitlement that I caught in myself of like, “This isn't fair. Things should be easier. Things should be going easier or they shouldn't be so hard.” And this real entitlement that came with that, and even though we use the word “entitlement,” I'm not using that as a criticism towards myself. It's just naming it what it was. I felt this entitlement inside me of like, “No, things should be good. I should succeed at everything I try.” And that's totally not true. It is my responsibility to manage my mind. This one really hit me in September. I actually think I read something online that really hit me with this. I'm writing this down as I talk to you just so I make sure I get it in for you in the show notes. Often, I talk to my patients and clients that you can't control your thoughts and you can't control your feelings, but you can control your reaction to those thoughts and feelings. And when you do that, you may find that your thoughts and feelings start to change. It's a very basic concept of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a helpful modality of therapy for many, many, many different mental illnesses. But when I talk about managing my mind is being, again, very intentional about the way I respond to problems and stresses in my mind. I'm not saying that you can control your intrusive thoughts, but I'm going to say it is my job to manage when anxiety shows up. It is my job to manage when thoughts and strong emotions hit me and make me want to lash out or project. A lot of my patients have reported this. They'll come to session and they'll say, “You will not believe my husband. He just won't do A, B, and C, and he knows it makes me crazy. He knows it makes me anxious. So why is he doing it? If he loved me, he wouldn't do this.” And I have to keep gently reminding them, “It's your responsibility to manage your emotions. It's not their job.” We talked about this in one of the last episodes of the year in 2021, which is setting boundaries, you are responsible. You're in your lane to manage your mind and your emotions. It's not anybody else's. I think what was really hard about this is when I heard this, I used to take offense and I'd be like, “Oh my God, that's just so mean. What about the people who are really, really, really suffering?” or “Wow, that's so abrupt and dismissive.” Until I really sat with it. I actually journaled a lot on this of like, what shows up for me when someone talks about the word “responsibility”? I wrote about this a lot in the self-compassion workbook for OCD – compassionate responsibility. And I think the word “responsibility” really triggers us into thinking that if we're taking responsibility for ourselves, we don't deserve other people's support. And that's not true. But when I really sat on “It's my job to manage my mind,” everything changed. I think that's why I came to the place where I was like, “Okay, I'm going to be way more intentional because it is my job. It's my job to really slowly and in baby steps, work at changing how I react and having really hard conversations with myself on like, ‘Wow, you fully reacted in a little bit of a crazy way there.'” What was going on for you? What do you need to change? How do you need to show up for yourself different? How can you be intentional around this? Because it's your job. I'm saying that to myself, “Kimberley, it's your job. It's your responsibility.” It's the most compassionate act you can do, is to practice managing your mind. Catch your thought errors. Again, these all tie beautifully in together because once I took responsibility for really managing my mind and really owning what was showing up for me, it was then my job to catch the thought errors. Again, I want to be really clear here. I'm not saying that you can control your intrusive thoughts. Absolutely not. But what I'm speaking about more, and I'm actually going to do a whole episode on this in just a couple of weeks, is catching thoughts like, “I'm going to screw this up. That was the worst. I am a failure. I am freaking out.” These are all often not accurate statements, So I'm talking about the way in which we frame and perceive things, not your intrusive thoughts. I want to be really, really certain. We're not in the business of correcting intrusive thoughts of anxiety. When it comes to depressive thoughts or very negative thoughts or catastrophic thoughts, or very black and white thoughts, we can be very intentional and be like, “Wait a second, I catch myself on this all the time. I'll be like, my husband often comes home in the end of the day and says, ‘How was your day?' And I'll often make these sweeping statements like, ‘Oh, it was a really hard day.' Even if that's true, how does it benefit me? Was it 100% true? Because what's probably 100% true is, oh, there are a couple of really, really difficult times that took me some time to come down from. But there were also some really beautiful moments.” That's the truth. It takes more effort to say that and you have to be more intentional to say that. But if we say, “It was a really hard day,” our brain is going to pick up on that and it's going to start to feel overwhelmed and heavy. I am not for everybody (and that's okay). I'm going to leave you with this one because this one was the best. That is the lesson I took away – I'm not for everybody. I guess what we could say in parentheses is, “and that's okay.” I actually was on a podcast this week with Bryan Piatt, an amazing OCD advocate. He had asked me this question and I was reflecting on it the other day, which is, I think that in my many years of being on the planet earth and being in my human body, I thought that if I was just kind, there's really no reason anyone could not like me. If I was just kind to everybody and I did my best and I kept out of drama, everybody should like me. There can't be much to hate. I think I banked on this as a way of avoiding conflict and as a way of getting people to approve of me. I learned last year that even when I'm kind, even when I show up in the best version of myself and I do nothing, but show up with loving kindness in my heart, I'm still not going to be for everybody. Do you want to know how crazy that made me when I realized that? In 2021, a lot of you may know, but I was very seriously online bullied and shamed and trolled. There is this one particular person who really trolls a lot of mental health accounts, and I seem to be one that they loved to really bully and shame. I kept crying and going home to my husband and saying, “But why am I so kind?” I had to realize it's that same kind of concept of like, good things should happen to good people and bad things should happen to bad people, until I was like, “Oh, that's not true.” Life is 50/50, and you're never going to be for everybody. So, I'm going to offer to you the same thing. I'm not for everyone. You're not for everyone. Try to get a good 10 people in your life on your side and the other billion gazillion people, you don't need to please them. Just be a little intentional there. And I'm too, I'm doubling down now in really just being intentional on who matters and whose opinion does matter and everyone else can take me or leave me. I hope that those five things were helpful to you. Maybe they sparked some curiosity for you and you may or may not agree with some of those. The good thing to remember here is, these are the things I learned, but they might not be exactly what you needed to hear today. And that's totally okay. Sometimes we need to hear things at a certain time. At other times, they're not for you at that particular time in your life. And that is okay. So, there are the things I learned this year, in 2021. I'm so excited about this year because I have those amazing lessons that I learned. I'm going to be much more intentional about the podcast and I'm going to try to use the podcast to be a little more personal, where people in my podcast are more my insider group compared to social media because again, I want to be really intentional and healthy around social media. Before we finish, I want to do the review of the week. Please, please, please, please. If you can do me one gift, it would be to leave a review for the podcast. This one is from Kanji96 and they said: “Thank you, Kimberley. This podcast is very helpful for me, especially when I'm going through hard times. Right now happens to be one of those hard times. Here I am back listening to Kimberley. Thank you.” I'm so grateful, Kanji, for that you support me. Thank you so, so much. I'm going to leave you all with a quote that Kanji almost used and that I always use, which is, it is a beautiful day to do hard things. Let's do 2022 together. I'm so incredibly thrilled to be walking on this path with you. I know that your time is valuable. I appreciate you coming and spending your time with me, and I'll see you next week.

Revival Lifestyle with Isaiah Saldivar
The ANOINTING of the HOLY SPIRIT W/ TJ Malcangi

Revival Lifestyle with Isaiah Saldivar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 95:55


TJ Malcangi and Isaiah Saldivar are going to discuss what the anointing of the Holy Spirit is and what it is not. 1 John 2:27 But the anointing that you received from him abides in you, and you have no need that anyone should teach you. But as his anointing teaches you about everything, and is true, and is no lie—just as it has taught you, abide in him. "You don't have to try to work in righteousness unto Christ, when you are filled with the Holy Ghost, it will be your driving force!" - TJ Malcangi In 2012, Evangelist T.J. Malcangi's life was supernaturally transformed through an encounter with the raw power of the Gospel. The Lord delivered him from a life of sin & healed him of an incurable mental disorder called Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), a generalized anxiety disorder that affects countless lives today. In Matthew 10:8, Jesus declares, "Freely you have received, now freely give." The Gospel is not a gift to be hoarded or kept secret. What God will do for one, He is ready and present to do for all (Acts 10:34 // Romans 2:11). T.J. and his wife Kerry have been traveling, preaching the Gospel full time since 2016 in various countries worldwide. We have seen thousands commit their lives to Christ, but we know this is the beginning. "Once more in a little while, I will shake the heavens, the earth and the sea…and I will shake all nations, and they shall come to the Desire of All Nations, and I will fill this temple with glory' says the Lord of Hosts." (Haggai 2:6-7) We are at the beginning of a worldwide awakening. Our MISSION is to use every platform and media accessible to get the Gospel into people's hearts across this globe. "Knowing that it is HIGH TIME to awake out of sleep; for our salvation is nearer than when we first believed." (Romans 13:11) We were born for such a time as this to plunder hell of the souls of this generation & populate heaven! People are hurting more than ever… the Gospel is needed more than ever. The problem of sin, sorrow, sickness & death remains the detrimental issue mankind continues to face. Jesus came to dominate every single one of those categories: "The Son of God was made manifest to destroy the work of the devil." (1 John 3:7) Only the truth people know can set them free! (John 8:32) Beginning in 2017, by the grace of God, Salvation Now began organizing open air city crusades in Canada and plans to do so wherever the Lord lead us to. The problem has always been sin… The solution has always been the Gospel! The generation on earth today has not had a first hand encounter with the Jesus of the Bible. The hour is late, and the last few grains of sand are trickling through the hourglass of time… Today is the day of God's favor. Now is the TIME for SALVATION!  TJ Malcangi Website: https://www.salvationnow.ca/  Guest on podcast: TJ Malcangi Connect With Isaiah Saldivar, the Host of Revival Lifestyle Podcast www.Isaiahsaldivar.com www.Instagram.com/Isaiahsaldivar www.Facebook.com/Isaiahsaldivar www.youtube.com/Isaiahsaldivar  To sow  www.Isaiahsaldivar.com/partner  

Flusterclux: Fix Anxiety With Lynn Lyons LICSW
When Anxious Kids Deny They're Anxious

Flusterclux: Fix Anxiety With Lynn Lyons LICSW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 40:25


When anxious kids can't see that they are anxious or refuse therapy, anxiety expert Lynn Lyons talks about options parents have in helping their kids. We also discuss a listener question where a daughter denies she's anxious or has OCD tendencies. Flusterclux  Retreat on Parenting TeensSave the date for the weekend of April 9th! Join the Facebook group for first access to information and registration coming this month! The retreat will be held at the Woodstock Inn in Vermont. Registration will go live soon! NEW Course for Parents!Managing Anxiety in Children: A Guide for ParentsThis self-paced course covers the core tools a family needs to manage their anxiety, the same principles Lynn teaches to families in her private practice.This course includes 6 video modules from Lynn Lyons, LICSW, and 9 additional Q&A videos from Lynn and Robin of Flusterclux.What you'll get:Understand how anxiety works so that you can help manage your kids and your own.Learn what to say when anxiety shows up for you or your kids.For Kids: A special video that explains how anxiety works suitable for those ages 6 and up.Follow UsJoin the Facebook group to get news on the upcoming courses for parents, teens, and kids.Follow Flusterclux on Facebook and Instagram.Follow Lynn Lyons on Twitter and Youtube.New episodes arrive Friday at 12:00AM EST.

Awaken into Love Podcast
TOP Awakening Reminders for 2022!

Awaken into Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 33:26


May you have an Awakened 2022, loves! In this podcast episode, Kiyomi talks about collective grief and sadness, new years expectations, the trauma response, leads an inner smile meditation to help the nervous system, goes through different aspirations and reminders Kiyomi will be speaking about for the year of 2022. She also ends with some journaling questions to kick of this new year in awakening! 

FearCast
Harm OCD

FearCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 76:23


Harm OCD is an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder subtype focused on violent or harming themes. This is a common obsession for people suffering with OCD and can cause a tremendous amount of anxiety for those experiencing the thoughts and compulsions. On this episode, I discuss what Harm OCD is, why it… Continue reading The post Harm OCD appeared first on FearCast Podcast.

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS Productivity

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:01


Bosses, your time is money. Don't waste a second of it! Anne + Laya dive deep into all the things that keep their businesses on track every day. From adding personal time to the calendar to automating follow up emails, you'll want to try it all. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, along with the amazing, happy new year, very special guest cohost Laya Hoffman. Laya, yay! Laya: Hey Anne, happy new year. Anne: Happy new year to you. How are you, Laya? Laya: Did you rock it? I'm great. I'm like ready to seize this year. Anne: Did I rock it? Like every new year's -- Laya: Did you rock it? Anne: I'm getting older now, so it's harder and harder. Laya: It's slower rocking. Anne: It's slower rocking for me, but you know what? I celebrate it just as much, however, I may not be awake exactly. Laya: Yeah. I mean, well, it's funny. I used to run nightclubs for a living, and so New Year's Eve was the biggest thing that we did all year long. And I can't even tell you the planning and the hours awake that I stayed. Anne: Oh, I can imagine. Laya: It's probably not something I would admit publicly. And here I am, but now I'm like to me, a rocking new year is in bed by 10. Anne: And you were probably the thing about that is you were probably working at the stroke of midnight. Laya: Oh working, oh, for sure. I was, I was on stage commanding the audience, doing the thing popped in the balloons. Oh yeah. The whole nine yards. Anne: The whole nine yards. Laya: These days, my rocket new year is much more low key. Yeah. Anne: And it got very confusing when my husband and I moved from the east coast to the west coast. Cause now we're like, well, okay, can we celebrate it at 9:00? Laya: Yes, you can. Yes, you can. Because the ball drops at 9:00. Absolutely. Anne: The ball drops at 9:00 out here. Laya: Yes, it does. Anne: And I still get confused. I don't know. We've been out here forever and I still get confused, but anyway. Laya: You can do it. You can do it. Anne: We go on. Laya: I say so. Anne: We go on. Laya: We go on to a better, brighter year, hopefully. Anne: That's right. Laya: Because gosh, I mean, we've had some success. We talked about this in the last episode. Anne: Yeah. Laya: There was a lot to look back on last year as being positive, and with this new growth mindset, we're walking into the new year, but we've got some good -- Anne: We've got work to do. Laya: -- ideas to share. Yes, we do. Anne: That's right. Laya: And we have to make this year the best yet. Anne: Yeah. So with all this work that we've already kind of like, here's what we want to do for our new year -- and of course, you know, over the actual time that you've had to think if you've had some time off, you might've come up with some more things that maybe you want to do for this new year, get yourself pumped up. So I think it's a great time to talk about, oh, how can I get this all organized? How can I be more productive with my time? Because I had a lot to do last year. And if I want to continue those, if I want to continue my brand and my parallel income streams, I still have a lot to do this year. So I want to know how can I do that more productively? Laya: That is a great question. I'm asking myself that all the time, but as a Virgo, A-typical personality, super organized and a little OCD, I think that for me, it starts with a bit of a daily checklist. And I mean, I don't always stick to it, but at least it's in my framework of which buckets of the business can I dip into and touch a little bit every day? So that's where my productivity window starts. How about you? Anne: Well, okay. So yeah, old school, old school, I have a to-do list. Laya: Your pen and paper. Anne: Yes, my pen and paper. And because I have to continue to make sure that I can actually write with a pen. It's interesting because when I write checks now like hand write checks, it's -- Laya: Oh yeah, your signature is all crazy. Anne: Yeah! Laya: Calligraphy is off. Anne: My calligraphy is off. Laya: Yeah. Anne: I feel like the pen doesn't fit right in my hand anymore. Laya: Yeah, isn't that crazy? Anne: And that's with my to-do list. I'm constantly scratching on my to-do list. And literally I have saved my to-do list for the past five years. And they're just these little, I have these wonderful, thin notebooks that I love to write in, lined. And I basically every single day, actually the night before, this is what helps me, I write down what I want to accomplish the next day or what I need to do for the next day. Laya: Love that. Anne: It doesn't always get crossed off because sometimes those tasks are, you know, multiple day tasks. But for me, what I love is, and I, and I remember you telling me, you like to cross those things off. I mean, that is like a -- Laya: I do. Anne: -- it's like a feel-good, I'm done, cross it off. I like that. I check beside it because I like to be able to see what I've done throughout the year. I still use that as kind of a checkpoint, but I also like to flip the page, right? To a new day, a clean -- Laya: A new day. Anne: -- slate. Laya: A clean slate. Absolutely. Anne: A clean slate, absolutely. And I make sure that that is the first thing that I do. Plus as I'm telling you, I'm getting a little older, my brain doesn't always remember everything that I have to do. Laya: Sure. Anne: So writing it down really helps cement this is what I have to do. It helps remind me of what I have to do. And the check mark is like so satisfying. Laya: Yes, it is. Well, speaking of that check mark, I actually have something maybe we are able to share with the BOSSes, like the actual document, but I created a VO business daily checklist for myself that is in those buckets. It has a few things. The buckets are, what do I do in my voice work? it's warm up stretch, vocalize, then all the way down the list into check emails, record and edit and deliver jobs, file all the work, you know, digital folders, et cetera, and make sure that -- Anne: Write the invoices. Laya: -- it's not all cluttered on the -- yes, the invoices, all of that. Then there's a bucket for business development. Then there's one for social, like stay active, but -- Anne: Love it. Laya: -- don't waste time here. That's a huge asterisk next to everything. Learn something new is another bucket and health and wellness is a bucket -- Anne: Nice. Laya: -- as we've talked about a lot before, so maybe I'll polish this thing up, and we can share it with our BOSSes. Anne: Yes, that sounds amazing. Laya: It's helpful. It's equal parts -- I print them out. I have it digitally, but then I can check them off and start a new page when everything's accomplished. Helps my mind stay focused and stay productive. Anne: Well, you know, what's really nice too, is if any of you guys are Mac users, the Notes, just the simple Notes application works great. You can create a checklist. Laya: Yes, it does. Anne: Yup. And what I love about it is you can check those things off and then you can see it nicely and neatly checked off. So if you aren't enthralled with your handwriting. Laya: No handwriting required. Anne: No handwriting required for the Notes version. And yeah, I think that that for me is the number one thing that helps me stay organized and be productive. And I'm going to talk a little bit about, 'cause you mentioned it, social media. I literally cannot have a social media window open when I am trying to be productive. I just -- Laya: Nope, nope, no notifications either for me. Anne: -- can't. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And even though I say to myself, I am advertising on social media, right? 'Cause I have events through my VO Peeps and my VO BOSS episodes I'm posting out there, and I want to make sure that I'm responding and engaging with the community. I cannot have the windows open for LinkedIn, for Facebook, for Instagram, for anything, if I'm trying to get something done. So I make sure that I have specific times during the day that I will open them up and check and then respond. Laya: Yes. I actually agree with that. And here's a tip for BOSSes. I use my social media, meaning Instagram and Facebook, the real, you know, schleppy social media channels, but are equally as important. I only check those in the morning over coffee, 8:00, 9:00. And then again in the evening, 5:00, 6:00. The reason I do is because those are peak times for engagement. And so if you are going to post, and people are going to engage, the chance of them seeing it is higher in those time points -- Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: -- as opposed to you posting it 2:00 in the afternoon or 9:00 at night. So those are great windows of opportunity for exposure and to compartmentalize. And then I check LinkedIn at lunchtime because that's when my business colleagues and people are most active on LinkedIn is straight in the middle of their day. It's going to trickle out on its own time, as we know about all these platforms. But for me, that's where I compartmentalize that time to make sure that I don't stay off. I'm not great at it, but that's where I like to stay. Anne: And I think it's been, I think that those specific times are really good. And you know, it's been an adjustment, I will say, because I know that people were more used to me being like immediately engaging on social media. And I know the past couple of years, I just cannot be immediately there to respond or comment when things come in, and it's okay. I've had to kind of be okay with that myself to not be as available out there. And I've always like stressed and worried. Well, if I don't respond, will I lose my audience? Laya: Oh gosh. Anne: But I think that that has been one of those things that I have had to really try to test out and see, okay, how many times do I need to revisit and engage with my audience before they figure, oh, this is just, nobody's really here. And I do know that I have certain social media avenues where people think I'm not there, and that I'm a robot. And that has been something that I've been really consciously trying to test out and rectify and figure out what is the -- is there a magical formula for when and how often I should revisit that? So that has been the last couple of years, it has been a definite like test on my part, and I've realized that I don't have to be there. And in reality, I think the way social media has gotten in the past where it's been a little more toxic, a little more frustrating, there are more people who are taking time off from social media. And it's a little more accepted that -- Laya: Oh, it's beyond accepted. Anne: -- I'm not there. Laya: And let me give you a perspective flip on the mindset of that. If I see somebody that's constantly on social media, like throughout the day, the first thing I think of is they're not busy in their work. Anne: Oh my goodness, yes. Laya: They're not successful because they're -- Anne: Absolutely. Laya: -- wasting their time here if -- they wouldn't be here if they had jobs in the booth. So when I see people that are super active all day long, I think what are you doing in your business? You're just chatting or responding to people. Anne: I love that you say that. Laya: So the mindset flip there is like, hey, the perception, maybe to others, if I am responding so much, is that I don't have enough work in my business. Anne: Well, yeah. Laya: And nobody wants to feel that way. Anne: Nobody wants that. Laya: But that candidly is sometimes what I see when I -- and not in our industry necessarily, when I see other people that I think are successful creatives. I'm like, what are you, how do you have time to be on this at 2:00 in the afternoon? You know? And so that's just a different way to shift your perspective. Maybe that'll help. I don't know. Anne: No, I actually, I love that you said that because there will be times I will see certain people, if they're continually commenting, continually posting, and I'll be like, what? Like, and this sounds horrible, but like, stop, like, just be quiet. Like just want to say, why are you here so much? Laya: Yes. Anne: Like if you're that busy, why are you still talking? Laya: Or if you're that successful, how are you that -- there's no way you're that successful if you were spending half your day or you're checking in every hour or whatever it is. And it's a willpower thing. Right? And so I'm like, maybe you're a little weak in your willpower, or maybe you're a little weak in your self-esteem that you've got to be on this all the time -- Anne: Interesting. Laya: -- looking for re-encouragement or looking for engagement when you should just be in your business. So that's kind of where I stuck in my head when I felt the same way about you. I started to notice how I felt when I saw that type of activity. Anne: Yeah, I think it's always -- Laya: Maybe that's a hack. Anne: I think it's always good to look inward. So how you -- it's similar to, let's say emails, right? So if I got an email from somebody, and it was unsolicited and they're trying to sell me something, and I look at it and inside I go really? Like, and that is my initial reaction. I think that all BOSSes should look to that. In terms of before you post something, before you email something, before you do anything, how would you react if it was done to you? That kind of thing, you know? Right. I mean, it's just, it's like life lessons 101. Laya: Sure, sure. Anne: If that happened to you, how would you feel? And so there are so many people that are silently doing that to every move possibly that you make on social media or in an email. They're silently making assessments. That's how I'll put it, they're making assessments. Laya: Sure. Anne: And so -- Laya: That's what I was doing. I, so I totally agree with that. Yeah. Anne: I think it's a good check to find out should I post, should I say that? Should I do that? So in terms of helping me be more productive, it actually has helped me to be more productive to limit myself -- Laya: Good for you. Anne: -- limit my input on social media. So that is definitely a number two productivity hack so that I can get my job done and not be distracted. Laya: Time management. Anne: Yes. Laya: You know, it's about everything. And it also kind of comes down to how you format your day. I don't know about you, but a typical day for me will be I get up and I'll do my wellness exercises, my meditation, we've talked about that. Get some fresh air, take care of my kid, get right down to work. I'll usually address -- and I, and I do this in stages and kind of in blocks. And I've learned this through some of my other voiceover mentors, because it's very easy to get wrapped up and scattered in your brain as to, oh, I should. I got to just get these invoices. And I just take a little bit of time every day, but I keep it organized, right? I'll handle all my top priority clients and agent auditions first or jobs, but usually a job isn't -- for me because I work shortform, is not usually left to the next morning unless it has to be. But the warmups for me tend to sit there, and then I'll continue to block the day where if there's jobs, in between those jobs or those sessions, I know I've got invoicing later this afternoon, I'm going to do all my invoicing in one block. And so those block mentality, as you compartmentalize your day, can help you stay productive. And there's a lot of thought about that, like work for 50 minutes and then take that 10-minute break, get up, walk around, get a snack, get a drink, what have you. And so if you can block your day -- Anne: That's important. Laya: -- that also helps with productivity. Anne: Well, as a matter of fact, my sessions are 50 minutes long. So I have 10 minutes to just relax and/or prep for my next session. And I wanted to kind of go back in terms of communication with clients, right? In terms of any type of communication with clients that you might do over and over again, there's a really cool feature that I love in, well, I have two ways that I do it. One is in Gmail. Gmail has templates now. So if you have a certain message that you send over and over to, let's say, a new contact, "hi, thanks so much for contacting. It's a pleasure to meet you. I'd be thrilled to be the voice for your next project." And so those types of templates can be automatically filled through the Gmail templates. I also had another thing that I purchased before the Gmail template came out and that was called Type 4 Me. And that's on a Mac. Laya: Oh, okay. Anne: T-Y-P-E, 4, the number four, Me. And that allows me to have all of these little like clips of the same type of emails, even my response, like my "warm regards, comma, you know, new line, new line, Anne Ganguzza." Laya: Right. Anne: That is, that is a clip. And I can just in a keystroke and with one, I'll do it. Like, thank you. I think I do, uh, TYWR, then it pops in those words for me into the email. And that helps me so immensely. Laya: Thanks for that hack, Anne, because I am a Mac user, and I'm slightly jealous. I know there's a way to convert into using your email to, or Apple Mail to Gmail, but I missed from my old days, those canned email responses. And so what I do is -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- I have a document for that, but thank you for helping me to the Type 4 Me, for Mac. I knew there was something. Anne: There is. Laya: Because I do use canned email templates for a lot of things. I do -- I have one for generic inquiries, for generic corporate work or just what my kind of standard rates are. And that helps you streamline the process. Of course, I tweak and personalize where I need to and when I need to, but just like you see some templates features in some of the pay-to-plays, it's very helpful to -- Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: -- just continue to go back to that. I like to keep mine in Google docs, that way I can pull it from anywhere or in my notes, and it can be on my phone in case I'm on the go. And that makes sure that you don't miss anything when communicating quickly to a new client or sending -- Anne: Oh, it's so helpful. Laya: -- inquiry, right? So it's so key. Thanks for that, Type 4 Me. Anne: Type 4 Me. And I think also on the Mac, there is an auto-complete. If you type a few characters, there is an auto-complete, and you can set that up, and that's just comes with the operating system. However, I'm so used to -- and you might want to look into that. Laya: Sure. Anne: Just look into Mac iOS auto-complete, and see how you can enact that or enable that. But I love the type, the Type 4 Me is, it just pops up. It's a little application and I can just say, assign these few characters to this snippet. You know, so it's actually a snippet. Laya: Sure. Anne: And I love, love, love it, because it totally helps me. And I'll tell you another thing that helps me, which I found out a couple of years ago, because I do schedule meetings, and I'm in meetings quite a bit, not just with clients, but also with students. And so my other is a scheduling system, which is done through my Wix website that schedules on my calendar, integrates with my Google calendar, which by the way, I would not be able to live without my Google calendar. Laya: Same. Anne: Everything is scheduled into my Google calendar, and there's a lot of programs out there. Laya: My whole life. Anne: Yes, my life is Google calendar, and everything, there are lots of programs out there that integrate with a Google calendar. Laya: Yeah. Anne: So that is like another one of my hacks. Like literally here, if you want to talk to me or you want to get in touch with me, bang, go sign up for a free consult or just get on my calendar here. And those types of automations really help me to schedule when I can talk to people. Like I literally am scheduled out probably -- my days are pretty darn busy, but this is an ongoing thing with me. You literally need to get me at least a week or two in advance before I can fit you in. 'Cause I've got it so blocked out. Laya: Yeah. Anne: The biggest problem that I have is that if I don't block out time for me, then I have no time for me. That is an issue. Laya: Exactly. So you gotta be number one on your calendar. Anne: Yep. Laya: I agree with you in that I use Calendly, which I've found to be incredibly helpful, especially if you get into the customization. Because for me, I've got, of course I just spoke, I've got an Apple calendar and that does integrate with the Gmail calendars and things of that. I share a calendar with the household. My kid's got a calendar, you know, all of those things. If you're laser connected to Calendly and you can have your own VO calendar, from there, I compartmentalize whether you need a 15 minute precession chat or a SourceConnect test, or maybe you just need to talk about a project that's coming up. Maybe that's a 30 minute block. I've got my session blocks as well for an hour or 50 minutes. And that's helpful to send to my agents for instance -- Anne: Yes. Laya: -- where they're like, hey, we just need to know your schedule. Like what's your general availability for the next two weeks? I'm like, here's my link to Calendly and -- Anne: Oh my God. That's a perfect idea. I love that. Laya: Send that over. Now the thing is though for me, I've chose not to add it to my website. The con for me -- pro would be that it's super easy. The con is that then I would have no control over who's booking. And so I have it embedded in a private link on my website. That private link also has my revisions policy -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- my professional services guarantee, and my resume in case somebody needs any of that old school, the old school resume information. Anne: Yup, yup. Laya: So I'll send that link to clients that are asking, or I'll just send the Calendly link for this specific time slot they're asking for which can be its own independent link. Like, hey, we just need a SourceConnect test. Well, here's all the 15 minute blocks that you could get in my schedule over the next infinity. So that to me has been a huge bonus hack as far as keeping things easy. And then you're not going back and forth with the well, yeah, 2:00 on Thursday -- Anne: Oh gosh, that takes up -- Laya: -- from this time to this time. Anne: -- so much time. Laya: You're actually -- and it makes you look way less professional and like you've got a system for your schedule, and that you're in demand. And so -- Anne: Well, yeah. Laya: -- I think that has, it serves many purposes. Anne: And I actually have it linked to my signature on my email. Laya: Nice. Anne: Here, set up a consult or whatever, schedule a chat with me. And so it just links to my scheduler, which is so, so helpful for me because you're right, the back and forth, "okay. So when are you available?" And I'm like, honestly, the best way to get in touch with me is here. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And I'll give them a link to my calendar to get on my calendar, and that just helps. And what's nice is it's automated. It has like, thank you. Here's how we're going to connect. You know -- Laya: Yes, same. Anne: -- it might be ipDTL, or it might be via phone call. It might be via Zoom. I've got all the different ways that you can connect with me. And it just makes my life so much easier. I'm going to say that when I implemented my schedule or my calendar, it literally saved me -- and it automated like sent out the emails. Laya: Yeah. Anne: Thank you for connecting. Here's your automated reminder. Laya: Yes, the follow-up on those are awesome. Anne: Oh, gosh, you can do follow-up. And the fact that it automated all of those emails saved me 50%, at least, of the time that I used to try to schedule people in at times and going back and forth with email. It just became really, really frustrating. Laya: Yeah. And the effort to become more accommodating to your clients, to your students, to whoever, even your friends, you end up wasting more of your time. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And so that's kind of a boundary set. That's really nice. And I love that you spoke to the automation on the backend. Anne: Yeah. Laya: Like I mentioned with Calendly, I can send an immediate reminder 15 minutes prior to session. Anne: Yup, yup. Laya: I can send a follow-up message two weeks after or a week after, or what have you, that says, hey, just checking in, making sure everything is clean with the audio, if you had any other needs. And so it takes that extra wheelhouse off of my mind. Of course, I still have my own method for following up with the client personally, but this just adds like this extra layer. And sometimes I'll get the response back, and they'll be like, oh, thank you so much for checking back in. And to be honest, I may have even forgotten and you know, to follow up or got so busy and something else. Anne: Yeah. Laya: So it saves just peace of mind and professionalism. It takes it to the next level. Anne: And I think also there are those programs or CRMs that can help you to -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- once you connect with your contact, after you've done the job, it can send out an automated email that said "thanks so much again, it was a pleasure working with you and keep me in mind for any additional projects. If you have any questions in the meantime, feel free to contact me here" and boom, and then are actual like on a Wix platform, I have a few drip campaigns that are set up that will automatically contact my clients. So if anybody's on a Wix platform, it is part of the Ascend platform that you -- it's an add-on for email marketing. And basically, so after you connect with a client, you can have a "if then" statement that says, if they open this email, then three days later, send this email or send a followup. And there's lots of different scenarios. So it's really great. So I'll give an example for a VO BOSS interview. If somebody inquires about I want to be on the veal BOSS show, it goes through a whole campaign. Here, sign up here, fill out this form here. The form then sends me all the information, and then it gives them a link to the calendar, which then allows them to schedule, which then there's an automated email that says, thank you so much. Here's how you're going to connect with Anne. It'll send a reminder right before the connection. And then a couple of days after the actual scheduled session, there'll be a thank you that goes out. So it's really awesome the way that it can automate. Laya: I love that. Anne: And there's more than just -- that's the Wix platform. I also have an Active Campaign that I send emails out from to my lists. I also have client lists that can also do automations like that. Laya: Yeah. I've seen some of that same functionality in using HubSpot, which is a free CRM solution. You can connect Zapient to MailChimp. Anne: Yes. Laya: You can connect it to -- Anne: Is it Zapient? Laya: Zap -- Zapient? Anne: Or is it Zapier? Is it Zapier or Zay-pier? I can't remember. Are they two different things? Laya: I think they may be one in the same. Anne: Okay. Laya: I'm not going to fact check myself in this moment, but -- Anne: if you start with zap -- Laya: There's a zap somewhere. There's a zap somewhere out there. Anne: I've used it myself. And it's great. Laya: It's great. Anne: So if this happens, then do that. It's a really wonderful free app that you can do things like that with. Laya: And you can pull content too. Like if you have a hard time pulling all your email addresses because you've got multiple email accounts, or you're trying to create more of a contact list -- in fact, I recently found out an automation was in that cog wheelhouse that pulls my contacts from QuickBooks and put it into MailChimp. So I don't have my CRM solution fully vetted out by any means. I need all the help in the world, but trying these different productivity hacks for automation, there are many solutions out there that can make your life easier and less laborious, you know? Anne: Absolutely. And one other thing I'm going to oh, totally, totally recommend is go ahead, be brave and outsource things that you just -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- don't want to spend your time doing, or it's too com -- I'm going to say like for me, accounting, I say it all the time. Everybody that's listened to any, to just one episode, I might say it every episode. I'm not sure, but outsourcing my accounting was the best thing I ever did for my business. Laya: Yeah. If you don't love it -- Anne: Don't love it. Laya: -- pay someone that does. Anne: And she's great. She's fast. She loves it. And I trust her. I trust her with my life. You know, she'd been doing my accounting for gosh, at least five years. So. Laya: And that's a great hack too. And I use somebody not for my voiceover business, but for the podcast. I have partnered with a very talented, very savvy copywriter, and she knows my style of I, and she creates a social media posts for the podcast that I do with my daughter, She Sounds Like Me. And I love it because it just takes that off my plate. But also we use a platform called Later, which is a social media scheduler. And what I love about that is that I can see what's coming. She can do a cross platform integration and schedule. I can approve it ahead of time. And then if I don't like where she's got it, or it doesn't feel quite right, or it's not timely, I can very easily shift the tiles. So it's either aesthetically pleasing or it's more on topic point or what have you. And that's become a seamless integration into my social media management. I've often thought about integrating it into my voiceover business page, but for me that's still very in the moment, very real time, very personal -- Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: -- and not exactly all that consistent at the moment because of just the last year of burnout. But I have found that Later is a great platform. And I feel like I've tried them all over the years, as far as social media scheduling goes. Anne: Yeah. Laya: So that one's pretty efficient. Yeah. Anne: I have a social media scheduler for, 'cause I have so many Facebook business pages, and Facebook for a while was really where a lot of my clients were. And so I have a Facebook scheduler, which also integrates with Twitter and LinkedIn. I can have so many social media to -- it's called Post Planner. Laya: Okay. Anne: And so I've been using that for years. And then also Facebook now has become, and/or Instagram, one in the same now, have their own scheduler now. Laya: Sure, they do. Anne: And so that has become fairly decent in terms of you can't schedule too far, but you can schedule out. So with the combination of those, I'm able to schedule the majority of my stuff out there. And then I will follow up with the engagement. Like I said, I can't be connected to social media every hour of the day, but when I do connect, that's when I engage and comment and respond and also post some interesting finds to my own timeline or add to what I've already posted before to keep it kind of fresh and not too predictable. Laya: Yeah. Absolutely. Another great resource that I've been loving because my days of graphic design or my experience there is limited -- I know what I like aesthetically, but there's no way I'm going to spend time creating unique graphics, whether it's for the show or for promoting the business or promoting something within the voiceover business, like we've done with the podcast. I love using Canva and I use Canva Pro for graphic design for so many things. Anne: Yay! Canva's amazing. Laya: And it's actually, yeah, speaking of integration and scheduling, Canva just introduced a scheduler within their platform. Anne: [gasps] Yes. Laya: And what I love to deep -- and take it to a next level, everyone asks who may not be savvy in those audio grams, where you're seeing how you've maybe just done a radio commercial, and you've gotten full permission from the client, you can use the spot on social or to promote your business, but they don't have moving imagery. So you grab the picture that represents the brand best or the concept or the campaign. And you overlay that audio on top. People are always asking, how did you do that? I use Headliner for that. Anne: Yup. Headliner's awesome. Laya: Love that. I use it for the podcast as well. And sometimes for some of my voice work or for my demos to make a moving image. But Canva now integrates with Headliner. Anne: Oh, amazing. Laya: So these, some of these systems are working together to not only plan, create, schedule, but overlay -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- all in an effort to be more productive, more cohesive, and save you time. Anne: I have to plus like 21,000 for Canva because that literally, you don't have to be a graphic artist -- Laya: No, it's so easy. Anne: -- which not many people I know. Laya: It's intuitive. Yeah. Anne: And so I would struggle with Adobe because I have the Creative Suite -- Laya: Same. Anne: -- but it's not something I use every single day. I'm not a graphic designer, and neither are necessarily anybody that's working with me to do to post social media. But Canva has just joined us together in happy, joyous unity. Laya: Oh, I love it. I love it for my teams too. Anne: Yup. Laya: Like I was saying about my social media manager, we have folders that are specific to that brand. Anne: Yup. Laya: I have folders that are specific to my voiceover business or Cyla's voiceover business. And so to go in there and have this asset library -- Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: -- and the membership is very inexpensive. Anne: It is. Laya: There is a free version -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- and then an inexpensive version. I just make sure -- Anne: I use Pro. Laya: -- that these are part of my -- yeah, me too, to integrate that as part of my business cost, because those memberships can save you so much time, energy, and effort and up-level the look and feel of your brand and your professionalism. Anne: I didn't know they had scheduling. Now I'm going to have to check that out. Laya: Yeah. Anne: That's awesome. Laya: I don't know what it integrates with or if it's a standalone scheduler, but I love that it's there. It's, everybody's thinking along those same lines, you know? Anne: God, good stuff. Laya: For sure. Anne: BOSS productivity hacks. Laya: Love it. Anne: You guys BOSSes, we would love to hear your productivity hacks. So we've given you the best of ours. And I think I am really, really excited for an amazing year this year, Laya, and I know you are too. Laya: Yes, let's work smarter, not harder -- Anne: There you go. Laya: -- and be smart and productive in our VO BOSS businesses. Anne: And I'll tell you what else is smart. Our sponsor, ipDTL. Laya: Yes. Anne: I love, love, love ipDTL. It allows me to connect with Laya, with all of my clients and with every BOSS out there. So you can find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing, productive week. And we'll see you next week. Laya: And happy new year, absolutely. Anne: Yes. Happy new year. Bye, guys. Laya: Bye-bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at vobss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Sigma Nutrition Radio
#420: Cannabis – Kevin Boehnke, PhD & Carrie Cuttler, PhD

Sigma Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 81:02


Kevin Boehnke is a researcher at the University of Michigan, in the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. His current research focuses on therapeutic applications of illicit or semi-licit substances (cannabis, psychedelics). His goal is to rigorously assess appropriate use of these substances and to help address the public health harms caused by their criminalization. Carrie Cuttler is an Assistant Professor at Washington State University. Her research at the Health and Cognition Laboratory there focuses on elucidating the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of chronic cannabis use and acute cannabis intoxication. Her recent work has focused on examining links between cannabis use and mental health (e.g., ADHD, PTSD, OCD, depression, anxiety). Show notes available at sigmanutrition.com/episode420/

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast
Unusual Medication Effects from 2021

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 16:00


In 2021 we uncovered some paradoxical effects of medications, including meds that can both cause and treat OCD (antipsychotics), depression (benzodiazepines and antidepressants), and cognitive problems (stimulants and anti-dementia medications).CME: Take the CME Post-Test for this episodePublished On: 01/03/2022Duration: 16 minutes, 0 secondsReferenced Articles: “Stimulants and Creativity,”The Carlat Psychiatry Report, February 2021“Brexpiprazole Ineffective in Mania,” The Carlat Psychiatry Report, October 2021“The Schizophrenia-OCD Overlap,” The Carlat Psychiatry Report, October 2021Chris Aiken, MD, and Kellie Newsome, PMHNP, have disclosed no relevant financial or other interests in any commercial companies pertaining to this educational activity.

The OCD Stories
Story: Sam (#310)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 43:23


In episode 310 I chat with Sam who has kindly agreed to share her story with us.  We discuss her story, a sexual assault that came before the OCD, worrying about getting an STI, pedophile themed OCD (pOCD), her compulsions, doing exposure and response prevention therapy (ERP), medication and self stigma, what else helps her, where she's at now, and much more. Hope it helps.   Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/story-sam-310 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Mayim Bialik's Breakdown
Howie Mandel: Never too Late to Make a Change

Mayim Bialik's Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 71:39


Howie Mandel (America's Got Talent, Deal or No Deal, Howie Mandel Does Stuff podcast) opens up about his struggles with ADHD, anxiety, depression, and OCD. He discusses the rituals and intrusive thoughts that force him to hit the pause button on his life, why he finally decided to seek professional treatment, and how his diagnoses have affected his lifepath. Howie explains how Candid Camera first inspired him to do comedy and recounts his first time onstage performing stand-up. He and Mayim consider the importance of living in the moment, hypervigilance as a survival mechanism, and tips on achieving success within therapy. Mayim breaks down ways to manage mental illness with meditation in another installment of Ask Mayim Anything.Howie Mandel's Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/howie-mandel-does-stuff-podcast/id1555137542BialikBreakdown.comYouTube.com/mayimbialik