Podcasts about obamacare

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Obamacare, ACA - U.S. federal statute

  • 2,374PODCASTS
  • 7,306EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 4, 2021LATEST
obamacare

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Best podcasts about obamacare

Show all podcasts related to obamacare

Latest podcast episodes about obamacare

The Jason Rantz Show
Rantz Rewind January 21st, 2014

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 35:13


 The Supreme Court gave religious groups the right to ignore the Obamacare requirement to provide contraceptive services. Rantz looks past the religious side to this story to question why we expect free contraceptive services. KIRO's Kim Shepard reports on a hugely popular series of children's books that focus on history. Rantz loves this story and agrees that young children should be learning history from an early age. Chris Kresser, author of “Your Personal Paleo Code”, joins the show to explain the Paleo diet and debunk some of the common myths that surround it. Chris takes you through a standard day on the Paleo diet.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chris Miles Money Show
The Most Affordable Health Insurance with Keaton Patey | 562

The Chris Miles Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 23:00


Here's the thing - many people don't realize that there are other options for health insurance aside from what the government and their advisors are giving them, and that's what our guest, Keaton Patey is talking about in this video.  Keaton Patey is in the space of health insurance and he has helped me, along with many other people, get the most affordable insurance they can. Watch this video to learn more about health insurance, why you need it, and why you don't need to pay thousands for it!  Key Talking Points of the Episode [00:00] Introduction [01:32] Health insurance [02:30] Getting a real insurance plan [03:49] How did Keaton get involved in health insurance? [07:43] Healthy looks differently for everyone [08:17] Flexibility of health care plans [09:23] Paying thousands for Obamacare [16:05] Is it too good to be true? [17:06] Comparing it to car insurance [18:29] Where health care for everybody fails [20:10] Why you should get in touch with Keaton Quotables “They dumb it down and say “Hey, if you're healthy, you should pay less. If you're a business owner, we can give you tax benefits and other ways to innovatively offer this in your company.” “The biggest thing is, healthy looks different in people.” “The person who's telling you to keep that plan has incentive to do so.” “The place that I see where most people miss out on is the holes in your bucket where that money is draining out.” “Why spend more money on something that doesn't give you any benefit?” Links Contact Keaton: https://calendly.com/keaton-patey/health-money-ripples

Politics Done Right
Clarence Miller on his run for commissioner. Some winning advice for Democrats. Bad African policy.

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 57:55


Sen. Heitkamp hands Gov. Christie his a$$ on subsidizing state taxes. Southern states are the takers: Fmr. Gov. Chris Christie gave Fmr. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp a layup to point out an inconvenient truth for Republican states. They are welfare states. Norm Ornstein defines the Republican Party: The GOP, It is not a party, it is a cult: When the GOP has lost someone like Norm Ornstein so completely it is clear that the Republican Party is no longer a viable political instrument for the people. Chuck Todd dropped false equivalence between Dems & Republicans? Aren't you embarrassed?: Chuck Todd showed a level of personal disgust with the politicians he schmoozed with as he temporarily dropped the false equivalence. The two infrastructure bills may be a worse capitulation than the two Obamacare bills: We must have very long memories. I have seen this game before. And guess who has always won? I do not need to answer. Not human infrastructure. Devon J Hall aka Loud Mouth Brown Girl, Canadian writer/blogger talks about empowerment: Hall did not disappoint. The #WEOC member presented an empowering message that is worth listening to. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

Politics Done Right
Writer/Blogger Devon J Hall visits with us with an empowering message. But politics first?

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 57:55


LIVE on KPFT 90.1 FM: Writer/Blogger Devon J Hall aka Loud Mouth Brown Girl did not disappoint. Republican fail and Centrist Democrat shenanigans. Sen. Heitkamp hands Gov. Christie his a$$ on subsidizing state taxes. Southern states are the takers: Fmr. Gov. Chris Christie gave Fmr. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp a layup to point out an inconvenient truth for Republican states. They are welfare states. Norm Ornstein defines the Republican Party: The GOP, It is not a party, it is a cult: When the GOP has lost someone like Norm Ornstein so completely it is clear that the Republican Party is no longer a viable political instrument for the people. Chuck Todd dropped false equivalence between Dems & Republicans? Aren't you embarrassed?: Chuck Todd showed a level of personal disgust with the politicians he schmoozed with as he temporarily dropped the false equivalence. The two infrastructure bills may be a worse capitulation than the two Obamacare bills: We must have very long memories. I have seen this game before. And guess who has always won? I do not need to answer. Not human infrastructure. Devon J Hall aka Loud Mouth Brown Girl, Canadian writer/blogger talks about empowerment: Hall did not disappoint. The #WEOC member presented an empowering message that is worth listening to. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Celebrating World AIDS Day 2021

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:43


In celebration of World AIDS Day 2021, Matthew Zachary and guest co-host Elura Nanos welcome Krishna Stone, director of community relations for Gay Men's Health Crisis, and Damon Jacobs, New York-based licensed therapist and HIV/AIDS activist. They discuss early HIV/AIDS activism, the latest scientific advancements, and what we can all do to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The theme for the WAD 2021 observance is “Ending the HIV Epidemic: Equitable Access, Everyone's Voice.” World AIDS Day was first observed in 1988. Each year, organizations and individuals across the world bring attention to the HIV epidemic, endeavor to increase HIV awareness and knowledge, speak out against HIV stigma, and call for an increased response to move toward Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. For more about WAD, visit https://www.hiv.gov.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Giving MS the Finger with Kathy Reagan-Young

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:40


Today I talk to multimedia guru and patient influencer Kathy Reagan Young. She's been blogging since before that was a word. She's a video producer. And she hosts an amazing podcast called FUMS, an acronym for Fuck You Multiple Sclerosis. And yes swearing like a sailor is also in her toolkit. When Kathy was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis she didn't let that stop her from being the badass that she is. Instead, she took to the web and started an online MS support community. And she launched the FUMS podcast - a new addition to the OffScrip Health network. Kathy talks about all that as well as the psychedelic effects of Amazonian frog venom and the physics behind '80s hair.For more on Kathy's podcast, visit FUMSnow.com. And for information on us, visit https://OffScrip.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripMedia on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Politics Done Right
Build Back Better being played like Obamacare is why we must have a big 2022 progressive win

Politics Done Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 56:52


It is clear that there are a couple of Democrats intent on doing the same thing they did to Obamacare in 2010 to Build Back Better. They will neuter it to protect the rich. The two infrastructure bills may be a worse capitulation than the two Obamacare bills: We must have very long memories. I have seen this game before. And guess who has always won? I do not need to answer. Not human infrastructure. The shenanigans by some Democrats about the Build Back Better human infrastructure bill are worse than the one played out for Obamacare. And those were not only bad but inhumane. Chuck Todd ridicules Mississippi Governor on vaccine mandate objection: It's a pro-life position: Chuck Todd mainly was on his game as he ridiculed the hypocrisy exhibited by Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves on vaccines vs. women's choice. Sen. Heitkamp hands Gov. Christie his a$$ on subsidizing state taxes. Southern states are the taker: Republicans are so used to taking on the offensive even when the truth is embarrassing that it can catch them off guard. That happened to Chris Christie today. More people to be aware that the Red States are generally welfare states. In other words, they take more from the Federal Government than they put in. They love to preach about low taxes and the low cost of living in their states. But what happens is that most of America end up subsidizing them. Red State Democratic Senator shows how to sell progressive policies unabashedly. Former Republican operative has important advice for Democrats, they must reach those who vote. --- If you like what we do please do the following! Most Independent Media outlets continue to struggle to raise the funds they need to operate much like the smaller outlets like Politics Done Right SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel here. LIKE our Facebook Page here. Share our blogs, podcasts, and videos. Get our books here. Become a YouTube PDR Posse Member here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Patreon here. Become a Politics Done Right Subscriber via Facebook here. Consider providing a contribution here. Please consider supporting our GoFundMe equipment fund here. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/politicsdoneright/support

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
How to Survive a WTF Whirlwind And Live To Tell About It

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:19


Amanda Ferraro is the Iron Woman of cancer survivorship. She's endured a WTF whirlwind — double pneumonia, seven brain surgeries to treat a cyst on her cerebellum, hydrocephalus, appendicitis, acute myeloid leukemia, and various complications related to those illnesses. But Amanda lived to tell the tale. She started a blog called “Cancer is an Asshole,” which she expanded into a podcast. Amanda continues to share her story, advocates for patients, and runs a nonprofit, all while fighting chronic health problems and being a mom.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Squawk Pod
Build, Back, Passed -- and Moxie, Salad and TikTok

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 30:31


The House of Representatives has passed the largest expansion of the social safety net in decades, a $1.75 trillion bill that funds universal pre-K, Medicare expansion, renewable energy credits, affordable housing, a year of expanded Child Tax Credits and major Obamacare subsidies. Now President Biden's Build Back Better Act heads to the Senate. CNBC's Ylan Mui reports on the Congressional Budget Office estimate that the legislation would add $367 billion to budget deficits over a decade. Veteran CEO Richard Parsons, senior advisor at Providence Equity Partners and former CEO of Time Warner, tells Joe Kernen, Becky Quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin that the President hasn't been showing enough “leadership moxie.” Scott Cohn reports on the end of the 11-week trial against Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes. Plus, Sweetgreen has a sweet debut and the kids - they love TikTok.In this episode:Ylan Mui, @ylanmuiScott Cohn, @ScottCohnTVAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Vax On: Big Bird Beef and Some Venison on the Side

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:49


In this episode of Vax On, Matthew Zachary and Elura Nanos discuss an unexpected Twitter feud about the COVID-19 vaccine. They also discuss scientific evidence that SARS-CoV-2 has been spreading explosively among our woodland friends across the United States. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Introducing "The Cycle," a Rockstar Podcast about Endometriosis

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 13:31


Today I talk to Melissa Boudreau, endometriosis advocate and the latest podcasting rockstar to join OffScrip Health. It took years of suffering the debilitating effects of endometriosis and a battery of unrelated tests before Melissa would finally get diagnosed with the disease. That's because endometriosis isn't talked about. Despite the fact that one in ten women have it, it takes an average of 7 to 10 years for most women to get diagnosed. Melissa is working to change that. She started the podcast "The Cycle" to get the conversation going and help endo patients share their stories.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Cancer Mavericks Goes To Hollywood

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 39:46


For decades, the portrayal of cancer in movies and television was grim. If a character was diagnosed with cancer, it was a near certainty they'd be dead by the credits. But, like cancer treatment itself, Hollywood evolved, and many storylines about cancer became stories of survival. In this episode, we ask the question, "Who influences us and why?" From musicians to television stars, film producers to televised cancer screenings, when celebrities lend their voices to raising awareness and fundraising, that kind of star power can move mountains. Join us as we hear from voices such as actor Patrick Dempsey, StandUp2Cancer Co-Founders Katie Couric, Pam Williams, the late Laura Ziskin. Also appearing in this episode: Steven Hoffman (Professor of Global Health Law and Political Science at York University in Toronto, Canada,) Dr. Larissa Nekhlyudov (Director of Internal Medicine for Cancer Survivors at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute,) Kami Kosenko (Professor of Communication at North Carolina State University,) and Milton Kent (Former reporter and sports columnist for The Baltimore Sun). For more information about this series, visit https://CancerMavericks.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Kim Monson Show
Thank You for your Service, Veterans

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 56:48


A BIG thank you to all the veterans who secured our freedoms through their service.  Their sacrifices are noted, especially those who gave their lives.  Matt Albright, Director of Center for American Values based in Pueblo, is Kim's guest on America's Veteran's Stories this Sunday, 3pm on KLZ 560 AM and KLZ 100.7 FM.  The “Brandon” administration acts in complete contrast to Trump's as the Biden administration double downs on anti-American ideals, forced mandates such as no jab-no job, increased regulations and high taxes.  Kim, on Veteran's Day, appropriately reflects on her experience in Normandy, France for the 73rd anniversary of the WWII D-Day landings. Frequent guest Dr. Jill Vecchio joins Kim to discuss the COVID-19/Wuhan-China Virus narrative.  How did healthcare workers go from heroes to zeroes in a year?  The government is controlling what doctors can and cannot do.  Polis issues an executive order that gives him power to decide who will and will not be admitted into a hospital thereby creating two classifications of patients.  The problem at hospitals is not beds but staffing as many healthcare professionals left the industry when Polis mandated that all healthcare workers must take the experimental vaccination.  His actions violate the Hippocratic oath of “do no harm.”  Risk benefit analysis and informed consent are not part of the mandated vaccination process.  Polis' actions makes one question what he will do next.  The 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution says that powers not delegated to the federal government are reserved to the states or to the people.  A true healthcare free market will bring down costs, increase access and improve quality.  Governor Polis is setting up two classifications of people:  vaccinated and unvaccinated.  Epoch Times is the media leader in reporting medical discrimination. Dr. Vecchio walks us through a historical perspective of nationalized healthcare.  Karl Max noted that to control the people, government should control healthcare.  Medicare and Medicaid began in the 1960's under Johnson's socialized programs.  Obamacare was signed in 2010, which strengthened government control of healthcare, and made it more difficult for small medical practices to survive.  Many doctors sold their practices to large corporations.  Most physicians now practice under large corporations which is destroying the patient-doctor relationship.  Doctors must obey the corporation's demands (i.e. vaccine mandates) so that they can continue to practice and make a living.  Big business and big government like each other.  Big business influences big government PBI's (Politicians, Bureaucrats and Interested Parties) to write regulations that favor the corporations.  Corporations write checks to the politicians/candidates.  We are witnessing a major transition in the medical industry:  caring, ethical and moral individuals are changing his/her standards to comply to mandates and regulations.  This leads to vicious behavior, to the point that patients are used as experiments (current vaccinations) and some are killed in the process.  We have seen this transition over the past twenty plus months.  Dr. Vecchio and Kim state that Americans are strong and are observant.  Call your representatives and stand up so your voice will be heard.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Vax On: The beginning of the end of a Pandemic and New York is Back!

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:54


OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
RJ11 Patch Panels: The Ritesh Patel Show

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:52


Ritesh Patel is Senior Partner, Global Digital Health at FINN Partners. He is a digital evangelist and has been evangelizing digital since the early days of the dot com boom in the late 1990s. As a young man, he joined Agency.com and quickly began to consult with major fortune 500 companies to evangelize the merits of the World Wide Web. (Remember that term, kids?) He's recently taken his mission on the road to speak at a wide variety of digital and healthcare-centered events worldwide, focusing primarily on digital strategy, tools, platforms, and ecosystems in Healthcare and Health Systems. Enjoy the show.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Vax On: Kids Now Eligible for the Jab and China's ‘Zero COVID' Policy

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:10


Trent Loos Podcast
Rural Route Radio Nov 2, 2021 So how much of the $3 trillion infrastructure bill actually has to do with infrastructure? About like ObamaCare I reckon.

Trent Loos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 48:04


Today "Across the Pond" version with Jay Truitt, MO and Andrew Henderson, UK is mostly about a bill that will look nothing like it did at the beginning, in fact should disappear. That plus a tidbit about a 95 year old Queen that will provide cover to the damage done by the Global Warming Summit that is meant to control your life.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Allison Rosen Takes to TikTok

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 27:41


Today I talk to Allison Rosen, a science nerd, a TikTok star, a dance fanatic, a Myam Bialik look alike, and a cancer survivor. Allison was diagnosed with Stage II colon cancer at age 32. That was nearly ten years ago and ever since Allison has been using her personal experience as a cancer survivor and her training as a medical researcher to educate people about young adult cancer. She's even taken to TikTok to talk about her ostomy bag, one of the permanent bodily changes she's undergone since getting cancer. Allison now serves as the Project Director at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. And when she's not working hard, she's out living life to the fullest - on the dancefloor or on top of a surfboard.Follow Allison Rosen on TikTok @allisonrosen4, Instagram @alicat380, and on Twitter @ARosen380. For more information on us, visit https://OffScrip.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripHealth on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The 4&3 Podcast
118 - Biden's 'Build Back Better' Fight Eerily Similar to Obamacare Battle of 2010

The 4&3 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 28:04


Thursday, October 28, 2021: Today on the 4&3 Podcast, Faithwire's Dan Andros breaks down today's top stories along with Tré Goins-Phillips.Biden's 'Build Back Better' Fight Eerily Similar to Obamacare Battle of 2010Twix releases Halloween ad targeting children and sexual identityShocking Percentage of Americans Report Personal Experiences With the ‘Paranormal'Celebrity tattoo artist Kat Von D is closing her business in California and moving to rural Indiana

An Honorable Profession
Former Congressman Tom Perriello Offers Insight into Virginia's Election

An Honorable Profession

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 62:01


Host and NewDEAL CEO Debbie Cox Bultan talks with Tom Perriello, Executive Director of Open Society Foundation, on dynamics in the Virginia Gubernatorial election, the key differences from the vote on Obamacare versus the infrastructure plan, and if this is a breakthrough or breakdown moment for America.

Curimanos
Obamacare: Facil y Rapido!

Curimanos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 13:27


En este episodio Antonio Solís y Cecilia Vilchez nos cuentan cómo, de manera rápida y sencilla, puedes obtener tu mejor cobertura de salud en este periodo de enrolamiento . Escúchalo hasta al final, disfrútalo y comparte este episodio.

Doc Washburn Show
The Doc Washburn Show, October 27, 2021 - Episode 12

Doc Washburn Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 89:16


FDA panel unanimously recommends Emergency Use Authorization for Covid vaccines for 5 - 11 year olds! One member of the panel said we won't really know what the effects of the jab will be on kids until they start getting it. Remind you of Pelosi and Obamacare? Details on this episode of "The Doc Washburn Show!"

On Point With Victor
10/26/21 Atlanta Gets The Last Laugh

On Point With Victor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:01


Stacey Abrams and the other wokes took away the Allstar game, but they cannot take away the World Series. Go Braves! With Victor Armendariz

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
The Koby & Hannah Show: An Interview With My 11-Year-Old Twins

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 22:07


Today Koby and Hannah Greenzweig, a pair of twins in their tweens, wax about adolescence in the age of Covid. Hannah loves to draw and play with Baby Tristan, her toy dinosaur. Koby loves the Terminator but didn't care much for his fourth-grade teacher. The Greenzweigs jam about everything from video games and middle-school bullies to doing your taxes. Believe me, these kids have a lot to say. That's because they're my children. For more information on us, visit https://OffScrip.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripHealth on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Vax On: Supply Chain Mayhem, Uncrustables, and Florida's at It Yet Again

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:02


MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend
We Can Fix Healthcare - Deane Waldman, MD, MBA ("Dr. Deane")

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 68:39


https://www.deanewaldman.com/PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/minddogtvSponsors:https://podmatch.com/signup/minddogtvhttps://mybookie.com Promo Code minddoghttps://record.webpartners.co/_6_DFqqtZcLQWqcfzuvZcQGNd7ZgqdRLk/1https://apply.fundwise.com/minddoghttps://myvitalc.com/minddog. promo code minddogtvhttps://skillbuilder.academy/dashboard?view_sequence=1601856764231x540742189759856640&promoCode=MINDDOG100OFFhttps://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=599839&u=1659788&m=52971&urllink=&afftrack=https://enticeme.com/#minddog

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast
Ep. 250 - Remember the olden days, when health insurance was lots better?

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 26:16


In the days before Obamacare, reasonably priced health insurance had small deductibles and coinsurance, paying 100% of most catastrophic expenses. What the heck happened? Look to the politicians. Government bullied its way into what had been a robust and vibrant private enterprise and proceeded to ruin it for everyone else.  Also, what's up with the "most severe critic"? (Most severe critic: A+)   Inspired by "MEDICARE FOR THE LAZY MAN; Simplest & Easiest Guide Ever! (2021)" on Amazon.com. Return to leave a short customer review & help future readers. Official website: https://www.MedicareForTheLazyMan.com Send questions & love notes: DBJ@MLMMailbag.com

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Starting From Scratch: From Chemo to Cookie Dough

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 26:59


Today I talk to baking businesswoman Loren Brill. While battling Hodgkin's Lymphoma in her early twenties, Loren became interested in health foods. But she couldn't find many store-bought snacks that weren't loaded with artificial flavors and ingredients. So after she recovered from cancer, Loren set out on another life-affirming mission: She founded Sweet Loren's, which specializes in vegan cookie dough made with all-natural ingredients. Because she wanted to prove that one can be good to their body without giving up the sweet things in life. Find out more about Sweet Loren's at https://sweetlorens.com/. For more information on us, visit https://OffScripMedia.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripMedia on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton
Who Needs Health Insurance?! Revolutionizing American Healthcare w/ CrowdHealth CEO Andy Schoonover

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 52:57


This episode could save you thousands, tens of thousands, even HUNDREDS of thousands of dollars. So make sure you listen to it ASAP.One of the biggest recurring expenses for many early-stage entrepreneurs in the post-Obamacare era is health insurance. In fact, many people never even consider striking out on their own simply because they're afraid to leave their employer and lose their health insurance.Lots of people have pivoted to health share programs, but those come with their own major drawbacks, the most significant being that it can often take months to get paid out on claims. Not everyone can afford to float thousands of dollars in bills for 60-90 days, or even longer.If you can relate to any of this, you MUST listen to today's show.Our guest is Andy Schoonover, CEO of upstart "community-powered alternative to health insurance" CrowdHealth.After being tagged with an $8,000 bill for a 10-minute procedure that his health insurance refused to pay -- even though it was urgently recommended for his daughter by her doctor! -- Andy decided to do more than just sit around and complain about the injustice of our healthcare system. He put his money where his mouth is and built a solution.If you're anything like us, you'll hardly be able to believe just how good their business model is.FULL DISCLOSURE: as of the recording of this episode, CrowdHealth is a sponsor of this show. But they're such an amazing company with such a fantastic program that they deserved an entire episode.To sign up, just go to https://www.joincrowdhealth.com/99 and use promo code "JASON".******If you're ready to take control of your life, income, and future, go to http://controlthesource.com and join the Nomad Network to get started. Brand new app in app stores now!Give your business an unfair advantage in less than 3 minutes a day. Get the daily newsletter that delivers the most actionable and tactical growth strategies available today, straight from the mind of a marketing genius: http://dailyalchemy.me.Learn the blueprint for generating predictable and sustainable income from anywhere on earth: http://www.nomadicwealthoffer.com.Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jason_stapletonJason on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasonstapletonJason's website: https://jasonstapleton.comMatt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/realkingpilledDon't forget to like and subscribe, and please share the show!

Life Matters
261: It's Good To Get Old

Life Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 27:58


In this episode of Life Matters, Commissioner Johnston discusses why it's good to get old and how the language and words we use can dramatically impact our attitudes towards our own aging and towards the aging of others. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal (9/24/21), examines how in Japan, demographically the oldest nation in the world, they have begun to re-define what the meaning of what ‘old' is. For example, the city of Nagano is officially changing its legal definition of “elderly”. Beginning next year, in order to keep residents active and engaged in their lives, what is considered ‘old' now, 65 or over, will only apply linguistically and legally at age 75.   Nagano was the site of the 1998 Winter Olympics.  Now the new definition will reduce the proportion of its population classified as ‘elderly' to just 16% from 30% of the population under the old definition, transitioning it from one of the oldest to one of the youngest cities in Japan. Ironically, the values, language, and legal definitions in the United States are moving in the opposite direction. Not only is the idea of age and senior 'senility,' looked down upon in the United States, but many leaders and progressive government link thinkers, are advocating that 75 is actually the time to die. Seriously. With the increase in the routine denial of medical treatment, and the stunning government actions of intentional exposure to Covid-19, an intentional non-treatment of the elderly in both the states of New York and California, the cultural shift and values and language are becoming more apparent. With the introduction of Obamacare, the idea of a single-payer, government-sponsored and controlled health system, brought a new view of “appropriate” care for the elderly. The intentional installation of seniors and giving them exposure to Covid, with the concomitant non-treatment and isolation was a stunning government response by the governors of New York in California in 2020. Tens of thousands of seniors were intentionally sent to die, for the supposed “greater good.”   At the height of the Obamacare debate the Atlantic magazine published an extensive article by Ezekiel Emmanuel. He was one of the policy figures essential to the healthcare debate within the Obama administration, and the brother of Obama Chief-of-Staff, Rahm Emanuel. “Why I hope to die at 75: an argument that society and families - and you - will be better off if nature takes it's course swiftly and promptly,” raised some concerns in the pro-life community, but was largely greeted by knowing nods of agreement by the academic and media elite. ‘Who wants to be senile?' But the open public comment if not ‘instruction' (remember the subtitle… “you will be better off if nature takes its course swiftly and promptly.') and the not-so-camouflaged derision of senility brings a great risk.  The Covid reaction is but the tip of a not so hidden iceberg.   As far as the demographics of aging and population, the United States is not far behind Japan. Brian is free to admit his personal inclination toward a Christian worldview, and points out that that perspective is, in fact, much more accommodating and closer to the Japanese embrace of the elderly than the new progressive ideology of American healthcare.   He gives several examples from both Old and New Testament, and the values that once were a foundation for our American culture, and Western Civilization itself. Honoring the elderly and embracing long lines for ourselves is nicely summed up in Deuteronomy 5:16: “Honor your father and mother as the Lord your God has commanded you. That your days may be prolonged and then it may go well with you and the land which the Lord your God gives you..” This was literally a commandment to us as individuals and to our culture as a whole.   The Christian influenced worldview of Western Civilization, as well as many old and established cultures revere the elderly and see it as a duty to honor, rather than disparage old age. Psalm 71:9; Proverbs 23:22; Proverbs 17:6, Psalm 91:16 and the list goes on and on. Our culture is being invited to change its view of the elderly, to no longer view aging as a good thing, to avoid maturity with its challenges and wisdom, to embrace what is new, what is young, what is fashionably elite.  But the cost is great. It is very great. It is not only the loss of lives and wisdom, but may include the loss of our civilization itself.

New Books in History
Rachel M. Blum, "How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:25


The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics (U Chicago Press, 2020), focuses on the Tea Party's rise, as a new faction within a long line of factions, and how the Tea Party infiltrated the Republican Party—impacting the disposition of the party itself and how it now operates. Blum's personal background and political interests contributed to her capacity to analyze and evaluate the strategies and approaches used by the Tea Party, helping her to understand the structure and the sometimes-confusing tactics that these activists used to pursue their goals. Blum's book also examines the Republican Party as an organization that, at its core, is aimed at getting Republicans elected to office, and how the Tea Party was able to take advantage of the structure and organization of the GOP at the most local levels, as well as at state and national levels, to aid in the drive to activate the Tea Party agenda within the Republican Party itself. Ultimately, the Tea Party would push against the GOP like a party within a party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is a multi-method investigation into the Tea Party and the Republican Party, constructed out of an elaborate collection of evidence including network analysis, the use of text-as-data, and long-form interviews with Tea Party activists. Blum started her research as a result of a conversation with a Tea Party activist in 2012 where, rather than discussing President Obama's re-election, Obamacare, or government spending, Blum was surprised to find the activist preferred to discuss their distrust of the Republican Party. Why would this lifelong Republican choose to be upset with his own party, rather than with the Democrats? This is the question that drove Blum's investigation of political polarization within the Republican party itself, and this led to a complex matrix of approaches to weave together the analysis of what was going on between the Tea Party and the Republican Party. Blum's understanding of factions within factions presents a new way to understand the Tea Party's political strategies, but it also helps us to understand the more expansive polarization across the political spectrum in the United States. Blum's work also outlines how candidate Donald Trump picked up on the topics and the rhetoric of the Tea Party, and how the Trump/MAGA faction has also been able to take over the current Republican Party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is an elegant and articulate exploration of the Tea Party, including an analysis of the Tea Party strategies, message, and its insurgent approach to politics. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP also formulates a lesson that guides the reader to better understand party dynamics, both inside the parties themselves and in competition with each other. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Rachel M. Blum, "How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:25


The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics (U Chicago Press, 2020), focuses on the Tea Party's rise, as a new faction within a long line of factions, and how the Tea Party infiltrated the Republican Party—impacting the disposition of the party itself and how it now operates. Blum's personal background and political interests contributed to her capacity to analyze and evaluate the strategies and approaches used by the Tea Party, helping her to understand the structure and the sometimes-confusing tactics that these activists used to pursue their goals. Blum's book also examines the Republican Party as an organization that, at its core, is aimed at getting Republicans elected to office, and how the Tea Party was able to take advantage of the structure and organization of the GOP at the most local levels, as well as at state and national levels, to aid in the drive to activate the Tea Party agenda within the Republican Party itself. Ultimately, the Tea Party would push against the GOP like a party within a party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is a multi-method investigation into the Tea Party and the Republican Party, constructed out of an elaborate collection of evidence including network analysis, the use of text-as-data, and long-form interviews with Tea Party activists. Blum started her research as a result of a conversation with a Tea Party activist in 2012 where, rather than discussing President Obama's re-election, Obamacare, or government spending, Blum was surprised to find the activist preferred to discuss their distrust of the Republican Party. Why would this lifelong Republican choose to be upset with his own party, rather than with the Democrats? This is the question that drove Blum's investigation of political polarization within the Republican party itself, and this led to a complex matrix of approaches to weave together the analysis of what was going on between the Tea Party and the Republican Party. Blum's understanding of factions within factions presents a new way to understand the Tea Party's political strategies, but it also helps us to understand the more expansive polarization across the political spectrum in the United States. Blum's work also outlines how candidate Donald Trump picked up on the topics and the rhetoric of the Tea Party, and how the Trump/MAGA faction has also been able to take over the current Republican Party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is an elegant and articulate exploration of the Tea Party, including an analysis of the Tea Party strategies, message, and its insurgent approach to politics. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP also formulates a lesson that guides the reader to better understand party dynamics, both inside the parties themselves and in competition with each other. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Rachel M. Blum, "How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:25


The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics (U Chicago Press, 2020), focuses on the Tea Party's rise, as a new faction within a long line of factions, and how the Tea Party infiltrated the Republican Party—impacting the disposition of the party itself and how it now operates. Blum's personal background and political interests contributed to her capacity to analyze and evaluate the strategies and approaches used by the Tea Party, helping her to understand the structure and the sometimes-confusing tactics that these activists used to pursue their goals. Blum's book also examines the Republican Party as an organization that, at its core, is aimed at getting Republicans elected to office, and how the Tea Party was able to take advantage of the structure and organization of the GOP at the most local levels, as well as at state and national levels, to aid in the drive to activate the Tea Party agenda within the Republican Party itself. Ultimately, the Tea Party would push against the GOP like a party within a party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is a multi-method investigation into the Tea Party and the Republican Party, constructed out of an elaborate collection of evidence including network analysis, the use of text-as-data, and long-form interviews with Tea Party activists. Blum started her research as a result of a conversation with a Tea Party activist in 2012 where, rather than discussing President Obama's re-election, Obamacare, or government spending, Blum was surprised to find the activist preferred to discuss their distrust of the Republican Party. Why would this lifelong Republican choose to be upset with his own party, rather than with the Democrats? This is the question that drove Blum's investigation of political polarization within the Republican party itself, and this led to a complex matrix of approaches to weave together the analysis of what was going on between the Tea Party and the Republican Party. Blum's understanding of factions within factions presents a new way to understand the Tea Party's political strategies, but it also helps us to understand the more expansive polarization across the political spectrum in the United States. Blum's work also outlines how candidate Donald Trump picked up on the topics and the rhetoric of the Tea Party, and how the Trump/MAGA faction has also been able to take over the current Republican Party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is an elegant and articulate exploration of the Tea Party, including an analysis of the Tea Party strategies, message, and its insurgent approach to politics. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP also formulates a lesson that guides the reader to better understand party dynamics, both inside the parties themselves and in competition with each other. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Political Science
Rachel M. Blum, "How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:25


The discussion of factions in American politics is as old as the republic itself. But there is more to consider, particularly in terms of the way that contemporary factions operate within our current political landscape. Political Scientist Rachel Blum, in her new book, How The How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics (U Chicago Press, 2020), focuses on the Tea Party's rise, as a new faction within a long line of factions, and how the Tea Party infiltrated the Republican Party—impacting the disposition of the party itself and how it now operates. Blum's personal background and political interests contributed to her capacity to analyze and evaluate the strategies and approaches used by the Tea Party, helping her to understand the structure and the sometimes-confusing tactics that these activists used to pursue their goals. Blum's book also examines the Republican Party as an organization that, at its core, is aimed at getting Republicans elected to office, and how the Tea Party was able to take advantage of the structure and organization of the GOP at the most local levels, as well as at state and national levels, to aid in the drive to activate the Tea Party agenda within the Republican Party itself. Ultimately, the Tea Party would push against the GOP like a party within a party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is a multi-method investigation into the Tea Party and the Republican Party, constructed out of an elaborate collection of evidence including network analysis, the use of text-as-data, and long-form interviews with Tea Party activists. Blum started her research as a result of a conversation with a Tea Party activist in 2012 where, rather than discussing President Obama's re-election, Obamacare, or government spending, Blum was surprised to find the activist preferred to discuss their distrust of the Republican Party. Why would this lifelong Republican choose to be upset with his own party, rather than with the Democrats? This is the question that drove Blum's investigation of political polarization within the Republican party itself, and this led to a complex matrix of approaches to weave together the analysis of what was going on between the Tea Party and the Republican Party. Blum's understanding of factions within factions presents a new way to understand the Tea Party's political strategies, but it also helps us to understand the more expansive polarization across the political spectrum in the United States. Blum's work also outlines how candidate Donald Trump picked up on the topics and the rhetoric of the Tea Party, and how the Trump/MAGA faction has also been able to take over the current Republican Party. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics is an elegant and articulate exploration of the Tea Party, including an analysis of the Tea Party strategies, message, and its insurgent approach to politics. How the Tea Party Captured the GOP also formulates a lesson that guides the reader to better understand party dynamics, both inside the parties themselves and in competition with each other. Shaina Boldt assisted with this podcast. Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), as well as co-editor of Mad Men and Politics: Nostalgia and the Remaking of Modern America (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015). Email her comments at lgoren@carrollu.edu or tweet to @gorenlj. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

Loving Liberty Radio Network
10-11-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 109:37


Hour 1 * Guest: Lowell Nelson – CampaignForLiberty.org – RonPaulInstitute.org. * Welcome to Our Celebration of Columbus and Christianity, on Columbus Day! – Columbus Day celebrates the landing of Christopher Columbus in the Americas on October 12, 1492. * Biden Formally Recognizes Indigenous Peoples' Day. * Parents Should Control Education – Ron Paul. * Biden Administration: Investigate Protesting Parents For ‘Domestic Terrorism'! – What should we do? Starve the beast. Take your children out of public school. They miss out on the money they get when your children attend the public schools. * Teaching Kids About Race & Gender? – Chris Sweeney. * Candace Owens: Parents should remove their children from public schools because they are brainwashing children with “Marxist principles. “Pull your children out of public schools,” Owens told Fox News' “Sunday Morning Futures. “The time is now, remove your children from these indoctrination camps, they're not learning to be smart, they're not focused on hard academics, they are being brainwashed and systematically controlled. * The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned the decision by Judge Robert Pitman to temporarily block the Texas Heartbeat Act. Hour 2 * Dr. Pierre Kory: Members of Congress Treated for COVID-19 with Ivermectin – Kory states claim comes from a highly credible source inside Congress – Between 100–200 members of Congress and their families & staffers have been treated with IVM & our I-MASK+ protocol for COVID. NO hospitalizations. * Guest: Dr. Murray Sabrin PhD., A retired professor of finance at Ramapo College, Co-founded the Sabrin Center for Free Enterprise in the Anisfield School of Business in 2007. Sabrin emigrated with his parents from West Germany to the United States in 1949. * Who decides what medical care you can get? – Dr Murray Sabrin, widely recognized as a leading voice in the American Libertarian movement, tackles that question and the nation's health crisis with stunning insights and solutions in his intriguing new book, “Universal Medical Care from Conception to End of Life: The Case for a Single-Payer System.” * Sabrin wants to phase out employer-based insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and Obamacare! He says medicine and government should be separated – just like government and religion. * Sabrin's single-payer system is based on strong Libertarian principles. He proposes: Direct primary care where patients pay cash, a mega health savings account where you would put money in tax free, it would grow tax free and you would take it out tax free – to pay for extraordinary expenses, A catastrophic policy for really big expenses, such as heart surgery, The indigent wouldn't need Medicaid, saving taxpayers billions of dollars per year, by the creation of thousands of non-profit medical centers * Do you even know what a Fee Schedule is? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Fifteen Minute Financial Advisor

Enrolling in your health care plan can be easy, if you're keeping everything the same. But it can be incredibly difficult if you're going it alone, or even choosing from a list of options that is vastly different than what you're used to. Also a reminder: Medicare open enrollment begins Friday October 15th, 2021 and runs through Tuesday December 7th, 2021.  Obamacare open enrollment begins Monday November 1st, and runs through Wednesday, December 15th.    Questions? Email me: Mike@ngpfp.com

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
The Cancer Mavericks EP5: The Young Adult Cancer Movement

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:35


Facing a diagnosis of cancer at any age is horrible. But for young adults, it's just plain different. Not better. Not worse. Different. Those diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 are on a planet all their own, often left to fend for themselves as lost voices sandwiched between pediatrics and adult cancer. The consequences of living with, through, and, ideally, beyond cancer carries with it a whole host of unique long-term issues, issues that had fallen under the radar and gone ignored by the system for far too long. In this episode, we talk to a new generation of cancer mavericks like Tamika Felder, Heidi Adams, Doug Ulman, and Lindsay Nohr-Beck, who revived a dying national conversation on cancer survivorship in the earliest days of the Internet. They created edgy websites, forced doctors to listen by creating fertility preservation guidelines, and fought to bring the invisible and underserved voice of the young adult cancer community into the national public spotlight. For more information about this series, visit https://CancerMavericks.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 2 – 10/11/2021

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 54:49


* Dr. Pierre Kory: Members of Congress Treated for COVID-19 with Ivermectin - Kory states claim comes from a highly credible source inside Congress - Between 100–200 members of Congress and their families & staffers have been treated with IVM & our I-MASK+ protocol for COVID. NO hospitalizations. * Guest: Dr. Murray Sabrin PhD., A retired professor of finance at Ramapo College, Co-founded the Sabrin Center for Free Enterprise in the Anisfield School of Business in 2007. Sabrin emigrated with his parents from West Germany to the United States in 1949. * Who decides what medical care you can get? - Dr Murray Sabrin, widely recognized as a leading voice in the American Libertarian movement, tackles that question and the nation's health crisis with stunning insights and solutions in his intriguing new book, “Universal Medical Care from Conception to End of Life: The Case for a Single-Payer System.” * Sabrin wants to phase out employer-based insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and Obamacare! He says medicine and government should be separated - just like government and religion. * Sabrin's single-payer system is based on strong Libertarian principles. He proposes: Direct primary care where patients pay cash, a mega health savings account where you would put money in tax free, it would grow tax free and you would take it out tax free – to pay for extraordinary expenses, A catastrophic policy for really big expenses, such as heart surgery, The indigent wouldn't need Medicaid, saving taxpayers billions of dollars per year, by the creation of thousands of non-profit medical centers * Do you even know what a Fee Schedule is?

Now What
64 Representation Matters with Roxanne Martinez

Now What

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 36:06


EPISODE NAME: “Representation Matters” with Roxanne Martinez    Host: Diane Gil, KeKey Moore, DJLG Executive Producer: DJ LG Special Guest: Roxanne Martinez, FWISD Trustee, District 9 0:00 - 1:10: This is a follow up to episode 63 with special guest Roxanne Martinez. If you have not listened to Episode 63, make sure to do so. In this episode Roxanne shares her personal experience with America's healthcare programs, the government's systematic approach to oppress those who are most in need, the poor, and the sick and why representation matters for communities of color at all levels. Roxanne also shares a glimpse into the politics behind a 2021 run off election victory as FWISD Trustee District 9.  1:11:  Diane begins the show recognizing the inspiring story Roxanne has shared so far. She comments that Roxanne did all things America expects of citizens, following the steps to achieve success.  2:02:  Roxanne shares about her experience in Corporate America, the  healthcare system and social programs that are designed to oppress the most vulnerable and needy citizens.  6:50:  Key reminds listeners that over 66% of all bankruptcies in America are a result of medical bills.  8:02: Roxanne shares her experience and thoughts about America's healthcare system, and it's failure to provide support and resources to those in need.  9:15: Roxanne, Key and LG discuss poverty and the inequities our healthcare creates in our communities, and how ObamaCare was critical to her livelihood.  Roxanne explains how her experience in Corporate America during her cancer treatment, the disappointment with our government's health care programs, and the support of her community in her darkest moments inspired her to reflect on what she wants her legacy to be.   11:20: Key and Roxanne discuss what the role of a school board trustee is and the constituents they serve.  12:07 Roxanne shares the important role of a district school board trustee and its responsibilities such as establishing a district's financial budget, policies, and academic goals. Roxanne shares three key focus areas for FWISD, elementary literacy, middle school mathematics, and high school college and career readiness.  19:20: Unsure of whether Roxanne would survive her cancer diagnosis, she shares her cancer journal that helped put words to the most important things in life, and what she wants her legacy to be. During this time, Roxanne shares her motivation to become an entrepreneur and the founding of Roxstar Marketing.  19:36 After surviving breast cancer, Roxanne devotes the next 10 years in her community leading grass root initiatives to help her community overcome the educational and healthcare inequities.  20:50 Roxanne explains how title 1 schools in her community do not have the financial resources to support its students. She rejuvenated a debunk booster club, and organized school PTAs and booster clubs. Her deep commitment to her community cultivated a strong student led movement to march to the polls and vote.  21:50 Roxanne is asked by the students why her name wasn't on the ballot, and who was their community's representation. This sparked a personal call to action to lift her community up in a broader capacity.  22:30 Roxanne begins to educate herself on the elected officials who did not reflect the makeup of her community and makes a plan to run for a future local election.  25:00 Key and Roxanne discuss the process and challenges of running a political campaign, and how team Roxy led her to a run-off victory for FWISD trustee district 9 against all odds in a political process that was not built for people like Roxanne.  29:00 Key and Roxanne discuss their shared experiences in political campaigns, and the reality of the run off process designed to oppress and maintain a white power structure that disenfranchises minority candidate and minority voters.  30:00 Roxanne shares her campaign strategy and why representation matters. Key reminds the audience that over 90% of current elected officials are white males, and recognizes the significance and impact Roxanne has made for her community and people of color.  33:50 Roxanne reminds listeners this is only the first step in a long and hard journey to changing the political makeup representing the communities they serve. 34:15 Roxanne challenges everyone to continue participating in the local election process, and looks forward to the day she sees her youth-led organizers on the election ballot.   Roxanne challenges everyone to continue participating in the local election process, and looks forward to the day she sees her youth-led organizers on the election ballot.   The Now What podcast is a space where we give a platform to honor and share voices and stories just like Roxanne's.  “Now What” Takeaways: Turn your Now What into action by joining our members forum on our website “Follow” the show from wherever you are listening from, and share this podcast with 1 friend.  Checkout nowwhatradio.com to listen directly to the show, stream our live DJ sessions Subscribe to our mailing list so you can be the first to hear what's new Related Episodes:  13: A Latina's Journey to Higher Education 19: A Latina's Journey to Political Office 25: Politicas for the People 101 32: Voto Latino 64: Against All Odds Our voices, Our music, Our people - Now What Join the Movement: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nowwhatradio Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NowWhatRadio; https://www.facebook.com/kekey.moore/; https://www.facebook.com/diane.gil/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/now_what_radio/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@now_what_podcast?lang=en YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQVr4_MBqOP8gCwAPMFIkaA DJ Sessions: www.nowwhatpodcast.org/radio Listen to other episodes: www.nowwhatradio.com

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Can $1 Trillion Buy Us Better Healthcare? | Lanhee Chen

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:32


Another policy deep dive episode that will make you a lot more knowledgable about our healthcare system and what's happening with Medicare. Lanhee Chen joins us to break down the $1 trillion component of Bernie's $3.5 trillion "human" infrastructure bill, which supposedly expands Americans access to Medicare. We also cover the funding challenges with the current Medicare program, better ideas to help the working poor, debunk some myths about Britain and Canada's single payer systems, and ask whether or not Obamacare lived up to its promise of equalizing healthcare access for all Americans. Lanhee J. Chen, Ph.D. is the David and Diane Steffy Fellow in American Public Policy Studies at the Hoover Institution and Director of Domestic Policy Studies and Lecturer in the Public Policy Program at Stanford University. Follow Lanhee Chen on Twitter at @lanheechen.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Biden's Radical Budget Bill: Can Manchin And Sinema Rescue Their Party From Political Suicide?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:23


President Biden and congressional Democratic leaders ended last week without a vote on two colossal spending bills, recognizing that they had overplayed their hand. So is Biden's radical budget bill in trouble? Steve Forbes on whether Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema can rescue their party from political suicide.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Kaliner: Joe Biden's Infrastructure Plan Will Ruin America

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:58


In Hour 2 of the program, Pete talks about how far President Joe Biden has moved from being a moderate Democrat earlier in his political career and says that if his spending bill is approved - it will be Obamacare 2.0.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Politics Politics Politics
Episode 220: How much power can two cranky Democratic voting Senators possibly have?

Politics Politics Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 63:16


As we marvel at the cluster in congress surrounding Biden's Build Back Better bill we look back at the 2009 passage of Obamacare where... you guessed it... two Democratic votes gummed up the works. Is what happened a road map of the future? The good and bad news for Biden on COVID as Delta finally relents. Matt Donnelly (Ice Cream Social) joins us again to talk about the COVID politics of Las Vegas, quite possibly the only city in America where the people, the businesses and the politicians are all united in one common goal: providing the world a place to get wasted and gamble.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Implantable insulin pump, Doctors (not parents) miss T1D symptoms, Dexcom shelf-life extension and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:41


It's "In the News..." the only diabetes newscast! Top stories this week: Medtronic moves on implantable insulin pump, study: doctors - but not parents - are missing symptoms of T1D in kids, Dexcom "shelf-life extension" explained, news about whether COVID is causing a surge of diabetes in children and what happened with the Apple watch BG monitoring news? -- Join us each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT! Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Transcription Below:    Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. What helps people with diabetes gain better glucose control? Expansion of Medicaid. As part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, U.S. states were given the option of expanding Medicaid coverage to more people as a means of reducing the number of people without health insurance. As of today, only 12 states have not taken advantage. A new study finds that blood pressure and glucose control measures have improved in states that have. The researchers behind the study say it may take a while to show up but that, over the longer run, expanding Medicaid eligibility may improve key chronic disease health outcomes for low-income, marginalized populations. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/medicaid-expansion-improves-hypertension-and-diabetes-control XX Medtronic takes over the intellectual property rights to an implanted infusion pump. This is technology developed by the Alfred E Mann foundation. 25 years ago, there was a lot of buzz about implantable insulin pumps, but it hasn't panned out. The tech is just what it sounds like – a small insulin pump that goes under the skin and holds enough insulin for a few months. Medtronic had one on the market but pulled it almost 15 years ago. One of the drawbacks is that you have to go to the doctor every time you need to fil the pump and there's other upkeep – but the upside is said to be better control and a lot less thinking about diabetes. Interesting to follow this one. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronic-buys-implanted-infusion-pump-tech-to-develop-new-type-1-diabetes-treatment XX A story familiar to way too many parents.. symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers. This was a study of about 240 kids under 18.. published in Pediatric Diabetes These researchers found that 39% of parents had suspicions of new-onset diabetes before they brought their child in for care. Of those, the majority of parents first brought their child to the doctor with symptoms.. and then ended up bringing the same child to the emergency room within the next four weeks. This was a Swedish study, but research shows especially during COVID, diagnosis during DKA is increasing in children in many countries, showing the greater need for better education all around. https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-09-21/doctors-often-miss-signs-of-type-1-diabetes-in-kids XX We've heard a lot during this pandemic about an increase in new diabetes diagnoses. A new report from Mississippi, where providers are reporting a -quote – massive increase. One pediatric endocrinologist is says they've seen up to a 40% increase this year, compared to 2019. That's both type 1 and type 2. So what's going on? Lots of theories including indirect effects of quarantines, closures, and unemployment. It might sound odd to some, but severe emotional stress is thought to be a trigger for diabetes, especially in type 1. Additional studies show that COVID targets the insulin making pancreatic beta cells. A full understanding may be some time away, but these endos say the surge is real. XX Interesting listener question about Dexom sensors.. thanks for sending in this photo – seems that some customers are getting these G6 inserters – brand new in the original packaging – with a label that says “this product meets shelf life extension requirements.” I reached out to Dexcom and they told me: the stickers are legit and there are updated expirations dates. I've asked for a bit more information as to why they'd do something like this and if it means that all G6 sensors could have extended shelf life. They responded that they aren't going through all the sensors, so only the ones labeled can be considered extended.. no answer as to why now or to which part of the sensor or inserter actually expires. I'll follow up next time we talk for the podcast, but if you get one of these labeled sensors – the company says it's legit and safe. XX More to come, But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I've told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… Big news for a great children's book. JDRF has put Shia Learns About Insulin into the Bag of Hope. We had the author on the show last year... I'll link that episode up so you can hear the whole story. Shaina (SHAY-ahn-uh) Hatchell is a Registered Nurse, Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist, and Nurse Manager at the Howard University Diabetes Treatment Center. The story was inspired by her brother, who lives with T1D. The JDRF Bag of Hope is given to newly diagnosed children age 11 and under. Frankly, it's pretty hard to get new products in there – it's nice to see some more diverse representation. https://www.jdrf.org/press-releases/jdrf-announces-the-addition-of-shia-learns-about-insulin-book-into-the-bag-of-hope/ -- Last bit of news is note worthy for what didn't happen. Big apple news conference this month with absolutely no mention of blood glucose monitoring. You'll recall there was a ton of speculation about this all year long.. with many tech websites breathlessly reporting this was going to be happen. Look – I do think it will.. but there is really no hard evidence that anyone has come close to cracking this. Non invasive remotely accurate glucose monitoring is really hard. And, as I've said all along, we'll know it's for real when we see some clinical trials. -- Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is with American Idol contestant turned actor Kevin Covais – he's in a new Netflix show out this month and he spent some time this summer mentoring teens. Fun guy with great behind the scenes Idol stories, too. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
The Ten Year War with Jonathan Cohn

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 56:00


In “The Ten Year War: Obamacare and the Unfinished Crusade for Universal Coverage,” journalist Jonathan Cohn writes about the battle over healthcare and takes readers into the impetus for, history of, and current state of the Affordable Care Act. He joins to discuss what's missing, inflection points, the role of bipartisanship, and what the ACA means for Americans trying to navigate an increasingly complex system.

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E42: Saving Humanities | Stephen Blackwood

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 121:08


Dr. Stephen Blackwood: Philosopher, cultural critic and founder of Ralston College.  Jordan Peterson and Dr. Stephen Blackwood discuss his work as founder of the Inner City Youth Program and his experience with developing Ralston College in Savannah, Georgia. We get into a deep discussion about the inner workings of philosophical aspects about social constructs, University and the humanities, the spiritual ‘culture crisis' going on today, and more.  Dr. Stephen Blackwood is the founding president of Ralston College in Savannah, Georgia. Dr. Blackwood specializes in the history of philosophy and dedicates a large portion of his work and studies on Boethius. He has contributed a great deal to several programs including the St. George's YouthNet as well as an educational mentoring program for inner-city kids in Nova Scotia. Dr. Blackwood has been recognized by the floor of the US Senate due to his op-ed “ObamaCare and My Mother's Cancer Medicine” that reached the Wall Street Journal.  Check out Dr. Stephen Blackwood's website:  https://www.stephenjblackwood.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices