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    Paddle N' Fin
    S5E152 Feather & Fur- Jon Steigerwaldt, Great Lakes / Upper Midwest Forest Conservation Director

    Paddle N' Fin

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 80:40


    This week on Feather and Fur Brad sits down with Jon Steigerwaldt, Great Lakes / Upper Midwest Forest Conservation Director for the Ruffed Grouse Society and American Woodcock Society and we learn what diverse forest management all entails. Jon provides a high-level view of the multiple habitats needed for grouse and woodcock to succeed, the methods used to manage those habitats along with discussing new RGS & AWS projects around his region. Get your notebooks out as there is a ton of information in the episode! To learn more about the Ruffed Grouse Society and the impact they have head over to their website: https://ruffedgrousesociety.org/ Make sure to also follow their social media https://www.facebook.com/RuffedGrouseSociety https://www.instagram.com/ruffedgrousesociety/ To stay informed about their conservation efforts, subscribe to their monthly email. https://mailchi.mp/ruffedgrousesociety/bellwether Dale Hollow Lodging- www.eastport.info Fantasy Kayak League- www.paddlenfin.com/fantasy Waypoint TV- https://waypointtv.com Patreon-https://www.patreon.com/paddlenfin Podcast & Website- www.paddlenfin.com YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/paddlenfin Email- paddlenfin@gmail.com Social Media- @paddlenfin Yak Gadget- www.yakgadget.com Pelican Professional- www.pelican.com Rocktown paddlesports - rocktownadventures.com JigMasters Jigs- https://jigmasters.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Cloud Pod
    166: The Cloud Pod Eagerly Awaits the Microsoft Pay Increase

    The Cloud Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 61:47


    On The Cloud Pod this week, the team struggles with scheduling to get everyone in the same room for just one week. Plus, Microsoft increases pay for talent retention while changing licensing for European Cloud Providers, Google Cloud introduces AlloyDB for PostgreSQL, and AWS announces EC2 support for NitroTPM. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

    AWS Morning Brief
    Security Model Citizen Development

    AWS Morning Brief

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 5:06


    Links: Google Cloud Build deep dive Andrea Brancaleoni found an ELB header security issue An article on You Can't Opt Out of Citizen Development  DOJ Announces It Won't Prosecute White Hat Security Researchers Choosing the right certificate revocation method in ACM Private CA a somewhat... controversial AWS Security Maturity Model  AWS API calls that return credentials on GitHub

    Screaming in the Cloud
    On the Corner of Broadway and Tech with Carla Stickler

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 38:34


    About CarlaCarla Stickler is a professional multi-hyphenate advocating for the inclusion of artists in STEM. Currently, she works as a software engineer at G2 in Chicago. She loves chatting with folks interested in shifting gears from the arts to programming and especially hopes to get more women into the field. Carla spent over 10 years performing in Broadway musicals, most notably, “Wicked,” “Mamma Mia!” and “The Sound of Music.” She recently made headlines for stepping back into the role of Elphaba on Broadway for a limited time to help out during the covid surge after not having performed the role for 7 years. Carla is passionate about reframing the narrative of the “starving artist” and states, “When we choose to walk away from a full-time pursuit of the arts, it does not make us failed artists. The possibilities for what we can do and who we can be are unlimited.”Links Referenced: G2: https://www.g2.com/ Personal website: https://carlastickler.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sticklercarla/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn, there seems to be a trope in our industry that the real engineers all follow what more or less looks like the exact same pattern, where it's you wind up playing around with computers as a small child and then you wind up going to any college you want—as long as it's Stanford—and getting a degree in anything under the sun—as long as it's computer science—and then all of your next jobs are based upon how well you can re-implement algorithms on the whiteboard. A lot of us didn't go through that path. We wound up finding our own ways to tech. My guest today has one of the more remarkable stories that I've come across. Carla Stickler is a software engineer at G2. Carla, thank you for agreeing to suffer my slings and arrows today. It's appreciated.Carla: Thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, before you entered tech—I believe this is your first job as an engineer and as of the time we're recording this, it's been just shy of a year that you've done in the role. What were you doing before now?Carla: Oh, boy, Corey. What was I doing? I definitely was not doing software engineering. I was a Broadway actress. So, I spent about 15 years in New York doing musical theater, touring around the country and Asia in big Broadway shows. And that was pretty much all I did.I guess, I also was a teacher. I was a voice teacher and I taught voice lessons, and I had a studio and I taught it a couple of faculties in New York. But I was one hundred percent ride-or-die, like, all the way to the end musical theater or bust, from a very, very early age. So, it's been kind of a crazy time changing careers. [laugh].Corey: What inspired that? I mean, it doesn't seem like it's a common pattern of someone who had an established career as a Broadway actress to wake up one day and say, “You know what I don't like anymore. That's right being on stage, doing the thing that I spent 15 years doing. You know what I want to do instead? That's right, be mad at computers all the time and angry because some of the stuff is freaking maddening.” What was the catalyst that—Carla: Yeah, sounds crazy. [laugh].Corey: —inspired you to move?Carla: It sounds crazy. It was kind of a long time coming. I love performing; I do, and it's like, my heart and soul is with performing. Nothing else in my life really can kind of replace that feeling I get when I'm on stage. But the one thing they don't really talk about when you are growing up and dreaming of being a performer is how physically and emotionally taxing it is.I think there's, like, this narrative around, like, “Being an actor is really hard, and you should only do it if you can't see yourself doing anything else,” but they don't actually ever explain to you what hard means. You know, you expect that, oh, there's going to be a lot of other people doing it in, I'm going to be auditioning all the time, and I'm going to have a lot of competition, but you never quite grasp the physical and emotional toll that it takes on your body and your—you know, just ongoing in auditions and getting rejections all the time. And then when you're working in a show eight times a week and you're wearing four-inch heels on a stage that is on a giant angle, and you're wearing wigs that are, like, really, really massive, you don't really—no one ever tells you how hard that is on your body. So, for me, I just hit a point where I was performing nonstop and I was so tired. I was, like, living at my physical therapist's office, I was living at, like, my head therapist's office.I was just trying to, like, figure out why I was so miserable. And so, I actually left in 2015, performing full time. So, I went to get my Master's in Education at NYU thinking that teaching was my way out of performing full-time.Corey: It does seem that there's some congruities—there's some congruities there between your—instead of performing in front of a giant audience, you're performing in front of a bunch of students. And whether it's performing slash educating, well that comes down to almost stylistic differences. But I have a hard time imagining you just reading from your slides.Carla: Yeah, no, I loved it because it allowed me to create connections with my students, and I found I like to help inspire them on their journeys, and I really like to help influence them in a positive way. And so yeah, it came really natural to me. And my family—or I have a bunch of teachers in my family so, you know, teaching was kind of a thing I just assumed I would be good at, and I think I fell naturally into. But the thing that was really hard for me was while I was teaching, I was still… kind of—I had, like, one foot in performing. I was still, like, going in and out of the show that I've been working on, which I didn't mention.So, I was in Wicked for, like, ten years, that's kind of like my claim to fame. And I had been with that show for a really long time, and that was why—when I left to go teach, that was kind of my way out of that big show because it was hard for me to explain to people why it was leaving such a giant show. And teaching was just, like, a natural thing to go into. I felt like it was like a justifiable action, [laugh] you know, that I could explain to, like, my parents for why I was quitting Broadway.So, you know, I love teaching and—but I—and so I kept that one foot kind of in Broadway, and I was still going in and out of the show. It's like a vacation cover, filling in whenever they needed me, and I was still auditioning. But I was like, I was still so burned out, you know? Like, I still had those feelings of, like—and I wasn't booking work; I think my heart just wasn't really in it. Like, every time I'd go into audition, I would just feel awful about myself every time I left.And I was starting to really reject that feeling in my life because I was also starting to find there were other things in my life that made me really happy. Like, just having a life. Like, I had—for the first time in a very long time, I had friends that I could hang out with on the weekends because I wasn't working on the weekend. And I was able to, like, go to, you know, birthdays and weddings and I was having, like, this social life. And then every time I would go on an audition—Corey: And they did other things with their lives, and it wasn't—Carla: Yeah.Corey: All shop talk all the time—Carla: Right.Corey: Which speaking as someone who lives in San Francisco and worked in normal companies before starting this ridiculous one, it seems that your entire social circle can come out of your workplace. And congratulations, it's now all shop talk, all the time. And anyone you know or might be married to who's not deeply in tech just gets this long-suffering attitude on all of it. It's nice to be able to have varied conversations about different things.Carla: Yes. And so, I was like having all these, like—I was, like, having these life moments that felt really good, and then I would go to an audition and I would leave being, like, “Why do I do that to myself? Why do I need to feel like that?” Because I just feel awful every time I go. And so, then I was having trouble teaching my students because I was feeling really negative about it, and I was like, “I don't know how to encourage you to go into a business that's just going to, like, tear you down and make you feel awful about yourself all the time.”Corey: And then you got into tech?Carla: [laugh]. And then I was just, like, “Tech. That's great.” No, I—do you know what—Corey: Like, “I'm sad all the time and I feel like less than constantly. You know what I'm going to use to fix that? I'm going to learn JavaScript.” Oh, my God.Carla: Yeah. I'm going to just challenge myself and do the hardest thing I can think of because that's fun. But ki—I mean, sort of I [laugh] I, I was not ever—like, being an engineer was never, like, on my radar. My dad was an engineer for a long time, and he kind of always would be, like, “You're good at math. You should do engineering.”And I was like, “No, I'm an actor. [laugh]. I don't want to do that.” And so, I kind of always just, like, shooed it away. And when a friend of mine came to my birthday party in the summer of 2018, who had been a songwriter and I had done some readings of a musical of his, and he was like, “I'm an engineer now at Forbes. Isn't that great?”And I was like, “What? How does that happen? I need you to back up, explain to me what's going on.” And I just, like—but I went home and I could not stop thinking about it. I don't know if it was like my dad's voice in the back of my head, or there was like the stars aligned.My misery that I was feeling in my life, and, like, this new thing that just got thrown in my face was just such an exciting, interesting idea. I was like, “That sounds—I don't know what—I don't even know what that looks like or I don't even know what's involved in that, but I need to figure out how to do it.” And I went home when I first started teaching myself how to do it. And I would just sit on my couch and I would do, like, little coding challenges, and before I knew it, like, hours would have passed by, I forgot to eat, I forget to go to the bathroom. Like, I would just be, like, groove on the couch from where I was sitting for too long.And I was like, oh, I guess I really liked this. [laugh]. It's interesting, it's creative. Maybe I should do something with it.Corey: And then from there, did you decide at some point to pursue—like, a lot of paths into tech these days. There's a whole sea of boot camps, for example, that depending on how you look at them are either inspirational stories of how people can transform their lives, slash money-grabbing scams. And it really depends on the boot camp in particular, is that the path you took? Did you—Carla: Yes.Corey: Remain self-taught? How did you proceed from—there's a whole Couch-to-5k running program; what is about—I guess we'll call getting to tech—but what was your Couch-to-100k path?Carla: Yeah, I was just going to say, Couch-to-100k tech gig.Corey: Yeah.Carla: So, my friend to had gone to Flatiron School, which is a boot camp. I think they have a few locations around the country, and so I initially started looking at their program just because he had gone there, and it sounded great. And I was like, “Cool, great.” And they had a lot of free resources online. They have, like, this whole free, like, boot camp prep program that you can do that teaches Rails and JavaScript.And so, I started doing that online. And then I—at the time, they had, like, a part-time class. I like learning in person, which is funny because now I just work remote and I do everything on Google… it's like, Google and Stack Overflow. So—but I knew at the time—Corey: I have bad news about the people who are senior. It doesn't exactly change that much.Carla: Yeah, that's what I've heard, so I don't feel bad about telling people that I do it. [laugh].Corey: We're all Full Stack Overflow developers. It happens.Carla: Exactly. So yeah, I just. They had, like, a part-time front-end class that was, like, in person two nights a week for a couple months. And I was like, “Okay, that'll be a really good way to kind of get my feet wet with, like, a different kind of learning environment.”And I loved it. I fell in love with it. I loved being in a room of people trying to figure out how to do something hard. I liked talking about it with other people. I liked talking about it with my teachers.So, I was like, “Okay, I guess I'm going to invest in a boot camp.” And I did their, like, immersive, in-person boot camps. This was 2019 before everything shut down, so I was able to actually do it in person. And it was great. It was like, nine to six, five days a week, and it was really intense.Did I remember everything I learned when it was over? No. And did I have to, like, spend a lot of time relearning a lot of things just so I could have, like, a deeper understanding of it. Yes. But, like, I also knew that was part of it, you know? It's like, you throw a lot of information out you, hope some of it sticks, and then it's your job to make sure that you actually remember it and then know how to use it when you have to.Corey: One of the challenges that I've always found is that when I have a hobby that I'm into, similar to the way that you were doing this just for fun on your couch, and then it becomes your full-time focus, first as a boot camp and later as a job, that it has a tendency in some cases to turn a thing that you love into a thing that you view is this obligation or burden. Do you still love it? Is it still something that you find that's fun and challenging and exciting? Or is it more a means to an end for you? And there is no wrong answer there.Carla: Yeah, I think it's a little bit of both, right? Like, I found it was a creative thing I could do that I enjoy doing. Am I the most passionate software engineer that ever lived? No. Do I have aspirations to be, like, an architect one day? Absolutely not. I really, like, the small tickets that I do that are just, like, refactoring a button or, you know, like, I find that stuff creative and I think it's fun. Do I necessarily want to—Corey: You can see—Carla: —no.Corey: The results immediately as [crosstalk 00:15:15]—Carla: Yeah.Corey: More abstract stuff. It's like, “Well, when this 18 months migration finishes, and everything is 10% faster, oh, then I'll be vindicated.”Carla: Yeah. No.Corey: It's a little more attenuated from the immediate feedback.Carla: Yeah. I'm not that kind of developer, I'm learning. But I'm totally fine with that. I have no issue. Like, I am a very humble person about it. I don't have aspirations to be amazing.Don't ask me to do algorithm challenges. I'm terrible at them. I know that I'm terrible at them. But I also know that you can be a good developer and be terrible algorithm, like, challenges. So, I don't feel bad about it.Corey: The algorithm challenge is inherently biased for people who not only have a formal computer science education but have one relatively recently. I look back at some of the technical challenges I used to give candidates and take myself for jobs ten years ago, and I don't remember half of it because it's not my day-to-day anymore. It turns out that most of us don't have a job implementing quicksort. We just use the one built into the library and we move on with our lives to do something interesting and much more valuable, like, moving that button three pixels left, but because of CSS, that's now a two-week project.Carla: Yeah. Add a little border-radius, changes the su—you know. There are some database things I like. You know, I'm trying to get better at SQL. Rails is really nice because we use Active Record, and I don't really have to know SQL.But I find there are some things that you can do in Rails that are really cool, and I enjoyed working in their console. And that's exciting. You know when you write, like, a whole controller and then you make something but you can only see it in the console? That's cool. I think to me, that's fun. Being able to, like, generate things is fun. I don't have to always see them, like, on the page in a visual, pretty way, even though I tend to be more visual.Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: One of the big fictions that we tend to have as an industry is when people sit down and say, “Oh, so why did you get into tech?” And everyone expects it to be this aspirational story of the challenge, and I've been interested in this stuff since I was a kid. And we're all supposed to just completely ignore the very present reality of well, looking at all of my different opportunities, this is the one that pays three times what the others do. Like, we're supposed to pretend that money doesn't matter and we're all following our passion. That is actively ridiculous from where I sit.Carla: Mm-hm.Corey: Do you find that effectively going from the Broadway actress side of the world to—where, let's be clear, in the world of entertaining and arts—to my understanding—90% of people in that space are not able to do that as their only gig without side projects to basically afford to eat, whereas in tech, the median developer makes an extremely comfortable living that significantly outpaces the average median income for a family of four in the United States. Do you find that it has changed your philosophy on life in any meaningful way?Carla: Oh, my God, yeah. I love talking about on all of my social platforms the idea that you can learn tech skills and you can—like, there are so many different jobs that exist for an engineer, right? There are full-time jobs. There are full-time job that are flexible and they're remote, and nobody cares what time you're working as long as you get the work done. And because of that and because of the nature of how performing and being an artist works, where you also have a lot of downtime in between jobs or even when you are working, that I feel like the two go very, very well together, and that it allows—if an artist can spend a little bit of time learning the skill, they now have the ability to feel stable in their lives, also be creative how they want to, and decide what the art looks like for them without struggling and freaking out all the time about where's my next meal going to come from, or can I pay my rent?And, like, I sometimes think back to when I was on tour—I was on tour for three years with Wicked—and I had so much free time, Corey. Like, if I had known that I could have spent some time when I was just like hanging out in my hotel room watching TV all day, like, learning how to code. I would have been—I would have done this years ago. If I had known it was even, I don't even know actually if it was an option back then in, like, the early-2010s. I feel like boot camps kind of started around then, but they were mostly in person.But if I was—today, if I was right now starting my career as an artist, I would absolutely learn how to code as a side hustle. Because why wait tables? [laugh]. Why make, like, minimum wage in a terrible job that you hate when you can I have a skillset that you can do from home now because everything is remote for the most part? Why not?It doesn't make sense to me that anybody would go back to those kind of awful side gigs, side hustle jobs. Because at the end of the day, side hustle jobs end up actually being the things that you spend more time doing, just because theater jobs and art jobs and music jobs are so, you know, far apart when you have them. That might as well pick something that's lucrative and makes you feel less stressed out, you know, in the interim, between gigs. I see it as kind of a way to give artists a little more freedom in what they can choose to do with their art. Which I think is… it's kind of magical, right?Like, it takes away that narrative of if you can't see yourself—if you can see yourself doing anything else, you should do it, right? That's what we tell kids when they go into the arts. If you can see yourself doing any other thing, you know, you have to struggle to be an artist; that is part of the gig. That's what you sign up for. And I just call bullshit on it, Corey. I don't know if I can swear on this, but I call bullshit on [crosstalk 00:21:06]—[laugh].Corey: Oh, you absolutely can.Carla: I just think it's so unfair to young people, to how they get to view themselves and their creativity, right? Like, you literally stunt them when you tell them that. You say, “You can only do this one thing.” That's like the opposite of creative, right? That's like telling somebody that they can only do one thing without imagining that they can do all these other things. The most interesting artists that I know do, like, 400 things, they are creative people and they can't stop, right? They're like multi-hyphenates [crosstalk 00:21:39].Corey: It feels like it's setting people up for failure, on some level, in a big way where when you're building your entire life toward this make-or-break thing and then you don't get it, it's, well, what happens then?Carla: Yeah.Corey: I've always liked the idea of failure as a step forward. And well, that thing didn't work out; let's see if we can roll into it and see what comes out next. It's similar to the idea of a lot of folks who are career-changing, where they were working somewhere else in a white-collar environment, well time to go back to square one for an entry-level world. Hell with that. Pivot; take a half step toward what you want to be doing in your next role, and then a year or so later, take the other half step, and now you're doing it full time without having to start back at square one.I think that there are very few things in this world that are that binary as far as you either succeed or you're done and your whole life was a waste. It is easy get stuck in this idea that if your childhood dream doesn't come true, well give up and prepare for a life of misery. I just don't accept that.Carla: Yeah, I—Corey: But maybe it's because I have no choice because getting fired is my stock-in-trade. So, it wasn't until I built a company where I can't get fired from it that I really started to feel a little bit secure in that. But it does definitely leave its marks and its damages. I spent 12 years waiting for the surprise meeting with my boss and someone I didn't recognize from HR where they don't offer you coffee—that's always the tell when they don't offer coffee—and to realize it while I'm back on the job market again; time to find something new. It left me feeling more mercenary that I probably should have, which wasn't great for the career.What about you? Do you think that—did it take, on some level, a sense of letting go of old dreams? Was it—and did it feel like a creeping awareness that this was, like—that you felt almost cornered into it? Or how did you approach it?Carla: Yeah, I think I was the same way. I think I especially when you were younger because of that narrative, right, we tell people that if they decide to go into the arts, they have to be one hundred percent committed to it, and if they aren't one hundred percent and then they don't succeed, it is their fault, right? Like, if you give it everything that you have, and then it doesn't work out, you have clearly done something wrong, therefore you are a failure. You failed at your dream because you gave it everything that you have, so you kind of set yourself up for failure because you don't allow yourself to, you know, be more of who you are in other ways.For me, I just spent so many I had so many moments in my life where I thought that the world was over, right? Like, when I was—right out of college, I went to school to study opera. And I was studying at Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, it was, like, the great, great conservatory, and halfway through my freshman year, I got diagnosed with a cyst on my vocal cords. So, basically what this meant was that I had to have surgery to have it removed, and the doctor told me that I probably would never sing opera. And I was devastated.Like, I was—this was the thing I wanted to do with my life; I had committed myself one hundred percent, and now all of a sudden this thing happened, and I panicked. I thought it was my fault—because there was nobody to help me understand that it wasn't—and I was like, “I have failed this thing. I have failed my dream. What am I going to do with my life?” And I said, “Okay I'll be an actor because acting is a noble thing.” And that's sort of like act—that's sort of like performing; it's performing in a different way, it's just not singing.And I was terrified to sing again because I had this narrative in my head that I was a failed singer if I co,uldn't be an opera singer. And so, it took me, like, years, three years before I finally started singing again I got a voice teacher, and he—I would cry through all of my lessons. He was like, “Carly, you really have a—should be singing. Like, this is something that you're good at.” And I was like, no because if I can't sing, like, the way I want to sing, why would I sing?And he really kind of pushed me and helped me, like, figure out what my voice could do in a new way. And it was really magical for me. It made me realize that this narrative that I've been telling myself of what I thought that I was supposed to be didn't have to be true. It didn't have to be the only one that existed; there could be other possibilities for what I could do and they could look different. But I closed myself off to that idea because I had basically been told no, you can't do this thing that you want to do.So, I didn't even consider the possibilities of the other things that I could do. And when I relearned how to sing, it just blew my mind because I was like, “Oh, my God, I didn't know this was possible. I didn't know in my body it was possible of this. I didn't know if I could do this.” And, like, overcoming that and making me realize that I could do other things, that there were other versions of what I wanted, kind of blew my mind a little bit.And so, when I would hit road bumps and I'd hit these walls, I was like, “Okay, well, maybe I just need to pivot. Maybe the direction I'm going in isn't quite the right one, but maybe if I just, like, open my eyes a little bit, there's another—there's something else over here that is interesting and will be creative and will take me in a different way, an unexpected way that I wasn't expecting.” And so, I've kind of from that point on sort of living my life like that, in this way that, well, this might be a roadblock, and many people might view this thing as a failure, but for me, it allowed me to open up all these other new things that I didn't even know I could do, right? Like, what I'm doing now is something I never would have imagined I'd be doing five years ago. And now I'm also in a place where not only am I doing something completely different as a software engineer, but I have this incredible opportunity to also start incorporating art back into my life in a way that I can own and I can do for myself instead of having to do for other people.Which is also something I never thought because I thought it was all or nothing. I thought if I was an artist, I was an artist; I'm a software engineer, I'm a software engineer. And so, now I have the ability to kind of live in this weird gray area of getting to make those decisions for myself, and recognize that those little failures were, you know—like, I like to call them, like, the lowercase failures instead of the uppercase failure, right? Like, I am not a failure because I experienced failure. Those little failures are kind of what led me to grow my strength and my resilience and my ability to recognize it more free—like, more quickly when I see it so that I can bounce back faster, right?Like, when I hit a wall, instead of living in that feeling of, like, “Ugh, God, this is the worst thing that ever happened,” I allow myself to move faster through it and recognize that there will be light on the other side. I will get there. And I know that it's going to be okay, and I can trust that because it's always been okay. I always figure it out. And so, that's something—taken me a long time to, like, realize, you know? To, like, really learn, you have to fail a lot to learn that you're going to be okay every time it happens. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, what's the phrase? “Sucking at something is the first step to being kind of good at it?”Carla: Yeah. You got to let yourself suck at it. When I used to teach voice, I would make my students make just, like, the ugliest sounds because I was like, if we can just get past the fact that no matter what, when you sing you're going to sound awful at some point. We're going to try something, you're going to crack, it's not going to come out right, and if we can't own that it's going to suck a little bit on the journey to being good, like, you're going to have a really hard time getting there because you're just going to beat yourself up every time it sucks. Like, it's going to suck a lot [laugh] before you get good. And that's just part of it. That's, like, it is just a part of the process, and you have to kind of own it.Corey: I think that as people we are rarely as one-dimensional as we imagine we are when. And for example, I like working with cloud services, let's not kid ourselves on this. But I have a deep and abiding love affair with the sound of my own voice, so I'm always going to find ways to work that into it. I have a hard time seeing a future career for you that does not in some way, shape or form, tie back to your performing background because even now, talking about singing, you lit up when talking about that in a way that no one does—or at least should—light up when they're talking about React. So, do you think that there's a place between the performing side of the world and the technical side of the world, or those phases of your life, that's going to provide interesting paths for you down the road?Carla: That is a good question, Corey. And I don't know if I have the answer. You know, I think one thing—if there's anything I learned from all the crazy things that happened to me, is that I just kind of have to be open. You know, I like to say yes to things. And also learning to say no, which has been really a big deal for me.Corey: Oh, yes.“, no,” is a complete sentence and people know that sometimes at their own peril.Carla: Yes, I have said no to some things lately, and it's felt very good. But I like to be open, you know? I like to feel like if I'm putting out good things into the world, good things will come back to me, and so I'm just trying to keep that open. You know, I'm trying to be the best engineer that I can be. And I'm trying to also, you know—if I can use my voice and my platform to help inspire other people to see that there are other ways of being an artist, there are, you know, there are other paths in this world to take.I hope that, you know, I can, other things will come up to me, there'll be opportunities. And I don't know what those look like, but I'm open. So, if anybody out there hears this and you want to collaborate, hit me up. [laugh].Corey: Careful what you offer. People don't know—people have a disturbing tendency of saying, “Well, all right, I have an idea.” That's where a lot of my ridiculous parody music videos came from. It's like, “So, what's the business case for doing?” It's like, “Mmm, I think it'll be funny.”It's like, “Well, how are you going to justify the expense?” “Oh, there's a line item and the company budget labeled ‘Spite.' That's how.” And it's this weird combination of things that lead to a path that on some level makes perfect sense, but at the time you're building this stuff out, it feels like you're directionless and doing all these weird things. Like, one of the, I guess, strange parts of looking back at a path you take in the course of your career is, in retrospect, it feels like every step for the next was obvious and made intuitive sense, but going through it it's, “I have no idea what I'm doing. I'm like the dog that caught the car, and they need to desperately figure out how to drive the thing before it hits the wall.”It's just a—I don't pretend to understand how the tapestry of careers tie together, but I do know that I'm very glad to see people in this space, who do not all have the same ridiculous story for how they got in here. That's the thing that I find continually obnoxious, this belief that there's only one way to do it, or you're somehow less than because you didn't grow up programming in the '90s. Great. There's a lot of people like that. And yes, it is okay to just view computers as a job that pays the bills; there is nothing inherently wrong with that.Carla: Yeah. And I mean, and I—Corey: I just wish people were told that early on.Carla: Yeah, why not? Right? Why didn't anybody tell us that? Like, you don't—the thing that I did not—it took me a long time to realize is that you do not have to be passionate about your job. And that's like, that's okay, right? All you have to do is enjoy it enough to do it, but it does not have to be, like—Corey: You have to like it, on some level [crosstalk 00:33:10]—Carla: Yeah, you just do have to like it. [laugh].Corey: —dreading the 40 hours a week, that's a miserable life on some level.Carla: Like, I sit in front of a computer now all day, and I enjoy it. Like, I enjoy what I'm doing. But again, like, I don't need to be the greatest software engineer that ever lived; I have other things that I like to do, and it allows me to also do those things. And that is what I love about it. It allows me that ability to just enjoy my weekends and have a stable career and have a stable life and have health insurance. And then when I want—Corey: Oh, the luxuries of modern life.Carla: [laugh]. Yeah, the luxuries of modern life. Health insurance, who knew? Yeah, you know, so it's great. And then when creative projects come up, I can choose to say yes or no to them, and that's really exciting for me.Corey: I have a sneaking suspicion—I'll just place my bet now—that the world of performing is not quite done with you yet.Carla: Probably not. I would be lying if I said it was. I—so before all this stuff, I don't know if your listeners know this, but in January, the thing that kind of happened to me that went a little viral where I went back to Broadway after not being on Broadway for a little while, and the news media and everybody picked up on it, and there were like these headlines of, “Software engineer plays Elphaba on Broadway after seven years.” It surprised me, but it also didn't surprise me, you know? Like, when I left, I left thinking I was done.And I think it was easy to leave when I left because of the pandemic, right? There was nothing going on when I—like, I started my journey before the pandemic, but I fully shifted into software engineering during the pandemic. So, I never had feelings of, like, “I'm missing out on performing,” because performing didn't exist. There was no Broadway for a while. And so, once it kind of started to come back last year in the fall, I was like, “Oh, maybe I miss it a little bit.”And maybe I accidentally manifested it, but, you know, when Wicked called and I flew back to New York for those shows, and I was like, “Oh, this is really wonderful.” Also, I'm really glad I don't have to do this eight times a week. I'm so excited to go home. And I was like, having a little taste of it made me realize, “Oh, I can do this if I want to do this. I also don't have to do this if I don't want to do this.” And that was pretty—it was very empowering. I was like, “That feels nice.”Corey: I really appreciate your taking so much time to talk about how you've gone through what at the time has got to have felt like a very strange set of career steps, but it's starting to form into something that appears to have an arc to it. If people want to learn more and follow along as you continue to figure out what you're going to do next, where's the best place to find you?Carla: Oh, good question, Corey. I do a website, carlastickler.com. Because I've had a lot of people—artists, in particular—reaching out and asking how I did this, I'm starting to build some resources, and so you can sign up for my mailing list.I also am pretty big on Instagram if we're going to choose social media. So, my Instagram is stiglercarla. And there's links to all that stuff on my website. But—Corey: And they will soon be in the [show notes 00:36:26] as well.Carla: Ah yes, add them to the show notes. [laugh]. Yeah, and I want to make sure that I… I want—a lot of people who've seen my story and felt very inspired by it. A lot of artists who have felt that they, too, were failures because they chose not to go into art and get a regular nine to five. And so, I'm trying to, like, kind of put a little bit more of that out there so that people see that they're not alone.And so, on my social media, I do post a lot of stories that people send to me, just telling me their story about how they made the transition and how they keep art in their life in different ways. And so, that's something that also really inspires me. So, I tried to put their voices up, too. So, if anybody is interested in feeling not alone, feeling like there are other people out there, all of us, quote-unquote, “Failed artists,” and there's a lot of us. And so, I'm just trying to create a little space for all of us.Corey: I look forward to seeing it continue to evolve.Carla: Thank you.Corey: Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Carla: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Carla Stickler, software engineer at G2 and also very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, and if it's on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe buttons, as the kids of today are saying, whereas if you've hated this podcast, same thing: Five-star review, smash the buttons, but also leave an angry comment telling me exactly what you didn't like about this, and I will reply with the time and date for your audition.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    The OMFIF Podcast
    How can central banks innovate in the digital age?

    The OMFIF Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 31:03


    Xiaochen Zhang is principal manager at Amazon Web Services. Prior to AWS, Xiaochen worked with many portfolio companies in launching new offers, entering into new markets and building transformative collaborative initiatives on central bank digital currencies, sustainable development and blockchain. Xiaochen built strong collaborations with government agencies, multinational organisations and financial institutions through work with the World Bank, United Nations, Inter-America Development Bank, Astana International Finance Center, FinTech4Good and many other international platforms in the past 20 years.

    Culture Factor 2.0
    Trey Pezzetti: VaynerNFT Building Partnerships that Lead with Empathy & Education

    Culture Factor 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 44:43


    Trey serves as a Director of Client Partnerships at Vayner NFT. He focuses on educating his clients on the advantages of NFTs and the business impact Web3 space can have on their relationships with consumers. He leads his clients in all stages of their NFT journey, ensuring authentic entry to the space and building long-term strategic NFT programs. Prior to joining VaynerNFT, he worked as a team lead at an Artificial Intelligence consulting firm and spent 3 years helping build DraftKings marketing partnerships. Trey is focused on putting his clients in a position to take advantage of the next generation of the internet.Building impact in the Web3 space requires a ton of EQ and AQ and Gary Vaynerchuck and all his various businesses are the blueprint of making sure that the unattractive parts of Web 2 do not seep into the company culture or the client relationships. So it is imperative that the people he entrusts also carry this determination to build an empathetic Web3. You are tasked with all phases of a project with the client but the authentic entry and onboarding process really sets the tone for their experience. What parts of your history, be it upbringing, school or work experience prepared you most for this? I often speak on this show about road-maps and the rug pulls that are unsuccessful in meeting any part of the promises made. So what excited me about having this conversation with you specifically is that you are achieving this at the highest level in the NFT ecosystem with VaynerNFT.  Part of your role at VaynerNFT is building long-term strategic programs. And with very high profile clients. I myself did this in my tenure in white glove hospitality and know how discerning this client can be. How do you navigate delivering on the vision of a client? And on a more granular level, how do you build out utility that not only serves the client but is attainable?Can you give an example or case study of a client either at your time at Draftkings or VaynerNFT that allowed you to break new ground to create something that you yourself didn't see at the start but turned into magic?The VaynerNFT model really creates an open forum for diversity and empathy. These are core tenants for my show. If I'm not representing that in the speakers and the content I create, then I'm not solving for the future. What do you see for the future in terms of trends and how you and VaynerNFT can possibly solve for the bigger picture?Are there any projects you are working on that you are especially excited about?Are there brands or areas of businesses that you are dreaming about creating NFT projects with?Identify your portfolio with NFT purchases. We present ourselves on social media differently, so why not in your wallet! We embody different personalities, professionally, personally, artistically, politically, with family, different social norms based on environment and who you are with.Circular economy with NFTs and musicians.Left field question: are you open to partnerships with creators that come to you with ideas, say through VeeFriends, Discord channels or DAOs?Catch another great episode! https://culturefactor.simplecast.com/episodes/brian-fanzo-p1-early-adoption-the-101-on-nfts-web3-blockchain-and-creator-coins-jmcxjfkshttps://youtu.be/-NQ0W2w3Uo4 #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #metaverse #bitcoinTrey Pezzetti on TwitterHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, ClubhouseMusic by Paco Hallak 

    Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
    Leveraging Population Health Technologies to Advance Progress on Health Disparities

    Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 36:01


    In this episode we are joined by Dr. Abdul Shaikh, Principal for Population Health Analytics, World Wide Public Sector Healthcare for Amazon Web Services, Dr. Reed Tuckson, Co-Founder of The Black Coalition Against COVID and Co-Chair of the Digital Action Collaborative, National Academy of Medicine and Dr. David Ansell, Senior Vice President of Community Health Equity for Rush University Medical Center as they discuss the role of technology, data, and community engagement for health equity.This episode is sponsored by AWS.

    The Sound Off Podcast
    Should You Transcribe Your Podcast?

    The Sound Off Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 6:40


    In the 6 years since we started a podcast, there has been a total of one (1) request for a transcription of an episode. That was the Natasha Gargiulo episode back in 2018, and the person asking was hearing impaired. Natasha has a very large Canadian following, and I would have been more than happy to help out one of her followers. Sadly, at the time, I was largely clueless on how to do this. Today, I am happy to report that I know a little more on the topic.At Podcast Movement last month, the Live New Media show with ToddCochrane and Rob Greenlee had Andy Bowers, Rachael King and James Cridland on as guests, and the subject of transcription came up.I have to admit that after dabbling with the offerings from Headliner, Descript, and the Microsoft offering in my subscription, I was largely underwhelmed with its efficiency and honestly questioned its necessity. After a brief Twitter exchange, I pivoted positions; providing a transcription is the right thing to do for your show. There are some SEO benefits, and it adds a nice dimension to your website content.But these questions were still burning:-Why is it the responsibility of the content creator to provide them?-Why would I want someone reading the show when I want them listening to it? (I get paid in downloads, you know.)-Why should I pay for this? It's expensive.I think I can answer these.Companies like Amazon, Google, Spotify, and Apple all have the technology to do this. But there is nothing in it for them. In fact, all it takes is a few mis-transcribed words to launch them into a lawsuit.As for people reading the show rather than downloading it, that might happen- and if the person doing so is hearing impaired, that should make you feel good. But here's a side marketing bonus you probably didn't consider: Bloggers and writers can easily cut and paste quotes from you and your guests, and credit your podcast. This recently happened to one of my older episodes, and it led to a few more followers. Sometimes it's the things that you didn't plan for that make it all worthwhile.As for justifying the price, that's going to have to be a personal decision. It's more than the subscription cost- it's also spending the time after the transcription has been made to verify spelling and oddly pronounced words. It will likely take you even longer If your podcast is about something scientific or medical, or cities in Wales. As it stands now, some transcripts refer to me as Mad Kendall which I am considering adopting as my new wrestling name. And for networks who manage podcasts, between paying the humans reviewing the shows and paying for the subscriptions, the costs add up.One of the big reasons podcasters get involved with transcription is for the SEO. However, there are some who believe that simply attaching a transcription to the bottom of the episode page on your website will result in Google judging the page to be too long for ideal consumption.My thanks to James Cridland for the suggestion of finding a sponsor to assist with the payment of the podcast transcription costs. Your podcast is more than just pre-rolls and mid-rolls.Look for newer episodes of the Sound Off Podcast to contain transcriptions of each episode via Poddin.io. We decided to partner with Poddin because of its efficiency and its downloadable player, ease of use, and now with the ability to pull from your podcast's RSS feed.Here are some of the other services we tried and largely liked. Choose wisely.Headliner, Descript, Microsoft, AWS, Trint ------Also a thanks to our latest sponsor, The CHR Prep Service. Click to get a free trial.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Greymatter
    Jerry Chen & Jason Risch | VC Funding for the Cloud

    Greymatter

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 20:47


    Audio version of the latest essay by Greylock investors' Jerry Chen and Jason Risch. As part of our ongoing Castles in the Cloud project, we've compiled and analyzed VC funding data into cloud-focused startups in 2021 and Q1 2022. We are mapping the activity in the venture capital-funded startup ecosystem with that of the Big 3 Cloud providers: AWS, Azure, and GCP. You can read the essay here: https://greylock.com/greymatter/vc-funding-for-the-cloud/ You can find the entire Castles in the Cloud project here: https://greylock.com/castles/

    AWS Morning Brief
    An AWS Free Tier Bill Shock: Your Next Steps

    AWS Morning Brief

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 9:35


    Want to give your ears a break and read this as an article? You're looking for this link.https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/an-aws-free-tier-bill-shock-your-next-stepsNever miss an episode Join the Last Week in AWS newsletter Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts Help the show Leave a review Share your feedback Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts What's Corey up to? Follow Corey on Twitter (@quinnypig) See our recent work at the Duckbill Group Apply to work with Corey and the Duckbill Group to help lower your AWS bill

    Der AWS-Podcast auf Deutsch
    40 - VMware Cloud on AWS mit Oliver Grassl

    Der AWS-Podcast auf Deutsch

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 28:26


    Mit VMware Cloud on AWS können VMware-Kunden ihre virtualisierten Systeme direkt zu AWS migrieren, ihre Disaster Recovery-Prozesse modernisieren und bestehende Rechenzentren ohne großen Aufwand in die Cloud erweitern oder auch vollständig ersetzen. In dieser Episode spricht Oliver Grassl über die typischen Anwendungsszenarien für VMware Cloud on AWS, aber auch über seine eigene Rolle als Specialist Solutions Architect bei AWS. Links zur Sendung: VMware Cloud on AWS Oliver Grassl bei LinkedIn und auf Twitter Der offizielle deutschsprachige Podcast rund um Amazon Web Services (AWS), für Neugierige, Cloud-Einsteiger und AWS-Experten, produziert von Dennis Traub, Developer Advocate bei AWS. Bei Fragen, Anregungen und Feedback wendet euch gerne direkt an Dennis auf Twitter (@dtraub) oder per Mail an traubd@amazon.com. Für mehr Infos, Tipps und Tricks rund um AWS und die Cloud folgt Dennis auf: Twitter - https://twitter.com/dtraub LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/dennis-traub YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/dennistraub

    Found
    Nikil Viswanathan and Joe Lau, Alchemy

    Found

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 52:41


    Alchemy co-founders Nikil Viswanathan and Joe Lau were persistent in their search for the right startup idea. The duo that an investor once compared to cockroaches for their ability to survive , talk to Jordan and Darrell about building such a trusting founder relationship, staying ahead of their competition by working closely with their customers – Web3 designers, and how they've managed to more or less leave their venture capital dollars in the bank.  Take our listener survey and let us know a bit about yourself and what you think of FOUND.Connect with us:On TwitterOn InstagramVia email: found@techcrunch.comCall us and leave a voicemail at (510) 936-1618

    Screaming in the Cloud
    Let Your Backups Help you Sleep with Simon Bennett

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 33:43


    About SimonFounder and CEO of SnapShooter a backup company Links Referenced: SnapShooter.com: https://SnapShooter.com MrSimonBennett: https://twitter.com/MrSimonBennett TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that I learned early on in my career as a grumpy Unix systems administrator is that there are two kinds of people out there: those who care about backups an awful lot, and people who haven't lost data yet. I lost a bunch of data once upon a time and then I too fell on the side of backups are super important. Here to talk with me about them a bit today is Simon Bennett, founder and CEO of SnapShooter.com. Simon, thanks for joining me.Simon: Thanks for having me. Thank you very much.Corey: It's fun to be able to talk to people who are doing business in the cloud space—in this sense too—that is not venture-backed, that is not, “Well, we have 600 people here that are building this thing out.” And similar to the way that I handle things at The Duckbill Group, you are effectively one of those legacy things known as a profitable business that self-funds. What made you decide to pursue that model as opposed to, well, whatever the polite version of bilking venture capitalists out of enormous piles of money for [unintelligible 00:01:32]?Simon: I think I always liked the idea of being self-sufficient and running a business, so I always wanted to start a physical business when I was younger, but when I got into software, I realized that that's a really easy way, no capital needed, to get started. And I tried for years and years to build products, all of which failed until finally SnapShooter actually gained a customer. [laugh].Corey: “Oh, wait, someone finally is paying money for this, I guess I'm onto something.”Simon: Yeah.Corey: And it's sort of progressed from there. How long have you been in business?Simon: We started in 2017, as… it was an internal project for a company I was working at who had problems with DigitalOcean backups, or they had problems with their servers getting compromised. So, I looked at DigitalOcean API and realized I could build something. And it took less than a week to build a product [with billing 00:02:20]. And I put that online and people started using it. So, that was how it worked.Every other product I tried before, I'd spent months and months developing it and never getting a customer. And the one time I spent less than [laugh] less than a week's worth of evenings, someone started paying. I mean, admittedly, the first person was only paying a couple of dollars a month, but it was something.Corey: There's a huge turning point where you just validate the ability and willingness for someone to transfer one dollar from their bank account to yours. It speaks to validation in a way that social media nonsense generally doesn't. It's the oh, someone is actually willing to pay because I'm adding value to what they do. That's no small thing.Simon: Yeah. There's definitely a big difference between people saying they're going to and they'd love it, and actually doing it. So.Corey: I first heard about you when Patrick McKenzie—or @patio11, as he goes by on Twitter—wound up doing a mini-thread on you about, “I've now used SnapShooter.com for real, and it was such a joy, including making a server migration easier than it would otherwise have been. Now, I have automatically monitored backups to my own S3 account for a bunch of things, which already had a fairly remote risk of failure.” And he keeps talking about the awesome aspects of it. And okay, when Patrick says, “This is neat,” that usually means it's time for me to at least click the link and see what's going on.And the thing that jumped out at me was a few things about what it is that you offer. You talk about making sure that people can sleep well at night, that it's about why backups are important, about—you obviously check the boxes and talk about how you do things and why you do them the way that you do, but it resonates around the idea of helping people sleep well at night. Because no one wants to think about backups. Because no one cares about backups; they just care an awful lot about restores, usually right after they should have cared about the backups.Simon: Yeah. This is actually a big problem with getting customers because I don't think it's on a lot of people's minds, getting backups set up until, as you said in the intro, something's gone wrong. [laugh]. And then they're happy to be a customer for life.Corey: I started clicking around and looking at your testimonials, for example, on your website. And the first one I saw was from the CEO of Transistor.fm. For those who aren't familiar with what they do, they are the company that hosts this podcast. I pay them as a vendor for all the back issues and whatnot.Whenever you download the show. It's routing through their stuff. So yeah, I kind of want them to have backups of these things because I really don't want to have all these conversations [laugh] again with everyone. That's an important thing. But Transistor's business is not making sure that the data is safe and secure; it's making podcasts available, making it easy to publish to them.And in your case, you're handling the backup portion of it so they can pay their money and they set it up effectively once—set it and forget it—and then they can go back to doing the thing that they do, and not having to fuss with it constantly. I think a lot of companies get it wrong, where they seem to think that people are going to make sustained, engaged efforts in whatever platform or tool or service they build. People have bigger fish to fry; they just want the thing to work and not take up brain sweat.Simon: Yeah. Customers hardly ever log in. I think it's probably a good sign when they don't have to log in. So, they get their report emails, and that's that. And they obviously come back when they got new stuff to set up, but from a support point of view is pretty, pretty easy, really, people don't—[laugh] constantly on there.Corey: From where I sit, the large cloud providers—and some of the small ones, too—they all have backup functionality built into the offering that they've got. And some are great, some are terrible. I assume—perhaps naively—that all of them do what it says on the tin and actually back up the data. If that were sufficient, you wouldn't have any customers. You clearly have customers. What is it that makes those things not work super well?Simon: Some of them are inflexible. So, some of the providers have built-in server backups that only happen weekly, and six days of no backups can be a big problem when you've made a mistake. So, we offer a lot of flexibility around how often you backup your data. And then another key part is that we let you store your data where you want. A lot of the providers have either vendor lock-in, or they only store it in themselves. So… we let you take your data from one side of the globe to the other if you want.Corey: As anyone who has listened to the show is aware, I'm not a huge advocate for multi-cloud for a variety of excellent reasons. And I mean that on a per-workload basis, not, “Oh, we're going to go with one company called Amazon,” and you use everything that they do, including their WorkMail product. Yeah, even Amazon doesn't use WorkMail; they use Exchange like a real company would. And great, pick the thing that works best for you, but backups have always been one of those areas.I know that AWS has great region separation—most of the time. I know that it is unheard of for there to be a catastrophic data loss story that transcends multiple regions, so the story from their side is very often, oh, just back it up to a different region. Problem solved. Ignoring the data transfer aspect of that from a pricing perspective, okay. But there's also a risk element here where everyone talks about the single point of failure with the AWS account that it's there, people don't talk about as much: it's your payment instrument; if they suspend your account, you're not getting into any region.There's also the story of if someone gets access to your account, how do you back that up? If you're going to be doing backups, from my perspective, that is the perfect use case, to put it on a different provider. Because if I'm backing up from, I don't know, Amazon to Google Cloud or vice versa, I have a hard time envisioning a scenario in which both of those companies simultaneously have lost my data and I still care about computers. It is very hard for me to imagine that kind of failure mode, it's way out of scope for any disaster recovery or business continuity plan that I'm coming up with.Simon: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, I haven't—[laugh] I don't have that in my disaster recovery plan, to be honest about going to a different cloud, as in, we'll solve that problem when it happens. But the data is, as you say, in two different places, or more. But yeah, the security one is a key one because, you know, there's quite a lot of surface area on your AWS account for compromising, but if you're using either—even a separate AWS account or a different provider purely for storage, that can be very tightly controlled.Corey: I also appreciate the idea that when you're backing stuff up between different providers, the idea of owning both sides of it—I know you offer a solution where you wind up hosting the data as well, and that has its value, don't get me wrong, but there are also times, particularly for regulated industries, where yeah, I kind of don't want my backup data just hanging out with someone else's account with whatever they choose to do with it. There's also the verification question, which again, I'm not accusing you of in any way, shape, or form of being nefarious, but it's also one of those when I have to report to a board of directors of like, “Are you sure that they're doing what they say they're doing?” It's a, “Well, he seemed trustworthy,” is not the greatest answer. And the boards ask questions like that all the time. Netflix has talked about this where they backup a rehydrate-the-business level of data to Google Cloud from AWS, not because they think Amazon is going to disappear off the face of the earth, but because it's easier to do that and explain it than having to say, “Well, it's extremely unlikely and here's why,” and not get torn to pieces by auditors, shareholders, et cetera. It's the path of least resistance, and there is some validity to it.Simon: Yeah, when you see those big companies who've been with ransomware attacks and they've had to either pay the ransom or they've literally got to build the business from scratch, like, the cost associated with that is almost business-ending. So, just one backup for their data, off-site [laugh] they could have saved themselves millions and millions of pounds. So.Corey: It's one of those things where an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. And we're still seeing that stuff continue to evolve and continue to exist out in the ecosystem. There's a whole host of things that I think about like, “Ooh, if I lost, that would be annoying but not disastrous.” When I was going through some contractual stuff when we were first setting up The Duckbill Group and talking to clients about this, they would periodically ask questions about, “Well, what's your DR policy for these things?” It's, “Well, we have a number of employees; no more than two are located in the same city anywhere, and we all work from laptops because it is the 21st century, so if someone's internet goes out, they'll go to a coffee shop. If everyone's internet goes out, do you really care about the AWS bill that month?”It's a very different use case and [unintelligible 00:11:02] with these things. Now, let's be clear, we are a consultancy that fixes AWS bills; we're not a hospital. There's a big difference in the use case and what is acceptable in different ways. But what I like is that you have really build something out that lets people choose their own adventure in how managed they want it to be, what the source is, what the target should be. And it gives people enough control but without having to worry about the finicky parts of aligning a bunch of scripts that wind up firing off in cron jobs.Simon: Yeah. I'd say a fair few people run into issues running scripts or, you know, they silently fail and then you realize you haven't actually been running backups for the last six months until you're trying to pull them, even if you were trying to—Corey: Bold of you to think that I would notice it that quickly.Simon: [laugh]. Yeah, right. True. Yeah, that's presuming you have a disaster recovery plan that you actually test. Lots of small businesses have never even heard of that as a thing. So, having as us, kind of, manage backups sort of enables us to very easily tell people that backups of, like—we couldn't take the backup. Like, you need to address this.Also, to your previous point about the control, you can decide completely where data flows between. So, when people ask us about what's GDPR policies around data and stuff, we can say, “Well, we don't actually handle your data in that sense. It goes directly from your source through almost a proxy that you control to your storage.” So.Corey: The best answer: GDPR is out of scope. Please come again. And [laugh] yeah, just pass that off to someone else.Simon: In a way, you've already approved those two: you've approved the person that you're managing servers with and you've already approved the people that are doing storage with. You kind of… you do need to approve us, but we're not handling the data. So, we're handling your data, like your actual customer; we're not handling your customer's customer's data.Corey: Oh, yeah. Now, it's a valuable thing. One of my famous personal backup issues was okay, “I'm going to back this up onto the shared drive,” and I sort of might have screwed up the backup script—in the better way, given the two possible directions this can go—but it was backing up all of its data and all the existing backup data, so you know, exponential growth of your backups. Now, my storage vendor was about to buy a boat and name it after me when I caught that. “Oh, yeah, let's go ahead and fix that.”But this stuff is finicky, it's annoying, and in most cases, it fails in silent ways that only show up as a giant bill in one form or another. And not having to think about that is valuable. I'm willing to spend a few hours setting up a backup strategy and the rest; I'm not willing to tend it on an ongoing basis, just because I have other things I care about and things I need to get done.Simon: Yeah. It's such a kind of simple and trivial thing that can quickly become a nightmare [laugh] when you've made a mistake. So, not doing it yourself is a good [laugh] solution.Corey: So, it wouldn't have been a @patio11 recommendation to look at what you do without having some insight into the rest of the nuts and bolts of the business and the rest. Your plans are interesting. You have a free tier of course, which is a single daily backup job and half a gig of storage—or bring your own to that it's unlimited storage—Simon: Yep. Yeah.Corey: Unlimited: the only limits are your budget. Yeah. Zombo.com got it slightly wrong. It's not your mind, it's your budget. And then it goes from Light to Startup to Business to Agency at the high end.A question I have for you is at the high end, what I've found has been sort of the SaaS approach. The top end is always been a ‘Contact Us' form where it's the enterprise scope of folks where they tend to have procurement departments looking at this, and they're going to have a whole bunch of custom contract stuff, but they're also not used to signing checks with fewer than two commas in them. So, it's the signaling and the messaging of, “Reach out and talk to us.” Have you experimented with that at all, yet? Is it something you haven't gotten to yet or do you not have interest in serving that particular market segment?Simon: I'd say we've been gearing the business from starting off very small with one solution to, you know, last—and two years ago, we added the ability to store data from one provider to a different provider. So, we're sort of stair-stepping our way up to enterprise. For example, at the end of last year, we went and got certificates for ISO 27001 and… one other one, I can't remember the name of them, and we're probably going to get SOC 2 at some point this year. And then yes, we will be pushing more towards enterprises. We add, like, APIs as well so people can set up backups on the fly, or so they can put it as part of their provisioning.That's hopefully where I'm seeing the business go, as in we'll become under-the-hood backup provider for, like, a managed hosting solution or something where their customers won't even realize it's us, but we're taking the backups away from—responsibility away from businesses.Corey: For those listeners who are fortunate enough to not have to have spent as long as I have in the woods of corporate governance, the correct answer to, “Well, how do we know that vendor is doing what they say that they're doing,” because the, “Well, he seemed like a nice guy,” is not going to carry water, well, here are the certifications that they have attested to. Here's copies under NDA, if their audit reports that call out what controls they claim to have and it validates that they are in fact doing what they say that they're doing. That is corporate-speak that attests that you're doing the right things. Now, you're going to, in most cases, find yourself spending all your time doing work for no real money if you start making those things available to every customer spending 50 cents a year with you. So generally, the, “Oh, we're going to go through the compliance, get you the reports,” is one of the higher, more expensive tiers where you must spend at least this much for us to start engaging down this rabbit hole of various nonsense.And I don't blame you in the least for not going down that path. One of these years, I'm going to wind up going through at least one of those certification approaches myself, but historically, we don't handle anything except your billing data, and here's how we do it has so far been sufficient for our contractual needs. But the world's evolving; sophistication of enterprise buyers is at varying places and at some point, it'll just be easier to go down that path.Simon: Yeah, to be honest, we haven't had many, many of those customers. Sometimes we have people who come in well over the plan limits, and that's where we do a custom plan for them, but we've not had too many requests for certification. But obviously, we have the certification now, so if anyone ever [laugh] did want to see it under NDA, we could add some commas to any price. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: What I like as well is that you offer backups for a bunch of different things. You can do snapshots from, effectively, every provider. I'm sorry, I'm just going to call out because I love this: AWS and Amazon LightSail are called out as two distinct things. And Amazonians will say, “Oh, well, under the hood, they're really the same thing, et cetera.” Yeah, the user experience is wildly different, so yeah, calling those things out as separate things make sense.But it goes beyond that because it's not just, “Well, I took a disk image. There we go. Come again.” You also offer backup recipes for specific things where you could, for example, back things up to a local file and external storage where someone is. Great, you also backup WordPress and MongoDB and MySQL and a whole bunch of other things.A unified cloud controller, which is something I have in my house, and I keep thinking I should find a way to back that up. Yeah, this is great. It's not just about the big server thing; it's about having data living in managed services. It's about making sure that the application data is backed up in a reasonable, responsible way. I really liked that approach. Was that an evolution or is that something you wound up focusing on almost from the beginning?Simon: It was an evolution. So, we started with the snapshots, which got the business quite far to be honest and it was very simple. It was just DigitalOcean to start with, actually, for the first two years. Pretty easy to market in a way because it's just focused on one thing. Then the other solutions came in, like the other providers and, you know, once you add one, it was easy to add many.And then came database backups and file backups. And I just had those two solutions because that was what people were asking for. Like, they wanted to make sure their whole server snapshot, if you have a whole server snapshot, the point in time data for MySQL could be corrupt. Like, there could be stuff in RAM that a MySQL dump would have pulled out, for example. Like… there's a possibility that the database could be corrupt from a snapshot, so people were asking for a bit of, more, peace of mind with doing proper backups of MySQL.So, that's what we added. And it soon became apparent when more customers were asking for more solutions that we really needed to, like, step back and think about what we're actually offering. So, we rebuilt this whole, kind of like, database engine, then that allowed us to consume data from anywhere. So, we can easily add more backup types. So, the reason you can see all the ones you've listed there is because that's kind of what people have been asking for. And every time someone comes up with a new, [laugh], like, a new open-source project or database or whatever, we'll add support, even ones I've never heard of before. When people ask for some weird file—Corey: All it takes is just waiting for someone to reach out and say, hey, can you back this thing up, please?Simon: Yeah, exactly, some weird file-based database system that I've never ever heard of. Yeah, sure. Just give us [laugh] a test server to mess around with and we'll build, essentially, like, we use bash in the background for doing the backups; if you can stream the data from a command, we can then deal with the whole management process. So, that's the reason why. And then, I was seeing in, like, the Laravel space, for example, people were doing MySQL backups and they'd have a script, and then for whatever reason, someone rotated the passwords on the database and the backup script… was forgotten about.So, there it is, not working for months. So, we thought we could build a backup where you could just point it at where the Laravel project is. We can get all the config we need at the runtime because it's all there with the project anyway, and then thus, you never need to tell us the password for your database and that problem goes away. And it's the same with WordPress.Corey: I'm looking at this now just as you go through this, and I'm a big believer in disclaiming my biases, conflicts of interest, et cetera. And until this point, neither of us have traded a penny in either direction between us that I'm ever aware of—maybe you bought a t-shirt or something once upon a time—but great, I'm about to become a customer of this because I already have backup solutions for a lot of the things that you currently support, but again, when you're a grumpy admin who's lost data in the past, it's, “Huh, you know what I would really like? That's right, another backup.” And if that costs me a few hundred bucks a year for the peace of mind is money well spent because the failure mode is I get to rewrite a whole lot of blog posts and re-record all podcasts and pay for a whole bunch of custom development again. And it's just not something that I particularly want to have to deal with. There's something to be said for a holistic backup solution. I wish that more people thought about these things.Simon: Can you imagine having to pull all the blog posts off [unintelligible 00:22:19]? [laugh]—Corey: Oh, my got—Simon: —to try and rebuild it.Corey: That is called the crappiest summer internship someone has ever had.Simon: Yeah.Corey: And that is just painful. I can't quite fathom having to do that as a strategy. Every once in a while some big site will have a data loss incident or go out of business or something, and there's a frantic archiving endeavor that happens where people are trying to copy the content out of the Google Search Engine's cache before it expires at whatever timeline that is. And that looks like the worst possible situation for any sort of giant backup.Simon: At least that's one you can fix. I mean, if you were to lose all the payment information, then you've got to restitch all that together, or anything else. Like, that's a fixable solution, but a lot of these other ones, if you lose the data, yeah, there's no two ways around it, you're screwed. So.Corey: Yeah, it's a challenging thing. And it's also—the question also becomes one of, “Well, hang on. I know about backups on this because I have this data, but it's used to working in an AWS environment. What possible good would it do me sitting somewhere else?” It's, yeah, the point is, it's sitting somewhere else, at least in my experience. You can copy it back to that sort of environment.I'm not suggesting this is a way that you can run your AWS serverless environment on DigitalOcean, but it's a matter of if everything turns against you, you can rebuild from those backups. That's the approach that I've usually taken. Do you find that your customers understand that going in or is there an education process?Simon: I'd say people come for all sorts of reasons for why they want backup. So, having your data in two places for that is one of the reasons but, you know, I think there's a lot of reasons why people want peace of mind: for either developer mistakes or migration mistakes or hacking, all these things. So, I guess the big one we come up with a lot is people talking about databases and they don't need backups because they've got replication. And trying to explain that replication between two databases isn't the same as a backup. Like, you make a mistake you drop—[laugh] you run your delete query wrong on the first database, it's gone, replicated or not.Corey: Right, the odds of me fat-fingering an S3 bucket command are incredibly likelier than the odds of AWS losing an entire region's S3 data irretrievably. I make mistakes a lot more than they tend to architecturally, but let's also be clear, they're one of the best. My impression has always been the big three mostly do a decent job of this. The jury's still out, in my opinion, on other third-party clouds that are not, I guess, tier one. What's your take?Simon: I have to be careful. I've got quite good relationships with some of these. [laugh].Corey: Oh, of course. Of course. Of course.Simon: But yes, I would say most customers do end up using S3 as their storage option, and I think that is because it is, I think, the best. Like, is in terms of reliability and performance, some storage can be a little slow at times for pulling data in, which could or could not be a problem depending on what your use case is. But there are some trade-offs. Obviously, S3, if you're trying to get your data back out, is expensive. If you were to look at Backblaze, for example, as well, that's considerably cheaper than S3, especially, like, when you're talking in the petabyte-scale, there can be huge savings there. So… they all sort of bring their own thing to the table. Personally, I store the backups in S3 and in Backblaze, and in one other provider. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. Like—Simon: I like to have them spread.Corey: Like, every once in a while in the industry, there's something that happens that's sort of a watershed moment where it reminds everyone, “Oh, right. That's why we do backups.” I think the most recent one—and again, love to them; this stuff is never fun—was when that OVH data center burned down. And OVH is a somewhat more traditional hosting provider, in some respects. Like, their pricing is great, but they wind up giving you what amounts to here as a server in a rack. You get to build all this stuff yourself.And that backup story is one of those. Oh, okay. Well, I just got two of them and I'll copy backups to each other. Yeah, but they're in the same building and that building just burned down. Now, what? And a lot of people learned a very painful lesson. And oh, right, that's why we have to do that.Simon: Yeah. The other big lesson from that was that even if the people with data in a different region—like, they'd had cross-regional backups—because of the demand at the time for accessing backups, if you wanted to get your data quickly, you're in a queue because so many other people were in the same boat as you're trying to restore stored backups. So, being off-site with a different provider would have made that a little easier. [laugh].Corey: It's a herd of elephants problem. You test your DR strategy on a scheduled basis; great, you're the only person doing it—give or take—at that time, as opposed to a large provider has lost a region and everyone is hitting their backup service simultaneously. It generally isn't built for that type of scale and provisioning. One other question I have for you is when I make mistakes, for better or worse, they're usually relatively small-scale. I want to restore a certain file or I will want to, “Ooh, that one item I just dropped out of that database really should not have been dropped.” Do you currently offer things that go beyond the entire restore everything or nothing? Or right now are you still approaching this from the perspective of this is for the catastrophic case where you're in some pain already?Simon: Mostly the catastrophic stage. So, we have MySQL [bin logs 00:27:57] as an option. So, if you wanted to do, like, a point-in-time of store, which… may be more applicable to what you're saying, but generally, its whole, whole website recovery. For example, like, we have a WordPress backup that'll go through all the WordPress websites on the server and we'll back them up individually so you can restore just one. There are ways that we have helped customers in the past just pull one table, for example, from a backup.But yeah, we geared towards, kind of, the set and the forget. And people don't often restore backups, to be honest. They don't. But when they do, it's obviously [laugh] very crucial that they work, so I prefer to back up the whole thing and then help people, like, if you need to extract ten megabytes out of an entire gig backup, that's a bit wasteful, but at least, you know, you've got the data there. So.Corey: Yeah. I'm a big believer in having backups in a variety of different levels. Because I don't really want to do a whole server restore when I remove a file. And let's be clear, I still have that grumpy old Unix admin of before I start making changes to a file, yeah, my editor can undo things and remembers that persistently and all. But I have a disturbing number of files and directories whose names end in ‘.bac' with then, like, a date or something on it, just because it's—you know, like, “Oh, I have to fix something in Git. How do I do this?”Step one, I'm going to copy the entire directory so when I make a pig's breakfast out of this and I lose things that I care about, rather than having to play Git surgeon for two more days, I can just copy it back over and try again. Disk space is cheap for those things. But that's also not a holistic backup strategy because I have to remember to do it every time and the whole point of what you're building and the value you're adding, from my perspective, is people don't have to think about it.Simon: Yes. Yeah yeah yeah. Once it's there, it's there. It's running. It's as you say, it's not the most efficient thing if you wanted to restore one file—not to say you couldn't—but at least you didn't have to think about doing the backup first.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to talk to me about all this. If people want to learn more for themselves, where can they find you?Simon: So, SnapShooter.com is a great place, or on Twitter, if you want to follow me. I am @MrSimonBennett.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:11]. Thank you once again. I really appreciate it.Simon: Thank you. Thank you very much for having me.Corey: Simon Bennett, founder and CEO of SnapShooter.com. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that, just like your backup strategy, you haven't put enough thought into.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    AWS Morning Brief
    Amazon's Original Risk Store

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    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 4:44


    AWS Morning Brief for the week of May 23, 2022 with Corey Quinn.

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    Validating Software for Moving Between Private Data Centers and Public Cloud

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    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


    In this podcast segment, The Forecast's editor Ken Kaplan talks to Tony Palmer, principal validation analyst at research firm ESG, who tested Nutanix Cloud Clusters on AWS, designed to reduce the operational complexity of migrating, extending or bursting business applications and data between on-premises and clouds. Perhaps at the top of IT's wish list is […]

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    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


    In this podcast segment, The Forecast's editor Ken Kaplan talks to Tony Palmer, principal validation analyst at research firm ESG, who tested Nutanix Cloud Clusters on AWS, designed to reduce the operational complexity of migrating, extending or bursting business applications and data between on-premises and clouds. Perhaps at the top of IT's wish list is […]

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    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 67:02


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    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 49:16


    As the world becomes more and more digitised, data has become one of the most valuable resources on earth. And as organisations race to keep up with the latest trends and tech, many are turning to data analytics as a way to gain an edge on their competitors. However, simply having access to data is no longer enough. In order to truly maximise its value, organisations are starting to see data as a product in and of itself. This shift towards “Data as a Product” represents a fundamental change in the way businesses operate. Meet Mark Burnard Mark's Role as a Data Analytics Leader at Amazon Web Services Mark Burnard is a Principal Solution Architect and Data & Analytics Specialist at Amazon Web Services (AWS). Launched in 2006, AWS began exposing key infrastructure services to businesses in the form of web services -- now widely known as cloud computing. Today, AWS provides a highly reliable, scalable, low-cost infrastructure platform in the cloud that powers hundreds of thousands of businesses in 190 countries around the world. Mark's Other Work in Data Governance and Advisory ​ Besides Mark's role with Amazon Web Services, he is also a Trainer in Data Governance at AlphaZetta, authoring and presenting a customisable 1 to 2 day masterclass. He is the Strategic Advisor at Invia - a specialist software and solution provider with an exclusive focus on the Telecommunications industry - and an Advisor at The Data People. Finally, Mark is the Author of the book, Data Governance for Everyone: A practical guide to unlocking the value in Digital Transformation. Mark has over 20 years' experience helping organisations get more value from their data. After starting his career as a Business Analyst at Telstra, Mark moved on to work with Affin Bank, Malaysia Airlines, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia, Sydney Water, IAG, the University of Sydney, DataRobot, and more. Data Platforms, Data Products, and Data Lake Architecture In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Mark shares: The evolution of data platforms, from 1970s Data Warehouses, 2005 Big Data, 2010 Data Lakes, Data Democratisation, to 2019 Data Products The challenges involved in building data platforms The need to scale Data Access Federating data governance Fast, easy, and curated access to governed datasets Shielding end users from unneeded complexity Overcoming challenges with a proper data lake architecture Data engineers to data product owners How data product owners are consuming analytics and machine learning Shifting the mindset of data owners A use case for outsourcing the building of data products If you are a data analytics professional looking to shift to data as a product and leverage in-business expertise to scale analytics, this is the episode you do not want to miss out on. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

    Relating to DevSecOps
    Episode #044: Multiball Pinball with Multicloud Hot Takes and Infrastructure as Code

    Relating to DevSecOps

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 37:24


    Mike and Ken are BACK after a small hiatus and they jump into hot takes on multi-cloud. What does multi-cloud even mean? How does it differ from hybrid cloud, private cloud, or even just the status quo data center. The hosts discuss integration of products and projects into a multicloud deployment, security concerns associated with the approach, and how it differs from  the horrors and challenges in private cloud and hybrid cloud. The team talks resources, talent, hiring, and what challenges they've faced over time shifting organizations into cloud deploymentsAs the passion increases, hot takes on hot takes manifest and a discussion of cloud unicorns ensues. We hope you enjoy!

    DevOps and Docker Talk
    GitOps with Pulumi

    DevOps and Docker Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:10


    Unedited live recording of the complete show on YouTube (Ep #164). Includes demos.Bret is joined by David Flanagan, aka @Rawkode Academy, from Pulumi to show off how Pulumi infrastructure-as-code can improve GitOps pipelines. Our conversation focused on what GitOps and Pulumi are and how they work together to manage your infrastructure and app deploys. Streamed live on YouTube on March 24, 2022. ★ Topics ★PulumiProductK8s OperatorK8sGitOpsLaw of Demeter1Password SSH management★ David Flanagan aka Rawkode Academy★Rawkode Academy, Live weeklyRawkode on Twitter★ Join My Community ★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

    The Cloud Pod
    165: The Cloud Pod Angry That Amazon Describes Step Functions as Low Code

    The Cloud Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:33


    On The Cloud Pod this week, the team discusses wholesome local Oakland toast for breakfast. Plus: Hybrid infrastructure is unsustainable, the AWS Proton template library expands, and Amazon angers the team by describing Step Functions as “low-code.” A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights