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City Cast Salt Lake
Utah's Wild Horse Conundrum

City Cast Salt Lake

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 18:14


Have you heard about Mongo? His story brought Utah's wild horse conundrum close to home and served as unusually good press for the Bureau of Land Management's wild horse roundups. Growth, land use, and the good old fashioned “way of life” question are all at stake in Utah's wild horse debacle — which host (and horse girl) Ali Vallarta and Salt Lake Tribune reporter Brian Maffly try to unravel. See Grieg Huggins' photo exhibit at Sandy City Hall. Call us with your thoughts on “Falling for Christmas” at 801-203-0137. Subscribe to our daily morning newsletter here. You can find us on Instagram @CityCastSLC and Twitter @CityCastSLC. Looking to advertise on City Cast Salt Lake? Check out our options for podcast and newsletter ads at citycast.fm/advertise. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
Couchbase and the Evolving World of Databases with Perry Krug

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 34:21


About PerryPerry Krug currently leads the Shared Services team which is focused on building tools and managing infrastructure and data to increase the productivity of Couchbase's Sales and Field organisations.  Perry has been with Couchbase for over 12 years and has served in many customer-facing technical roles, helping hundreds of customers understand, deploy, and maintain Couchbase's NoSQL database technology.  He has been working with high performance caching and database systems for over 15 years.Links Referenced: Couchbase: https://www.couchbase.com/ Perry's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/perrykrug/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: InfluxDB is the smart data platform for time series. It's built from the ground-up to handle the massive volumes and countless sources of time-stamped data produced by sensors, applications, and systems. You probably think of these as logs.InfluxDB is programmable and performant, has a common API across the platform, and handles high granularity data–at scale and with high availability. Use InfluxDB to build real-time applications for analytics, IoT, and cloud-native services, all in less time and with less code. So go ahead–turn your apps up to 11 and start your journey to Awesome for free at InfluxData.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's episode is a promoted guest episode brought to us by our friends at Couchbase. Now, I want to start off by saying that this week is AWS re:Invent. And there is Last Week in AWS swag available at their booth. More on that to come throughout the next half hour or so of conversation. But let's get right into it. My guest today is Perry Krug, Director of Shared Services over at Couchbase. Perry, thanks for joining me.Perry: Hey, Corey, thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure.Corey: So, we're recording this before re:Invent, so the fact that we both have, you know, personality and haven't lost our voices yet should probably be a bit of a giveaway on this. But I want to start at the very beginning because unlike people who are academically successful, I tend to suck at doing the homework, across the board. Couchbase has been around for a long time. We've seen the company do a bunch of different things, most importantly and notably, sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense for which I thank you. But let's start at the beginning. What is Couchbase?Perry: Yeah, you're very welcome, Corey. And it's again, it's a pleasure to be here. So, Couchbase is an enterprise database company at the very top level. We make database software and we distribute that to our customers. We have two flavors, two ways of getting your hands on it.One is the kind of legacy, what we call self-managed, where you the user, the customer, downloads the software, installs it themselves, sets it up, manages the cluster monitoring, scaling all of that. And that's, you know, a big part of our business. Over the last few years we've identified, and certainly others in the industry have, as well the desire for users to access database and other technology in a hosted Software-as-a-Service pay-as-you-go, cloud-native, buzzword, et cetera, et cetera, vehicle. And so, we've released the Couchbase Capella, which is our fully managed, fully hosted database-as-a-service, running in—currently—Amazon and Google, soon to be Azure as well. And it wraps and extends our core Couchbase Server product into a, as I mentioned, hosted and managed platform that our users can now come to and consume as developers and build their applications while leaving all of the operational and administration—monitoring, managing failover expansion, all of that—to us as the experts.Corey: So, you folks are non-relational database, NoSQL in the common parlance, which is odd because they call it NoSQL, yet. They keep making more of them, so I feel like that's sort of the Hollywood model where okay, that was so good. We're going to do it again. Where did NoSQL come from? Because back when I was learning databases, when dinosaurs roamed the earth, it was all about relational models, like we're going to use a relational database because when the only tool you have is an axe, every problem looks like hours of fun. What gave rise to this, I guess, Cambrian explosion that we've seen of NoSQL options that proliferate o'er the land?Perry: Yeah, a really, really good question, and I like the axe-throwing metaphor. So sure, 20, 30, 40 now years ago, as digital applications needed a place to store their data, the world invented relational databases. And those were used and continue to be used very well for what they were designed for, for data that follows a very strict structure that doesn't need to be served at significant scale, does not need to be replicated geographically, does not need to handle data coming in from different sources and those sources changing their formats of things all the time. And so, I'm probably as old as you are and been around when the dinosaurs were there. We remember this term called ‘Web 2.0.' Kids, you're going to have to go look that up in the dictionary or TikTok it or something.But Web 2.0 really was the turning point when websites became web applications. And suddenly, there was the introduction of MySpace and Facebook and Amazon and Google and LinkedIn, and a number of others, and they realized that relational databases we're not going to meet their needs, whether it be performance, whether it be flexibility, whether it be changing of data models, whether it be introducing new features at a rapid pace. They tried; they stretched them, they added a bunch of different databases together, and really was not going to be a viable solution. So, 10 now, maybe 15 years ago, you started to see the rise of these tech giants—although we didn't call them tech giants back then but they were the precursors to today's—invent their own new databases.So, Amazon had theirs, Google has theirs, LinkedIn, and a number of others. These companies had reached a level of scale and reached a level of user base, had reached a level of data requirement, had reached a level of expectation with their customers. These customers, us, the users, us consumers, we expect things to be fast, we expect them to be always available. We expect Facebook to give us our news feed in milliseconds. We expect Google to give us our website or our search results in immediate, with more and more information coming along with them.And so, it was these companies that hit those requirements first. The only solution for them was to start from scratch and rewrite their own databases. Fast forward five, six, seven years, and we as consumers turned around and said, “Look, I really liked the way Facebook does things. I really like the way Google does things. I really like the way Amazon does things.“Bank of America, can you do the same? IRS, can you do the same? Health care vendor number one, two, three, and four, government body, can you all give me the same experience? I want my taxi to tell me exactly where it's going to take me from one place to another, I want it to give me a receipt immediately after I finish my ride. Actually, I want to be able to change my payment method after I paid for that ride because I used the wrong one.”All of these are expectations that we as consumers have taken from the tech giants—Apple, LinkedIn, Facebook—and turned around to nearly every other service that we interact with on a daily basis. And all of a sudden, the requirements that Facebook had, that Google had, that no other company had, you know, outside of the top five, suddenly were needed by every single industry, nearly every single company, in order to be competitive in their markets.Corey: And there's no way to scale relational to get to a point where it can wind up handling those type workloads efficiently?Perry: Correct, correct. And it's not just that the technology cannot do it—everything is technically feasible—but the cost both financially and time-to-market-wise in order to do that in a relational database was untenable. It either cost too much money, or it costs too much developers time, or cost too much of everybody's time to try to shoehorn something into it. And then you have the rise of cloud and containers, which relational databases, you know, never even had the inkling of a thought that they might need to be able to handle someday. And so, these requirements that consumers have been placed on everything else that they interact with really led to the rise of NoSQL as a commodity or as a database for the masses.LinkedIn is not in the business of developing a database and then selling it to everybody else to use as a database, right? They built it for themselves, they made their service better. And so, what you see is some of those founding fathers created databases, but then had no desire to sell them to others. And then after that followed the rise of companies like Couchbase and a number of others who said, “Look, we think we can provide those capabilities, we think we can meet those requirements for everybody.” And thereby rose the plethora of NoSQL databases because everybody had a little bit different of an approach to it.If you ask ten people what NoSQL is about, you're going to get eleven or twelve different answers. But you can kind of distill that into two categories. One is performance and operations. So, I need it to be faster, I need it to be scalable, I need it to be replicated geographically. And that's what NoSQL is to me. And that's the right answer.And so, you have things like Cassandra and Redis that are meant to be fast and scalable and replicated. You ask another group and they're going to tell you, “No, no, no. NoSQL needs to be flexible. I need to get rid of the rigid database schemas, I need to bring JSON or other data formats in and munge all this data together and create something cool and new out of it.” And thereby you have the rise of things like MongoDB, who focused nearly exclusively on the developer experience of working with data.And for a long time, those two were in opposite camps, where you have the databases that did performance and the databases that did flexibility. I'm not here to say that Couchbase is the ultimate kitchen sink for everything, but we've certainly tried to approach both of those challenges together so that you can have something that scales and performs and can be flexible enough in data model. And everybody else is trying to do the same thing, right? But all these databases are competing for that same nirvana of the best of both worlds.Corey: And it almost feels like there's a convergence play in place where everything now is trying to go away from the idea of, “Oh, yeah, we started off as a purpose-built database, but you can use this for everything.” And I don't necessarily know that is going to be the path that a lot of companies want to go down. What do you view Couchbase as I guess, falling down? In other words, what workloads is Couchbase inappropriate for?Perry: Yeah, that's a good question. And my [crosstalk 00:10:35]—Corey: Anyone who can't answer that one is a zealot and that's one of those okay, let's be very careful and not take our eyes off you for one second, while smiling and backing away slowly.Perry: Let's cut to commercial. No, I mean, there certainly are workloads that you know, in the past, we've not been good for that we've made improvements to address. There are workloads that we had not address well today that we will try to address in the future, and there are workloads that we may never see as fitting in our wheelhouse. The biggest category group that comes to mind is Couchbase is not an archival database. We are not meant to have data put in us that you don't care about, that you don't want to—that you just need to keep it around, but you don't ever need to access.And there are systems that do that well, they do that at a solid total cost of ownership. And Couchbase is meant for operational data. It's meant for data that needs to be interacted with, read and/or written, at scale and at a reasonable performance to serve a user-facing or system-facing application. And we call ourselves a general-purpose database. Bongo and others call themselves as well. Oracle calls itself a general-purpose database, and yet, not everybody uses Oracle for everything.So, there are reasons that you—Corey: Who could afford that?Perry: Who could? Exactly. It comes down to cost, ultimately. So, I'm not here to say that Couchbase does everything. We like to think, and we're trying to target and strive towards an 80%, right? If we can do 80% of an application or an organization's workloads, there is certainly room for 20% of other workloads, other applications, other requirements that can be met or need to be met by purpose-built databases.But if you rewind four or five years, there was this big push towards polyglot persistence. It's a buzzword that came and kind of has gone out of fashion, but it presented the idea that everybody is going to use 15 different databases and everybody is going to pick the right one for exactly the workload and they're going to somehow stitch them all together. And that really hasn't come to fruition either. So, I think there's some balance, where it's not one to rule them all, but it's also not 15 for every company. Some organizations just have a set of requirements that they want to be met and our database can do that.Corey: Let's continue our tour of the competitive landscape here now that we've handled the relational side of the world. The best database, as anyone who's listened to this show knows, is of course, Amazon's Route 53 TXT records stuffed into DNS, especially in the NoSQL land. Clearly, you're all fighting for second place after that. How do you stack up against the idea of legitimately using that approach? And for those who are not in on the joke, please don't do this. It is not the right answer. But I'm curious to get your take as to why DNS TXT records are an inappropriate NoSQL option.Perry: Well, it's a joke, right? And let's be clear about that. But—Corey: I have to say that because otherwise, someone tries it in production. I've gotten that wrong a few times, historically, so now I put a disclaimer in because yeah, it's only funny, so long as people are in on the joke. If not, and I lead someone down the primrose path to disaster, I feel bad. So, let's be very clear. We're kidding.Perry: And I'm laughing. I'm laughing here behind the camera. I am. I am.Corey: Yeah.Perry: So, the element of truth that I think Couchbase is in a position, or I'm in a position to kind of talk about is, 12 years ago, when Couchbase started, we were a key-value database and that's where we saw the best part of the market in those days, and where we were able to achieve the best scale and replication and performance, and fairly quickly realized that simple key-value, though extremely valuable and easy to manage, was not broad enough in requirements-meeting. And that's where we set our sights on and identified the larger, kind of, document database group, which is really just a derivative of key-value, where still everything is a key and a value; it's just now a document that you can reason about, that you can create an index on, that you can query, that you can run full-text search on, you can do much more with the data. So, at our core, we are still a key-value database. When that value is JSON, we become a document database. And so, if Route 53 decided that they wanted to enter into the document database market, they would need to be adding things that allowed you to introspect and ask questions of the data within that text which you can't, right?Corey: Well, not with that attitude. But yeah, I agree with you.Perry: [laugh].Corey: Moving up the stack, let's talk about a much more fearsome competitor here that I'm certain you see an awful lot of deals that you wind up closing, specifically your own open-source product. You historically have wound up selling software into environments, I believe, you referred to as your legacy offering where it's the hosted version of your commercial software. And now of course, you also have Capella, your cloud-hosted version. But open-source looks surprisingly compelling for an awful lot of use cases and an awful lot of folks. What's the distinction?Perry: Sure. Just to correct a little bit the distinction, we have Couchbase Server, which we provide as a what we call self-managed, where you can download it and install it yourself. Now, you could do that with the open-source version or you could do that with our Enterprise Edition. What we've then done is wrapped that Enterprise Edition in a hosted bottle, and that's Capella. So, the open-source version is something we've long been supporters of; it's been a core part of our go-to-market for the last 12 or 13 years or so and we still see it as a strong offering for organizations that don't need the added features, the added capabilities, don't need the support of the experts that wrote the software behind them.Certainly, we contribute and support our community through our forums and Discord and other channels, but that's a very big difference than two o'clock in the morning, something's not working and I need a ticket to track. We don't do that for our community edition. So, we see lots of users downloading that, picking it up building it into their applications, especially applications that are in their infancy or are with organizations that they simply can't afford the added cost and therefore they don't get the added benefit. We're not here to gouge and carve out every dollar that we can, but if you need the benefit that we can provide, we think there's value in that and that's what we're trying to run a business as.Corey: Oh, absolutely. It doesn't work when you're trying to wind up charging a license fee for something that someone is doing in their spare time project for funsies just to learn the technology. It's like, and then you show up. It's like, “That'll be $700. Surprise.”Yeah, that's sort of the AWS billing model approach, where—it's not a viable onramp for most folks. So, the open-source direction down there make sense. Counterpoint. If you're running a bank on top of it, “Well, we're running it ourselves and really hoping for the best. I mean, we have access to the code and all.” Great, but there are times you absolutely want some of the best minds in the world, with respect to that particular product, able to help troubleshoot so the ATM start working again before people riot in the streets.Perry: Yeah, yeah. And ultimately, it's a question of core competencies. Are you an organization that wants to be in the database development market? Great, by all means, we'd love to support you in that. If you want to focus on doing what you do best be at a bank or an e-commerce website, you worry about your application, you let us worry about the database and everybody gets along very well.Corey: There's definitely something to be said for outsourcing some of the pain, some of the challenge around an awful lot of it.Perry: There's a natural progression to the cloud for that and Software-as-a-Service, database-as-a-service where you're now outsourcing even more by running on our hosting platform. No longer do you have to download the binary and install yourself, no longer do you have to setup the cluster and watch it in case it has a blip or the statistic goes up too far. We're taking care of that for you. So yes, you're paying for that service, but you're getting the value of not having to be a database manager, let alone database developer for them.Corey: Love how serverless helps you scale big and ship fast, but hate debugging your serverless apps? With Lumigo's serverless observability, it's fast and easy (and maybe a little fun, too). End-to-end distributed tracing gives developers full clarity into their most complex serverless and containerized applications, connecting every service from AWS Lambda and Amazon ECS to DynamoDB, API Gateways, Step Functions and more. Try Lumigo free and debug 3x faster, reduce error rate and speed up development. Visit snark.cloud/lumigo That's snark.cloud/L-U-M-I-G-OCorey: What is the point of distinction between Couchbase Server and Couchbase Capella? To be clear, your self-hosted versus managed cloud offerings. When is one appropriate versus the other?Perry: Well, I'm supposed to say that Capella is always the appropriate choice, but there are currently a number of situations where Capella is not available in particular regions or cloud providers and so downloading running the software yourself certainly in your own—yes, there are people who still run their own data centers. I know it's taboo and we don't like to talk about that, but there are people who have on-premise. And so, Couchbase Capella is not available for them. But Couchbase Server is the original Couchbase database and it is the core of Couchbase Capella. So, wrapping is not giving it enough credit; we use Couchbase Server to power Couchbase Capella.And so, there's an enormous amount of value added around the core database, but ultimately, it's the behind the scenes of Couchbase Capella. Which I think is a nice benefit in that when an application is connecting to either one, it gets the same experience. You can point an application at one versus the other and because it's the same database running behind the scenes, the behavior, the data model, the query language, the APIs are all the same, so it adds a nice level of flexibility four customers that are either moving from one to another or have to have some sort of hybrid approach, which we see in the market today.Corey: Let's talk economics for a second. I can see scenarios where especially you have a high volume environment where you're sending tremendous amounts of data back and forth and as soon as it crosses an availability zone boundary or a region boundary, or God forbid, goes out to the internet via standard egress fees over in AWS-land, there's a radically different economic modeling that comes into play as opposed to having something in the same availability zone, in the same subnet just where that—or all traffic back and forth is free. Do you see that in your customer base, that that is a model that is driving people towards self-hosting?Perry: No. And I'd say no because Capella allows you to peer and run your application in the same availability zone as the as a database. And so, as long as that's an option for you that we have, you know, our offering in the right region, in the right AZ, and you can put your application there, then that's not a not an issue. We did have a customer not too long ago that didn't set that up correctly, they thought they did, and we noticed some high data transfer charges. Again, the benefit of running a hosted service, we detected that for them and were able to turn around and say, “Hmm, you might want to change this to over there so that we all save some money in doing so.”If we were not there watching it, they might not have noticed that themselves if they were running it self-managed; they might not have known what to do about it. And so, there's a benefit to working with us and using that hosted platform that we can keep an eye out. And we can apply all of our learning and best practices and bug fixes, we give that to everybody, rather than each person having to stumble across those hurdles themselves.Corey: That's one of those fun, weird corner-case trivia things about AWS data transfer. When you're transferring data within the same region between availability zones, it costs a penny on the sending side and a penny on the receiving side. Everything else is one side or the other that winds up getting the charge. And what makes this especially fun is that when it shows up on your bill, if you transfer a petabyte, it shows as cross-AZ data transfer: two petabytes.Perry: Two. Yeah.Corey: So, it double-counts so they can bill for it appropriately, but it leads to some really weird hunting it down, like, “Okay, well, we found half of it, but where's the other half hiding?” It's always obnoxious to trace this stuff down. The fact that you see it on your bill, well, that's testament to the fact that yeah, they're using the service. Good for them and good for you. Being able to track it down on a per-customer basis that does speak to your level of insight into what exactly is going on in your environment and where. As someone who does this for a living, let me confirm that is absolutely non-trivial.Perry: No, definitely not trivial. And you know, we've learned over the last four or five years, we've learned an enormous amount about how cloud providers work, how AWS works, but guess what, Google does it completely differently. And Azure does it—Corey: Yep.Perry: —completely differently. And so, on the surface level, they're all just cloud providers and they give you a VM, and you put some stuff on it, but integrating with the APIs, integrating with the different systems and naming of things, and then understanding the intricacies of the ins and outs, and, yeah, these cloud providers have their own bugs as well. And so, sometimes you stumble across that for them. And it's been a significant learning exercise that I think we're all better off for, having Couchbase gone through it for you.Corey: Let's get this a little bit more germane for this week for those of you who are listening to this during re:Invent. You folks are clearly here at the show—it's funny to talk about ‘here,' even though when we're recording this, it is not near here; we're actually home and enjoying ourselves, but welcome to temporal dislocation; here we are—here at the show, you folks are—among other things—being kind enough to pass out the Last Week in AWS swag from your booth, which, thank you. So, that is obviously the primary reason that you were at the show. What are the other reasons? What are the secondary reasons that you decided to come here?Perry: Yeah [laugh]. Well, I guess I have to think about this now since you already called out the primary reason.Corey: Exactly. Wait, we can have more than one reason for things? My God.Perry: Can we? Can we? AWS has long been a huge partner of ours, even before Capella itself was released. I remember sometime in, you know, five years or so ago, some 30% of our customers were running Couchbase inside of AWS, and some of our largest were some of your largest at times, like Viber, the messaging platform. And so, we've always had a very strong relationship with AWS, and the better that we can be presenting ourselves to your customers, and our customers can feel that we are jointly supporting them, the better. And so, you know, coming to re:Invent is a testament to that long-standing and very solid partnership, and also it's meant to get more exposure for us to let it be clear that Couchbase runs very well on AWS.Corey: It's one of those areas where when someone says, “Oh yeah, this is a great service offering, but it doesn't run super well on AWS.” It's like, “Okay, so are you bad computers or is what you have built so broken and Byzantine that it has to live somewhere else?” Or occasionally, the use case is absolutely not supported by AWS. Not to beat them up some more on their egress fees, but I'm absolutely about to if you're building a video streaming site, you don't want it living in AWS. It won't run super well there. Well, it'll run well, it'll just run extortionately expensively and that means that it's a non-starter.Perry: Yeah, why do you think Netflix raises their fees?Corey: Netflix, to their credit, has been really rather public about this, where they do all of their egress via their Open Connect, custom-built CDN appliances that they drop all over the place. They don't stream a single byte from AWS, and we know this from the outside because they are clearly still solvent.Perry: [laugh].Corey: I do the math on that. So, if I had been streaming at on-demand prices one month with my Netflix usage, I would have wound up spending four times my subscription fee just in their raw costs for data transfer. And I have it on good authority that is not just data transfer that is their only bill in the entire company; they also have to pay people and content and the analytics engine and whatnot. And it's kind of a weird, strange world.Perry: Real estate.Corey: Yeah. Because it's one of those strange stories because they are absolutely a showcase customer for AWS. They've been a marquee customer trotted out year after year to talk about what they're doing. But if you attempt to replicate their business purely on top of AWS, it will not work. Full stop. The economics preclude that happening.What is your philosophy these days on what historically has felt like an existential threat to most vendors that I've spoken to in a variety of ways: what if Amazon decides to enter your market? I'd ask you the same thing. Do you have fears that they're going to wind up effectively taking your open-source offering and turning it into Amazon Basics Couchbase, for lack of a better term? Is that something that is on your threat radar, or is that not really something you concern yourselves about?Perry: So, I mean, there's no arguing, there's no illusion that Amazon and Google and Microsoft are significant competitors in the database space, along with Oracle and IBM and Mongo and a handful of others.Corey: Anything's a database if you hold it wrong.Perry: This is true. This specific point of open-source is something that we have addressed in the same ways that others have addressed. And that's by choosing and changing our license model so that it precludes cloud providers from using the open-source database to produce their own service on the back of it. Let me be clear, it does not impact our existing open-source users and anybody that wants to use the Community Edition or download the software, the source code, and build it themselves. It's only targeted at Amazon because they have a track record of doing that to things like Elastic and Redis and Mongo, all of whom who have made similar to Couchbase moves to prevent that by the licensing of the open-source code.Corey: So, one of the things I do see at re:Invent every year is—and I believe wholeheartedly this comes historically from a lot of AWS's requirements for vendors on the show floor that have become public through a variety of different ways—where you for a long time, you are not allowed to mention multi-cloud or reference the fact that you work on any other cloud provider there. So, there's been a theme of this is why, for whatever it is we sell or claim to sell or hope one day to sell, AWS is the absolute best place for you to run it, full stop. And in some cases, that's absolutely true because people build primarily for a certain cloud provider and then when they find customers and other places, they learn to run it over there, too. If I'm approaching this from the perspective of I have a database problem—because looking at my philosophy on databases is hard to imagine I don't have database problems—then is my experience going to be better or even materially different between any of the cloud providers if I become a Couchbase Capella customer?Perry: I'd like to say no. We've done our best to abstract and to leverage the best of all of the cloud providers underneath to provide Couchbase in the best form that they will allow us to. And as far as I can see, there's no difference amongst those. Your application and what you do with the data, that may be better suited to one provider or another, but it's always been Couchbase is philosophy—sort of say, strategy—to make our software available to wherever our customers and users want to, to consume it. And that goes everything from physical hardware running in a data center, virtual machines on top of that, containers, cloud, and different cloud providers, different regions, different availability zones, all the way through to edge and other infrastructures. We're not in a position to say, “If you want Couchbase, you should use AWS.” We're in a position to say, “If you are using AWS, you can have Couchbase.”Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time, and of course, your sponsorship dollars, which are deeply appreciated. Once again, swag is available at the Couchbase booth this week at re:Invent. If people want to learn more and if for some unfathomable reason, they're not at re:Invent, probably because they make good life choices, where can they go to find you?Perry: couchbase.com. That'll to be the best place to land on. That takes you to our documentation, our resources, our getting help, our contact pages, directly into Capella if you want to sign in or login. I would go there.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it.Perry: Corey, it's been a pleasure. Thank you for your questions and banter, and I really appreciate the opportunity to come and share some time with you.Corey: We'll have to have you back in the near future. Perry Krug, Director of Shared Services at Couchbase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry and insulting comment berating me for being nowhere near musical enough when referencing [singing] Couchbase Capella.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

KFAT Radio - Mister X
KFAT Radio, Mister X - 327 - The return of Mongo

KFAT Radio - Mister X

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 141:18


All I Need
Episode 401: Happy Thanksgiving, Video Games, mongo push, classic skate videos Barthe #401

All I Need

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 131:10


Epic day after thanksgiving podcast with my good friend and all around shredder Nick Barthe. - AnthonySponsor a episode by shopping AIN here www.allineedskate.bigcartel.com

Hunters and Unicorns
Hunters and Unicorns: Playbook Universe - Graham Moreno #002

Hunters and Unicorns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 36:34


Hunters and Unicorns shares the playbooks from leaders, founders, executives and investors from high growth technology companies. In this special edition series The 33 CXOs we investigate the greatest success story in the history of software sales.   Discover how thirty-three sales execs from one organisation, BladeLogic, became CXOs in the world's 100 fastest growing technology companies. We uncover the stories and playbooks of the most prolific sales leaders in the industry. In this episode we sit down with Graham Moreno, Regional Vice President, Central, Southeast, and LatAm at Grafana Labs to take a look back at his incredible career trajectory and discuss how his early indoctrination in the Playbook community at MongoDB shaped and influenced his leadership style today, enabling him to recognise the huge opportunity presented by Grafana Labs and play an incremental role in scaling this company from 30 to 1000 employees in just three and a half years. “They had almost $5 million in revenue. No salespeople, no customer success people, it was a team of very extraordinarily talented engineers and I just remember sitting at a bar with Raj and saying, " I think there's the opportunity to do something really amazing here." And he was like, "I do too, but I'm not a sales guy." After a couple of months, I joined and it's really been incredible.” Founded in 2014 by Raj Dutt, Torkel Ödegaard and Anthony Woods, Grafana Labs has not only experienced overwhelming growth in recent years, it has also been recognized for the second year in a row as one of America's best start-up employers. We ask Graham to guide us through his experience of scaling the hiring process from the bottom up at Grafana Labs and how he implemented structure in the early stages of development using the foundations of Playbook methodology to create a successful growth strategy based on both repetition and continual evolution. Offering advice and guidance to current and future leaders, Graham insists that it's not only the Playbook but the people and culture of Grafana Labs — which fosters transparency, autonomy, and accountability — that has proven to be the cornerstone of the company. No matter how big the organization gets or how fast it scales, leaders are dedicated to prioritising culture above revenue, staying true to company values and building long lasting relationships to improve communication and cultivate trust and respect. “With experience and maturity, I have learned to communicate a lot more effectively because as we've gotten bigger, it is so important that even if you disagree, you're able to do it in a way that is opening up a productive conversation and I don't think I was always awesome at that early on. I've had an opportunity to evolve - if you look at the most effective selling teams at Mongo and Grafana, it's the teams where customer success, engineering, and marketing are all onboard and working together and there's a really good environment in terms of how we're sharing knowledge and what we're able to bring to our customers as a result.” In this vodcast you will discover: The framework that enabled Graham to scale the Grafana Labs workforce from 30 to 1000 employees in record time How to maintain high performance throughout your career by surrounding yourself with astonishing talent and learning to accept feedback How to scale the hiring process through periods of rapid growth How to protect the culture of an organisation as it scales Graham Moreno understands exactly How to build a sales force to stand the test of time. We discuss key challenges and accomplishments from Graham's journey at Grafana Labs and what he believes to be the core ingredients needed for a company to reach unicorn status. This wide-ranging discussion is essential listening for those with an interest in sales strategy, as well as anyone with a passion for the technology space.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Not My Austin!

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 106:30


We discuss how Jason spent his birthday, Mama Dick's list of demands for Jason's new Manor manor, and a new game called Not My Austin!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
20VC: Chris Sacca, Chamath Palihapitiya, Gary Vee, Brad Gerstner and more on Their Relationship To Money, How It Has Changed with Time and Wealth, How They Bring Up Their Children To Engender the Same Values of Ambition and Hard Work?

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:48


Twenty Minute VC Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Check Out the 20VC Episode Page & Show NotesRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.org Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. From interviewing some of the world's richest married couples, how did gaining wealth change their relationship and marriage? What does Chris do to actively ensure his children remain hungry and know the value of money? Chamath Palihapitiya is Founder & CEO @ Social Capital. Social's portfolio includes the likes of Slack, Yammer, Front, Intercom and Carta to name a few. What does Chamath mean when he says we need to think through the mindset of "infinite games" not finite games? How does this change how you think about money? How does Chamath think about his relationship to risk today as a result? Brad Gerstner is the Founder and CEO of Altimeter. Brad's notable deals that he has helped lead include Snowflake, Mongo, Bytedance, Gusto, Unity, Okta, dbt, Modern Treasury, EPIC Games, Hotel Tonight and Zillow. What is the most important thing parents can do to ensure that despite wealth, their children remain grounded and ambitious? Why does Brad, despite being a billionaire, still live in a modest house and not spend on the excesses of life? How does Brad embrace essentialism with wealth? Cyan Banister is one of the most successful and renowned early-stage investors in the last decade. Her portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Uber, Affirm, Opendoor Postmates, Niantic and Thumbtack to name a few. Why did Cyan used to hate money? Why was she "anti-capitalist"? How does Cyan approach risk management today? Why does she invest every dollar she makes back into the ecosystem? George Zachary is a General Partner @ CRV, one of the nation's oldest and most successful early-stage venture capital firms with a portfolio including the likes of Airtable, DoorDash, Dropbox, Niantic and many more. What did George learn about how the way people view you changes with your increasing wealth? Why does George believe rich people like to hang out with rich people? Biz Stone is best known as the Co-Founder of Twitter and Medium. Biz is also an investor in the likes of Slack, Square, Intercom, Beyond Meat and Blue Bottle Coffee. What does Biz mean when he says, "wealth only serves to amplify the person you are?"

Podcast Notes Playlist: Startup
20VC: Chris Sacca, Chamath Palihapitiya, Gary Vee, Brad Gerstner and more on Their Relationship To Money, How It Has Changed with Time and Wealth, How They Bring Up Their Children To Engender the Same Values of Ambition and Hard Work?

Podcast Notes Playlist: Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:48


Twenty Minute VC Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Check Out the 20VC Episode Page & Show NotesRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.org Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. From interviewing some of the world's richest married couples, how did gaining wealth change their relationship and marriage? What does Chris do to actively ensure his children remain hungry and know the value of money? Chamath Palihapitiya is Founder & CEO @ Social Capital. Social's portfolio includes the likes of Slack, Yammer, Front, Intercom and Carta to name a few. What does Chamath mean when he says we need to think through the mindset of "infinite games" not finite games? How does this change how you think about money? How does Chamath think about his relationship to risk today as a result? Brad Gerstner is the Founder and CEO of Altimeter. Brad's notable deals that he has helped lead include Snowflake, Mongo, Bytedance, Gusto, Unity, Okta, dbt, Modern Treasury, EPIC Games, Hotel Tonight and Zillow. What is the most important thing parents can do to ensure that despite wealth, their children remain grounded and ambitious? Why does Brad, despite being a billionaire, still live in a modest house and not spend on the excesses of life? How does Brad embrace essentialism with wealth? Cyan Banister is one of the most successful and renowned early-stage investors in the last decade. Her portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Uber, Affirm, Opendoor Postmates, Niantic and Thumbtack to name a few. Why did Cyan used to hate money? Why was she "anti-capitalist"? How does Cyan approach risk management today? Why does she invest every dollar she makes back into the ecosystem? George Zachary is a General Partner @ CRV, one of the nation's oldest and most successful early-stage venture capital firms with a portfolio including the likes of Airtable, DoorDash, Dropbox, Niantic and many more. What did George learn about how the way people view you changes with your increasing wealth? Why does George believe rich people like to hang out with rich people? Biz Stone is best known as the Co-Founder of Twitter and Medium. Biz is also an investor in the likes of Slack, Square, Intercom, Beyond Meat and Blue Bottle Coffee. What does Biz mean when he says, "wealth only serves to amplify the person you are?"

Podcast Notes Playlist: Business
20VC: Chris Sacca, Chamath Palihapitiya, Gary Vee, Brad Gerstner and more on Their Relationship To Money, How It Has Changed with Time and Wealth, How They Bring Up Their Children To Engender the Same Values of Ambition and Hard Work?

Podcast Notes Playlist: Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:48


Twenty Minute VC Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Check Out the 20VC Episode Page & Show NotesRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.org Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. From interviewing some of the world's richest married couples, how did gaining wealth change their relationship and marriage? What does Chris do to actively ensure his children remain hungry and know the value of money? Chamath Palihapitiya is Founder & CEO @ Social Capital. Social's portfolio includes the likes of Slack, Yammer, Front, Intercom and Carta to name a few. What does Chamath mean when he says we need to think through the mindset of "infinite games" not finite games? How does this change how you think about money? How does Chamath think about his relationship to risk today as a result? Brad Gerstner is the Founder and CEO of Altimeter. Brad's notable deals that he has helped lead include Snowflake, Mongo, Bytedance, Gusto, Unity, Okta, dbt, Modern Treasury, EPIC Games, Hotel Tonight and Zillow. What is the most important thing parents can do to ensure that despite wealth, their children remain grounded and ambitious? Why does Brad, despite being a billionaire, still live in a modest house and not spend on the excesses of life? How does Brad embrace essentialism with wealth? Cyan Banister is one of the most successful and renowned early-stage investors in the last decade. Her portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Uber, Affirm, Opendoor Postmates, Niantic and Thumbtack to name a few. Why did Cyan used to hate money? Why was she "anti-capitalist"? How does Cyan approach risk management today? Why does she invest every dollar she makes back into the ecosystem? George Zachary is a General Partner @ CRV, one of the nation's oldest and most successful early-stage venture capital firms with a portfolio including the likes of Airtable, DoorDash, Dropbox, Niantic and many more. What did George learn about how the way people view you changes with your increasing wealth? Why does George believe rich people like to hang out with rich people? Biz Stone is best known as the Co-Founder of Twitter and Medium. Biz is also an investor in the likes of Slack, Square, Intercom, Beyond Meat and Blue Bottle Coffee. What does Biz mean when he says, "wealth only serves to amplify the person you are?"

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Chris Sacca, Chamath Palihapitiya, Gary Vee, Brad Gerstner and more on Their Relationship To Money, How It Has Changed with Time and Wealth, How They Bring Up Their Children To Engender the Same Values of Ambition and Hard Work?

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 26:48


Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. From interviewing some of the world's richest married couples, how did gaining wealth change their relationship and marriage? What does Chris do to actively ensure his children remain hungry and know the value of money? Chamath Palihapitiya is Founder & CEO @ Social Capital. Social's portfolio includes the likes of Slack, Yammer, Front, Intercom and Carta to name a few. What does Chamath mean when he says we need to think through the mindset of "infinite games" not finite games? How does this change how you think about money? How does Chamath think about his relationship to risk today as a result? Brad Gerstner is the Founder and CEO of Altimeter. Brad's notable deals that he has helped lead include Snowflake, Mongo, Bytedance, Gusto, Unity, Okta, dbt, Modern Treasury, EPIC Games, Hotel Tonight and Zillow. What is the most important thing parents can do to ensure that despite wealth, their children remain grounded and ambitious? Why does Brad, despite being a billionaire, still live in a modest house and not spend on the excesses of life? How does Brad embrace essentialism with wealth? Cyan Banister is one of the most successful and renowned early-stage investors in the last decade. Her portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Uber, Affirm, Opendoor Postmates, Niantic and Thumbtack to name a few. Why did Cyan used to hate money? Why was she "anti-capitalist"? How does Cyan approach risk management today? Why does she invest every dollar she makes back into the ecosystem? George Zachary is a General Partner @ CRV, one of the nation's oldest and most successful early-stage venture capital firms with a portfolio including the likes of Airtable, DoorDash, Dropbox, Niantic and many more. What did George learn about how the way people view you changes with your increasing wealth? Why does George believe rich people like to hang out with rich people? Biz Stone is best known as the Co-Founder of Twitter and Medium. Biz is also an investor in the likes of Slack, Square, Intercom, Beyond Meat and Blue Bottle Coffee. What does Biz mean when he says, "wealth only serves to amplify the person you are?"

Stories of Selling Human
How A Program Manager in Tech Infuses Sales Into Her Role - Emet Ozar, Senior Program Mgr, Mongo DB

Stories of Selling Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:46


Summary: Emet Ozar is a seasoned Program Manager with 15 years experience in technology and education sectors passionate about creating effective processes and programs, managing relationships and using data to drive informed decision making. She was born and raised in California. After graduating with a degree in Learning, Design, & Technology from Stanford University, Emet worked primarily in Technology, Education and Operations. Emet's passions include reading, hanging with family, creative problem solving, crossword construction and solving, and building and fixing things. Emet is married with three children. Key Moments: 03:16 - Trust based influence and deep empathy 14:20 - The importance of being transparent. Vulnerability opens people up. 27:07 - What is Program Managers job? Are there elements of sales in it? 32:42 - Quantitative approach vs human approach when requesting budget from executives for software projects. Connect with Emet https://www.linkedin.com/in/emet-ozar/ (LinkedIN) Connect with Us! https://www.linkedin.com/company/53108426/admin/ (LinkedIN: ) https://stories-of-selling-human.captivate.fm/ (Website: )

Kaidankai: Ghost and Supernatural Stories
Mr. Mongo's Fanciful Elixir by Glenn Dungan

Kaidankai: Ghost and Supernatural Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 44:00


What's your ailment? Feeling old and tired? Do you have a bum knee or sciatica shooting pain down your leg? Whatever your ailment—rheumatism, toothache, sore throat, from itchy insect bites to ingrown toenail to ideopathic pulmonary fibrosis, Mister Mungo's Fanciful Elixir Cures All. You'll grow to depend on it, but it's so reasonaly priced, you'll be back for more and more. Ah…but have you ever wondered where your favorite snake oil comes from? And what will happen when it runs out?Glenn Dungan is currently based in Brooklyn, NYC. He exists within a Venn-diagram of urban design, sociology, and good stories. When not obsessing about one of those three, he can be found at a park drinking black coffee and listening to podcasts about murder.  For more of his work, see his website: whereisglennnow.com or following his on Instagram: whereisglennnow.You can read "Mr. Mongo's Fanciful Elixir" at https://www.whiteenso.com/ghost-stories-2022Win a T-shirt with the Kaidankai logo. Go to the podcast description to learn more. Send your contest answers:by DM on Twitter at: Japanese Ghost Stories @ghostJapanese orInstagram: WhiteEnsoJapan or Facebook: Kaidankai: Ghost and Supernatural Stories Podcast/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kaidankai100/ or by email: Kaidankai100ghoststories@gmail.com.Help me pay the contributors for their work. Donate to the Kaidankai through Ko-Fi. Thank you! https://ko-fi.com/kaidankaighoststories

Waddle & Silvy
10/17 5 PM: Happy Birthday Mongo!

Waddle & Silvy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 43:33 Very Popular


Happy 65th Birthday to Steve "Mongo" McMichael!

Azure Friday (HD) - Channel 9
Desktop tools for developing with Azure Cosmos DB

Azure Friday (HD) - Channel 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


Estefani Arroyo joins Scott Hanselman to talk about and demo Azure Cosmos DB desktop tools for developing, querying, and testing your applications. The Azure Cosmos DB Linux Emulator provides a high-fidelity emulation of the Azure Cosmos DB service. The Azure Data Studio Cosmos DB API for Mongo DB extension enables you to connect to your Mongo resources and query your data using the mongo shell. Chapters 00:00 - Intro 01:03 - Emulator configuration options 02:20 - Emulator pre-requisites 04:36 - Adding certificates 07:20 - Azure Cosmos DB emulator 08:31 - Querying data 09:27 - Python sample app to try it 10:30 - Visualizing data with Azure Data Studio 12:26 - Mongo shell 15:13 - Wrap-up Recommended resources Install and use the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator for local development and testing Run the emulator on Docker for Linux (Preview) Quickstart: Use Azure Data Studio to connect and query Azure Cosmos DB API for MongoDB (Preview) Get Azure Data Studio Create a Pay-as-You-Go account (Azure) Create a free account (Azure) Connect Scott Hanselman | Twitter: @SHanselman Azure Friday | Twitter: @AzureFriday

Azure Friday (Audio) - Channel 9
Desktop tools for developing with Azure Cosmos DB

Azure Friday (Audio) - Channel 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022


Estefani Arroyo joins Scott Hanselman to talk about and demo Azure Cosmos DB desktop tools for developing, querying, and testing your applications. The Azure Cosmos DB Linux Emulator provides a high-fidelity emulation of the Azure Cosmos DB service. The Azure Data Studio Cosmos DB API for Mongo DB extension enables you to connect to your Mongo resources and query your data using the mongo shell. Chapters 00:00 - Intro 01:03 - Emulator configuration options 02:20 - Emulator pre-requisites 04:36 - Adding certificates 07:20 - Azure Cosmos DB emulator 08:31 - Querying data 09:27 - Python sample app to try it 10:30 - Visualizing data with Azure Data Studio 12:26 - Mongo shell 15:13 - Wrap-up Recommended resources Install and use the Azure Cosmos DB Emulator for local development and testing Run the emulator on Docker for Linux (Preview) Quickstart: Use Azure Data Studio to connect and query Azure Cosmos DB API for MongoDB (Preview) Get Azure Data Studio Create a Pay-as-You-Go account (Azure) Create a free account (Azure) Connect Scott Hanselman | Twitter: @SHanselman Azure Friday | Twitter: @AzureFriday

The Phil Show Podcast
Stupid News - October 11, 2022

The Phil Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 6:17


Being the victim of a scam is terrible, especially when it toys with both your finances and your feelings. But maybe this person should have been slightly suspicious when her soon-to-be fiance was on the International Space Station. Find out the details of this & more, including a horse named Mongo finding his way home, in STUPID NEWS! #PhilShowSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Craig Collins Show
Good Story/Bad Story

The Craig Collins Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 13:16


Good Story/ Bad Story! An 18 year old horse named Mongo! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Craig Collins Show
Good Story/Bad Story

The Craig Collins Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 13:16


Good Story/ Bad Story! An 18 year old horse named Mongo! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Altimeter's Brad Gerstner on Why Supercycles and the Powerlaw is the Most Important Thing In Investing, Why Portfolio Diversification is the Opposite of Risk Mitigation and The #1 Question Brad Asks All New Recruits

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 68:46 Very Popular


Brad Gerstner is the Founder and CEO of Altimeter, a life-cycle technology investment firm that manages public and private portfolios. Brad has personally participated in more than 100 IPOs as a sponsor, anchor, and investor. Brad's notable deals include Snowflake, Mongo, Bytedance, Gusto, Unity, Okta, dbt, Modern Treasury, EPIC Games, Hotel Tonight, and Zillow. Prior to founding Altimeter, Brad was a 3-time co-founder where he sold all three businesses (to IAC, Google, and Marchex), a founding principal at General Catalyst; a securities lawyer, a former Deputy Secretary of State of Indiana, and a pilot. In Today's Episode with Brad Gerstner We Discuss: 1.) From Humble Beginnings in Indiana to 100 IPOs: When did Brad realize his original love of finance and entrepreneurship? What one single question does Brad ask all potential new recruits to determine if they have hustle? What does Brad know now that he wishes he had known at the beginning of his career? 2.) The Power Law and Supercycles: What is a power law? Why is it the single most important thing in investing? How do the best investors in the world build a framework around supercycles? How does Brad approach market sizing? How does Brad think about market creation when aligning that to his thesis of investing in power laws? How does Brad determine if a large opportunity is a "super-cyle" or a short, time-stamped fad that is unsustainable? How does Brad assess the importance of market timing? 3.) Building Anti-Fragile Portfolios: Portfolio Construction: Why does Brad disagree that the answer to risk mitigation is portfolio diversification? How many companies is enough companies for a diverse portfolio? Price Sensitivity: How does Brad reflect on his own relationship to price? How does this process and mindset change on re-investments? What is needed for Brad to re-invest? Time to Exit: How does Brad analyze when is the right time to exit a position? What are the single biggest mistakes people make when it comes to timing their exit? 4.) The Venture Landscape: Today, What is Happening? Why does Brad believe what has happened over the last 24 months is a great disservice to founders? What are the biggest examples of a complete lack of investor discipline? Why does Brad believe that for all positions valued over $500M, we should apply a 20% discount? Is today's pricing actually just the new normal? How has the public market pricing impacted the deployment of growth stage checks? How will this play out in the next 12 months? Why does Brad believe there is "not blood on the streets yet"? How does the speed of interest rate change impact our ecosystem so dramatically? Items Mentioned in Today's Episode: Brad's Favourite Book: The Snowball: Warren Buffet and the Business of Life

Sit Down with Sniper
Sit Down With Sniper | Episode 34 ft. Mike Mongo

Sit Down with Sniper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 85:45


This week it was such an honor to sit down with the amazing Mike Mongo!We spoke about what Mike has been doing in Web3 and he was able to really make a great conversation. This is hands down one of my favorite episodes and I feel everyone can take at least one thing away from this interaction. I greatly appreciate you Mr. Mongo! And thank you to my team, NRN

Le jazz sur France Musique
Quel est ton nom ? : Paquito D'Rivera, Mongo Santamaria, Clément Janinet, Artie Shaw et d'autres

Le jazz sur France Musique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 59:29


durée : 00:59:29 - Quel est ton nom ? - par : Nathalie Piolé -

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM
Naim Belgin – przewodniczący Demokratycznej Unii Tatarów w Konstancy/ Wielka Wyprawa/ 27.09.2022 r.

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 17:52


Rozmowa z Naimem Belginem na temat Tatarów. Przewodniczący Demokratycznej Unii Tatarów w Konstancy opowiadał o przetrwaniu języka tatarskiego w Kazachstanie i różnych odnogach narodu tatarskiego. Belgin podkreślał, że Tatarzy mają 3000 lat historii. Zaznaczył, że ich historia nie zaczyna się od Czyngis Chana, którego uważa, podobnie jak wszystkich Mongołów, za Tatara. Nasz rozmówca mówił, że chcieliby przegranej Rosji. Rozmówca Piotra Mateusza Bobołowicza opowiadał także o początku kontaktów Tatarów z Polską, które sięgają czasów Tochtamysza, który schronił się na Litwie przed Tamerlanem. Naim Belgin wskazał, że Gaugazowie są ich braćmi, niezależnie od ich chrześcijańskiej wiary. Opowiadał o stosunkach Seldżuków z Wielką Ordą. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiownet/message

Trek Talk with Tech and Kirk
Trek Talk - Episode 103 - Feelings

Trek Talk with Tech and Kirk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 112:41


Gary the Hate Camel presents a podcast with Tech, Kirk, Handy and Boom: Guests: MadamStarGazer (66), ocmsrzr, InquisitorBurnzy (45), JustJoel (31), PimpSauce (52), Molly_Weasley (21), Stratalorian (9), Pho3nix, Parzival, DonaldTrump (34) Topics Discussed: 0:00 - The Craig hate starts early today! 1:00 - Don't say gay! 3:14 - On to sci-fi! Orville is now streaming on Disney+ so you are running out of excuses for not watching it! Spoilers ahead! 12:54 - Craig barfs the audio for about 13 seconds, our apologies! Still talking Orville though! 17:46 - Conflict over the past few days around trying to call out mental illness. Not ok. And if a referee tells you to stop, you stop, it's not that hard. 23:55 - JustJoel is an alliance mate of the person booted, and apparently that guy is a real unpleasant individual. 26:26 - And back to the Orville!!! We can't quit it! 29:12 - Sometimes you have to stir drinks in an unorthodox manner... And some beer talk, because some people love yak piss. And how beer now has as many variants as weed does, because some people appear to also be hippies. Yes, Boom hates beer and weed, get over it. Give me a real drink and STFU. 38:17 - On to STFC talk, and the next upcoming incursions! S45 got paired against S49, which has a lot more power than S45. 50:30 - Everyone is glad that for incursions our opponents are being rotated! 56:08 - Tech can't kill a capital trader in Kronos with his Augur unless he hits it multiple times. For shame! 1:07:20 - Treachery and treason in incursions! Wait...doesn't this all seem really familiar? Like we covered it last week? :eyes: 1:13:24 - It's odd that aggressive alliances don't go all-in on incursions. 1:14:30 - What we do when someone rolls into our territory and hits one of our bases? We actually DON'T go crack every base out there just because someone hit a base in our territory. Unless it's during the actual territory defense time, in which case it's straight to war do not pass go. NONA is...less aggressive, and shit is about to go off the rails! 1:15:45 - We have some serious underlying Parzival frustration here! 1:20:57 - Parzival explains his issue with Pho3nix and Pho3nix explains his side. And calm, respectful conversations are Handy's hope...has he never BEEN on the internet before? 1:26:34 - Ocm, by the transitive property, hates women. And Parzival and Pho3nix both work with very difficult people, so the combativeness is weird to Techman. 1:32:16 - Techman asks if Parzival can unblock Pho3nix for 5 minutes, Parzival declines. He has come to a conclusion about Pho3nix, so he doesn't need to know anything else. Personally, this seems a little shortsighted, but I don't know what happened so maybe it makes complete sense? 1:36:55 - Duel with Parrots at dawn! Because WTF is normal, anyways? 1:41:11 - Is it more exhausting to be accepting and move on, or to be angry and hold a grudge? For me, it's hard to always turn the other cheek, it's easier to hate people for their shortcomings. 1:46:48 - Mongo just pawn in great game of life. 1:49:43 - If you haven't thought about murdering someone, you haven't loved them. 1:50:33 - Boom does something many should have done much earlier during this podcast, and pleads the 5th. And watch the %&#@ing Orville! And remember...spread the hate! Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trektalkpodcast/?hl=en Visit Trek Talk Discord: https://discord.gg/MKZZhK7CSA for more related Star Trek related content, and to interact with a greater Star Trek Fleet Command community. #STFC #StarTrek #StarTrekFleetCommand #TrekTalkwithTechandKirk

Matt Spectro Thru The Multiverse
Podcast From Planet Mongo-Flash Gordon(1979)

Matt Spectro Thru The Multiverse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 50:34


This week, I'm joined by frequent collaborator Dave Walker as we travel thru the Multiverse to 1979 for the Flash Gordon episode "A Planet in Peril!" Legendary animation studios Filmation takes on one of America's oldest super hero and pop culture icon Flash Gordon! Appearing in everything from comic strips to film to live action to animation, Dave and I touch on it all!! Join us as we discuss the long history of Flash, why Flash is the most eligible bachelor on Mongo, Zarkov just taking up space, Flash Gordon influence on Star Wars and the Peculiar Purple Pie Man!! All this and more as Flash saves every one of us....in cartoon form!!

Monday Warfare: The Battles Within
Monday Warfare: RAW vs. NITRO – Episode 22 (6/10/96) - KEVIN NASH ARRIVES IN WCW!

Monday Warfare: The Battles Within

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 124:29


The Monday Night War rages on when KEVIN NASH arrives in WCW and changes the measuring stick. Also on Nitro, Sting & Lex defend against Flair & Arn Anderson, Scott Steiner has a banger vs. Booker T, and Debra McMichael wants the Horsemen to cancel their match with hubby Mongo. Then on Raw, former Tag Champs collide when Owen Hart meets Yokozuna in a KotR Qualifier with a surprise ending. The Undertaker battles the British Bulldog, while Jim Cornette drops a bomb on HBK. Follow us on Twitter @RasslinGrenade and be automatically entered into our FREE PRIZE GIVEAWAY CONTESTS!Please Follow and LIKE our FACEBOOK PAGE located at https://www.facebook.com/RasslinGrenadePlease Subscribe to our Youtube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/RasslinGrenade as we continue to add new videos of wrestling history's past.Visit our Podcast Network https://wrestlecopia.comPlease Subscribe to our ALL NEW Patreon account to help keep us going, 12 Tiers to choose from!!! https://www.patreon.com/wrestlecopiaIncludes a $5 "All Access" Tier featuring our Patreon Watch-Along Series of PPV Events, Coliseum Video collection, as well as all past Grenade and Monday Warfare show notes, unedited TR SHOCKS episodes, DIGITAL DOWNLOADS, and so much more! Listen at your leisure and pick back up later if need be! Timestamps below for easy navigation.Monday Warfare: The Battles Within – Episode 22 (June 10, 1996)WWF NEWS  BRIAN PILLMAN SIGNS WITH TITAN. We do a deep dive into all the behind the scenes workings of Brian Pillman playing WCW and WWF against each other in order to get the best contract possible. Ron Simmons, Jim Neidhart, The Dirty White Boy, Tracy Smothers, Tom Brandi, and Alex Porteau headed to the WWF... and not a single GOOD gimmick between them.  The crack slinging Samoan Gangstas QUIT the WWF Jeff Jarrett gives his notice to the company for the umpteenth time Louie Spicolli is ECW bound Vince tries to lock down exclusive rights to certain arenas to shut WCW out Is it REALLY Vader Time? We talk Vader's nagging injuries and poor booking The latest on the BRITISH BULLDOG's contract negotiations and storyline involving wife Diana and WWF Champion Shawn Michaels Yokozuna's weight is becoming a real problem. We talk the WWF taking him off TV and sending him to Duke in hopes for Yoko to get healthy. Things are looking a bit "Cloudy".... The Body Donnas find their new manager...  Crushing your childhood... We discuss how Sunny was NOT the "Most Downloaded" celeb on AOL, nor was the Warrior's Comic Book the #1 best seller. How did naked Goldust fair in the ratings last week? Did he bring in new viewers or force people to change the channel? WWF MONDAY NIGHT RAW 6/10/96 (00:35:18) Yokozuna meets Owen Hart in a battle of former Tag Team Champions in a King of the Ring Qualifier Yokozuna cuts a despondant promo, vowing to leave the WWF to find himself. Wildman Marc Mero faces BodyDonna Skip in the final King of the Ring Qualifier Jerry Lawler has a gift for the Ultimate Warrior... But Warrior man (baseball cap and all) isn't buying it... or "selling" for that matter. Jim Cornette drops a bomb on Shawn Michaels as Corny gets to choose the referee for the KotR Title Rematch between HBK vs. The Bulldog The Undertaker battles The British Bulldog Mankind strikes again, how will the Undertaker respond? WCW NEWS (01:03:01) Nothing new here... Jacques Rougeau already has heat with the company and he hasn't even started on the road yet.  WCW has their eyes on Raven Just why does Scott Steiner look the way he does? Is it genetics, or..... WCW MONDAY NITRO 6/3/96 (01:05:08) It's the Go-Home Show to the Great American Bash PPV Great action kicks things off when Scott Steiner takes on Booker T We talk WCW's new use of commercial bumpers to promote matches and wrestlers DEBRA MCMICHAEL has a dilemma she brings to Mean Gene Interviews with Konna, Big Bubba, and others promoting their matches at the upcoming GAB PPV Larry Zbyszko would be canceled in 2022, and we love him for it Jimmy Powers makes his WCW debut vs. "Lord of the Ring" DDP Sting battles Meng with some weird booking attached Debra McMichael requests Mongo's match vs. the Horsemen to be canceled. The Horsemen have an altercation with Debra McMichael and proceed to take out their competition in the locker room "Hacksaw" Jim Duggan looks for revenge on Squire David Taylor WCW Champion The Giant has STIFF competition in Scott Norton We talk WCW's "rush syndrome" where they try and cram too much into one segment in a short amount of time, causing noticeable errors Lex Luger confronts the Giant with an ice bucket! Lord Steven Regal stretches Billy Kidman as Sting seeks revenge In one of the most disgusting professional acts that we can recount, The Nasty Boys take on The Public Enemy in a match where the Nasties refuse to sell anything while taking advantage of and stiffing TPE.  Steve McMichael and Kevin Green train for the match against the Horsemen this Sunday night. Sting & Lex Luger defend the Tag Team Titles vs. Ric Flair & Arn Anderson The Giant takes on Sting, Lex Luger, Scott Steiner, AND a myriad of chair shots! The Measuring Stick just changed as the Big Mang, KEVIN NASH ARRIVES IN WCW! Nash has some words for Eric Bischoff and company. Plus, we pick our segments of the week, we talk Ratings, and who do we declare the "REAL WINNER" of the rivalry between Raw vs. Nitro this week?

The Aquacave
STARMAN: -2 Part 10 LIVE!

The Aquacave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 40:19


Inspired by the recent “Five Star Classic” in 2022, Jonnie Sea is here to reevaluate the “worst of the worst” as he watches the list of WORST REVIEWED WRESTLING MATCHES using “that guys” STAR RATINGS! Matches that received a -2 Star Ranking will be taken to court and found Guilty or Not Guilty of earning their stars! This episode brings us: Mongo, Crush, Kai-En-Tai, The Oddities, and our SECOND KANE VS THE UNDERTAKER match…..LIVE!

Higher Conscious Thinker
The Rise of Islam

Higher Conscious Thinker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 22:58


In this episode we will discuss how Islam was formed and organized as well as how and why it spread so quickly.Sources:The Essential World History by William Duiker and Jackson SpielvogelWestern Civilizations - by Joshua Cole, Carol Symes, Judith Coffin, and Robert Stacey

The Movement with Mongo

Author, speaker, podcaster, filmmaker and host of "The Movement with Mongo' show Mongo Allen speaks on power!  There is power waiting for those who seek the healing power of Christ.   The power of recovery from addiction. The power of stabilization of mental illness. The power of hope for the down trodden and broken hearted. The power of manifestation and fruition for those who believe. You will BELIEVE!

Mark Side of the Ring

We watch WCW Fall Brawl 1997 War Games match!

What Happened When
Episode 296: MoneyForMongo.com

What Happened When

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 97:36 Very Popular


On this very special episode of What Happened When, Tony and Conrad are joined by a line up of wrestling royalty to raise money for MoneyForMongo.com. Ric Flair, Mick Foley, Jim Ross, Eric Bischoff and Jeff Jarrett share stories of Mongo's electric energy and career. Support us on Patreon, get this show early and ad free, plus TONS of BONUS content: patreon.com/WHWMonday Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/WHWMonday Check out all the new cool merchandise at BoxOfGimmicks.com Buy a shirt at LoisRules.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: youtube.com/whw Save thousands at Savewithconrad.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Two White Guys Talking Film
Ep.153 Blazing Saddles and Tropic Thunder or Frogsplash off the top rope my dude!

Two White Guys Talking Film

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 101:48


Willkommen. Bienvenue. Welcome. C'mon in to another hilarious and thrilling TWGTF! This week the boys are back and they are feeling funny and funny about how comedy has changed and in some ways lost its way in the modern era! That is why Ben has picked two comedies that most likely could not get the greenlight in 2022! Up first the boys examine in what one of their opinions is a contender for the best bit of work the great Mel Brooks has ever created in the 1974 Blazing Saddles! Following that we are launched from the seventies into the late 2000's with what might be the last truly filthy R rated comedy in Ben Stiller's epic insanity known as Tropic Thunder. 0:00:00 to 0:05:12 Preamble & Music: ...Laughing about how dirty they did the Rikishi? 0:05:13 to 0:17:33 Opening and the Best Thing We Saw This Week 0:17:34 to 0:22:06 The First Film and "Hold it! Hold it! What the hell is that shit?" 0:22:07 to 1:09:57 The Conversation and Ratings 1:09:58 to 1:13:09 The Second Film and "You were farting in bathtubs and laughing your ass off!" 1:13:10 to 1:36:49 The Conversation and Ratings 1:36:50 to 1:39:24 What is happening on the next TWGTF and Outro 1:39:25 to 1:41:48 The Cutting Room Floor! Spoiler Alert: The power of laughter heals everything...except being punched by Mongo!

The Movement with Mongo

Author, speaker, podcaster, filmmaker and host of "The Movement with Mongo' show Mongo Allen speaks on power!  There is power waiting for those who seek the healing power of Christ.   The power of recovery from addiction. The power of stabilization of mental illness. The power of hope for the down trodden and broken hearted. The power of manifestation and fruition for those who believe. You will BELIEVE!

Into The Void Podcast
Heavy Underground - Charta 77 om Ödesboxen

Into The Void Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 68:20


Charta 77 har snart funnits i 40 år men fortsätter oförtrutet att släppa ny musik. Nu släpps Ödesboxen som samlar ihop de tre senaste plattorna Skuld, Verdan-di och Urd i en låda och som efter en del strul äntligen finns att köpa.  Heavy Underground fick det stora nöjet att leda (nåja) releasefirandet som livesändes på Youtube och det blev ett långt samtal om Charta 77 då, idag och i framtiden varvat med tre akustiska versioner av låtar från skivorna.  Stort tack till Per, Mongo, Janne och Tommie för inbjudan! Tack till Birdnest Records. Köp Ödesboxen här  Se hela webbsändningen här 

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka
Kałmucja - szachiści i buddyści - Historia Mongołów 16 // Za Rubieżą - 217

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:41


Czy na szachach można robić politykę? Zapraszam na moje soszjale, gdzie wrzucam dodatkowe materiały: https://www.instagram.com/zarubieza/ https://www.facebook.com/Za-Rubie%C5%BC%C4%85-109949267414211/ I jeszcze twitter: https://twitter.com/mioszszymaski2 Jeśli chcesz wesprzeć moją twórczość, to zapraszam tutaj: https://patronite.pl/miloszszymanski

The Aquacave
STARMAN: -2 Part Seven

The Aquacave

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 41:43


Inspired by the recent “Five Star Classic” in 2022, Jonnie Sea is here to reevaluate the “worst of the worst” as he watches the list of WORST REVIEWED WRESTLING MATCHES using “that guys” STAR RATINGS!   Matches that received a -2 Star Ranking will be taken to court and found Guilty or Not Guilty of earning their stars! This episode bring us: A Mid 90s WCW TRILOGY! Featuring, Kurasawa! One Man Gang! Hawk (possibly drunk?) Plus: Folks, I don't mind telling ya, you cannot afford to miss the big main event! It's Chicago vs Green Bay as MONGO “battles” REGGIE WHITE!    

The Danny Mac Podcast
Dan McNeil pays tribute to Steve McMichael: Long live Mongo

The Danny Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 31:12 Transcription Available


In this edition of The Danny Mac Podcast, Dan McNeil looks back at his friendship with Steve McMichael, who is battling ALS.  Danny Mac talks about his time with Mongo, the struggle with ALS, and the mark he's made on Chicago.

Bob Sirott
Mongo Mash Bash taking place this Sunday!

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


Former Bears defensive end and Hall of Famer Dan Hampton joins Bob Sirott and Dave Eanet to share details about the event taking place this Sunday inspired by Hampton’s former teammate, Steve McMichael. The Mongo Mash Bash, a benefit for families impacted by ALS, will have prize baskets, a 50/50 raffle, as well as live […]

83 Weeks with Eric Bischoff
Episode 230: Steve "Mongo" McMichael

83 Weeks with Eric Bischoff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 118:51 Very Popular


GEICO - Do you own or rent your home? Sure you do! And it's hard work. But you know what's easy? Bundling with GEICO. Go to GEICO.com, get a quote, and see how much YOU could save. It's GEICO-easy!  RECTEQ - Visit recteq.com and use the code BISCHOFF to get 5% off SITEWIDE! That's 5% off their top-notch wood pellet grills, one-of a kind RECTEQ ICER coolers, chef-tested rubs and sauces, accessories, merchandise, everything, 5% off!  CARSHIELD - CarShield helps protect my wallet from expensive car repairs, and they'll do the same for you! Go to CarShield.com/Podcast to start your plan and lock in your pricing forever. A deductible may apply. FEALS - It's time to say no to sluggish days and restless nights with Feals Focus Melts! Become a member today and save 50% off your first order of Focus Melts and get free shipping by going to Feals.com/83WEEKS and using code 83WEEKS at checkout. As a member, you'll save money on every order and you can easily pause, swap or cancel at any time. WOOOOO WINGS - Wooooo! Wings, a virtual restaurant concept from The Man himself, the Nature Boy Ric Flair. Enjoy the legendary flavors and world championship wings by ordering with your Uber Eats or Postmates app.  Wooo Wings is now open in Nashville, San Antonio, Jacksonville, Florida as well as Huntsville and Tuscaloosa in Alabama, with many more locations coming soon.  Try the only chicken wings worthy of carrying the name of the 16x World Heavyweight Champion.  SAVE WITH CONRAD - If you have credit card debt or in a 30 year loan? Well, we can help you get out of that pinch and save money at the same time! Head over to SaveWithConrad.com for a quick quote.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Saturday Morning Fever
Saturday Morning Fever #10 - Flash Gordon

Saturday Morning Fever

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 67:08


Rob and special guest Cory Drew blast off to the planet Mongo to discuss the classic 1979 Filmation cartoon THE NEW ADVENTURES OF FLASH GORDON! E-MAIL: firewaterpodcast@comcast.net Subscribe to the SATURDAY MORNING FEVER: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/saturday-morning-fever/id1131851827 Subscribe via other podcatchers: http://feeds.feedburner.com/saturday-morning Also available on Stitcher, Spotify, Amazon Music and Google Podcasts Musical theme by Luke Daab: http://daabcreative.com This episode brought to you by InStockTrades: http://instocktrades.com. Our picks this week: FLASH GORDON DAN BARRY SUNDAYS VOL.1 DEATH PLANET: https://www.instocktrades.com/products/apr172058/flash-gordon-dan-barry-sundays-hc-vol-01-death-planet KINGS WATCH VOL. 1: https://www.instocktrades.com/products/may141365/kings-watch-tp-vol-01 This podcast is a proud member of the FIRE AND WATER PODCAST NETWORK: Visit the Fire & Water WEBSITE: http://fireandwaterpodcast.com Follow Fire & Water on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/FWPodcasts Like our Fire & Water FACEBOOK page: https://www.facebook.com/FWPodcastNetwork Use our HASHTAG online: #FWPodcasts Thanks for listening! 

Place to Be Nation POP
Pop Goes The Classics - A Bug's Life Live Watch

Place to Be Nation POP

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 100:45


On a special episode of Pop Goes The Classics, Andy Atherton rides solo to do a live watch of 1998's A Bug's Life. Originally broadcasted live on Stream Lounge, he gives his thoughts on the great ensemble voice cast; the animated take on The Magnificent Seven; The Twig of '93; Flik's Doc Brown-esque inventions; the lifespan of ants; how terrifying Hopper is; rabid grasshoppers; Flik's fool's errand; PT Flea the carnie; Bug City; Thud, the “Mongo” of the movie; comedy of misunderstandings; movie parallels; The War Magician; Heimlich's obsession with becoming a butterfly; bug celebrations; the nefarious plot of the grasshoppers; bug pep talks; Russian gibberish; metal in the microwave; PT Flea ruining the troupe's plans & the first set of Pixar outtakes.   To watch along on Stream Lounge, click this link: https://www.streamlounge.io/watch/27a22566-3138-4b0b-8c61-ce31aa0e4f0f

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka
Mongolski Stalin - Historia Mongołów 15 // Za Rubieżą - 212

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 52:58


Jak mogła wyglądać stalinowska Polska? Zapraszam na moje soszjale, gdzie wrzucam dodatkowe materiały: https://www.instagram.com/zarubieza/ https://www.facebook.com/Za-Rubie%C5%BC%C4%85-109949267414211/ I jeszcze twitter: https://twitter.com/mioszszymaski2 Jeśli chcesz wesprzeć moją twórczość, to zapraszam tutaj: https://patronite.pl/miloszszymanski

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka
Jak komuniści przejęli władzę w Mongolii? - Historia Mongołów 14 // Za Rubieżą - 210

Za Rubieżą. Historia i polityka

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:19


Jak czerwoni przejęli władzę bez rozlewu krwi? Zapraszam na moje soszjale, gdzie wrzucam dodatkowe materiały: https://www.instagram.com/zarubieza/ https://www.facebook.com/Za-Rubie%C5%BC%C4%85-109949267414211/ I jeszcze twitter: https://twitter.com/mioszszymaski2 Jeśli chcesz wesprzeć moją twórczość, to zapraszam tutaj: https://patronite.pl/miloszszymanski

Screaming in the Cloud
Cloud-Hosted Database Services with Benjamin Anderson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:39


About BenjaminBenjamin Anderson is CTO, Cloud at EDB, where he is responsible for developing and driving strategy for the company's Postgres-based cloud offerings. Ben brings over ten years' experience building and running distributed database systems in the cloud for multiple startups and large enterprises. Prior to EDB, he served as chief architect of IBM's Cloud Databases organization, built an SRE practice at database startup Cloudant, and founded a Y Combinator-funded hardware startup.Links Referenced: EDB: https://www.enterprisedb.com/ BigAnimal: biganimal.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at EDB. And not only do they bring us this promoted episode, they bring me their CTO for Cloud, Benjamin Anderson. Benjamin, thank you so much for agreeing to suffer the slings and arrows that I will no doubt throw at you in a professional context, because EDB is a database company, and I suck at those things.Benjamin: [laugh]. Thanks, Corey. Nice to be here.Corey: Of course. So, databases are an interesting and varied space. I think we can all agree—or agree to disagree—that the best database is, of course, Route 53, when you misuse TXT records as a database. Everything else is generally vying for number two. EDB was—back in the days that I was your customer—was EnterpriseDB, now rebranded as EDB, which is way faster to say, and I approve of that.But you were always the escalation point of last resort. When you're stuck with a really weird and interesting Postgres problem, EDB was where you went because if you folks couldn't solve the problem, it was likely not going to get solved. I always contextualized you folks as a consulting shop. That's not really what you do. You are the CTO for Cloud.And, ah, interesting. Do databases behave differently in cloud environments? Well, they do when you host them as a managed service, which is an area you folks have somewhat recently branched into. How'd you get there?Benjamin: Ah, that's interesting. So, there's a bunch of stuff to unpack there. I think EDB has been around for a long time. It's something like 13, 14, 15 years, something like that, and really it's just been kind of slowly growing, right? We did start very much as a product company. We built some technology to help customers get from Oracle database on to Postgres, way back in 2007, 2008.That business has just slowly been growing. It's been going quite well. Frankly, I only joined about 18 months ago, and it's really cool tech, right? We natively understand some things that Oracle is doing. Customers don't have to change their schemas to migrate from Oracle to Postgres. There's some cool technology in there.But as you point out, I think a lot of our position in the market has not been that product focused. There's been a lot of people seeing us as the Postgres experts, and as people who can solve Postgres problems, in general. We have, for a long time, employed a lot of really sharp Postgres people. We still employ a lot of really sharp Postgres people. That's very much, in a lot of ways, our bread and butter. That we're going to fix Postgres problems as they come up.Now, over the past few years, we've definitely tried to shift quite a bit into being more of a product company. We've brought on a bunch of people who've been doing more enterprise software product type development over the past few years, and really focusing ourselves more and more on building products and investing in ourselves as a product company. We're not a services company. We're not a consulting company. We do, I think, provide the best Postgres support in the market. But it's been a journey. The cloud has been a significant part of that as well, right? You can't get away.Corey: Oh, yeah. These days, when someone's spinning up a new workload, it's unlikely—in most cases—they're going to wind up spinning up a new data center, if they don't already have one. Yes, there's still a whole bunch of on-prem workloads. But increasingly, the default has become cloud. Instead of, “Why cloud?” The question's become, “Why not?”Benjamin: Right, exactly. Then, as people are more and more accepting of managed services, you have to be a product company. You have to be building products in order to support your database customers because what they want his managed services. I was working in managed databases and service, something like, ten years ago, and it was like pulling teeth. This is after RDS launched. This was still pulling teeth trying to get people to think about, oh, I'm going to let you run my database. Whereas, now obviously, it's just completely different. We have to build great products in order to succeed in the database business, in general.Corey: One thing that jumped out at me when you first announced this was the URL is enterprisedb.com. That doesn't exactly speak to, you know, non-large companies, and EDB is what you do. You have a very corporate logo, but your managed service is called BigAnimal, which I absolutely love. It actually expresses a sense of whimsy and personality that I can no doubt guess that a whole bunch of people argued against, but BigAnimal, it is. It won through. I love that. Was that as contentious as I'm painting it to be, or people actually have a sense of humor sometimes?Benjamin: [laugh]. Both, it was extremely contentious. I, frankly, was one of the people who was not in favor of it at first. I was in favor of something that was whimsical, but maybe not quite that whimsical.Corey: Well, I call it Postgres-squeal, so let's be very clear here that we're probably not going to see eye-to-eye on most anything in pronunciation things. But we can set those differences aside and have a conversation.Benjamin: Absolutely, no consider that. It was deliberate, though, to try to step away a little bit from the blue-suit-and-tie, enterprise, DB-type branding. Obviously, a lot of our customers are big enterprises. We're good at that. We're not trying to be the hip, young startup targeting business in a lot of ways. We have a wide range of customers, but we want to branch out a little bit.Corey: One of the challenges right now is if I spin up an environment inside of AWS, as one does, and I decide I certainly don't want to take the traditional approach of running a database on top of an EC2 instance—the way that we did in the olden days—because RDS was crappy. Now that it's slightly less crappy, that becomes a not ideal path. I start looking at their managed database offerings, and there are something like 15 distinct managed databases that they offer, and they never turn anything off. And they continue to launch things into the far future. And it really feels, on some level, like 20 years from now—what we call a DBA today—their primary role is going to look a lot more like helping a company figure out which of Amazon's 40 managed databases is the appropriate fit for this given workload. Yet, when I look around at what the industry has done, it seems that when we're talking about relational databases. Postgres has emerged back when I was, more or less, abusing servers in person in my data center days, it was always MySQL. These days, Postgres is the de facto standard, full stop. I admit that I was mostly keeping my aura away from any data that was irreplaceable at that time. What happened? What did I miss?Benjamin: It's a really good question. And I certainly am not a hundred percent on all the trends that went on there. I know there's a lot of folks that are not happy about the MySQL acquisition by Oracle. I think there's a lot of energy that was adopted by the NoSQL movement, as well. You have people who didn't really care about transactional semantics that were using MySQL because they needed a place to store their data. And then, things like MongoDB and that type of system comes along where it's significantly easier than MySQL, and that subset of the population just sort of drifts away from MySQL.Corey: And in turn, those NoSQL projects eventually turn into something where, okay, now we're trying to build a banking system on top of it, and it's, you know, I guess you can use a torque wrench as a hammer if you're really creative about it, but it seems like there's a better approach.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. And those folks are coming back around to the relational databases, exactly. At the same time, the advancements in Postgres from the early eight series to today are significant, right? We shouldn't underestimate how much Postgres has really moved forward. It wasn't that long ago that replication was hardly a thing and Postgres, right? It's been a journey.Corey: One thing that your website talks about is that you accelerate your open-sourced database transformation. And this is a bit of a hobby horse I get on from time to time. I think that there are a lot of misunderstandings when people talk about this. You have the open-source purists—of which I shamefully admit I used to be one—saying that, “Oh, it's about the idea of purity and open and free as in software.” Great. Okay, awesome. But when I find that corporate customers are talking about when they say open-source database, they don't particularly care if they have access to the source code because they're not going to go in and patch a database engine, we hope. But what they do care about is regardless of where they are today—even if they're perfectly happy there—they don't want to wind up beholden to a commercial database provider, and/or they don't want to wind up beholden to the environment that is running within. There's a strategic Exodus that's available in theory, which on some level serves to make people feel better about not actually Exodus-ing, but it also means if they're doing a migration at some point, they don't also have to completely redo their entire data plan.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I mean, I like to talk—there's a big rat's nest of questions and problems in here—but I generally like talk to about open APIs, talk about standards, talk about how much is going to have to change if you eliminate this vendor. We're definitely not open-source purists. Well, we employ a lot of open-source purists. I also used to be an open—Corey: Don't let them hear you say that, then. Fair enough. Fair enough.Benjamin: [laugh] we have proprietary software at EDB, as well. There's a kind of wide range of businesses that we participate in. Glad to hear you also mention this where-it's-hosted angle, as well. I think there's some degree to which people are—they figured out that having at least open APIs or an open-source-ish database is a good idea rather than being beholden to proprietary database. But then, immediately forget that when they're picking a cloud vendor, right? And realizing that putting their data in Cloud Vendor A versus Cloud Vendor B is also putting them in a similar difficult situation. They need to be really wary of when they're doing that. Now, obviously, I work at an independent software company, and I have some incentive to say this, but I do think it's true. And you know, there's meaningful data gravity risk.Corey: I assure you, I have no incentive. I don't care what cloud provider you're on. My guidance has been, for years, to—as a general rule—pick a provider, I care about which one, and go all in until there's a significant reason to switch. Trying to build an optionality, “Oh, everything we do should be fully portable at an instance notice.” Great. Unless you're actually doing it, you're more or less, giving up a whole bunch of shortcuts and feature velocity you could otherwise have, in the hopes of one day you'll do a thing, but all the assumptions you're surrounded by baked themselves in regardless. So, you're more or less just creating extra work for yourself for no defined benefit. This is not popular in some circles, where people try to sell something that requires someone to go multi-cloud, but here we are.Benjamin: No, I think you're right. I think people underestimate the degree to which the abstractions are just not very good, right, and the degree to which those cloud-specific details are going to leak in if you're going to try to get anything done, you end up in kind of a difficult place. What I see more frequently is situations where we have a big enterprise—not even big, even medium-sized companies where maybe they've done an acquisition or two, they've got business units that are trying to do things on their own. And they end up in two or three clouds, sort of by happenstance. It's not like they're trying to do replication live between two clouds, but they've got one business unit in AWS and one business unit and Azure, and somebody in the corporate—say enterprise architect or something like that—really would like to make things consistent between the two so they get a consistent security posture and things like that. So, there are situations where the multi-cloud is a reality at a certain level, but maybe not at a concrete technical level. But I think it's still really useful for a lot of customers.Corey: You position your cloud offering in two different ways. One of them is the idea of BigAnimal, and the other—well, it sort of harkens back to when I was in sixth grade going through the American public school system. They had a cop come in and talk to us and paint to this imaginary story of people trying to push drugs. “Hey, kid. You want to try some of this?” And I'm reading this and it says EDB, Postgres for Kubernetes. And I'm sent back there, where it's like, “Hey, kid. You want to run your stateful databases on top of Kubernetes?” And my default answer to that is good lord, no. What am I missing?Benjamin: That's a good question. Kubernetes has come a long way—I think is part of that.Corey: Oh, truly. I used to think of containers as a pure story for stateless things. And then, of course, I put state into them, and then, everything exploded everywhere because it turns out, I'm bad at computers. Great. And it has come a long way. I have been tracking a lot of that. But it still feels like the idea being that you'd want to have your database endpoints somewhere a lot less, I guess I'll call it fickle, if that makes sense.Benjamin: It's an interesting problem because we are seeing a lot of people who are interested in our Kubernetes-based products. It's actually based on—we recently open-sourced the core of it under a project called cloud-native PG. It's a cool piece of technology. If you think about sort of two by two. In one corner, you've got self-managed on-premise databases. So, you're very, very slow-moving, big-iron type, old-school database deployments. And on the opposite corner, you've got fully-managed, in the cloud, BigAnimal, Amazon RDS, that type of thing. There's a place on that map where you've got customers that want a self-service type experience. Whether that's for production, or maybe it's even for dev tests, something like that. But you don't want to be giving the management capability off to a third party.For folks that want that type of experience, trying to build that themselves by, like, wiring up EC2 instances, or doing something in their own data center with VMware, or something like that, can be extremely difficult. Whereas if you've go to a Kubernetes-based product, you can get that type of self-service experience really easily, right? And customers can get a lot more flexibility out of how they run their databases and operate their databases. And what sort of control they give to, say application developers who want to spin up a new database for a test or for some sort of small microservice, that type of thing. Those types of workloads tend to work really well with this first-party Kubernetes-based offering. I've been doing databases on Kubernetes in managed services for a long time as well. And I don't, frankly, have any concerns about doing it. There are definitely some sharp edges. And if you wanted to do to-scale, you need to really know what you're doing with Kubernetes because the naive thing will shoot you in the foot.Corey: Oh, yes. So, some it feels almost like people want to cosplay working for Google, but they don't want to pass the technical interview along the way. It's a bit of a weird moment for it.Benjamin: Yeah, I would agree.Corey: I have to go back to my own experiences with using RDS back at my last real job before I went down this path. We were migrating from EC2-Classic to VPC. So, you could imagine what dates me reasonably effectively. And the big problem was the database. And the joy that we had was, “Okay, we have to quiesce the application.” So, the database is now quiet, stop writes, take a snapshot, restore that snapshot into the environment. And whenever we talk to AWS folks, it's like, “So, how long is this going to take?” And the answer was, “Guess.” And that was not exactly reassuring. It went off without a hitch because every migration has one problem. We were sideswiped in an Uber on the way home. But that's neither here nor there. This was two o'clock in the morning, and we finished in half the maintenance time we had allotted. But it was the fact that, well, guess we're going to have to take the database down for many hours with no real visibility, and we hope it'll be up by morning. That wasn't great. But that was the big one going on, on an ongoing basis, there were maintenance windows with a database. We just stopped databasing for a period of time during a fairly broad maintenance window. And that led to a whole lot of unfortunate associations in my mind with using relational databases for an awful lot of stuff. How do you handle maintenance windows and upgrading and not tearing down someone's application? Because I have to assume, “Oh, we just never patch anything. It turns out that's way easier,” is in fact, the wrong answer.Benjamin: Yeah, definitely. As you point out, there's a bunch of fundamental limitations here, if we start to talk about how Postgres actually fits together, right? Pretty much everybody in RDS is a little bit weird. The older RDS offerings are a little bit weird in terms of how they do replication. But most folks are using Postgres streaming replication, to do high availability, Postgres in managed services. And honestly, of course—Corey: That winds up failing over, or the application's aware of both endpoints and switches to the other one?Benjamin: Yeah—Corey: Sort of a database pooling connection or some sort of proxy?Benjamin: Right. There's a bunch of subtleties that get into their way. You say, well, did the [vit 00:16:16] failover too early, did the application try to connect and start making requests before the secondaries available? That sort of thing.Corey: Or you misconfigure it and point to the secondary, suddenly, when there's a switchover of some database, suddenly, nothing can write, it can only read, then you cause a massive outage on the weekend?Benjamin: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: That may have been of an actual story I made up.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, you should use a managed service.Corey: Yeah.Benjamin: So, it's complicated, but even with managed services, you end up in situations where you have downtime, you have maintenance windows. And with Postgres, especially—and other databases as well—especially with Postgres, one of the biggest concerns you have is major version upgrades, right? So, if I want to go from Postgres 12 to 13, 13 to 14, I can't do that live. I can't have a single cluster that is streaming one Postgres version to another Postgres version, right?So, every year, people want to put things off for two years, three years sometimes—which is obviously not to their benefit—you have this maintenance, you have some sort of downtime, where you perform a Postgres upgrade. At EDB, we've got—so this is a big problem, this is a problem for us. We're involved in the Postgres community. We know this is challenging. That's just a well-known thing. Some of the folks that are working EDB are folks who worked on the Postgres logical replication tech, which arrived in Postgres 10. Logical replication is really a nice tool for doing things like change data capture, you can do Walter JSON, all these types of things are based on logical replication tech.It's not really a thing, at least, the code that's in Postgres itself doesn't really support high availability, though. It's not really something that you can use to build a leader-follower type cluster on top of. We have some techs, some proprietary tech within EDB that used to be called bi-directional replication. There used to be an open-source project called bi-directional replication. This is a kind of a descendant of that. It's now called Postgres Distributed, or EDB Postgres Distributed is the product name. And that tech actually allows us—because it's based on logical replication—allows us to do multiple major versions at the same time, right? So, we can upgrade one node in a cluster to Postgres 14, while the other nodes in the clusters are at Postgres 13. We can then upgrade the next node. We can support these types of operations in a kind of wide range of maintenance operations without taking a cluster down from maintenance.So, there's a lot of interesting opportunities here when we start to say, well, let's step back from what your typical assumptions are for Postgres streaming replication. Give ourselves a little bit more freedom by using logical replication instead of physical streaming replication. And then, what type of services, and what type of patterns can we build on top of that, that ultimately help customers build, whether it's faster databases, more highly available databases, so on and so forth.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: One approach that I took for, I guess you could call it backup sort of, was intentionally staggering replication between the primary and the replica about 15 minutes or so. So, if I drop a production table or something like that, I have 15 short minutes to realize what has happened and sever the replication before it is now committed to the replica and now I'm living in hell. It felt like this was not, like, option A, B, or C, or the right way to do things. But given that meeting customers where they are as important, is that the sort of thing that you support with BigAnimal, or do you try to talk customers into not being ridiculous?Benjamin: That's not something we support now. It's not actually something that I hear that many asks for these days. It's kind of interesting, that's a pattern that I've run into a lot in the past.Corey: I was an ancient, grumpy sysadmin. Again, I'm dating myself here. These days, I just store everything at DNS text records, and it's way easier. But I digress.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, it's something that we see a lot for and we had support for a point-in-time restore, like pretty much anybody else in the business at this point. And that's usually the, “I fat-fingered something,” type response. Honestly, I think there's room to be a bit more flexible and room to do some more interesting things. I think RDS is setting a bar and a lot of database services out there and kind of just meeting that bar. And we all kind of need to be pushing a little bit more into more interesting spaces and figuring out how to get customers more value, get customers to get more out of their money for the database, honestly.Corey: One of the problems we tend to see, in the database ecosystem at large, without naming names or companies or anything like that, is that it's a pretty thin and blurry line between database advocate, database evangelist, and database zealot. Where it feels like instead, we're arguing about religion more than actual technical constraints and concerns. So, here's a fun question that hopefully isn't too much of a gotcha. But what sort of workloads would you actively advise someone not to use BigAnimal for in the database world? But yes, again, if you try to run a DNS server, it's probably not fit for purpose without at least a shim in the way there. But what sort of workloads are you not targeting that a customer is likely to have a relatively unfortunate time with?Benjamin: Large-scale analytical workloads is the easy answer to that, right? If you've got a problem where you're choosing between Postgres and Snowflake, you're seriously considering—you actually have as much data that you seriously be considering Snowflake? You probably don't want to be using Postgres, right? You want to be using something that's column, or you want to be using a query planner that really understands a columnar layout that's going to get you the sorts of performance that you need for those analytical workloads. We don't try to touch that space.Corey: Yeah, we're doing some of that right now with just the sheer volume of client AWS bills we have. We don't really need a relational model for a lot of it. And Athena is basically fallen down on the job in some cases, and, “Oh, do you want to use Redshift, that's basically Postgres.” It's like, “Yeah, it's Postgres, if it decided to run on bars of gold.” No, thank you. It just becomes this ridiculously overwrought solution for what feels like it should be a lot similar. So, it's weird, six months ago or so I wouldn't have had much of an idea what you're talking about. I see it a lot better now. Generally, by virtue of trying to do something the precise wrong way that someone should.Benjamin: Right. Yeah, exactly. I think there's interesting room for Postgres to expand here. It's not something that we're actively working on. I'm not aware of a lot happening in the community that Postgres is, for better or worse, extremely extensible, right? And if you see the JSON-supported Postgres, it didn't exist, I don't know, five, six years ago. And now it's incredibly powerful. It's incredibly flexible. And you can do a lot of quote-unquote, schemaless stuff straight in Postgres. Or you look at PostGIS, right, for doing GIS geographical data, right? That's really a fantastic integration directly in the database.Corey: Yeah, before that people start doing ridiculous things almost looks similar to a graph database or a columnar store somehow, and yeah.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. I think sometimes somebody will do a good column store that's an open-source deeply integrated into Postgres, rather than—Corey: I've seen someone build one on top of S3 bucket with that head, a quarter of a trillion objects in it. Professional advice, don't do that.Benjamin: [laugh]. Unless you're Snowflake. So, I mean, it's something that I'd like to see Postgres expand into. I think that's an interesting space, but not something that, at least especially for BigAnimal, and frankly, for a lot of EDB customers. It's not something we're trying to push people toward.Corey: One thing that I think we are seeing a schism around is the idea that some vendors are one side of it, some are on the other, where on the one side, you have, oh, every workload should have a bespoke, purpose-built database that is exactly for this type of workload. And the other school of thought is you should generally buy us for a general-purpose database until you have a workload that is scaled and significant to a point where running that on its own purpose-built database begins to make sense. I don't necessarily think that is a binary choice, where do you tend to fall on that spectrum?Benjamin: I think everybody should use Postgres. And I say not just because I work in a Postgres company.Corey: Well, let's be clear. Before this, you were at IBM for five years working on a whole bunch of database stuff over there, not just Postgres. And you, so far, have not struck me as the kind of person who's like, “Oh, so what's your favorite database?” “The one that pays me.” We've met people like that, let's be very clear. But you seem very even-handed in those conversations.Benjamin: Yeah, I got my start in databases, actually, with Apache CouchDB. I am a committer on CouchDB. I worked on a managed at CouchDB service ten years ago. At IBM, I worked on something in nine different open-source databases and managed services. But I love having conversations about, like, well, I've got this workload, should I use Postgres, rr should I use Mongo, should I use Cassandra, all of those types of discussions. Frankly, though, I think in a lot of cases people are—they don't understand how much power they're missing out on if they don't choose a relational database. If they don't understand the relational model well enough to understand that they really actually want that. In a lot of cases, people are also just over-optimizing too early, right? It's just going to be much faster for them to get off the ground, get product in customers hands, if they start with something that they don't have to think twice about. And they don't end up with this architecture with 45 different databases, and there's only one guy in the company that knows how to manage the whole thing.Corey: Oh, the same story of picking a cloud provider. It's, “Okay, you hire a team, you're going to build a thing. Which cloud provider do you pick?” Every cloud provider has a whole matrix and sales deck, and the rest. The right answer, of course, is the one your team's already familiar with because learning a new cloud provider while trying not to run out of money at your startup, can't really doesn't work super well.Benjamin: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: One thing that I think has been sort of interesting, and when I saw it, it was one of those, “Oh, I sort of like them.” Because I had that instinctive reaction and I don't think I'm alone in this. As of this recording a couple of weeks ago, you folks received a sizable investment from private equity. And default reaction to that is, “Oh, well, I guess I put a fork in the company, they're done.” Because the narrative is that once private equity takes an investment, well, that company's best days are probably not in front of it. Now, the counterpoint is that this is not the first time private equity has invested in EDB, and you folks from what I can tell are significantly better than you were when I was your customer a decade ago. So clearly, there is something wrong with that mental model. What am I missing?Benjamin: Yeah. Frankly, I don't know. I'm no expert in funding models and all of those sorts of things. I will say that my experience has been what I've seen at EDB, has definitely been that maybe there's private equity, and then there's private equity. We're in this to build better products and become a better product company. We were previously owned by a private equity firm for the past four years or so. And during the course of those four years, we brought on a bunch of folks who were very product-focused, new leadership. We made a significant acquisition of a company called 2ndQuadrant, which they employed a lot of the European best Postgres company. Now, they're part of EDB and most of them have stayed with us. And we built the managed cloud service, right? So, this is a pretty significant—private equity company buying us to invest in the company. I'm optimistic that that's what we're looking at going forward.Corey: I want to be clear as well, I'm not worried about what I normally would be in a private equity story about this, where they're there to save money and cut costs, and, “Do we really need all these database replicas floating around,” and, “These backups, seems like that's something we don't need.” You have, at last count, 32 Postgres contributors, 7 Postgres committers, and 3 core members. All of whom would run away screaming loudly and publicly, in the event that such a thing were taking place. Of all the challenges and concerns I might have about someone running a cloud service in the modern day. I do not have any fear that you folks are not doing what will very clearly be shown to be the right thing by your customers for the technology that you're building on top of. That is not a concern. There are companies I do not have that confidence in, to be clear.Benjamin: Yeah, I'm glad to hear that. I'm a hundred percent on board as well. I work here, but I think we're doing the right thing, and we're going to be doing great stuff going forward.Corey: One last topic I do want to get into a little bit is, on some level, launching in this decade, a cloud-hosted database offering at a time when Amazon—whose product strategy of yes is in full display—it seems like something ridiculous, that is not necessarily well thought out that why would you ever try to do this? Now, I will temper that by the fact that you are clearly succeeding in this direction. You have customers who say nice things about you, and the reviews have been almost universally positive anywhere I can see things. The negative ones are largely complaining about databases, which I admit might be coming from me.Benjamin: Right, it is a crowded space. There's a lot of things happening. Obviously, Amazon, Microsoft, Google are doing great things, both—Corey: Terrible things, but great, yes. Yes.Benjamin: [laugh] right, there's good products coming in. I think AlloyDB is not necessarily a great product. I haven't used it myself yet, but it's an interesting step in the direction. I'm excited to see development happening. But at the end of the day, we're a database company. Our focus is on building great databases and supporting great databases. We're not entering this business to try to take on Amazon from an infrastructure point of view. In fact, the way that we're structuring the product is really to try to get the strengths of both worlds. We want to give customers the ability to get the most out of the AWS or Azure infrastructure that they can, but come to us for their database.Frankly, we know Postgres better than anybody else. We have a greater ability to get bugs fixed in Postgres than anybody else. We've got folks working on the database in the open. We got folks working on the database proprietary for us. So, we give customers things like break/fix support on that database. If there is a bug in Postgres, there's a bug in the tech that sits around Postgres. Because obviously, Postgres is not a batteries-included system, really. We're going to fix that for you. That's part of the contract that we're giving to our customers. And I know a lot of smaller companies maybe haven't been burned by this sort of thing very much. We start to talk about enterprise customers and medium, larger-scale customers, this starts to get really valuable. The ability to have assurance on top of your open-source product. So, I think there's a lot of interesting things there, a lot of value that we can provide there.I think also that I talked a little bit about this earlier, but like the box, this sort of RDS-shaped box, I think is a bit too small. There's an opportunity for smaller players to come in and try to push the boundaries of that. For example, giving customers more support by default to do a good job using their database. We have folks on board that can help consult with customers to say, “No, you shouldn't be designing your schemas that way. You should be designing your schemas this way. You should be using indexes here,” that sort of stuff. That's been part of our business for a long time. Now, with a managed service, we can bake that right into the managed service. And that gives us the ability to kind of make that—you talk about shared responsibility between the service writer and the customer—we can change the boundaries of that shared responsibility a little bit, so that customers can get more value out of the managed database service than they might expect otherwise.Corey: There aren't these harsh separations and clearly defined lines across which nothing shall pass, when it makes sense to do that in a controlled responsible way.Benjamin: Right, exactly. Some of that is because we're a database company, and some of that is because, frankly, we're much smaller.Corey: I'll take it a step further beyond that, as well, that I have seen this pattern evolve a number of times where you have a customer running databases on EC2, and their AWS account managers suggests move to RDS. So, they do. Then, move to Aurora. So, they do. Then, I move this to DynamoDB. At which point, it's like, what do you think your job is here, exactly? Because it seems like every time we move databases, you show up in a nicer car. So, what exactly is the story here, and what are the incentives? Where it just feels like there is a, “Whatever you're doing is not the way that it should be done. So, it's time to do, yet, another migration.”There's something to be said for companies who are focused around a specific aspect of things. Then once that is up and working and running, great. Keep on going. This is fine. As opposed to trying to chase the latest shiny, on some level. I have a big sense of, I guess, affinity for companies that wind up knowing where they start, and most notably, where they stop.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I don't think that we will be building an application platform anytime soon.Corey: “We're going to run Lambda functions on top of a database.” It's like, “Congratulations. That is the weirdest stored procedure I can imagine this week, but I'm sure we can come up with a worse one soon.”Benjamin: Exactly.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so much about how you're thinking about this, and what you've been building over there. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to go to find you?Benjamin: biganimal.com.Corey: Excellent. We will throw a link to that in the show notes and it only just occurred to me that the Postgres mascot is an elephant, and now I understand why it's called BigAnimal. Yeah, that's right. He who laughs last, thinks slowest, and today, that's me. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Benjamin: Thank you. I really appreciate it.Corey: Benjamin Anderson, CTO for Cloud at EDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that you then wind up stuffing into a SQLite database, converting to Base64, and somehow stuffing into the comment field.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Main Event Marks
Episode 111: WCW Bash at the Beach 1997

Main Event Marks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 84:02


Rodzilla is in the house! The greatest rebounder in NBA history is in WCW to join the nWo's Hollywood Hogan in a tag match for the ages! These two monsters of their industries team up to take on Lex Luger and the Giant! Kevin Sullivan fights for his career against Chris Benoit, Jeff Jarrett swerves Mongo in their match, DDP has a mystery partner to take on the nWo team of Scott Hall and Randy Savage, "Hotrod" does battle with "The Nature Boy," and much more! Plus, in the news, we discuss the success of WWF's Canadian Stampede PPV, tensions building between WWF and ECW, Jim Cornette and Paul Heyman sniping at each other in public, and some major drug issues going around the wrestling industry.ALL PODCAST, SOCIAL MEDIA, & MERCHANDISE LINKS: linktr.ee/MainEventMarksCHECK OUT OUR MERCHANDISE: MainEventMarks.redbubble.com & bonfire.com/store/maineventmarksGET FUELED WITH SHOCKED ENERGY: https://shockedenergy.com/collections/all?sca_ref=1814354.mOXH7RrwKh&sca_source=MainEventMarks (promo code: MainEvent for 10% off)GET AWESOME SPORTS T-SHIRTS: intheclutch.com/MAINEVENT (use code "MAINEVENT" for 10% off)ORDER FROM SWIFT LIFESTYLES: SwiftLifestyles.com, use PROMO CODE: MainEventMarks at checkout for 15% offLISTEN EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 9PM EST: tikilive.com/channel/BURNS