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Best podcasts about MongoDB

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Latest podcast episodes about MongoDB

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

PyPI has been in the news for a bunch of reasons lately. Many of them good. But also, some with a bit of drama or mixed reactions. On this episode, we have Dustin Ingram, one of the PyPI maintainers and one of the directors of the PSF, here to discuss the whole 2FA story, securing the supply chain, and plenty more related topics. This is another important episode that people deeply committed to the Python space will want to hear. Links from the show Dustin on Twitter: @di_codes Hardware key giveaway: pypi.org OpenSSF funds PyPI: openssf.org James Bennet's take: b-list.org Atomicwrites (left-pad on PyPI): reddit.com 2FA PyPI Dashboard: datadoghq.com github 2FA - all users that contribute code by end of 2023: github.blog GPG - not the holy grail: caremad.io Sigstore for Python: pypi.org pip-audit: pypi.org PEP 691: peps.python.org PEP 694: peps.python.org Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat IRL Podcast AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

SCRIPTease
054 | CloudTalk.io – Josef Podaný, Head of Development

SCRIPTease

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 58:37


Slovenský startup CloudTalk, který vyvíjí SaaS řešení pro call centra, založili v roce 2018 Martin Malych a Viktor Vaněk a od té doby zažívají neuvěřitelnou jízdu. Letos se zařadili mezi top 100 nejrychleji rostoucích softwarových platforem světa, z 10 zaměstnanců vyrostli na 250, zákazníků mají rovnou 10x tolik a patří mezi ně i taková jména jako DHL, Revolut nebo Mercedes.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#376: Pydantic v2 - The Plan

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 78:53 Very Popular


Pydantic has become a core building block for many Python projects. After 5 years, it's time for a remake. With version 2, the plan is to rebuild the internals (with benchmarks already showing a 17x performance improvement) and clean up the API. Sounds great, but what does that mean for us? Samuel Colvin, the creator of Pydantic, is here to share his plan for Pydantic v2. Links from the show Samuel on Twitter: @samuel_colvin Pydantic v2 plan: pydantic-docs.helpmanual.io Py03: pyo3.rs FastAPI: fastapi.tiangolo.com Beanie: github.com SQLModel: sqlmodel.tiangolo.com Speedate: docs.rs Pytests running on Pydantic in browser: githubproxy.samuelcolvin.workers.dev JSON to Pydantic tool: jsontopydantic.com Pyscript: pyscript.net Michael's Pyscript + WebAssembly: Python Web Apps video: youtube.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat Microsoft AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

The Cloud Pod
175: AWS re:Inforces Their Dislike for OrcaSec

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 48:49


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team gets skeptical on Prime Day numbers. Plus: AWS re:Inforce brings GuardDuty, Detective and Identity Center updates and announcements; Google Cloud says hola to Mexico with a new Latin American region; and Azure introduces its new cost API for EC and MCA customers. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#375: Python Language Summit 2022

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 58:31 Very Popular


Every year, the Python core developers and a few other key players in the Python ecosystem meet to discuss the pressing issues and important advancements at an event called the Python Language Summit. While Python is a community known for openness, this meeting is typically held behind closed doors mostly for efficiency's sake. On this episode, we'll give you a look behind that door. We have Alex Waygood here on this episode to break it down for us and give a look inside the summit. Links from the show Alex on Twitter: @alexwaygood 2022 Python Language Summit: pyfound.blogspot.com Individual Talks Python without the GIL: pyfound.blogspot.com Reaching a per-interpreter GIL: pyfound.blogspot.com The "Faster CPython" project: 3.12 and beyond: pyfound.blogspot.com WebAssembly: Python in the browser and beyond: pyfound.blogspot.com F-strings in the grammar: pyfound.blogspot.com Cinder Async Optimizations: pyfound.blogspot.com The issue and PR backlog: pyfound.blogspot.com The path forward for immortal objects: pyfound.blogspot.com Sponsor: Reflect.run demo video: youtube.com Sponsor: Reflect.run sign up: app.reflect.run Sponsor: Microsoft for Startups Founder's Hub: startups.microsoft.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Reflect.run Microsoft AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Revenue Builders
Success Is A Marathon with Cedric Pech

Revenue Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 61:40


Everyone has their own definition of success. But for MongoDB's Chief Revenue Officer Cedric Pech, the journey towards achieving it, the self-improvements you make, and the lessons learned along the way may prove to be more important than the destination itself. In this episode of the Revenue Builders podcast, our hosts John McMahon and John Kaplan talk to Cedric about his career, and his thoughts on leadership, purpose, and success. Additional Resources:Connect with Cedric Pech on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cedricpech/HIGHLIGHTSFrom VP to CRO: Challenges faced and lessons learnedWhy having a purpose is crucial for teams It can't be just about the paycheck Patriots vs. Mercenaries Success is a marathon, not a sprintSlow Success vs. Fast Success How skiing influenced Cedric's career It's about the journey, not the destinationDetails are where the consequences lieLeaders have to take care of themselves tooGUEST BIOCedric Pech is the current  Chief Revenue Officer for MondoDB. He joined MongoDB to lead Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) sales in July 2017, and since that time has rapidly increased the size of the team, expanded into new markets, implemented a new process that has measurably increased sales productivity and has driven exceptional growth.With more than 20 years of sales leadership experience, Cedric has a track record of building high-performance sales organizations that deliver strong and consistent results. Prior to MongoDB, he led worldwide sales at Fuze, an enterprise global cloud communications and collaboration software platform. He has also held senior sales leadership roles for four different software companies, including three publicly traded companies: BladeLogic, BMC, and BazaarVoice.QUOTESCedric on finding your purpose: "I think it starts from you. There's a moment where you wake up in the morning and it's so hard that you ask yourself, why am I doing what I'm doing? And the moment you stop asking that, then you start to dig into yourself and do some introspection to come up with answers."John McMahon on retaining employees: "When people understand the why, they can handle the how."Cedric's advice for sellers: "Be patient and work on your craft. Don't cut corners and don't go after the next promotion or after short-term money but really work on your foundations. This is a marathon."Why Cedric says you shouldn't rush success: "Slow success builds character and fast success builds ego."Cedric on which things cannot be sacrificed for the sake of 'winning': "We are going to win, but not at any cost. And the line that we are going to draw is the line where people get hurt in their families, their health or their personal balance."Check out John McMahon's book here: https://www.amazon.com/Qualified-Sales-Leader-Proven-Lessons/dp/0578895064

Stock Hypers podcast
Fed Watch! Tech Giants Earnings Week! Stock Hypers weigh in.

Stock Hypers podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 35:24


Huge week to watch! Huge tech company earnings Plus Fed moves and comments. Move up or test lows - Stock Hypers weigh in. Hype or Hate:  Danny: Google, Fiverr, MongoDB                          Bryan: Coinbase, Amazon, Sofi Stock Hypers are amateur investors talking about stocks, wall street, business and the markets from a completely uninformed, unprofessional, sometimes nonsensical perspective. Danny and Bryan both are not recommending or pressuring you to buy any stock. If you take their advice you may lose money, your reputation and all your friends. This is meant for pure entertainment and listening pleasure. (Even if all our stocks go skyrocketing in value and we become zillionaires it's best that you, the listener, keep your money in your pocket. We may sound like geniuses but we are just regular Joes) You are forewarned

Data on Kubernetes Community
DoK Talks #144 - Mastering MongoDB on Kubernetes, the power of operators // Arek Borucki

Data on Kubernetes Community

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 60:50


https://go.dok.community/slack https://dok.community/ ABSTRACT OF THE TALK During my first talk for DoK community I want to walk you through the world of NoSQL database MongoDB and Kubernetes Operators - Community Edition, Enterprise Edition (MongoDB and Ops Manager on K8s), and Atlas operator, highlight the most important capabilities, talk about use cases and challenges, the theory will be mixed with a live demos! BIO I'm a SRE / NoSQL / DevOps professional. I hold CKA, CKAD, CKS, also I'm MongoDB Certified DBA and MongoDB Champion. I have experience with multiple cloud providers, Kubernetes, different types of K8s operators (Strimzi, RabbitMQ Cluster Operator), but especially MongoDB K8s Operator. I also work with KEDA. Since 2017, I have been a speaker at MongoDB conferences all around the world (USA, China, Europe). KEY TAKE-AWAYS FROM THE TALK I would like to share the best practices of running NoSQL database - MongoDB on Kubernetes also I want to show how to manage Atlas (MongoDB cloud) via K8s operator https://www.mongodb.com/developer/community-champions/arkadiusz-borucki/

VisualMakers
Bubble.io App DSGVO-konform machen? Faktoren & Tipps

VisualMakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 18:38


"Wie mache ich meine Bubble App DSGVO konform?" - ist eine der häufigsten Fragen, die wir gestellt bekommen. Nach der gekippten Privacy Shield Vereinbarung der EU & USA ist das Verarbeiten und Speichern von personenbezogenen Daten auf US-Servern nicht mehr DSGVO-konform. In dieser Folge möchten wir das Thema einmal aufgreifen und dir Möglichkeiten aufzeigen, wie du Bubble trotzdem für dich nutzen kannst. Dabei geht es konkret um die Themen Datenbank, Authentifizierung und Tracking / Cookies. Datenbanken: MySQL & PostgreSQL: https://cloud.ionos.de/managed/database Anbieter für MSSQL: https://www.fritz.gmbh/de/cloud-mssql-datenbank-hosting.htm https://www.ovhcloud.com/de/web-hosting/options/start-sql/ Anbieter für MongoDB: https://www.mongodb.com/de-de/pricing https://cloud.ionos.de/managed/database Mehr zu SeaTable: http://seatable.io Mehr zu Ninox: http://ninox.com Mehr zu Xano: http://xano.com Mehr zu Backendless: http://backendless.com Authentifizierung Mehr zu Auth0: Plugin: https://forum.bubble.io/t/new-plugin-auth0-integration/46458/16 https://auth0.com/blog/schrems-2-eu-us-privacy-shield-ruled-invalid/ Tracking Cookies: Mehr zu usercentrics:*https://bit.ly/3zfYhNN Mehr zu CookieFirst: http://cookiefirst.com Mehr zu CookieBot: http://cookiebot.com Fathom Analytics (DSGVO-konformes Website-Tracking)*:https://bit.ly/3JeRzMI Make lernen bei VisualMakers: https://visualmakers.de/make Bubble lernen bei VisualMakers: https://visualmakers.de/bubble Tritt unserer kostenlosen No-Code Community bei: https://visualmakers.de --- VisualMakers.de ist eine Lernplattform und Community für den Bereich NoCode. Lerne mit uns, wie du Webseiten, Web-Apps & Mobile-Apps bauen und Prozesse automatisieren kannst, ohne eine Zeile Programmiercode schreiben zu müssen. Mit * gekennzeichnete Links sind Provisionslinks. Dein Kaufpreis bleibt unverändert. Nutze diese gerne, wenn du das Projekt VisualMakers unterstützen möchtest. Vielen Dank!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Supper Club × Adam Cowley and Neo4j Database

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 57:01 Very Popular


In this supper club episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott talk with Adam Cowley about how Neo4j Database can help when working with data for your next app. Gatsby - Sponsor Today's episode was sponsored by Gatsby, the fastest frontend for the headless web. Gatsby is the framework of choice for content-rich sites backed by a headless CMS as its GraphQL data layer makes it straightforward to source website content from anywhere. Gatsby's opinionated, React-based framework makes the hardest parts of building a performant website simpler. Visit gatsby.dev/syntax to get your first Gatsby site up in minutes and experience the speed. ⚡️ Lightstep Incident Response - Sponsor Streamline on-call, collaboration, incident management, and automation with a free 30-day trial of Lightstep Incident Response, built on ServiceNow. Usage-based pricing on active services promotes collaboration across your entire team to build a culture of service ownership. Listeners of Syntax will also receive a free Lightstep Incident Response T-shirt after firing an alert or incident. Pay for the services you use, not the number of people on your team with Lightstep Incident Response, built on ServiceNow. Streamline on-call, collaboration, incident management, and automation with a free 30-day trial. Fire an alert or incident today and receive a free Lightstep Incident Response t-shirt. Show Notes 00:15 Welcome 01:24 Guest introduction 03:15 Browser innovation and testing 05:01 What is a graph database? Neo4j Cypher Sanity Groq 08:11 Is there a specific type of data that works best in a graph database? 11:57 Sponsor: Lightstep Incident Response 13:14 What's AuraDB vs Neo4js? 15:01 Whiteboard friendly data model 19:52 How are GraphQL and graph related? 23:08 Can you sync with MongoDB? 24:41 How do you pull data into a div on the web? 29:19 Why are you used for data science a lot? 30:43 Sponsor: Gatsby 31:51 Is visualization an important part of Neo4js? Neo4j Bloom 36:01 Do you have to think about indexing with graph databases? 39:43 Are there uses Neo4j isn't as good for? 40:22 Do you have to cache queries? 41:26 Dessert questions Intellijet Idea Cobalt 2 Theme 50:36 Shameless Plug Neo4j Desktop Neo4j Cloud 54:45 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Hue Lights Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Screaming in the Cloud
Cloud-Hosted Database Services with Benjamin Anderson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:39


About BenjaminBenjamin Anderson is CTO, Cloud at EDB, where he is responsible for developing and driving strategy for the company's Postgres-based cloud offerings. Ben brings over ten years' experience building and running distributed database systems in the cloud for multiple startups and large enterprises. Prior to EDB, he served as chief architect of IBM's Cloud Databases organization, built an SRE practice at database startup Cloudant, and founded a Y Combinator-funded hardware startup.Links Referenced: EDB: https://www.enterprisedb.com/ BigAnimal: biganimal.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at EDB. And not only do they bring us this promoted episode, they bring me their CTO for Cloud, Benjamin Anderson. Benjamin, thank you so much for agreeing to suffer the slings and arrows that I will no doubt throw at you in a professional context, because EDB is a database company, and I suck at those things.Benjamin: [laugh]. Thanks, Corey. Nice to be here.Corey: Of course. So, databases are an interesting and varied space. I think we can all agree—or agree to disagree—that the best database is, of course, Route 53, when you misuse TXT records as a database. Everything else is generally vying for number two. EDB was—back in the days that I was your customer—was EnterpriseDB, now rebranded as EDB, which is way faster to say, and I approve of that.But you were always the escalation point of last resort. When you're stuck with a really weird and interesting Postgres problem, EDB was where you went because if you folks couldn't solve the problem, it was likely not going to get solved. I always contextualized you folks as a consulting shop. That's not really what you do. You are the CTO for Cloud.And, ah, interesting. Do databases behave differently in cloud environments? Well, they do when you host them as a managed service, which is an area you folks have somewhat recently branched into. How'd you get there?Benjamin: Ah, that's interesting. So, there's a bunch of stuff to unpack there. I think EDB has been around for a long time. It's something like 13, 14, 15 years, something like that, and really it's just been kind of slowly growing, right? We did start very much as a product company. We built some technology to help customers get from Oracle database on to Postgres, way back in 2007, 2008.That business has just slowly been growing. It's been going quite well. Frankly, I only joined about 18 months ago, and it's really cool tech, right? We natively understand some things that Oracle is doing. Customers don't have to change their schemas to migrate from Oracle to Postgres. There's some cool technology in there.But as you point out, I think a lot of our position in the market has not been that product focused. There's been a lot of people seeing us as the Postgres experts, and as people who can solve Postgres problems, in general. We have, for a long time, employed a lot of really sharp Postgres people. We still employ a lot of really sharp Postgres people. That's very much, in a lot of ways, our bread and butter. That we're going to fix Postgres problems as they come up.Now, over the past few years, we've definitely tried to shift quite a bit into being more of a product company. We've brought on a bunch of people who've been doing more enterprise software product type development over the past few years, and really focusing ourselves more and more on building products and investing in ourselves as a product company. We're not a services company. We're not a consulting company. We do, I think, provide the best Postgres support in the market. But it's been a journey. The cloud has been a significant part of that as well, right? You can't get away.Corey: Oh, yeah. These days, when someone's spinning up a new workload, it's unlikely—in most cases—they're going to wind up spinning up a new data center, if they don't already have one. Yes, there's still a whole bunch of on-prem workloads. But increasingly, the default has become cloud. Instead of, “Why cloud?” The question's become, “Why not?”Benjamin: Right, exactly. Then, as people are more and more accepting of managed services, you have to be a product company. You have to be building products in order to support your database customers because what they want his managed services. I was working in managed databases and service, something like, ten years ago, and it was like pulling teeth. This is after RDS launched. This was still pulling teeth trying to get people to think about, oh, I'm going to let you run my database. Whereas, now obviously, it's just completely different. We have to build great products in order to succeed in the database business, in general.Corey: One thing that jumped out at me when you first announced this was the URL is enterprisedb.com. That doesn't exactly speak to, you know, non-large companies, and EDB is what you do. You have a very corporate logo, but your managed service is called BigAnimal, which I absolutely love. It actually expresses a sense of whimsy and personality that I can no doubt guess that a whole bunch of people argued against, but BigAnimal, it is. It won through. I love that. Was that as contentious as I'm painting it to be, or people actually have a sense of humor sometimes?Benjamin: [laugh]. Both, it was extremely contentious. I, frankly, was one of the people who was not in favor of it at first. I was in favor of something that was whimsical, but maybe not quite that whimsical.Corey: Well, I call it Postgres-squeal, so let's be very clear here that we're probably not going to see eye-to-eye on most anything in pronunciation things. But we can set those differences aside and have a conversation.Benjamin: Absolutely, no consider that. It was deliberate, though, to try to step away a little bit from the blue-suit-and-tie, enterprise, DB-type branding. Obviously, a lot of our customers are big enterprises. We're good at that. We're not trying to be the hip, young startup targeting business in a lot of ways. We have a wide range of customers, but we want to branch out a little bit.Corey: One of the challenges right now is if I spin up an environment inside of AWS, as one does, and I decide I certainly don't want to take the traditional approach of running a database on top of an EC2 instance—the way that we did in the olden days—because RDS was crappy. Now that it's slightly less crappy, that becomes a not ideal path. I start looking at their managed database offerings, and there are something like 15 distinct managed databases that they offer, and they never turn anything off. And they continue to launch things into the far future. And it really feels, on some level, like 20 years from now—what we call a DBA today—their primary role is going to look a lot more like helping a company figure out which of Amazon's 40 managed databases is the appropriate fit for this given workload. Yet, when I look around at what the industry has done, it seems that when we're talking about relational databases. Postgres has emerged back when I was, more or less, abusing servers in person in my data center days, it was always MySQL. These days, Postgres is the de facto standard, full stop. I admit that I was mostly keeping my aura away from any data that was irreplaceable at that time. What happened? What did I miss?Benjamin: It's a really good question. And I certainly am not a hundred percent on all the trends that went on there. I know there's a lot of folks that are not happy about the MySQL acquisition by Oracle. I think there's a lot of energy that was adopted by the NoSQL movement, as well. You have people who didn't really care about transactional semantics that were using MySQL because they needed a place to store their data. And then, things like MongoDB and that type of system comes along where it's significantly easier than MySQL, and that subset of the population just sort of drifts away from MySQL.Corey: And in turn, those NoSQL projects eventually turn into something where, okay, now we're trying to build a banking system on top of it, and it's, you know, I guess you can use a torque wrench as a hammer if you're really creative about it, but it seems like there's a better approach.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. And those folks are coming back around to the relational databases, exactly. At the same time, the advancements in Postgres from the early eight series to today are significant, right? We shouldn't underestimate how much Postgres has really moved forward. It wasn't that long ago that replication was hardly a thing and Postgres, right? It's been a journey.Corey: One thing that your website talks about is that you accelerate your open-sourced database transformation. And this is a bit of a hobby horse I get on from time to time. I think that there are a lot of misunderstandings when people talk about this. You have the open-source purists—of which I shamefully admit I used to be one—saying that, “Oh, it's about the idea of purity and open and free as in software.” Great. Okay, awesome. But when I find that corporate customers are talking about when they say open-source database, they don't particularly care if they have access to the source code because they're not going to go in and patch a database engine, we hope. But what they do care about is regardless of where they are today—even if they're perfectly happy there—they don't want to wind up beholden to a commercial database provider, and/or they don't want to wind up beholden to the environment that is running within. There's a strategic Exodus that's available in theory, which on some level serves to make people feel better about not actually Exodus-ing, but it also means if they're doing a migration at some point, they don't also have to completely redo their entire data plan.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I mean, I like to talk—there's a big rat's nest of questions and problems in here—but I generally like talk to about open APIs, talk about standards, talk about how much is going to have to change if you eliminate this vendor. We're definitely not open-source purists. Well, we employ a lot of open-source purists. I also used to be an open—Corey: Don't let them hear you say that, then. Fair enough. Fair enough.Benjamin: [laugh] we have proprietary software at EDB, as well. There's a kind of wide range of businesses that we participate in. Glad to hear you also mention this where-it's-hosted angle, as well. I think there's some degree to which people are—they figured out that having at least open APIs or an open-source-ish database is a good idea rather than being beholden to proprietary database. But then, immediately forget that when they're picking a cloud vendor, right? And realizing that putting their data in Cloud Vendor A versus Cloud Vendor B is also putting them in a similar difficult situation. They need to be really wary of when they're doing that. Now, obviously, I work at an independent software company, and I have some incentive to say this, but I do think it's true. And you know, there's meaningful data gravity risk.Corey: I assure you, I have no incentive. I don't care what cloud provider you're on. My guidance has been, for years, to—as a general rule—pick a provider, I care about which one, and go all in until there's a significant reason to switch. Trying to build an optionality, “Oh, everything we do should be fully portable at an instance notice.” Great. Unless you're actually doing it, you're more or less, giving up a whole bunch of shortcuts and feature velocity you could otherwise have, in the hopes of one day you'll do a thing, but all the assumptions you're surrounded by baked themselves in regardless. So, you're more or less just creating extra work for yourself for no defined benefit. This is not popular in some circles, where people try to sell something that requires someone to go multi-cloud, but here we are.Benjamin: No, I think you're right. I think people underestimate the degree to which the abstractions are just not very good, right, and the degree to which those cloud-specific details are going to leak in if you're going to try to get anything done, you end up in kind of a difficult place. What I see more frequently is situations where we have a big enterprise—not even big, even medium-sized companies where maybe they've done an acquisition or two, they've got business units that are trying to do things on their own. And they end up in two or three clouds, sort of by happenstance. It's not like they're trying to do replication live between two clouds, but they've got one business unit in AWS and one business unit and Azure, and somebody in the corporate—say enterprise architect or something like that—really would like to make things consistent between the two so they get a consistent security posture and things like that. So, there are situations where the multi-cloud is a reality at a certain level, but maybe not at a concrete technical level. But I think it's still really useful for a lot of customers.Corey: You position your cloud offering in two different ways. One of them is the idea of BigAnimal, and the other—well, it sort of harkens back to when I was in sixth grade going through the American public school system. They had a cop come in and talk to us and paint to this imaginary story of people trying to push drugs. “Hey, kid. You want to try some of this?” And I'm reading this and it says EDB, Postgres for Kubernetes. And I'm sent back there, where it's like, “Hey, kid. You want to run your stateful databases on top of Kubernetes?” And my default answer to that is good lord, no. What am I missing?Benjamin: That's a good question. Kubernetes has come a long way—I think is part of that.Corey: Oh, truly. I used to think of containers as a pure story for stateless things. And then, of course, I put state into them, and then, everything exploded everywhere because it turns out, I'm bad at computers. Great. And it has come a long way. I have been tracking a lot of that. But it still feels like the idea being that you'd want to have your database endpoints somewhere a lot less, I guess I'll call it fickle, if that makes sense.Benjamin: It's an interesting problem because we are seeing a lot of people who are interested in our Kubernetes-based products. It's actually based on—we recently open-sourced the core of it under a project called cloud-native PG. It's a cool piece of technology. If you think about sort of two by two. In one corner, you've got self-managed on-premise databases. So, you're very, very slow-moving, big-iron type, old-school database deployments. And on the opposite corner, you've got fully-managed, in the cloud, BigAnimal, Amazon RDS, that type of thing. There's a place on that map where you've got customers that want a self-service type experience. Whether that's for production, or maybe it's even for dev tests, something like that. But you don't want to be giving the management capability off to a third party.For folks that want that type of experience, trying to build that themselves by, like, wiring up EC2 instances, or doing something in their own data center with VMware, or something like that, can be extremely difficult. Whereas if you've go to a Kubernetes-based product, you can get that type of self-service experience really easily, right? And customers can get a lot more flexibility out of how they run their databases and operate their databases. And what sort of control they give to, say application developers who want to spin up a new database for a test or for some sort of small microservice, that type of thing. Those types of workloads tend to work really well with this first-party Kubernetes-based offering. I've been doing databases on Kubernetes in managed services for a long time as well. And I don't, frankly, have any concerns about doing it. There are definitely some sharp edges. And if you wanted to do to-scale, you need to really know what you're doing with Kubernetes because the naive thing will shoot you in the foot.Corey: Oh, yes. So, some it feels almost like people want to cosplay working for Google, but they don't want to pass the technical interview along the way. It's a bit of a weird moment for it.Benjamin: Yeah, I would agree.Corey: I have to go back to my own experiences with using RDS back at my last real job before I went down this path. We were migrating from EC2-Classic to VPC. So, you could imagine what dates me reasonably effectively. And the big problem was the database. And the joy that we had was, “Okay, we have to quiesce the application.” So, the database is now quiet, stop writes, take a snapshot, restore that snapshot into the environment. And whenever we talk to AWS folks, it's like, “So, how long is this going to take?” And the answer was, “Guess.” And that was not exactly reassuring. It went off without a hitch because every migration has one problem. We were sideswiped in an Uber on the way home. But that's neither here nor there. This was two o'clock in the morning, and we finished in half the maintenance time we had allotted. But it was the fact that, well, guess we're going to have to take the database down for many hours with no real visibility, and we hope it'll be up by morning. That wasn't great. But that was the big one going on, on an ongoing basis, there were maintenance windows with a database. We just stopped databasing for a period of time during a fairly broad maintenance window. And that led to a whole lot of unfortunate associations in my mind with using relational databases for an awful lot of stuff. How do you handle maintenance windows and upgrading and not tearing down someone's application? Because I have to assume, “Oh, we just never patch anything. It turns out that's way easier,” is in fact, the wrong answer.Benjamin: Yeah, definitely. As you point out, there's a bunch of fundamental limitations here, if we start to talk about how Postgres actually fits together, right? Pretty much everybody in RDS is a little bit weird. The older RDS offerings are a little bit weird in terms of how they do replication. But most folks are using Postgres streaming replication, to do high availability, Postgres in managed services. And honestly, of course—Corey: That winds up failing over, or the application's aware of both endpoints and switches to the other one?Benjamin: Yeah—Corey: Sort of a database pooling connection or some sort of proxy?Benjamin: Right. There's a bunch of subtleties that get into their way. You say, well, did the [vit 00:16:16] failover too early, did the application try to connect and start making requests before the secondaries available? That sort of thing.Corey: Or you misconfigure it and point to the secondary, suddenly, when there's a switchover of some database, suddenly, nothing can write, it can only read, then you cause a massive outage on the weekend?Benjamin: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: That may have been of an actual story I made up.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, you should use a managed service.Corey: Yeah.Benjamin: So, it's complicated, but even with managed services, you end up in situations where you have downtime, you have maintenance windows. And with Postgres, especially—and other databases as well—especially with Postgres, one of the biggest concerns you have is major version upgrades, right? So, if I want to go from Postgres 12 to 13, 13 to 14, I can't do that live. I can't have a single cluster that is streaming one Postgres version to another Postgres version, right?So, every year, people want to put things off for two years, three years sometimes—which is obviously not to their benefit—you have this maintenance, you have some sort of downtime, where you perform a Postgres upgrade. At EDB, we've got—so this is a big problem, this is a problem for us. We're involved in the Postgres community. We know this is challenging. That's just a well-known thing. Some of the folks that are working EDB are folks who worked on the Postgres logical replication tech, which arrived in Postgres 10. Logical replication is really a nice tool for doing things like change data capture, you can do Walter JSON, all these types of things are based on logical replication tech.It's not really a thing, at least, the code that's in Postgres itself doesn't really support high availability, though. It's not really something that you can use to build a leader-follower type cluster on top of. We have some techs, some proprietary tech within EDB that used to be called bi-directional replication. There used to be an open-source project called bi-directional replication. This is a kind of a descendant of that. It's now called Postgres Distributed, or EDB Postgres Distributed is the product name. And that tech actually allows us—because it's based on logical replication—allows us to do multiple major versions at the same time, right? So, we can upgrade one node in a cluster to Postgres 14, while the other nodes in the clusters are at Postgres 13. We can then upgrade the next node. We can support these types of operations in a kind of wide range of maintenance operations without taking a cluster down from maintenance.So, there's a lot of interesting opportunities here when we start to say, well, let's step back from what your typical assumptions are for Postgres streaming replication. Give ourselves a little bit more freedom by using logical replication instead of physical streaming replication. And then, what type of services, and what type of patterns can we build on top of that, that ultimately help customers build, whether it's faster databases, more highly available databases, so on and so forth.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: One approach that I took for, I guess you could call it backup sort of, was intentionally staggering replication between the primary and the replica about 15 minutes or so. So, if I drop a production table or something like that, I have 15 short minutes to realize what has happened and sever the replication before it is now committed to the replica and now I'm living in hell. It felt like this was not, like, option A, B, or C, or the right way to do things. But given that meeting customers where they are as important, is that the sort of thing that you support with BigAnimal, or do you try to talk customers into not being ridiculous?Benjamin: That's not something we support now. It's not actually something that I hear that many asks for these days. It's kind of interesting, that's a pattern that I've run into a lot in the past.Corey: I was an ancient, grumpy sysadmin. Again, I'm dating myself here. These days, I just store everything at DNS text records, and it's way easier. But I digress.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, it's something that we see a lot for and we had support for a point-in-time restore, like pretty much anybody else in the business at this point. And that's usually the, “I fat-fingered something,” type response. Honestly, I think there's room to be a bit more flexible and room to do some more interesting things. I think RDS is setting a bar and a lot of database services out there and kind of just meeting that bar. And we all kind of need to be pushing a little bit more into more interesting spaces and figuring out how to get customers more value, get customers to get more out of their money for the database, honestly.Corey: One of the problems we tend to see, in the database ecosystem at large, without naming names or companies or anything like that, is that it's a pretty thin and blurry line between database advocate, database evangelist, and database zealot. Where it feels like instead, we're arguing about religion more than actual technical constraints and concerns. So, here's a fun question that hopefully isn't too much of a gotcha. But what sort of workloads would you actively advise someone not to use BigAnimal for in the database world? But yes, again, if you try to run a DNS server, it's probably not fit for purpose without at least a shim in the way there. But what sort of workloads are you not targeting that a customer is likely to have a relatively unfortunate time with?Benjamin: Large-scale analytical workloads is the easy answer to that, right? If you've got a problem where you're choosing between Postgres and Snowflake, you're seriously considering—you actually have as much data that you seriously be considering Snowflake? You probably don't want to be using Postgres, right? You want to be using something that's column, or you want to be using a query planner that really understands a columnar layout that's going to get you the sorts of performance that you need for those analytical workloads. We don't try to touch that space.Corey: Yeah, we're doing some of that right now with just the sheer volume of client AWS bills we have. We don't really need a relational model for a lot of it. And Athena is basically fallen down on the job in some cases, and, “Oh, do you want to use Redshift, that's basically Postgres.” It's like, “Yeah, it's Postgres, if it decided to run on bars of gold.” No, thank you. It just becomes this ridiculously overwrought solution for what feels like it should be a lot similar. So, it's weird, six months ago or so I wouldn't have had much of an idea what you're talking about. I see it a lot better now. Generally, by virtue of trying to do something the precise wrong way that someone should.Benjamin: Right. Yeah, exactly. I think there's interesting room for Postgres to expand here. It's not something that we're actively working on. I'm not aware of a lot happening in the community that Postgres is, for better or worse, extremely extensible, right? And if you see the JSON-supported Postgres, it didn't exist, I don't know, five, six years ago. And now it's incredibly powerful. It's incredibly flexible. And you can do a lot of quote-unquote, schemaless stuff straight in Postgres. Or you look at PostGIS, right, for doing GIS geographical data, right? That's really a fantastic integration directly in the database.Corey: Yeah, before that people start doing ridiculous things almost looks similar to a graph database or a columnar store somehow, and yeah.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. I think sometimes somebody will do a good column store that's an open-source deeply integrated into Postgres, rather than—Corey: I've seen someone build one on top of S3 bucket with that head, a quarter of a trillion objects in it. Professional advice, don't do that.Benjamin: [laugh]. Unless you're Snowflake. So, I mean, it's something that I'd like to see Postgres expand into. I think that's an interesting space, but not something that, at least especially for BigAnimal, and frankly, for a lot of EDB customers. It's not something we're trying to push people toward.Corey: One thing that I think we are seeing a schism around is the idea that some vendors are one side of it, some are on the other, where on the one side, you have, oh, every workload should have a bespoke, purpose-built database that is exactly for this type of workload. And the other school of thought is you should generally buy us for a general-purpose database until you have a workload that is scaled and significant to a point where running that on its own purpose-built database begins to make sense. I don't necessarily think that is a binary choice, where do you tend to fall on that spectrum?Benjamin: I think everybody should use Postgres. And I say not just because I work in a Postgres company.Corey: Well, let's be clear. Before this, you were at IBM for five years working on a whole bunch of database stuff over there, not just Postgres. And you, so far, have not struck me as the kind of person who's like, “Oh, so what's your favorite database?” “The one that pays me.” We've met people like that, let's be very clear. But you seem very even-handed in those conversations.Benjamin: Yeah, I got my start in databases, actually, with Apache CouchDB. I am a committer on CouchDB. I worked on a managed at CouchDB service ten years ago. At IBM, I worked on something in nine different open-source databases and managed services. But I love having conversations about, like, well, I've got this workload, should I use Postgres, rr should I use Mongo, should I use Cassandra, all of those types of discussions. Frankly, though, I think in a lot of cases people are—they don't understand how much power they're missing out on if they don't choose a relational database. If they don't understand the relational model well enough to understand that they really actually want that. In a lot of cases, people are also just over-optimizing too early, right? It's just going to be much faster for them to get off the ground, get product in customers hands, if they start with something that they don't have to think twice about. And they don't end up with this architecture with 45 different databases, and there's only one guy in the company that knows how to manage the whole thing.Corey: Oh, the same story of picking a cloud provider. It's, “Okay, you hire a team, you're going to build a thing. Which cloud provider do you pick?” Every cloud provider has a whole matrix and sales deck, and the rest. The right answer, of course, is the one your team's already familiar with because learning a new cloud provider while trying not to run out of money at your startup, can't really doesn't work super well.Benjamin: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: One thing that I think has been sort of interesting, and when I saw it, it was one of those, “Oh, I sort of like them.” Because I had that instinctive reaction and I don't think I'm alone in this. As of this recording a couple of weeks ago, you folks received a sizable investment from private equity. And default reaction to that is, “Oh, well, I guess I put a fork in the company, they're done.” Because the narrative is that once private equity takes an investment, well, that company's best days are probably not in front of it. Now, the counterpoint is that this is not the first time private equity has invested in EDB, and you folks from what I can tell are significantly better than you were when I was your customer a decade ago. So clearly, there is something wrong with that mental model. What am I missing?Benjamin: Yeah. Frankly, I don't know. I'm no expert in funding models and all of those sorts of things. I will say that my experience has been what I've seen at EDB, has definitely been that maybe there's private equity, and then there's private equity. We're in this to build better products and become a better product company. We were previously owned by a private equity firm for the past four years or so. And during the course of those four years, we brought on a bunch of folks who were very product-focused, new leadership. We made a significant acquisition of a company called 2ndQuadrant, which they employed a lot of the European best Postgres company. Now, they're part of EDB and most of them have stayed with us. And we built the managed cloud service, right? So, this is a pretty significant—private equity company buying us to invest in the company. I'm optimistic that that's what we're looking at going forward.Corey: I want to be clear as well, I'm not worried about what I normally would be in a private equity story about this, where they're there to save money and cut costs, and, “Do we really need all these database replicas floating around,” and, “These backups, seems like that's something we don't need.” You have, at last count, 32 Postgres contributors, 7 Postgres committers, and 3 core members. All of whom would run away screaming loudly and publicly, in the event that such a thing were taking place. Of all the challenges and concerns I might have about someone running a cloud service in the modern day. I do not have any fear that you folks are not doing what will very clearly be shown to be the right thing by your customers for the technology that you're building on top of. That is not a concern. There are companies I do not have that confidence in, to be clear.Benjamin: Yeah, I'm glad to hear that. I'm a hundred percent on board as well. I work here, but I think we're doing the right thing, and we're going to be doing great stuff going forward.Corey: One last topic I do want to get into a little bit is, on some level, launching in this decade, a cloud-hosted database offering at a time when Amazon—whose product strategy of yes is in full display—it seems like something ridiculous, that is not necessarily well thought out that why would you ever try to do this? Now, I will temper that by the fact that you are clearly succeeding in this direction. You have customers who say nice things about you, and the reviews have been almost universally positive anywhere I can see things. The negative ones are largely complaining about databases, which I admit might be coming from me.Benjamin: Right, it is a crowded space. There's a lot of things happening. Obviously, Amazon, Microsoft, Google are doing great things, both—Corey: Terrible things, but great, yes. Yes.Benjamin: [laugh] right, there's good products coming in. I think AlloyDB is not necessarily a great product. I haven't used it myself yet, but it's an interesting step in the direction. I'm excited to see development happening. But at the end of the day, we're a database company. Our focus is on building great databases and supporting great databases. We're not entering this business to try to take on Amazon from an infrastructure point of view. In fact, the way that we're structuring the product is really to try to get the strengths of both worlds. We want to give customers the ability to get the most out of the AWS or Azure infrastructure that they can, but come to us for their database.Frankly, we know Postgres better than anybody else. We have a greater ability to get bugs fixed in Postgres than anybody else. We've got folks working on the database in the open. We got folks working on the database proprietary for us. So, we give customers things like break/fix support on that database. If there is a bug in Postgres, there's a bug in the tech that sits around Postgres. Because obviously, Postgres is not a batteries-included system, really. We're going to fix that for you. That's part of the contract that we're giving to our customers. And I know a lot of smaller companies maybe haven't been burned by this sort of thing very much. We start to talk about enterprise customers and medium, larger-scale customers, this starts to get really valuable. The ability to have assurance on top of your open-source product. So, I think there's a lot of interesting things there, a lot of value that we can provide there.I think also that I talked a little bit about this earlier, but like the box, this sort of RDS-shaped box, I think is a bit too small. There's an opportunity for smaller players to come in and try to push the boundaries of that. For example, giving customers more support by default to do a good job using their database. We have folks on board that can help consult with customers to say, “No, you shouldn't be designing your schemas that way. You should be designing your schemas this way. You should be using indexes here,” that sort of stuff. That's been part of our business for a long time. Now, with a managed service, we can bake that right into the managed service. And that gives us the ability to kind of make that—you talk about shared responsibility between the service writer and the customer—we can change the boundaries of that shared responsibility a little bit, so that customers can get more value out of the managed database service than they might expect otherwise.Corey: There aren't these harsh separations and clearly defined lines across which nothing shall pass, when it makes sense to do that in a controlled responsible way.Benjamin: Right, exactly. Some of that is because we're a database company, and some of that is because, frankly, we're much smaller.Corey: I'll take it a step further beyond that, as well, that I have seen this pattern evolve a number of times where you have a customer running databases on EC2, and their AWS account managers suggests move to RDS. So, they do. Then, move to Aurora. So, they do. Then, I move this to DynamoDB. At which point, it's like, what do you think your job is here, exactly? Because it seems like every time we move databases, you show up in a nicer car. So, what exactly is the story here, and what are the incentives? Where it just feels like there is a, “Whatever you're doing is not the way that it should be done. So, it's time to do, yet, another migration.”There's something to be said for companies who are focused around a specific aspect of things. Then once that is up and working and running, great. Keep on going. This is fine. As opposed to trying to chase the latest shiny, on some level. I have a big sense of, I guess, affinity for companies that wind up knowing where they start, and most notably, where they stop.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I don't think that we will be building an application platform anytime soon.Corey: “We're going to run Lambda functions on top of a database.” It's like, “Congratulations. That is the weirdest stored procedure I can imagine this week, but I'm sure we can come up with a worse one soon.”Benjamin: Exactly.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so much about how you're thinking about this, and what you've been building over there. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to go to find you?Benjamin: biganimal.com.Corey: Excellent. We will throw a link to that in the show notes and it only just occurred to me that the Postgres mascot is an elephant, and now I understand why it's called BigAnimal. Yeah, that's right. He who laughs last, thinks slowest, and today, that's me. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Benjamin: Thank you. I really appreciate it.Corey: Benjamin Anderson, CTO for Cloud at EDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that you then wind up stuffing into a SQLite database, converting to Base64, and somehow stuffing into the comment field.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Every year, the PSF and JetBrains team up to do a Python community survey. The most recent one was Fall of 2021. For this episode, I've gathered a great group of Python enthusiasts to discuss the results. I think you'll really enjoy the group discussion on this episode. Links from the show Guests Gina Häußge: @foosel Emily Morehouse-Valcarcel: @emilyemorehouse Tonya Sims: @TonyaSims Brett Cannon: @brettsky Jay Miller: @kjaymiller Paul Everitt: @paulweveritt 2021 Survey Results: jetbrains.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON RedHat AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Code Completion
92: Even Stupider Than JSON

Code Completion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 102:35


Welcome to Code Completion, Episode 92! We are a group of iOS developers and educators hoping to share what we love most about development, Apple technology, and completing your code! Follow us @CodeCompletion (https://twitter.com/CodeCompletion) on Twitter to hear about our upcoming livestreams, videos, and other content. Today, we discuss: - Locations to store App Data: - User Defaults - Documents/FileManager/Cache - Keychain - iCloud Key/Value store - Forms of Storage for Apps: - XML - JSON - wat (https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/wat) - MongoDB and BSON (https://www.mongodb.com/json-and-bson) - Property Lists - CoreData - NSCoding/NSKeyedArchiver - Binary Formats - Protocol Buffers (https://developers.google.com/protocol-buffers) - Media atoms (https://developer.apple.com/library/archive/documentation/QuickTime/QTFF/QTFFChap2/qtff2.html) - Bytes (https://github.com/mochidev/Bytes) - Mini Review Corner: - Logitech Circle View Doorbell (https://www.logitech.com/en-us/products/cameras/circle-view-video-doorbell.html) - Commented Out: - Dimitri's MMM screen murder mystery (https://twitter.com/dimitribouniol/status/1546535433521115136) Your hosts for this week: * Spencer Curtis (https://twitter.com/SpencerCCurtis) * Dimitri Bouniol (https://twitter.com/DimitriBouniol) Be sure to also sign up to our monthly newsletter (https://codecompletion.io/), where we will recap the topics we discussed, reveal the answers to #CompleteTheCode, and share even more things we learned in between episodes. You are what makes this show possible, so please be sure to share this with your friends and family who are also interested in any part of the app development process. Sponsor This week's episode of Code Completion is brought to you by Super Easy Timer. Search for Super Easy Timer on the Mac App Store to give it a try. https://apps.apple.com/app/apple-store/id1525104124?mt=12

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck - Peer Dependencies × Vitest × NVM and PNPM × Sprites

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 66:05 Very Popular


In this potluck episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott answer your questions about peer dependencies, Vitest, NVM and PNPM, using sprites for images, common MongoDB operations, and more! Prismic - Sponsor Prismic is a Headless CMS that makes it easy to build website pages as a set of components. Break pages into sections of components using React, Vue, or whatever you like. Make corresponding Slices in Prismic. Start building pages dynamically in minutes. Get started at prismic.io/syntax. Sanity - Sponsor Sanity.io is a real-time headless CMS with a fully customizable Content Studio built in React. Get a Sanity powered site up and running in minutes at sanity.io/create. Get an awesome supercharged free developer plan on sanity.io/syntax. LogRocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Show Notes 00:03 Welcome 01:53 Configuring home internet routers 04:42 Scott's Home Assistant update Mushroom Theme 07:52 Could you explain to me peer-dependencies and how does it work? 13:24 Using Vitest do you still have to transpile code? 16:14 Can you talk about helpful and common MongoDB operations, beyond just CRUD. 18:49 How can I update the “updatedAt” field of the document on every save automatically? 20:40 What is aggregation, and when do you use it? 25:33 Sponsor: Prismic 27:27 How does NVM relate to PNPM? pnpm nvm 30:45 I'm looking to upskill from front-end JavaScript? 33:53 Is it possible to have a private NPM repo I can “npm install” from, or do I put my components up on NPM publicly? Creating a private npm package 37:51 Sponsor: LogRocket 39:14 Should a majority of lodash functions be considered deprecated? angus c just 42:36 Please do an episode on programming/learning with ADHD. 44:04 Should I still be putting images in sprites? 49:20 Does Mux have a simple mechanism for adding auth to each video or group of videos? Mux Create playback restriction 53:48 Sponsor: Sanity.io 55:02 Is there copyright issues with using public APIs? Moneypuck 59:38 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Toto Bidet Wes: Sodastream Shameless Plugs Scott: LevelUp Tutorials Wes: Wes Bos Tutorials Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#373: Reinventing Azure's Python CLI

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 66:30 Very Popular


Deploying and managing your application after you create it can be a big challenge. Cloud platforms such as Azure have literally hundreds of services. Which ones should you choose? How do you link them together? In this episode, Anthony Shaw and Shayne Boyer share a new CLI tool and template they've created for jump starting you use of modern Python apps and deploying them to Azure. We're talking FastAPI, Beanie and MongoDB, async and await, Bicep DevOps, automated CI/CD pipelines and more. Plus we catch up on other Python work happening that Anthony is involved with. If you're interested in deploying or structuring modern Python apps, you'll find some interesting take aways from our conversation. Links from the show Anthony on Twitter: @anthonypjshaw Shayne Boyer: @spboyer Azure azd CLI tools: aka.ms Beanie ODM: github.io Pydantic: helpmanual.io Give me back my monolith article: craigkerstiens.com Python creator Guido van Rossum joins Microsoft: techcrunch.com Making Python Faster with Guido and Mark episode: talkpython.fm Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON NordVPN AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Screaming in the Cloud
Technical Lineage and Careers in Tech with Sheeri Cabral

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 35:50


About SheeriAfter almost 2 decades as a database administrator and award-winning thought leader, Sheeri Cabral pivoted to technical product management. Her super power of “new customer” empathy informs her presentations and explanations. Sheeri has developed unique insights into working together and planning, having survived numerous reorganizations, “best practices”, and efficiency models. Her experience is the result of having worked at everything from scrappy startups such as Guardium – later bought by IBM – to influential tech companies like Mozilla and MongoDB, to large established organizations like Salesforce.Links Referenced: Collibra: https://www.collibra.com WildAid GitHub: https://github.com/wildaid Twitter: https://twitter.com/sheeri Personal Blog: https://sheeri.org TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is Sheeri Cabral, who's a Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. And that is an awful lot of words that I understand approximately none of, except maybe manager. But we'll get there. The origin story has very little to do with that.I was following Sheeri on Twitter for a long time and really enjoyed the conversations that we had back and forth. And over time, I started to realize that there were a lot of things that didn't necessarily line up. And one of the more interesting and burning questions I had is, what is it you do, exactly? Because you're all over the map. First, thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. And what is it you'd say it is you do here? To quote a somewhat bizarre and aged movie now.Sheeri: Well, since your listeners are technical, I do like to match what I say with the audience. First of all, hi. Thanks for having me. I'm Sheeri Cabral. I am a product manager for technical and ETL tools and I can break that down for this technical audience. If it's not a technical audience, I might say something—like if I'm at a party, and people ask what I do—I'll say, “I'm a product manager for technical data tool.” And if they ask what a product manager does, I'll say I helped make sure that, you know, we deliver a product the customer wants. So, you know, ETL tools are tools that transform, extract, and load your data from one place to another.Corey: Like AWS Glue, but for some of them, reportedly, you don't have to pay AWS by the gigabyte-second.Sheeri: Correct. Correct. We actually have an AWS Glue technical lineage tool in beta right now. So, the technical lineage is how data flows from one place to another. So, when you're extracting, possibly transforming, and loading your data from one place to another, you're moving it around; you want to see where it goes. Why do you want to see where it goes? Glad you asked. You didn't really ask. Do you care? Do you want to know why it's important?Corey: Oh, I absolutely do. Because it's—again, people who are, like, “What do you do?” “Oh, it's boring, and you won't care.” It's like when people aren't even excited themselves about what they work on, it's always a strange dynamic. There's a sense that people aren't really invested in what they do.I'm not saying you have to have this overwhelming passion and do this in your spare time, necessarily, but you should, at least in an ideal world, like what you do enough to light up a bit when you talk about it. You very clearly do. I'm not wanting to stop you. Please continue.Sheeri: I do. I love data and I love helping people. So, technical lineage does a few things. For example, a DBA—which I used to be a DBA—can use technical lineage to predict the impact of a schema update or migration, right? So, if I'm going to change the name of this column, what uses it downstream? What's going to be affected? What scripts do I need to change? Because if the name changes other thing—you know, then I need to not get errors everywhere.And from a data governance perspective, which Collibra is data governance tool, it helps organizations see if, you know, you have private data in a source, does it remain private throughout its journey, right? So, you can take a column like email address or government ID number and see where it's used down the line, right? GDPR compliance, CCPA compliance. The CCPA is a little newer; people might not know that acronym. It's California Consumer Privacy Act.I forget what GDPR is, but it's another privacy act. It also can help the business see where data comes from so if you have technical lineage all the way down to your reports, then you know whether or not you can trust the data, right? So, you have a report and it shows salary ranges for job titles. So, where did the data come from? Did it come from a survey? Did it come from job sites? Or did it come from a government source like the IRS, right? So, now you know, like, what you get to trust the most.Corey: Wait, you can do that without a blockchain? I kid, I kid, I kid. Please don't make me talk about blockchains. No, it's important. The provenance of data, being able to establish a almost a chain-of-custody style approach for a lot of these things is extraordinarily important.Sheeri: Yep.Corey: I was always a little hazy on the whole idea of ETL until I started, you know, working with large-volume AWS bills. And it turns out that, “Well, why do you have to wind up moving and transforming all of these things?” “Oh, because in its raw form, it's complete nonsense. That's why. Thank you for asking.” It becomes a problem—Sheeri: [laugh]. Oh, I thought you're going to say because AWS has 14 different products for things, so you have to move it from one product to the other to use the features.Corey: And two of them are good. It's a wild experience.Sheeri: [laugh].Corey: But this is also something of a new career for you. You were a DBA for a long time. You're also incredibly engaging, you have a personality, you're extraordinarily creative, and that—if I can slander an entire profession for a second—does not feel like it is a common DBA trait. It's right up there with an overly creative accountant. When your accountant has done a stand-up comedy, you're watching and you're laughing and thinking, “I am going to federal prison.” It's one of those weird things that doesn't quite gel, if we're speaking purely in terms of stereotypes. What has your career been like?Sheeri: I was a nerd growing up. So, to kind of say, like, I have a personality, like, my personality is very nerdish. And I get along with other nerdy people and we have a lot of fun, but when I was younger, like, when I was, I don't know, seven or eight, one of the things I really love to do is I had a penny collection—you know, like you do—and I love to sort it by date. So, in the states anyway, we have these pennies that have the date that they were minted on it. And so, I would organize—and I probably had, like, five bucks worth a pennies.So, you're talking about 500 pennies and I would sort them and I'd be like, “Oh, this is 1969. This was 1971.” And then when I was done, I wanted to sort things more, so I would start to, like, sort them in order how shiny the pennies were. So, I think that from an early age, it was clear that I wanted to be a DBA from that sorting of my data and ordering it, but I never really had a, like, “Oh, I want to be this when I grew up.” I kind of had a stint when I was in, like, middle school where I was like, maybe I'll be a creative writer and I wasn't as creative a writer as I wanted to be, so I was like, “Ah, whatever.”And I ended up actually coming to computer science just completely through random circumstance. I wanted to do neuroscience because I thought it was completely fascinating at how the brain works and how, like, you and I are, like, 99.999—we're, like, five-nines the same except for, like, a couple of genetic, whatever. But, like, how our brain wiring right how the neuron, how the electricity flows through it—Corey: Yeah, it feels like I want to store a whole bunch of data, that's okay. I'll remember it. I'll keep it in my head. And you're, like, rolling up the sleeves and grabbing, like, the combination software package off the shelf and a scalpel. Like, “Not yet, but you're about to.” You're right, there is an interesting point of commonality on this. It comes down to almost data organization and the—Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: —relationship between data nodes if that's a fair assessment.Sheeri: Yeah. Well, so what happened was, so I went to university and in order to take introductory neuroscience, I had to take, like, chemistry, organic chemistry, biology, I was basically doing a pre-med track. And so, in the beginning of my junior year, I went to go take introductory neuroscience and I got a D-minus. And a D-minus level doesn't even count for the major. And I'm like, “Well, I want to graduate in three semesters.”And I had this—I got all my requirements done, except for the pesky little major thing. So, I was already starting to take, like, a computer science, you know, basic courses and so I kind of went whole-hog, all-in did four or five computer science courses a semester and got my degree in computer science. Because it was like math, so it kind of came a little easy to me. So taking, you know, logic courses, and you know, linear algebra courses was like, “Yeah, that's great.” And then it was the year 2000, when I got my bachelor's, the turn of the century.And my university offered a fifth-year master's degree program. And I said, I don't know who's going to look at me and say, conscious bias, unconscious bias, “She's a woman, she can't do computer science, so, like, let me just get this master's degree.” I, like, fill out a one page form, I didn't have to take a GRE. And it was the year 2000. You were around back then.You know what it was like. The jobs were like—they were handing jobs out like candy. I literally had a friend who was like, “My company”—that he founded. He's like, just come, you know, it's Monday in May—“Just start, you will just bring your resume the first day and we'll put it on file.” And I was like, no, no, I have this great opportunity to get a master's degree in one year at 25% off the cost because I got a tuition reduction or whatever for being in the program. I was like, “What could possibly go wrong in one year?”And what happened was his company didn't exist the next year, and, like, everyone was in a hiring freeze in 2001. So, it was the best decision I ever made without really knowing because I would have had a job for six months had been laid off with everyone else at the end of 2000 and… and that's it. So, that's how I became a DBA is I, you know, got a master's degree in computer science, really wanted to use databases. There weren't any database jobs in 2001, but I did get a job as a sysadmin, which we now call SREs.Corey: Well, for some of the younger folks in the audience, I do want to call out the fact that regardless of how they think we all rode dinosaurs to school, databases did absolutely exist back in that era. There's a reason that Oracle is as large as it is of a company. And it's not because people just love doing business with them, but technology was head and shoulders above everything else for a long time, to the point where people worked with them in spite of their reputation, not because of it. These days, it seems like in the database universe, you have an explosion of different options and different ways that are great at different things. The best, of course, is Route 53 or other DNS TXT records. Everything else is competing for second place on that. But no matter what it is, you're after, there are options available. This was not the case back then. It was like, you had a few options, all of them with serious drawbacks, but you had to pick your poison.Sheeri: Yeah. In fact, I learned on Postgres in university because you know, that was freely available. And you know, you'd like, “Well, why not MySQL? Isn't that kind of easier to learn?” It's like, yeah, but I went to college from '96 to 2001. MySQL 1.0 or whatever was released in '95. By the time I graduated, it was six years old.Corey: And academia is not usually the early adopter of a lot of emerging technologies like that. That's not a dig on them any because otherwise, you wind up with a major that doesn't exist by the time that the first crop of students graduates.Sheeri: Right. And they didn't have, you know, transactions. They didn't have—they barely had replication, you know? So, it wasn't a full-fledged database at the time. And then I became a MySQL DBA. But yeah, as a systems administrator, you know, we did websites, right? We did what web—are they called web administrators now? What are they called? Web admins? Webmaster?Corey: Web admins, I think that they became subsumed into sysadmins, by and large and now we call them DevOps, or SRE, which means the exact same thing except you get paid 60% more and your primary job is arguing about which one of those you're not.Sheeri: Right. Right. Like we were still separated from network operations, but database stuff that stuff and, you know, website stuff, it's stuff we all did, back when your [laugh] webmail was your Horde based on PHP and you had a database behind it. And yeah, it was fun times.Corey: I worked at a whole bunch of companies in that era. And that's where basically where I formed my early opinion of a bunch of DBA-leaning sysadmins. Like the DBA in and a lot of these companies, it was, I don't want to say toxic, but there's a reason that if I were to say, “I'm writing a memoir about a career track in tech called The Legend of Surly McBastard,” people are going to say, “Oh, is it about the DBA?” There's a reason behind this. It always felt like there was a sense of elitism and a sense of, “Well, that's not my job, so you do your job, but if anything goes even slightly wrong, it's certainly not my fault.” And to be fair, all of these fields have evolved significantly since then, but a lot of those biases that started early in our career are difficult to shake, particularly when they're unconscious.Sheeri: They are. I'd never ran into that person. Like, I never ran into anyone who—like a developer who treated me poorly because the last DBA was a jerk and whatever, but I heard a lot of stories, especially with things like granting access. In fact, I remember, my first job as an actual DBA and not as a sysadmin that also the DBA stuff was at an online gay dating site, and the CTO rage-quit. Literally yelled, stormed out of the office, slammed the door, and never came back.And a couple of weeks later, you know, we found out that the customer service guys who were in-house—and they were all guys, so I say guys although we also referred to them as ladies because it was an online gay dating site.Corey: Gals works well too, in those scenarios. “Oh, guys is unisex.” “Cool. So's ‘gals' by that theory. So gals, how we doing?” And people get very offended by that and suddenly, yeah, maybe ‘folks' is not a terrible direction to go in. I digress. Please continue.Sheeri: When they hired me, they were like, are you sure you're okay with this? I'm like, “I get it. There's, like, half-naked men posters on the wall. That's fine.” But they would call they'd be, like, “Ladies, let's go to our meeting.” And I'm like, “Do you want me also?” Because I had to ask because that was when ladies actually might not have included me because they meant, you know.Corey: I did a brief stint myself as the director of TechOps at Grindr. That was a wild experience in a variety of different ways.Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: It's over a decade ago, but it was still this… it was a very interesting experience in a bunch of ways. And still, to this day, it remains the single biggest source of InfoSec nightmares that kept me awake at night. Just because when I'm working at a bank—which I've also done—it's only money, which sounds ridiculous to say, especially if you're in a regulated profession, but here in reality where I'm talking about it, it's I'm dealing instead, with cool, this data leaks, people will die. Most of what I do is not life or death, but that was and that weighed very heavily on me.Sheeri: Yeah, there's a reason I don't work for a bank or a hospital. You know, I make mistakes. I'm human, right?Corey: There's a reason I work on databases for that exact same reason. Please, continue.Sheeri: Yeah. So, the CTO rage-quit. A couple of weeks later, the head of customer service comes to me and be like, “Can we have his spot as an admin for customer service?” And I'm like, “What do you mean?” He's like, “Well, he told us, we had, like, ten slots of permission and he was one of them so we could have have, like, nine people.”And, like, I went and looked, and they put permission in the htaccess file. So, this former CTO had just wielded his power to be like, “Nope, can't do that. Sorry, limitations.” When there weren't any. I'm like, “You could have a hundred. You want every customer service person to be an admin? Whatever. Here you go.” So, I did hear stories about that. And yeah, that's not the kind of DBA I was.Corey: No, it's the more senior you get, the less you want to have admin rights on things. But when I leave a job, like, the number one thing I want you to do is revoke my credentials. Not—Sheeri: Please.Corey: Because I'm going to do anything nefarious; because I don't want to get blamed for it. Because we have a long standing tradition in tech at a lot of places of, “Okay, something just broke. Whose fault is it? Well, who's the most recent person to leave the company? Let's blame them because they're not here to refute the character assassination and they're not going to be angling for a raise here; the rest of us are so let's see who we can throw under the bus that can't defend themselves.” Never a great plan.Sheeri: Yeah. So yeah, I mean, you know, my theory in life is I like helping. So, I liked helping developers as a DBA. I would often run workshops to be like, here's how to do an explain and find your explain plan and see if you have indexes and why isn't the database doing what you think it's supposed to do? And so, I like helping customers as a product manager, right? So…Corey: I am very interested in watching how people start drifting in a variety of different directions. It's a, you're doing product management now and it's an ETL lineage product, it is not something that is directly aligned with your previous positioning in the market. And those career transitions are always very interesting to me because there's often a mistaken belief by people in their career realizing they're doing something they don't want to do. They want to go work in a different field and there's this pervasive belief that, “Oh, time for me to go back to square one and take an entry level job.” No, you have a career. You have experience. Find the orthogonal move.Often, if that's challenging because it's too far apart, you find the half-step job that blends the thing you do now with something a lot closer, and then a year or two later, you complete the transition into that thing. But starting over from scratch, it's why would you do that? I can't quite wrap my head around jumping off the corporate ladder to go climb another one. You very clearly have done a lateral move in that direction into a career field that is surprisingly distant, at least in my view. How'd that happen?Sheeri: Yeah, so after being on call for 18 years or so, [laugh] I decided—no, I had a baby, actually. I had a baby. He was great. And then I another one. But after the first baby, I went back to work, and I was on call again. And you know, I had a good maternity leave or whatever, but you know, I had a newborn who was six, eight months old and I was getting paged.And I was like, you know, this is more exhausting than having a newborn. Like, having a baby who sleeps three hours at a time, like, in three hour chunks was less exhausting than being on call. Because when you have a baby, first of all, it's very rare that they wake up and crying in the midnight it's an emergency, right? Like they have to go to the hospital, right? Very rare. Thankfully, I never had to do it.But basically, like, as much as I had no brain cells, and sometimes I couldn't even go through this list, right: they need to be fed; they need to be comforted; they're tired, and they're crying because they're tired, right, you can't make them go to sleep, but you're like, just go to sleep—what is it—or their diaper needs changing, right? There's, like, four things. When you get that beep of that pager in the middle of the night it could be anything. It could be logs filling up disk space, you're like, “Alright, I'll rotate the logs and be done with it.” You know? It could be something you need snoozed.Corey: “Issue closed. Status, I no longer give a shit what it is.” At some point, it's one of those things where—Sheeri: Replication lag.Corey: Right.Sheeri: Not actionable.Corey: Don't get me started down that particular path. Yeah. This is the area where DBAs and my sysadmin roots started to overlap a bit. Like, as the DBA was great at data analysis, the table structure and the rest, but the backups of the thing, of course that fell to the sysadmin group. And replication lag, it's, “Okay.”“It's doing some work in the middle of the night; that's normal, and the network is fine. And why are you waking me up with things that are not actionable? Stop it.” I'm yelling at the computer at that point, not the person—Sheeri: Right,right.Corey: —to be very clear. But at some point, it's don't wake me up with trivial nonsense. If I'm getting woken up in the middle of the night, it better be a disaster. My entire business now is built around a problem that's business-hours only for that explicit reason. It's the not wanting to deal with that. And I don't envy that, but product management. That's a strange one.Sheeri: Yeah, so what happened was, I was unhappy at my job at the time, and I was like, “I need a new job.” So, I went to, like, the MySQL Slack instance because that was 2018, 2019. Very end of 2018, beginning of 2019. And I said, “I need something new.” Like, maybe a data architect, or maybe, like, a data analyst, or data scientist, which was pretty cool.And I was looking at data scientist jobs, and I was an expert MySQL DBA and it took a long time for me to be able to say, “I'm an expert,” without feeling like oh, you're just ballooning yourself up. And I was like, “No, I'm literally a world-renowned expert DBA.” Like, I just have to say it and get comfortable with it. And so, you know, I wasn't making a junior data scientist's salary. [laugh].I am the sole breadwinner for my household, so at that point, I had one kid and a husband and I was like, how do I support this family on a junior data scientist's salary when I live in the city of Boston? So, I needed something that could pay a little bit more. And a former I won't even say coworker, but colleague in the MySQL world—because is was the MySQL Slack after all—said, “I think you should come at MongoDB, be a product manager like me.”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring. Corey: If I've ever said, “Hey, you should come work with me and do anything like me,” people will have the blood drain from their face. And like, “What did you just say to me? That's terrible.” Yeah, it turns out that I have very hard to explain slash predict, in some ways. It's always fun. It's always wild to go down that particular path, but, you know, here we are.Sheeri: Yeah. But I had the same question everybody else does, which was, what's a product manager? What does the product manager do? And he gave me a list of things a product manager does, which there was some stuff that I had the skills for, like, you have to talk to customers and listen to them.Well, I've done consulting. I could get yelled at; that's fine. You can tell me things are terrible and I have to fix it. I've done that. No problem with that. Then there are things like you have to give presentations about how features were okay, I can do that. I've done presentations. You know, I started the Boston MySQL Meetup group and ran it for ten years until I had a kid and foisted it off on somebody else.And then the things that I didn't have the skills in, like, running a beta program were like, “Ooh, that sounds fascinating. Tell me more.” So, I was like, “Yeah, let's do it.” And I talked to some folks, they were looking for a technical product manager for MongoDB's sharding product. And they had been looking for someone, like, insanely technical for a while, and they found me; I'm insanely technical.And so, that was great. And so, for a year, I did that at MongoDB. One of the nice things about them is that they invest in people, right? So, my manager left, the team was like, we really can't support someone who doesn't have the product management skills that we need yet because you know, I wasn't a master in a year, believe it or not. And so, they were like, “Why don't you find another department?” I was like, “Okay.”And I ended up finding a place in engineering communications, doing, like, you know, some keynote demos, doing some other projects and stuff. And then after—that was a kind of a year-long project, and after that ended, I ended up doing product management for developer relations at MongoDB. Also, this was during the pandemic, right, so this is 2019, until '21; beginning of 2019, to end of 2020, so it was, you know, three full years. You know, I kind of like woke up from the pandemic fog and I was like, “What am I doing? Do I want to really want to be a content product manager?” And I was like, “I want to get back to databases.”One of the interesting things I learned actually in looking for a job because I did it a couple of times at MongoDB because I changed departments and I was also looking externally when I did that. I had the idea when I became a product manager, I was like, “This is great because now I'm product manager for databases and so, I'm kind of leveraging that database skill and then I'll learn the product manager stuff. And then I can be a product manager for any technical product, right?”Corey: I like the idea. Of some level, it feels like the product managers likeliest to succeed at least have a grounding or baseline in the area that they're in. This gets into the age-old debate of how important is industry-specific experience? Very often you'll see a bunch of job ads just put that in as a matter of course. And for some roles, yeah, it's extremely important.For other roles it's—for example, I don't know, hypothetically, you're looking for someone to fix the AWS bill, it doesn't necessarily matter whether you're a services company, a product company, or a VC-backed company whose primary output is losing money, it doesn't matter because it's a bounded problem space and that does not transform much from company to company. Same story with sysadmin types to be very direct. But the product stuff does seem to get into that industry specific stuff.Sheeri: Yeah, and especially with tech stuff, you have to understand what your customer is saying when they're saying, “I have a problem doing X and Y,” right? The interesting part of my folly in that was that part of the time that I was looking was during the pandemic, when you know, everyone was like, “Oh, my God, it's a seller's market. If you're looking for a job, employers are chomping at the bit for you.” And I had trouble finding something because so many people were also looking for jobs, that if I went to look for something, for example, as a storage product manager, right—now, databases and storage solutions have a lot in common; databases are storage solutions, in fact; but file systems and databases have much in common—but all that they needed was one person with file system experience that had more experience than I did in storage solutions, right? And they were going to choose them over me. So, it was an interesting kind of wake-up call for me that, like, yeah, probably data and databases are going to be my niche. And that's okay because that is literally why they pay me the literal big bucks. If I'm going to go niche that I don't have 20 years of experience and they shouldn't pay me as big a bucks right?Corey: Yeah, depending on what you're doing, sure. I don't necessarily believe in the idea that well you're new to this particular type of role so we're going to basically pay you a lot less. From my perspective it's always been, like, there's a value in having a person in a role. The value to the company is X and, “Well, I have an excuse now to pay you less for that,” has never resonated with me. It's if you're not, I guess, worth—the value-added not worth being paid what the stated rate for a position is, you are probably not going to find success in that role and the role has to change. That has always been my baseline operating philosophy. Not to yell at people on this, but it's, uh, I am very tired of watching companies more or less dunk on people from a position of power.Sheeri: Yeah. And I mean, you can even take the power out of that and take, like, location-based. And yes, I understand the cost of living is different in different places, but why do people get paid differently if the value is the same? Like if I want to get a promotion, right, my company is going to be like, “Well, show me how you've added value. And we only pay your value. We don't pay because—you know, you don't just automatically get promoted after seven years, right? You have to show the value and whatever.” Which is, I believe, correct, right?And yet, there are seniority things, there are this many years experience. And you know, there's the old caveat of do you have ten years experience or do you have two years of experience five times?Corey: That is the big problem is that there has to be a sense of movement that pushes people forward. You're not the first person that I've had on the show and talked to about a 20 year career. But often, I do wind up talking to folks as I move through the world where they basically have one year of experience repeated 20 times. And as the industry continues to evolve and move on and skill sets don't keep current, in some cases, it feels like they have lost touch, on some level. And they're talking about the world that was and still is in some circles, but it's a market in long-term decline as opposed to keeping abreast of what is functionally a booming industry.Sheeri: Their skills have depreciated because they haven't learned more skills.Corey: Yeah. Tech across the board is a field where I feel like you have to constantly be learning. And there's a bit of an evolve-or-die dinosaur approach. And I have some, I do have some fallbacks on this. If I ever decide I am tired of learning and keeping up with AWS, all I have to do is go and work in an environment that uses GovCloud because that's, like, AWS five years ago.And that buys me the five years to find something else to be doing until a GovCloud catches up with the modern day of when I decided to make that decision. That's a little insulting and also very accurate for those who have found themselves in that environment. But I digress.Sheeri: No, and I find it to with myself. Like, I got to the point with MySQL where I was like, okay, great. I know MySQL back and forth. Do I want to learn all this other stuff? Literally just today, I was looking at my DMs on Twitter and somebody DMed me in May, saying, “Hi, ma'am. I am a DBA and how can I use below service: Lambda, Step Functions, DynamoDB, AWS Session Manager, and CloudWatch?”And I was like, “You know, I don't know. I have not ever used any of those technologies. And I haven't evolved my DBA skills because it's been, you know, six years since I was a DBA.” No, six years, four or five? I can't do math.Corey: Yeah. Which you think would be a limiting factor to a DBA but apparently not. One last question that [laugh] I want to ask you, before we wind up calling this a show. You've done an awful lot across the board. As you look at all of it, what is it you would say that you're the most proud of?Sheeri: Oh, great question. What I'm most proud of is my work with WildAid. So, when I was at MongoDB—I referenced a job with engineering communications, and they hired me to be a product manager because they wanted to do a collaboration with a not-for-profit and make a reference application. So, make an application using MongoDB technology and make it something that was going to be used, but people can also see it. So, we made this open-source project called o-fish.And you know, we can give GitHub links: it's github.com/wildaid, and it has—that's the organization's GitHub which we created, so it only has the o-fish projects in it. But it is a mobile and web app where governments who patrol waters, patrol, like, marine protected areas—which are like national parks but in the water, right, so they are these, you know, wildlife preserves in the water—and they make sure that people aren't doing things they shouldn't do: they're not throwing trash in the ocean, they're not taking turtles out of the Galapagos Island area, you know, things like that. And they need software to track that and do that because at the time, they were literally writing, you know, with pencil on paper, and, you know, had stacks and stacks of this paper to do data entry.And MongoDB had just bought the Realm database and had just integrated it, and so there was, you know, some great features about offline syncing that you didn't have to do; it did all the foundational plumbing for you. And then the reason though, that I'm proud of that project is not just because it's pretty freaking cool that, you know, doing something that actually makes a difference in the world and helps fight climate change and all that kind of stuff, the reason I was proud of it is I was the sole product manager. It was the first time that I'd really had sole ownership of a product and so all the mistakes were my own and the credit was my own, too. And so, it was really just a great learning experience and it turned out really well.Corey: There's a lot to be said for pitching in and helping out with good causes in a way that your skill set winds up benefitting. I found that I was a lot happier with a lot of the volunteer stuff that I did when it was instead of licking envelopes, it started being things that I had a bit of proficiency in. “Hey, can I fix your AWS bill?” It turns out as some value to certain nonprofits. You have to be at a certain scale before it makes sense, otherwise it's just easier to maybe not do it that way, but there's a lot of value to doing something that puts good back into the world. I wish more people did that.Sheeri: Yeah. And it's something to do in your off-time that you know is helping. It might feel like work, it might not feel like work, but it gives you a sense of accomplishment at the end of the day. I remember my first job, one of the interview questions was—no, it wasn't. [laugh]. It wasn't an interview question until after I was hired and they asked me the question, and then they made it an interview question.And the question was, what video games do you play? And I said, “I don't play video games. I spend all day at work staring at a computer screen. Why would I go home and spend another 12 hours till three in the morning, right—five in the morning—playing video games?” And they were like, we clearly need to change our interview questions. This was again, back when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. So, people are are culturally sensitive now.Corey: These days, people ask me, “What's your favorite video game?” My answer is, “Twitter.”Sheeri: Right. [laugh]. Exactly. It's like whack-a-mole—Corey: Yeah.Sheeri: —you know? So, for me having a tangible hobby, like, I do a lot of art, I knit, I paint, I carve stamps, I spin wool into yarn. I know that's not a metaphor for storytelling. That is I literally spin wool into yarn. And having something tangible, you work on something and you're like, “Look. It was nothing and now it's this,” is so satisfying.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today about where you've been, where you are, and where you're going, and as well as helping me put a little bit more of a human angle on Twitter, which is intensely dehumanizing at times. It turns out that 280 characters is not the best way to express the entirety of what makes someone a person. You need to use a multi-tweet thread for that. If people want to learn more about you, where can they find you?Sheeri: Oh, they can find me on Twitter. I'm @sheeri—S-H-E-E-R-I—on Twitter. And I've started to write a little bit more on my blog at sheeri.org. So hopefully, I'll continue that since I've now told people to go there.Corey: I really want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Sheeri: Thanks to you, Corey, too. You take the time to interview people, too, so I appreciate it.Corey: I do my best. Sheeri Cabral, Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes, whereas if you've hated it, do exactly the same thing—like and subscribe, hit those buttons, five-star review—but also leave a ridiculous comment where we will then use an ETL pipeline to transform it into something that isn't complete bullshit.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#372: Applied mathematics with Python

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 75:44 Very Popular


Often when we learn about or work with Math, it's done so in a very detached style. You might learn the rules and techniques for differentiation, for example. But how often do you get to apply them to meaningful and interesting problems? In this episode, we have Vince Knight and Geraint Palmer on to discuss solving a wide variety of applied and approachable math problems using Python. Whether you're deeply into math or not so much, I think there is a lot to enjoy from this episode. Links from the show Applied Mathematics with Open-Source Software: taylorfrancis.com Book source files: ithub.com Vince on Twitter: @drvinceknight Geraint on Twitter: @geraintpalmer Traces Package: traces.readthedocs.io A Beautiful Mind: wikipedia.org Nashpy: github.com e: The Story of a Number: amazon.com SymPy episode: talkpython.fm 8451: 8451.com Stack Overflow Trends: stackoverflow.com PYCON UK 2017: Python for conducting operational research in healthcare: youtube.com Ciw package: github.com Python ternary: github.com Michael's in-person FastAPI course: maven.com Reimbursement templates for our courses Expense a Course at Talk Python: zoho.com Expense Course Bundle at Talk Python: zoho.com Expense Cohort Course at Talk Python: zoho.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors RedHat Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“Pfizer mit Milliarden-Deals” - Reichster Deutscher hat 15% von Lufthansa, MongoDB

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 11:03


Reichster Deutscher wird größter Lufthansa-Aktionär. About You und Samsung geben starke Quartalszahlen her. Und Merck mag das Business von Seagen sehr. Außerdem gibt's Aktiensplit bei Gamestop und Rendite bei Krypto. Mit zwei Medikamenten mehr Umsatz als ganz Nike. Eine Milliardenübernahme nach der anderen. Steigende Dividende seit 2010. Läuft bei Pfizer (WKN: 852009). Dokumentenorientierte nicht-relationale Datenbanken sind die Zukunft. Und MongoDB (WKN: A2DYB1) ist das Oracle der Zukunft. Diesen Podcast der Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) vom 08.07.2022, 3:00 Uhr stellt Dir die Trade Republic Bank GmbH zur Verfügung. Die Trade Republic Bank GmbH wird von der Bundesanstalt für Finanzaufsicht beaufsichtigt.

Revenue Builders
The Ideal Partnership with Alan Chhabra

Revenue Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 58:27


In this episode of the Revenue Builders podcast, John Kaplan and John McMahon are joined by Alan Chhabra, Executive Vice President of WW Partners at MongoDB. Alan talks about starting the partner program at MongoDB and how he overcame some of the role's biggest challenges.Alan shares what he's learned about establishing great partnerships, managing connections, and growing relationships with partners to maximize efficiency and long-term results. He also talks about his experience managing the complexities of client relationships, especially when it comes to competition.Additional Resources:Connect with Alan on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanchhabra/Visit MongoDB's website: https://www.mongodb.com/Donate to The Home for Little Wanderers: https://www.thehome.org/Support Vision-Aid: https://visionaid.org/More about Force Management | https://forc.mx/3waMDDSIncrease Revenue by Improving the Manager/Seller Relationship | https://forc.mx/3bt8jTlDrive Revenue Growth Through Indirect Sales Channels | https://forc.mx/3nsioThHIGHLIGHTSHow to manage the diversity of partnershipsGaining traction early with a partnerThe challenges of managing channel conflictThe characteristics of the right people for a channelEstablishing trust for enablement informationAlan's advice on things you can get from a partner communityQUOTESAlan: "When you put that together, then you get a handful of partners that you double down. I'm not one for where you just have hundreds of partners that you focus on. You really should get the ones that fit into all those buckets, and then you go deep."Alan: "It does start on the street. If local sales leadership from both companies are not tight at the hip, global partnerships do not work. They may help with some marketing awareness, they may get people excited on LinkedIn, but if there's no real tight-at-the-hip at the geos, it doesn't work.Alan: "The reason for that mistrust is usually because of misalignment on what's in it for them and what's in it for us. For example, if all that partner's job is to ambulance chase your deals in the field and steal points, the last thing you're going to do is share information with them."Alan: "The customers' buying motion has changed. In the last five to seven years, customers now buy upfront infrastructure and commitments with the cloud provider."Check out John McMahon's book here: https://www.amazon.com/Qualified-Sales-Leader-Proven-Lessons/dp/0578895064

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Spring Data Bad SpEL, Hive Gets Rust-ed, Cozy Bear Leverages BRc4, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 3:05


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 06 July, 2022Episode 259 - 06 July 2022Spring Data Bad SpEL- https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/spring-data-mongodb-hit-by-another-critical-spel-injection-flaw Hive Gets Rust-ed - https://thehackernews.com/2022/07/hive-ransomware-upgrades-to-rust-for.htmlSilent Shadow Fix - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/microsoft/microsoft-quietly-fixes-shadowcoerce-windows-ntlm-relay-bug/Google to Delete Sensitive Tracking- https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/british-army-social-media-accounts/Cozy Bear Leverages BRc4 - https://thehackernews.com/2022/07/hackers-abusing-brc4-red-team.htmlHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Wednesday July 6th 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From PortSwigger.netA critical SpEL injection vulnerability has been patched in Spring Data MongoDB. The 9.8 severity bug could be exploited to achieve remote code execution. First.org has ranked the flaw among the top 10 CVEs likely to be used in the wild over the last 30 days. The ease-of-exploitation and the number of proof of concepts available will likely make this vulnerability very popular. Get your patch on kids. From TheHackerNews.com:The operators of the Hive ransomware have completely rewritten the malware, moving from the Go language to Rust. This gains them the benefit of memory safety and deeper control over low-level resources as well as making use of a wide range of cryptographic libraries. It also makes it more difficult to reverse engineer. These changes continue to show Hive as one of the fastest evolving ransomware families out there. From ZDNet.com:Four more Android apps have been removed from the Google Play store after it was discovered they were being used to deliver the Joker malware to smartphones. The apps, which have over 100,000 downloads between them are: Smart SMS Messages, Blood Pressure Monitor, Voice Language Translator and Quick Text SMS. They join at least 11 other apps that have been removed recently for the same issue. Details in the article. From BleepingComputer.comMicrosoft has confirmed that they silently patched the ShadowCoerce vulnerability as part of their June 2022 updates. They say the vuln was mitigated along with CVE-2022-30154 because they both affect the same component. The question is, why have they not yet publicly provided any details, or even assigned a CVE ID. Strange actions for a vulnerability of this magnitude. No clarification yet from Redmond. And last today, from TheHackerNews.comMalicious actors have been observed abusing Brute Ratel C4, a relatively new and quite sophisticated toolkit designed to avoid detection by EDR and AV capabilities. BRc4 is a customized command-and-control center for red team and adversary simulation. Evidently the bad guys thought it was ready for prime time. The bad guys in this case probably being APT29, or Cozy Bear. You may remember them from the SolarWinds supply chain attack last year. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 500: Atlas on Cloud Nine

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 71:17 Very Popular


Deepfake spear phishing, unpatched systems vulnerability, MongoDB on the evolution of data storage tech, and more. A new, remarkably sophisticated malware is attacking routers Criminals use deepfake videos to interview for remote work Arduino launches IP40-rated Edge Control Enclosure Kit with on-board LCD user interface A world-first computer chip transmits data via sound waves rather than electrons Cyberattacks via unpatched systems cost organizations more than phishing MongoDB SVP of Cloud Products Andrew Davidson returns to talk more about MongoDB and the evolution of data storage technologies Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Davidson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit Nuvei.com Compiler - TWIET

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)
TWiET 500: Atlas on Cloud Nine - Deepfake phishing, unpatched systems attacks, MongoDB on data storage tech

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 71:17


Deepfake spear phishing, unpatched systems vulnerability, MongoDB on the evolution of data storage tech, and more. A new, remarkably sophisticated malware is attacking routers Criminals use deepfake videos to interview for remote work Arduino launches IP40-rated Edge Control Enclosure Kit with on-board LCD user interface A world-first computer chip transmits data via sound waves rather than electrons Cyberattacks via unpatched systems cost organizations more than phishing MongoDB SVP of Cloud Products Andrew Davidson returns to talk more about MongoDB and the evolution of data storage technologies Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Davidson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit Nuvei.com Compiler - TWIET

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 500: Atlas on Cloud Nine - Deepfake phishing, unpatched systems attacks, MongoDB on data storage tech

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 71:37


Deepfake spear phishing, unpatched systems vulnerability, MongoDB on the evolution of data storage tech, and more. A new, remarkably sophisticated malware is attacking routers Criminals use deepfake videos to interview for remote work Arduino launches IP40-rated Edge Control Enclosure Kit with on-board LCD user interface A world-first computer chip transmits data via sound waves rather than electrons Cyberattacks via unpatched systems cost organizations more than phishing MongoDB SVP of Cloud Products Andrew Davidson returns to talk more about MongoDB and the evolution of data storage technologies Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Davidson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit Nuvei.com Compiler - TWIET

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 500: Atlas on Cloud Nine

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 71:37


Deepfake spear phishing, unpatched systems vulnerability, MongoDB on the evolution of data storage tech, and more. A new, remarkably sophisticated malware is attacking routers Criminals use deepfake videos to interview for remote work Arduino launches IP40-rated Edge Control Enclosure Kit with on-board LCD user interface A world-first computer chip transmits data via sound waves rather than electrons Cyberattacks via unpatched systems cost organizations more than phishing MongoDB SVP of Cloud Products Andrew Davidson returns to talk more about MongoDB and the evolution of data storage technologies Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Davidson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit Nuvei.com Compiler - TWIET

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#371: pipx - Installable, Isolated Python Applications

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 58:43 Very Popular


I'm sure you're familiar with package managers for your OS even if you don't use them. On macOS we have Homebrew, Chocolatey on Windows, and apt, yum, and others on Linux. But if you want to install Python applications, you typically have to fallback to managing them with pip. Maybe you install them for your account with the --user flag. But with pipx you get a clean, isolated install for every Python application that you use. And if you distribute Python apps, pipx is a definitely worth considering as a channel. Links from the show Chad Smith: @cs01_software Pipx: github.com Entry Points: dev.to Python Packaging Dashboard: chadsmith.dev MKDocStrings: mkdocstrings.github.io gdbgui: github.com termpair: github.com httpie: httpie.io pls (ls-replacement): dhruvkb.github.io Glances: nicolargo.github.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Mergify Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

The Cloud Pod
170: The Cloud Pod Is Also Intentionally Paranoid

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 53:24


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team discusses Jonathan's penance for his failures. Plus: Microsoft makes moves on non-competes, NDAs, salary disclosures, and a civil rights audit; AWS modernizes mainframe applications for cloud deployment; and AWS CEO Adam Selipsky chooses to be intentionally paranoid. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

The HR Room Podcast
Episode 72 - PRIDE, Progress and Policies - with Shane O'Brien (Senior Manager EMEA Employee Experience at MongoDB)

The HR Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 43:36


Today on the HR Room Podcast, we're joined by Shane O'Brien to talk about the progress made so far by employers in supporting their employees and the LGBTQ+ community at large through their support, policies, and actions.  Shane is a highly experienced HR leader and is Senior Manager EMEA Employee Experience at MongoDB. About The HR Room Podcast The HR Room Podcast is a series from Insight HR where we talk to business leaders from around Ireland and share advice on how to create the HR systems and workplace culture that's right for your business. For show notes, go to www.InsightHR.ie/Podcast.  If you need any HR support in Ireland, get in touch with us at Insight HR. Whether it's conducting a complex workplace investigation, filling a gap by providing you with a virtual or an onsite HR resource, or providing advice via our HR support line, as an expert HR consultancy in Ireland, we'll help you resolve whatever Human Resources challenge your business is facing. Visit us at www.InsightHR.ie.

SCRIPTease
053 | Make.com – Patrik Šimek, CTO & Co-Founder

SCRIPTease

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 58:30


Integromat – platforma pro zjednodušení a automatizaci systémových integrací ve webových aplikacích u jehož založení v roce 2016 stál Patrik Šimek. Přičinil se o to, že vyrostla do neskutečných rozměrů: 180 zaměstnanců, 600 000 uživatelů, 50 000 000 integračních operací denně. A pak jednoho krásného dne na podzim roku 2020 přišla nabídka, která se neodmítá. Za přibližně 2,5 miliardy korun se Integromat stal členem německé softwarové skupiny Celonis.

Traction
How MongoDB Transformed From Sales-Led to Product-Led Leading to 20x Increase in Market Cap with Sahir Azam

Traction

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:12


On this episode of the Traction podcast, host Lloyed Lobo of Boast.AI welcomes Sahir Azam, Chief Product Officer at MongoDB.   Sahir shares how MongoDB transformed from a traditional software company—sales driven, longer cycles, etc.—into more of a consumer-style self-service model.   Overseeing the growth of MongoDB's Atlas, Sahir shares his learnings (the good, the bad, and the ugly) about building and bringing to market one of the fastest-growing cloud products of any scale (70% YoY, $400M ARR, 26K+ customers).   In this session, Sahir discusses: 7:44 - MongoDB sales-led model prior to going product-led 10:31 - What main KPIs were focused on 16:01 - Recommendations and best practices for building teams 20:07 - Tactics to make sure that cross-functional dialogue is happening regularly 26:57 - The ideal squad structure for a cross-functional team 32:46 - The product development framework at MongoDB 37:34 - Best practices for developing a go-to-market strategy for a product-led company 41:36 - Product marketing roles vs product manager roles 52:29 - What kickstarted growth for the MongoDB Atlas customer base 55:31 - Top pieces of advice that were learned the hard way 57:54 - Recommended books and resources   Learn more at https://tractionconf.io   Connect with Sahir Azam: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sahirazam/   Learn more about MongoDB at https://www.mongodb.com/   This episode is brought to you by:   Each year the U.S. and Canadian governments provide more than $20 billion in R&D tax credits and innovation incentives to fund businesses. But the application process is cumbersome, prone to costly audits, and receiving the money can take as long as 16 months. Boast automates this process, enabling companies to get more money faster without the paperwork and audit risk. We don't get paid until you do! Find out if you qualify today at https://Boast.AI.   Launch Academy is one of the top global tech hubs for international entrepreneurs and a designated organization for Canada's Startup Visa. Since 2012, Launch has worked with more than 6,000 entrepreneurs from over 100 countries, of which 300 have grown their startups to seed and Series A stage and raised over $2 billion in funding. To learn more about Launch's programs or the Canadian Startup Visa, visit https://LaunchAcademy.ca    Content Allies helps B2B companies build revenue-generating podcasts. We recommend them to any B2B company that is looking to launch or streamline its podcast production. Learn more at https://contentallies.com  

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career
Elena Verna on how B2B growth is changing, product-led growth, product-led sales, why you should go freemium not trial, what features to make free, and much more

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 59:16 Very Popular


Elena Verna has led growth at some of today’s most successful B2B businesses, including Miro as CMO, Surveymonkey as SVP of Growth, and now at Amplitude as interim Head of Growth. She’s also worked closely with over a dozen companies on growth and product strategy, including companies like MongoDB, Clockwise, and Netlify (where she sits on the board of directors). Elena is undoubtedly one of the smartest people on growth strategy in the world.—Thank you to our sponsors for making this episode possible:• Persona: https://withpersona.com/lenny• Stytch: https://stytch.com/• PostHog: https://posthog.com/lenny—In this episode, we cover:1) How did Elena go from an analyst at Safeway to Head of Product at Amplitude?2) What’s changing in B2B growth?3) What exactly is “product-led growth,” and how can you apply it at every stage of growth?4) How is PLG already transforming itself?5) Why do you need to be both product-led and sales-led?6) Why does PLG often get crushed when you move upmarket, and how do you avoid this?7) What it looks like when your PLG motion is dying.8) Why product-led is the future of sales.9) Why is freemium the way to go, over trial?10) Why should you hire internally for your first growth hire?—Where to find Elena:• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elenaverna• Twitter: https://twitter.com/elenaverna Get full access to Lenny's Newsletter at www.lennysnewsletter.com/subscribe

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#370: OpenBB: Python's Open-source Investment Platform

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 54:28 Very Popular


You may have heard of the Bloomberg terminal. It's expensive software that can monitor and analyze real-time financial market data and place trades on the electronic trading platform. But have you heard of OpenBB? It's similar software for real-time and long term analysis for finance and investing. The difference is it's open source and built entirely with Python and gives you access to analyze a massive amount of real-time and historical data using the full Python data science stack. On this episode, we have one of the cofounders, James Maslek here to give us a look inside this cool piece of Python-based software. Links from the show James Maslek: linkedin.com OpenBB: openbb.co OpenBB Feature Gallery: openbb.co $8.5M seed funding announcement: openbb.co/blog How to get rich talk by Naval (less money-focused than the title implies): youtube.com Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Sentry Error Monitoring, Code TALKPYTHON Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

Python Bytes
#289 Textinator is coming for your text, wherever it is

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 46:14


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us! Support our work through: Our courses at Talk Python Training Test & Code Podcast Patreon Supporters Special guest: Gina Häußge, creator & maintainer of OctoPrint Michael #1: beanita Local MongoDB-like database prepared to work with Beanie ODM So, you know Beanie - Pydantic + async + MongoDB And you know Mongita - Mongita is to MongoDB as SQLite is to SQL Beanita lets you use Beanie, but against Mongita rather than a server-based MongoDB server Brian #2: The Good Research Code Handbook Patrick J Mineault “for grad students, postdocs and PIs (principle investigator) who do a lot of programming as part of their research.” lessons setup git, virtual environments, project layout, packaging, cookie cutter style style guides, keeping things clean coding separating concerns, separating pure functions and those with side effects, pythonic-ness testing unit testing, testing with side effects, … (incorrect definition of end-to-end tests, but a good job at covering the other bits) documentation comments, tests, docstrings, README.md, usage docs, tutorials, websites documenting pipelines and projects social aspects various reviews, pairing, open source, community sample project extras testing example good tools to use Gina #3: CadQuery Python lib to do build parametric 3D CAD models Can output STL, STEP, AMF, SVG and some more Uses same geometry kernel as FreeCAD (OpenCascade) Also available: desktop editor, Jupyter extension, CLI Would recommend the Jupyter extension, the app seems a bit behind latest development Jupyter extension is easy to set up on Docker and comes with a nice 3D preview pane Was able to create a basic parametric design of an insert for an assortment box easily Python 3.8+, not yet 3.11, OpenCascade related Michael #4: Textinator Like TextSniper, but in Python Simple MacOS StatusBar / Menu Bar app to automatically detect text in screenshots Built with RUMPS: Ridiculously Uncomplicated macOS Python Statusbar apps Take a screenshot of a region of the screen using ⌘ + ⇧ + 4 (Cmd + Shift + 4). The app will automatically detect any text in the screenshot and copy it to your clipboard. How Textinator Works At startup, Textinator starts a persistent NSMetadataQuery Spotlight query (using the pyobjc Python-to-Objective-C bridge) to detect when a new screenshot is created. When the user creates screenshot, the NSMetadataQuery query is fired and Textinator performs text detection using a Vision VNRecognizeTextRequest call. Brian #5: Handling Concurrency Without Locks "How to not let concurrency cripple your system” Haki Benita “…common concurrency challenges and how to overcome them with minimal locking.” Starts with a Django web app A url shortener that generates a unique short url and stores the result in a database so it doesn't get re-used. Discussions of collision with two users checking, then storing keys at the same time. locking problems in general utilizing database ability to make sure some items are unique, in this case PostgreSQL updating your code to take advantage of database constraints support to allow you to do less locking within your code Gina #6: TatSu Generates parsers from EBNF grammars (or ANTLR) Can compile the model (similar to regex) for quick reuse or generate python source Many examples provided Active development, Python 3.10+ Extras Michael: Back on 285 we spoke about PEP 690. Now there is a proper blog post about it. Expedited release of Python3.11.0b3 - Due to a known incompatibility with pytest and the previous beta release (Python 3.11.0b2) and after some deliberation, Python release team have decided to do an expedited release of Python 3.11.0b3 so the community can continue testing their packages with pytest and therefore testing the betas as expected. (via Python Weekly) Kagi search via Daniel Hjertholm Not really python related, but if I know Michael right, he'll love the new completely ad free and privacy-respecting search engine kagi.com. I've used kagi.com since their public beta launched, mainly to search for solutions to Python issues at work. The results are way better than DuckDuckGo's results, and even better than Googles! Love the Programming-lens and the ability to up/down prioritize domains in the results. Their FAQ explains everything you need to know: https://kagi.com/faq Looks great but not sure about the pricing justification (32 sec of compute = $1), that's either 837x more than all of Talk Python + Python Bytes or more than 6,700x more than just one of our sites/services. (We spend about $100/mo on 8 servers.) But they may be buying results from Google and Bing, and that could be the cost. Here's a short interview with the man who started kagi. Gina: rdserialtool: Reads out low-cost USB power monitors (UM24C, UM25C, UM34C) via BLE/pybluez. Amazing if you need to monitor the power consumption/voltage/current of some embedded electronics on a budget. Helped me solve a very much OctoPrint development specific problem. Python 3.4+ nodejs-bin: by Sam Willis: https://twitter.com/samwillis/status/1537787836119793667 Install nodejs via pypi/as dependency, still very much an Alpha but looks promising Makes it easier to obtain a full stack environment Very interesting for end to end testing with JS based tooling, or packaging a frontend with your Python app See also nodeenv, which does a similar thing, but with additional steps Joke: Rejected Github Badges