Podcast appearances and mentions of robert cecil

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Best podcasts about robert cecil

Latest podcast episodes about robert cecil

History Cafe
#29 The king's fear - Ep 6 Blowing up the Gunpowder plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 32:09


As his father had done, King James I's Chief Minister, Robert Cecil ,built his entrapments around a germ of genuine plotting. We uncover a small Catholic rebellion in Warwickshire in response to the king's tougher anti-Catholic laws. And we examine Cecil's imaginative embellishment: a mystery letter delivered to a compromised Catholic peer on 26 October warning of ‘a terrible blow this Parliament.' It was handed to the king to decipher. If anything was designed to terrify James I, whose father had narrowly escaped death from a gunpowder blast, this was it.

History Cafe
#28 ‘A formidable network of secret agents' - Ep 5 Blowing up the Gunpowder Plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 31:52


We dig deeper into the animosity between the King, James I of England and VI of Scotland and his Chief Minister, Robert Cecil, whom he bullied and called names. And we see the Gunpowder plot in the context of the previous plots hatched by the Cecils (father and son) against their enemies. All of which historians now agree were largely fabrications. Father was Elizabeth I's Chief Minister, like his son he had spies everywhere and openly boasted of his policy of entrapment.

History Cafe
#25 ‘Here lieth the Toad' - Ep 2 Blowing up the Gunpowder Plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 34:50


We take a look at James I's shadowy chief minister Robert Cecil who manages to implicate most of his Catholic enemies in the plot. Cecil was so desperate to improve King James's dire view of him (his father had caused the execution of James' mother, Mary Queen of Scots) he would stoop to anything. (Rpt)

Christian Podcast Community
Gene Clyatt: The English Reformation under James I

Christian Podcast Community

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 94:19


Gene Clyatt returns for a third installment of English Reformation history. Gene was first on with me in August of last year, where he talked about the early days of the English Reformation under Henry the 8th and Bishop Thomas Cranmer. In the May episode this year, Gene returned to talk about England under Queen Elizabeth I. For this episode, we recap a little bit of the previous two, and get into King James VI of Scotland, who became King James I of England. Gene shares a bit about how James became king, and then gets into the Gunpowder Plot, which happened on November 5th, 1605, and was the inspiration behind this being the November episode. Outline of the Discussion When Elizabeth I died in 1603, her closest relative was King James VI of Scotland. Thus he became King James I of England. James was born in 1566; the son of Mary, Queen of Scots. James had become King of Scotland at 13 months old. James was raised by Scottish Presbyterian tutors as a staunch Protestant. However, as he grew, he came to dislike the Presbyterian Church because they were distanced from the Crown of Scotland. While he later came to like the Anglican Church (being it's head once he was crowned King of England,) he was probably not a true believer. In 1589, at age 23, he married 14-year-old Anne, princess of Denmark. Anne's father was a Protestant, and it was presumed she was too, but she later converted to Catholicism. In 1601, Elizabeth is sickly, and her Secretary of State - Robert Cecil - began preparing James to be King of England. Elizabeth dies on March 24, 1603. Messages are sent to James, and he departs Edinburgh on April 5. He arrived in London on May 7th. He had taken his time, stopping off to meet with various lords along the way. In 1605, a plot was concocted to kill the king and all of Parliament, and establish a Catholic monarchy. This followed a string of four major plots by Roman Catholics to attempt to take out Elizabeth. James had a way about him whereby he would lead people to believe he was on their side on various issues without ever stating so explicitly. He had Catholics believing he would relax various restrictions enacted following the plots against Elizabeth I. When this didn't materialize, many Catholics saw it as reneging on a promise made (which was never actually explicitly made.) The plot was to blow up Parliament during opening ceremonies, while both Houses were present, as would be the King. Furthermore, the plot was to kidnap the 9-year-old Princess, marry her off to a Catholic Lord, and rule England through her. Guy Fawkes was recruited as the explosives expert. He has the added benefit of being relatively unknown around London. The cellars under the palace of Winchester were available for rent. Lord Thomas Percy rented a unit under where the throne room was located and packed it with 36 barrels of gunpowder. On November 3rd, a Catholic member of Parliament received an anonymous letter warning him not to go to Parliament for opening ceremonies. He was suspicious, and gave the letter to Robert Cecil. The plot, and the gunpowder is discovered and thwarted. This brought Catholic plots against the English throne to an end. Gene ties Guy Fawkes Day to Halloween, and the practice of trick or treat, in the American colonies. We wrap up with a brief preview of the Witch Trials, which will be the subject of the October 2023 episode, then end on a very short section on the King James Bible. Related Episodes Gene Clyatt: The Early English Reformation Gene Clyatt: The English Reformation under Elizabeth I Fred Butler: Halloween

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics
Elizabeth, Essex, and Tudor Politics at the Playhouse (ep 122)

British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 26:31


We can look all kinds of places to see Tudor politics playing out--Hampton Court, Whitehall, the Tower. Sometimes, we can even look to the playhouse.Show Notes:Carol Ann Lloydwww.carolannlloyd.com@shakeuphistorypatreon.com/carolannlloydCreative Director: Lindsey LindstromMusic: Inspiring Dramatic Pack by Smart Sounds via Audio Jungle; Music Broadcast License

The History of England
329 Oaths and Libels

The History of England

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 46:11


By the time parliament met again in 1606, James' government was dominated by the men he laughingly referred to as his 'Trinity of Knaves'. And the foremost of those by some way was Robert Cecil, a chip off the old block. Cecil took full advantage of the Gunpowder plot with a massive subsidy - and James' Oath of Allegiance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
Tudor History Challenge XI

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 14:58


Thank you to all our wonderful subscribers, we can't believe that we've reached 60,000! Enjoy this quiz and let us know how you get on! The questions are here and the answers are below (no cheating!) 1) Who said: “I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too”? 2) Who was this priest describing - “a tyrant more cruel than Nero, for Nero destroyed but part of Rome, but this tyrant destroyeth this whole realm”? 3) “If my head would win him a castle in France, it should not fail to go” was said of Henry VIII, but who said it? 4) “Much suspected of me, nothing proved can be, quod Elizabeth the prisoner” - The Lady Elizabeth, future Elizabeth I, was said to have etched this on a window during her house arrest at Woodstock, but why was she a prisoner? 5) Who is being described in these words: “For her behaviour, manners, attire and tongue she excelled them all...”? 6) Who wrote to their former tutor saying: “I cannot marvel at thee and lament the case that thou sometimes was the lively member of Christ but now a deformed imp of the Devil”? 7) That homicide and unnatural tyrant which now unjustly bears dominion over you” Who said it and who was it about? 2 points 8) “Little man, the word ‘must' is not to be used to princes” - Who said this? 9) “When I think again that you shall depart from me again it makes my heart die to think what fortune I have that I cannot always be in your company” - who wrote these words in a letter and to whom? 2Points 10) Who was apologising for their eyesight, and therefore poor handwriting, with these words: “I beseech you to pardon me, for verrayly Madame my sight is nothing so perfitt as it has ben”? 11) Who wrote: “Princes at all times have not their wills, but my heart being my own is immutable”? 12) Who ended a letter “Lastly, I make this vow, that mine eyes desire you above all things” and to whom were they writing? 2 points. ANSWERS ------- 1- Elizabeth I to the troops at Tilbury, August 1588. 2- Henry VIII during the Pilgrimage of Grace Rebellion 1536 3- Sir Thomas More 4- Mary I and her privy council believed that Elizabeth was involved in Wyatt's Rebellion 5- Anne Boleyn, described by Lancelot Carles, secretary to the French ambassador 6- While she was in the Tower, Lady Jane Grey wrote this to her former tutor, Thomas Harding, who had converted to Catholicism. 7- This is how Henry described Richard III in letters sent to those who were in support of his claim to the throne. 8- Elizabeth I said this to Robert Cecil, her Secretary of State, when she was dying and he advised her to take to her bed. 9- Catherine Howard to Thomas Culpeper 10-Henry VII to Lady Margaret Beaufort 11-Mary, Queen of Scots, to Ambassador Randolph 12-The dying Catherine of Aragon to her former husband Henry VIII.

Poetry. by Ravenheart.
THE GUNPOWDER PLOT

Poetry. by Ravenheart.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 3:18


Treachery and treason never go out of season the gunpowder plot was the spy master's crowning piece of glory he'd managed to use the plot to catapult James the 1st from being a doomed king guaranteed to be assassinated into a national hero who united both Scotland and England into the union of Crowns a feat never before thought possible all by engineering a plot that was in its early stages and failing untill as an agent provocateur he coaxed it into a piece of political theatre using his mediaeval Machiavellian genius , Robert Cecil 1st earl of Salisbury was known by Elizabeth as the pygmy and by James the ist as his little beagle ,he also thwarted the Pope's attempts at a Catholic conversion .

A to Z of Poetry
THE GUNPOWDER PLOT

A to Z of Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 3:18


Treachery and treason never go out of season the gunpowder plot was the spy master's crowning piece of glory he'd managed to use the plot to catapult James the 1st from being a doomed king guaranteed to be assassinated into a national hero who united both Scotland and England into the union of Crowns a feat never before thought possible all by engineering a plot that was in its early stages and failing untill as an agent provocateur he coaxed it into a piece of political theatre using his mediaeval Machiavellian genius , Robert Cecil 1st earl of Salisbury was known by Elizabeth as the pygmy and by James the ist as his little beagle ,he also thwarted the Pope's attempts at a Catholic conversion . --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/steven-richardson6/message

Poetry
THE GUNPOWDER PLOT

Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 3:18


Treachery and treason never go out of season the gunpowder plot was the spy master's crowning piece of glory he'd managed to use the plot to catapult James the 1st from being a doomed king guaranteed to be assassinated into a national hero who united both Scotland and England into the union of Crowns a feat never before thought possible all by engineering a plot that was in its early stages and failing untill as an agent provocateur he coaxed it into a piece of political theatre using his mediaeval Machiavellian genius , Robert Cecil 1st earl of Salisbury was known by Elizabeth as the pygmy and by James the ist as his little beagle ,he also thwarted the Pope's attempts at a Catholic conversion . --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/steven-richardson5/message

History Cafe
Taster: #25 ‘Here lieth the Toad' - Ep 2 Blowing up the Gunpowder Plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 2:38


Taster for #25 - We take a look at James I's shadowy chief minister Robert Cecil who manages to implicate most of his Catholic enemies in the plot. Cecil was so desperate to improve King James's dire view of him (his father had caused the execution James' mother, Mary Queen of Scots) he would stoop to anything.

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
24 May - Robert Cecil, Elizabeth I's "pygmy"

Tudor History with Claire Ridgway

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2021 0:59


On this day in history, 24th May 1612, in the reign of King James I, Elizabeth I's former Secretary of State, Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, died. Find out a bit more about the man Elizabeth I called "my pygmy" from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link: https://youtu.be/qlINJwhUsNA   Claire is the founder of the Tudor Society, an online membership site for those who love Tudor history. There, you can learn from Claire and many other expert historians and authors, enjoy Tudor-focused magazines and live Q&A sessions with experts, and have access to all kinds of talks, articles, quizzes, virtual tours and more. Try it with a 14-day free trial - https://www.tudorsociety.com/signup/   Claire has written some bestselling Tudor history books:   On This Day in Tudor History - https://amzn.to/3oceahH The Fall of Anne Boleyn: A Countdown - https://amzn.to/3m8KaSi George Boleyn: Tudor Poet, Courtier and Diplomat - https://amzn.to/2TdwyZr The Anne Boleyn Collection - https://amzn.to/3kiQc1T The Anne Boleyn Collection II - https://amzn.to/3o9LUwi The Anne Boleyn Collection III - https://amzn.to/3kiQc1T The Life of Anne Boleyn Colouring Books - https://amzn.to/3jkJ5Vz   Claire has also done an online history course, The Life of Anne Boleyn, for MedievalCourses.com - https://medievalcourses.com/overview/life-anne-boleyn-mc06/   You can find Claire at: https://www.theanneboleynfiles.com  https://www.tudorsociety.com https://www.facebook.com/theanneboleynfiles/ https://www.facebook.com/tudorsociety/ https://twitter.com/AnneBoleynFiles  https://twitter.com/thetudorsociety  https://www.instagram.com/tudor.society/  https://www.instagram.com/anneboleynfiles/

Bloody Violent History
True Founding of America

Bloody Violent History

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 74:00


1607, and in the wilderness of Virginia, a tiny, pallisaded fort containing some one hundred English settlers clings on grimly and awaits salvation and resupply. Beset by internal feuds and attacks by the local Indians, the outpost continues to endure.  Theirs is a tale of stoicism and woe.  A relentless period of endurance and fear.  Conditions become so terrible that some are driven to eat their own compatriots and the worst offenders are burnt at the stake by authorities desperate to maintain control.  Outside, the Indians prowl with their turkey spur arrowheads and bone spears.  Should the settlers fall into their hands, they face being jointed and flayed alive with sharpened mussels shells.  This is the story of the first European colony in North America.So it GoesTom Assheton & James Jackson Readings by David Hartley:'Cradle' by James Jackson See also:https://www.instagram.com/bloodyviolenthistory/https://www.jamesjacksonbooks.comhttps://www.tomtom.co.uk If you enjoy the podcast, would you please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes, Spotify or Google Podcast App? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really helps to spread the word See https://simplecast.com/privacy/ for privacy information

Renaissance English History Podcast: A Show About the Tudors

Connecting the dots between a piece of porcelain, a 1602 dinner party at Robert Cecil's, the Rainbow Portrait, and a letter that only got as far as Baffin Island. And it all leads to China. Globalism isn't a new idea. Like this show? Leave a rating or review in whatever platform you're using to listen. Also, if you're interested... Tudorcon tickets at englandcast.com/tudorcon2021 - hope to see you there! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The War & Diplomacy Podcast: From the Centre for War and Diplomacy at Lancaster University
Civil Servants' role in the formulation of British foreign policy and the role of women, with Prof Gaynor Johnson

The War & Diplomacy Podcast: From the Centre for War and Diplomacy at Lancaster University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 34:50


Prof Gaynor Johnson explores the often-overlooked role civil servants in the formulation of foreign policy, including the role of women in the British Foreign Office. She discusses innovative methodological approaches to the study of diplomatic history, including the use of prosopography. Gaynor has published widely in the field of international history on topics ranging from fanaticism and warfare to interwar appeasement. She led a major AHRC project on British and French attitudes towards European integration between 1919 and 1957. A major preoccupation of her work has been the study of diplomacy and diplomats. She has published studies of Robert Cecil, Eric Phipps and Lord D'Abernon to name but a few. She has been Professor of International History at the University of Kent since 2013. She sits on the executive committees of the British International History Group and the Transatlantic Studies Association and was previously book reviews editor for the International History Review. She is also an Honorary Researcher at the Centre for War and Diplomacy. Gaynor's article 'Women Clerks and Typists in the British Foreign Office, 1920-1960: A Prosopographic Study' has just been published and you can find a full copy here: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09592296.2020.1842066 Music credit: Kai Engel, 'Flames of Rome', Calls and Echoes (Southern's City Lab, 2014).

History Cafe
#25 ‘Here lieth the Toad' - Ep 2 Blowing up the Gunpowder Plot

History Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 34:50


We take a look at James I's shadowy chief minister Robert Cecil who manages to implicate most of his Catholic enemies in the plot. Cecil was so desperate to improve King James's dire view of him (his father had caused the execution of James' mother, Mary Queen of Scots) he would stoop to anything.

Gresham College Lectures
Ruling Passions: The Architecture of the Cecils

Gresham College Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2020 67:03


Father and son, William and Robert Cecil, not only dominated politics for much of Elizabeth I and James I reign but dominated architectural fashion. Building a series of spectacular houses, they, and not the monarchy, were the great palace builders of their age. Burghley and Hatfield remain, but those that are lost were even more extraordinary in both their form and in how they were used.A lecture by Simon Thurley CBE 4 NovemberThe transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: https://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/cecil-architectureGresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 2,000 lectures free to access or download from the website.Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/greshamcollege

Hanging with History
32. The Revenge; The Elizabethan Era Part 4; Thermopylae or Agincourt?

Hanging with History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 27:31


The conclusion of the Pirate Arc. 4th of the Elizabethan era. Thermopylae or Agincourt?We begin with the story of the Revenge captained by Grenville. A legendary charge at 55:1 odds that ended with 10 Spanish ships sunk, after God’s intervention the next day and defeat for their elite marines again and again. Who would ever want to fight the English again after a day like that? What a day! But overall the long run effect of the pirates was to win the war for England. Spanish attrition increased from 1 loss in 10 voyages to 1 in 4. With losses like that Spain could not win.Newport’s 1591 voyage against the Mexican treasure fleet is covered then we wrap up with a discussion of the pilfering of the Madre De Deus. Along the way we get more logic from Slate Star Codex.We discuss Jeremy Black’s summation of the pattern of response to the Armada victory via Shakespeare and Henry V. The psychology of giving credit to someone else, the power move of giving credit to God.Harald and Camie discuss Robert Cecil, his disability and Harald’s concern that today’s reduced tolerance for people on the spectrum is a serious problem.

Bloody Violent History
Gunpowder, Treason & Plot

Bloody Violent History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 63:02


5th November 1605.  Few are unaware of the story and most have heard of Guy ‘Guido’ Fawkes.  After all, he was the ‘clean skin’, the mercenary hired to live under deep cover in the precincts of the Palace of Westminster and blow the King and his entourage to oblivion when the moment came.Yet fewer know of the true story, of the Catholic horsemen waiting to snatch the King’s young daughter, Princess Elizabeth, from her residence at Coombe Abbey in Northamptonshire.  The tale involves spies, treachery, double agents and a hunt for the hidden gunpowder.  It involves too the great spymaster Robert Cecil.  The world’s first great potential terrorist spectacular was foiled.  It could have been very different.So it GoesTom Assheton & James Jackson https://www.instagram.com/bloodyviolenthistory/https://www.jamesjacksonbooks.comhttps://www.tomtom.co.uk If you enjoy the podcast, would you please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes, Spotify or Google Podcast App? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really helps to spread the word Readings by David HartleyBooks by James Jackson See https://simplecast.com/privacy/ for privacy information

The Tudor Minute
Tudor Minute May 7: James VI/I arrives in London

The Tudor Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2020 1:09


Today in 1603 James I arrived in London, nine days after the funeral of Elizabeth I. From 1601 onwards, as it became clear that James was going to be Elizabeth’s successor, many of her court kept up a secret correspondence with James. As the Queen was dying in 1603, her chief minister, Robert Cecil, sent James a draft proclamation of his accession in early March. Elizabeth died on 24 March, and James was proclaimed king in London later on that day.

Stories in Sound
The Man in My Attic - The Other Woman...Part 2

Stories in Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2019 26:06


Part 2 of 2. In the leafy suburbs of South Belfast, journalist Ita Dungan discovered thousands of receipts in the attic of her Victorian terraced house. They reveal the middle class life enjoyed by Robert Smith, his wife Jeannie and their four children - Robert Cecil, Florence Eileen, Edward Ivan McCullagh and Donald Edgeworth. With the help of historian Dr Alice Johnson and newspaper reports, Ita discovers the controversial source of Robert's wealth, a diamond ring heirloom and the forgotten ‘other woman'. The fate of the Smith family is revealed - involving emigration and World War II battles. But what of their descendants? Will Ita find any? Produced by Cathy Moorehead

Pax Britannica
015 - The Trinity of Knaves

Pax Britannica

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2019 30:23


James' Privy Council, in contrast to the Bedchamber, was made up of Elizabethan-era lords, but three men in particular dominated government and parliament. Robert Cecil, Earl of Salisbury, Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, and Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton. They didn't all like each other, but they worked together to try and steer the king and control parliament. Check out the podcast website: https://www.paxbritannica.info Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PodBritannica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BritannicaPax In this episode I made particular use of the following publications: - Alan Stewart, The Cradle King: A Life of James VI and I - Pauline Croft, King James - The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography For a full bibliography, see the website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That Shakespeare Life
Episode 34: Shakespeare and the Legend of Robin Hood with Kathryn Roberts Parker

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2018 20:43


Mentioned by name in three of Shakespeare’s plays, the legend of Robin Hood played a big role in the life of most dramatists in early modern England, being a prominent figure in English folklore, his legend was a popular source of good dramatic material on stage. For William Shakespeare, Robin Hood had some very specific touch points, not only was he mentioned by names, but numerous volumes of Shakespeare’s contemporaries were writing and staging plays about Robin Hood, and Queen Elizabeth’s father, Henry VIII, famously had himself and his court to dress up as Robin Hood and his merry men for a celebration. There were songs and ballads about Robin Hood being sung in Shakespeare’s lifetime, and during the Gunpowder Plot, Robert Cecil even called Guy Fawkes and his associates “Robin Hoods” in 1605. With the current reputation of Robin Hood as a good folk hero, contrasted with the bad reputation Robert Cecil obviously had of him, I wondered exactly what we as a 21st century audience need to know about 17th century associations with Robin Hood when we encounter the mentions and references to this popular folktale in Shakespeare’s plays. To help us sort out this mystery and learn more about Shakespeare’s Robin Hood, is our guest Kathryn Roberts Parker.

The Slothman Prophecies Podcast
Episode 34: The Gunpowder Plot Part II - Threats Are Only For Boyz

The Slothman Prophecies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2018 49:58


I know of no reason why you shouldn't listen to this episode! Join us for gunfights, getaways, gullibility, and GUNPOWDER. It's the conclusion to our two-parter on England's infamous Gunpowder Plot, where things go south in a hurry. Find out why dying of a urinary tract infection in the Tower of London is definitely not the worst case scenario in Episode 34: The Gunpowder Plot Part 2 - Threats Are Only For Boyz! P.S. Follow us on Twitter @Slothpod, or send us a Gmail at Slothpod@gmail.com, or draw us a Guy Fawkes doodle and send it with #Slothpod to SlothmanPropheciesPodcast on Instagram! And if you like the show, subscribe, rate, and review!

The Slothman Prophecies Podcast
Episode 33: The Gunpowder Plot Part I - Wintour Is Coming

The Slothman Prophecies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2018 75:00


Viewers! Verily, we vociferously vow that vivacious vocalizations of vast value -ah, screw it- await! Exploding bananas, beefeaters, Bloody Mary, and Lawyerbot all make appearances in this one! Plus we explore the true story that inspired one of the great graphic novels of all time! Remember remember! It's Episode 33: The Gunpowder Plot Part I - Wintour Is Coming! P.S. We pre-recorded, so we didn't mention it in the show, but thank you for all your support in our Teepublic drive for the Central and Eastern Carolina Food Bank during October! We raised $50! All of you should feel super smug! If you missed out, you can stil donate directly to them at www.FoodbankCENC.org! P.P.S. Follow us on Twitter @Slothpod, or send us a Gmail at Slothpod@gmail.com, or draw us a Guy Fawkes doodle and send it with #Slothpod to SlothmanPropheciesPodcast on Instagram! And if you like the show, subscribe, rate, and review!

Early Stuart England
Episode 2: The Queen is Dead

Early Stuart England

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2018 30:46


Robert Cecil and the Earl of Essex battle for supremacy in the last days of Elizabeth's reign.

Rejects & Revolutionaries: The origins of America
Jamestown 9: The politics of Virginia in England

Rejects & Revolutionaries: The origins of America

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2018 29:07


In 1606, Bartholomew Gosnold and Gabriel Archer led a big new attempt to set up an English New World Colony. Robert Cecil immediately began to interfere and sabotage the company. The Spanish watched, trying to decide whether or not to attack. Finally, a document by John Smith popularized the idea, and led the way for a massive new expedition, whose flagship was the Sea Venture.

A History of Maryland
1.1- Lie back and Think of Crab Cakes (part I)

A History of Maryland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2017 20:04


We paint the political and religious back drop of the succession crisis at the end of Elizabeth I's reign (circa 1602-ish) and introduce George Calvert's powerful patron, Robert Cecil.

Coldwired Podcast. Trance and Progressive.
September 2016 Selection (featuring Matt Holliday, Way Out West, Jamie Baggotts, Will Atkinson, Alfonso Muchacho, The Digital Blonde, Neelix, Johan Gielen, DJ Gert, James H, Jimmy G, Ivan Miatto, Several Definitions, Robert Cecil, Azima, Reiklavik, Vok, D

Coldwired Podcast. Trance and Progressive.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2016 77:01


The Ave Maria Hour Radio Show

Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org Henry Garnet -- English Jesuit priest executed for his complicity in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Born in Heanor, Derbyshire, he was educated in Nottingham and later at Winchester College, before he moved to London in 1571, to work for a publisher. There he professed an interest in legal studies, and in 1575 he travelled to the continent and joined the Society of Jesus. He was ordained in Rome some time around 1582. In 1586 Garnet returned to England as part of the Jesuit mission, soon succeeding Father William Weston as Jesuit superior, following the latter's capture by the English authorities. Garnet established a secret press, which lasted until late 1588, and in 1594 he interceded in the Wisbech Stirs, a dispute between secular and regular clergy.  In summer 1605 Garnet met with Robert Catesby, a religious zealot who, unknown to him, planned to kill the Protestant King James I. The existence of Catesby's Gunpowder Plot was revealed to him by Father Oswald Tesimond on 24 July 1605, but as the information was received under the seal of the confessional, he felt that Canon law prevented him from speaking out. Instead, without telling anyone of what Catesby planned, he wrote to his superiors in Rome, urging them to warn English Catholics against the use of force. When the plot failed Garnet went into hiding, but he was eventually arrested on 27 January 1606. He was taken to London and interrogated by the Privy Council, whose members included John Popham, Edward Coke and Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury.