Podcasts about Cambridge

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  • 6,773PODCASTS
  • 15,583EPISODES
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  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Cambridge

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Latest podcast episodes about Cambridge

Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast
Predictive Policing with Johannes Heiler and Dr Miri Zilka

Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 51:28


For this week's episode, host Maryam Tanwir and panelist Nanna Sæten speak about predictive policing with Johannes Heiler, Adviser on Anti-Terrorism Issues at the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) and Miri Zilka, Research Associate in the Machine Learning Group at the University of Cambridge. Predictive policing leverages the techniques of statistics and machine learning for the purpose of predicting crime. The human rights perspective provides several interesting questions for the use of predictive policing; as the technology functions today, it seems to perpetuate already existing bias in police work, but could this be overcome? Using technology for the purpose of police work necessitates questions of who is responsible for the protection of human rights and how to decide on who's human rights to uphold in the case of conflict. What is clear to both of our guests is that there needs to be clear channels of oversight if human rights are to be protected in digitized law enforcement.

Spectator Radio
The Book Club: Christopher Prendergast

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 34:21


In this week's Book Club podcast, Sam is joined by Christopher Prendergast, Professor Emeritus of Modern French Literature at Cambridge and the author of the new book Living and Dying With Marcel Proust. In the centenary year of Proust's death (and the English publication of Swann's Way) he tells Sam (among other things) how the structure of A La Recherche is more straightforward than many think, why that madeleine was nearly a slice of toast, and about the great unsayable at the heart of Proust's great story.   

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily
Elizabeth “Mayor Of Cambridge Moms” Warren

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 57:24


Nevertheless, she podcasted! Our badass feminists cozy up to everyone's favorite professor, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Harvard), and her 2021 children's propaganda booklet “Pinky Promises.” From Lily's dad saving Hilary Clinton's life (seriously boots) to why Cambridge moms love oriental rugs, decoy Baileys and RBG doll mania—this is a huge victory for the American middle class.PLUS! In a very special political VIP Lounge—Steven goes to a strip club in Tampa on election night, Cambridge's alcoholic former mayor, and Jen Psaki's wedding announcement. Subscribe to our Patreon and get exclusive access to the VIP Lounge:https://www.patreon.com/cbcthepodFollow us for more fun!Instagram: @cbcthepodTwitter: @cbcthepodPlease, please give us 5 Stars on Apple Podcasts See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Into the Impossible
Nobel Prizewinner Reinhard Genzel: The Monster Black Hole at the Heart of our Galaxy!

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 98:06


Reinhard Genzel studied physics at Bonn Univ., and received his doctorate at the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy Bonn (1978), He was a Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (1978-1980), Cambridge, MA, was Associate Professor of Physics and Associate Research Astronomer, Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley (1981- 1985), Full Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1985-1986). He is Director and Scientific Member at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (since 1986), Honorary Professor Munich Univ. (since 1988), Full Professor of Physics University of California Berkeley (since 1999). Professor Reinhard was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics 2020 together with Roger Penrose and Andrea Ghez "for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy." Since nothing, not even light, can escape black holes, they can only be observed by the radiation and the movement of nearby objects. Since the 1990s, Reinhard and Andrea Ghez, with their respective research teams, have developed and refined techniques for studying the movement of stars. Observations of stars in the area around Sagittarius A* in the middle of our galaxy, the Milky Way, revealed a supermassive black hole. https://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/gravity https://www.eso.org/sci/facilities/paranal/instruments/gravity/overview.html This episode is sponsored by Linkedin. Please visit LinkedIn.com/Impossible to post a job ad for free!

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: Restaurateurs moving to suburbia "not really completely new"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 19:08


While many think the suburbs have a “boring, white bread reputation,” the pandemic has caused a wave of restaurateurs to set their eyes on suburbia over the big city. Food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Monday to share why increasing numbers of restaurateurs are choosing to open restaurants in the suburbs rather than the big city – and how new of a trend this really is. Although the pandemic spurred many people to move from urban areas to suburbia, Kummer notes that independent, award-winning restaurants have long pre-dated the pandemic. “There's lots of different groups that are opening restaurants, and I think there's a more discerning customer base that wants higher quality,” Kummer noted. Kummer pointed to Il Capriccio Ristorante e Bar in Waltham, an award-winning Northern Italian restaurant that first opened in 1981. The original owner of IL Capriccio, Enzo Danesi, worked at Barsanti's in Boston and Le Bocage in Cambridge before opening his restaurant in Waltham. Il Capriccio recently reopened at The Merc at Moody and Main. “This is part of a trend that has been accelerated by the pandemic and people moving to suburbs, but it's not really completely new,” Kummer said. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

The Food Programme
Angela Hartnett: A Life Through Food

The Food Programme

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 29:06


In this episode Sheila Dillon is joined by a chef, restaurateur, author and campaigner, Angela Hartnett, for another in the programme's series of Lives told through Food. Angela Hartnett is seen as an icon in the food industry - she started out learning on the job in Cambridge - and later rose up working for Gordon Ramsey, first at The Aubergine, and later at the Connaught Hotel, where she earned her first Michelin star. During that time she started to become a familiar face on British Television, appearing regularly on Hell's Kitchen and the Great British Menu. In 2010, Angela bought Ramsay out of the restaurant she still runs today - Murano - where she received another Michelin star. In January 2022, Angela was awarded an OBE for her services to the hospitality industry, and for the work she did for the NHS during the Covid-19 pandemic. In this conversation, Angela reflects on her campaigning, changes in the industry, and family life. Presented by Sheila Dillon Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

The Ancients
Alexander the Great & The Persian Thermopylae (Part Two)

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 39:58


In this second part of Tristan's explainer, he takes us right into the heart of the battle dubbed the Persian Thermopylae. Listen as Alexander begins a full-blooded assault on the Persian Gates, and find out how this battle for the Persian heartlands ended. Preorder Tristan's book today: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Perdiccas-Years-323320-BC-Hardback/p/20188 Jona Lendering article: https://www.livius.org/articles/battle/persian-gate-330-bce/ The narrow Yasuj pass. If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit. To download, go to Android or Apple store. If you're enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating The Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow this link.Further ReadingHammond, M. (2013), tr., Arrian: Alexander the Great, the Anabasis and the Indica, Oxford.Shepherd, R. (1793), tr., Polyaenus: Stratagems of War, Chicago.Waterfield, R. (2019), tr., Diodorus of Sicily: The Library, Books 16-20, Oxford.Yardley, J. (2001), tr., The History of Alexander: Quintus Curtius Rufus, Chatham.Bosworth, A. B. (1988), Conquest and Empire: The Reign of Alexander the Great, Cambridge.Engels, D. W. (1978), Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army, London.Heckel, W. (2006), Who's Who in the Age of Alexander the Great, Oxford. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Birth Hour
650| Five Day Induction after learning about ICP on The Birth Hour - Katie Friedland [Encore]

The Birth Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 35:10


At 37 weeks, Katie went in for an induction due to an ICP diagnosis (thanks to learning about it from this show and Nicole Phelps' story!)  Hoping for a very low-intervention birth experience, the team of midwives and nurses were amazing at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass in providing as gentle of an induction as possible. Sponsor: Go to Grove.com/birthhourto get a free gift set worth up to fifty dollars with your first order. Plus, shipping is fast and FREE.  Know Your Options Online Childbirth Course Beyond the Latch Course (comes free with KYO course) Support The Birth Hour via Patreon!

American Conservative University
Dr. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin‘s Tree and National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 69:44


Dr. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree and National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree https://youtu.be/aXKAMR94-rc 7,216 views Dec 17, 2021 Discovery Science 134K subscribers Everyone has seen the iconic tree of life depicted by Darwin. But in this bonus interview released as part of the Science Uprising series, best-selling author Stephen Meyer describes how the fossil record poses significant challenges to Darwin's tree of life. When one studies the various biological forms of the fossil record, one finds that these forms remain static with slight variations until the species either goes extinct or persists into the present day. According to Meyer, "we don't see the kind of morphing from one major morphological innovation into another that you would expect on the basis of Darwinian theory." Meyer argues that while the fossil record demonstrates some transitions in the history of life, evidence for the major transitions is lacking. He also challenges the claim that transitions are lacking because the fossil record simply didn't preserve the transitional forms. Meyer then goes on to discuss population genetics and the "waiting times" problem faced by the Darwinian mechanism. Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Twitter: @discoverycsc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe... The Magician's Twin - CS Lewis & Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/user/cslewisweb Darwin's Heretic - Alfred Russel Wallace: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlfredRW...   National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg https://youtu.be/glgXFGW_K6g 20,076 views Dec 14, 2021 Discovery Science 134K subscribers Evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg challenges what he calls the "National Geographic" or "textbook" view of the fossil record as a support for modern Darwinian theory. In this bonus interview released as part of the Science Uprising series, Sternberg unpacks what the fossil record really shows, what we learn from population genetics about Darwinian theory, and how the Darwinian mechanism can't account for the evolution of whales. He also examines competing scientific explanations for the abrupt appearance of new body plans in the history of life. Richard Sternberg is an evolutionary biologist with interests in the relation between genes and morphological homologies, and the nature of genomic “information.” He holds two Ph.D.'s: one in Biology (Molecular Evolution) from Florida International University and another in Systems Science (Theoretical Biology) from Binghamton University. From 2001-2007, he served as a staff scientist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and from 2001-2007 was a Research Associate at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Sternberg is presently a research scientist at Discovery Institute. ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Twitter: @discoverycsc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe... The Magician's Twin - CS Lewis & Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/user/cslewisweb Darwin's Heretic - Alfred Russel Wallace: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlfredRW...

American Conservative University
Dr. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin‘s Tree and National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 69:44


Dr. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree and National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg. Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg Stephen Meyer Takes On Darwin's Tree https://youtu.be/aXKAMR94-rc 7,216 views Dec 17, 2021 Discovery Science 134K subscribers Everyone has seen the iconic tree of life depicted by Darwin. But in this bonus interview released as part of the Science Uprising series, best-selling author Stephen Meyer describes how the fossil record poses significant challenges to Darwin's tree of life. When one studies the various biological forms of the fossil record, one finds that these forms remain static with slight variations until the species either goes extinct or persists into the present day. According to Meyer, "we don't see the kind of morphing from one major morphological innovation into another that you would expect on the basis of Darwinian theory." Meyer argues that while the fossil record demonstrates some transitions in the history of life, evidence for the major transitions is lacking. He also challenges the claim that transitions are lacking because the fossil record simply didn't preserve the transitional forms. Meyer then goes on to discuss population genetics and the "waiting times" problem faced by the Darwinian mechanism. Stephen C. Meyer received his Ph.D. in the philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. A former geophysicist and college professor, he now directs Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture in Seattle. He has authored the New York Times best seller Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2013), Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design (HarperOne, 2009), which was named a Book of the Year by the Times (of London) Literary Supplement in 2009, and now, Return of the God Hypothesis (HarperOne, 2021). ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Twitter: @discoverycsc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe... The Magician's Twin - CS Lewis & Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/user/cslewisweb Darwin's Heretic - Alfred Russel Wallace: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlfredRW...   National Geographic View of Fossil Record is WRONG Says Evolutionary Biologist Richard Sternberg https://youtu.be/glgXFGW_K6g 20,076 views Dec 14, 2021 Discovery Science 134K subscribers Evolutionary biologist Richard Sternberg challenges what he calls the "National Geographic" or "textbook" view of the fossil record as a support for modern Darwinian theory. In this bonus interview released as part of the Science Uprising series, Sternberg unpacks what the fossil record really shows, what we learn from population genetics about Darwinian theory, and how the Darwinian mechanism can't account for the evolution of whales. He also examines competing scientific explanations for the abrupt appearance of new body plans in the history of life. Richard Sternberg is an evolutionary biologist with interests in the relation between genes and morphological homologies, and the nature of genomic “information.” He holds two Ph.D.'s: one in Biology (Molecular Evolution) from Florida International University and another in Systems Science (Theoretical Biology) from Binghamton University. From 2001-2007, he served as a staff scientist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and from 2001-2007 was a Research Associate at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Sternberg is presently a research scientist at Discovery Institute. ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: Twitter: @discoverycsc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe... The Magician's Twin - CS Lewis & Evolution: https://www.youtube.com/user/cslewisweb Darwin's Heretic - Alfred Russel Wallace: https://www.youtube.com/user/AlfredRW...

Science Friday
Epstein-Barr Virus and MS, Agrivoltaics, Ag School Influence, Social Cues From Saliva. Jan 21, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:20


Scientists Are Working On A Universal COVID Vaccine As the Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spike around the U.S., there are scientists working not on variant-specific boosters, but on a vaccine that might cover every possible strain, past and future. Called universal vaccines, they require a fundamentally different approach from a shot that would target Delta, Omicron, or any other variant. Instead, a universal vaccine would need to train the body to respond to something every variant has in common—or to fill in the blanks of any possible mutations. Vox senior science reporter Umair Irfan reports on the difficult path and ongoing work toward such a vaccine, and why the immune system's T cells and B cells, more than neutralizing antibodies, will dictate our long-term future with the virus. Plus how an undersea eruption near Tonga was one of the most documented volcanic explosions in history, new research assesses the vast toll of global antibiotic resistance, and more stories from the week.   New Research Links Epstein-Barr Virus to Multiple Sclerosis A group of scientists at Harvard University says they have made a major breakthrough in understanding multiple sclerosis. For years, they have been testing out a hypothesis that the Epstein-Barr virus causes multiple sclerosis, a chronic and incurable disease of the nervous system. (Epstein-Barr is the contagious virus responsible for mononucleosis.) Researchers analyzed a dataset of 10 million active-duty military members. They found that service members who contracted the Epstein-Barr virus were 32 times more likely to later be diagnosed with MS. The research was published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston, Massachusetts, to discuss his team's research and its broader implications.   Saliva Sharing Might Help Kids Identify Their Closest Relationships How do little kids understand who has a close relationship with them? One of the clues they use to figure it out is by noticing who they're swapping saliva with. The closest bonds are with the people who are giving them kisses, sharing their forks, and wiping their drool. Those are the findings of a recent study published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Ashley Thomas, the study's lead author and a post doctoral fellow in the brain and cognitive sciences department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.   Big Agriculture Schools Face Increasing Donor Conflicts Of Interest A major donor to the University of Illinois wondered what the heck was up. Robb Fraley, a top Monsanto executive at the time, emailed the dean of the agriculture college in 2018 complaining about a professor saying publicly that one of his company's flagship products was causing widespread damage to crops. Monsanto was also a major donor. Fraley accused the professor of being “biased” and “prone to exaggeration.” U of I officials had spent years courting Fraley, and they had listened to him before when he'd complained about a lack of progress on an endowed chair he'd funded. But the 2018 episode highlights potentially thorny situations for public universities, which have cultivated powerful agricultural corporations as donors while public funding has stagnated. Dicamba posed a particularly critical issue to Fraley. After all, he was as responsible as anyone for leading modern agriculture into using lab-designed seeds that could withstand spraying from weedkillers. That Monsanto-branded Roundup Ready pairing of biotechnology with glyphosate herbicide revolutionized grain farming around the world. When glyphosate lost its punch — after weeds grew resistant to Roundup — Monsanto shifted to teaming different genetically modified seeds with the dicamba herbicide. But farmers who'd not adopted the new genetically engineered seeds started complaining about “dicamba drift” and of seeing their crops perish from the effects of the herbicide migrating to their fields. So when U of I weed scientist Aaron Hager spoke about a controversy as big as any in commercial agriculture in ways that didn't sit well with Fraley, the university benefactor let the school know about his displeasure. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Growing Plants—And Providing Solar Energy Food is one of our most basic needs. As the population of the world grows, we're going to need to grow more of it within the same amount of space. The United Nations estimates the world's population will grow by 2 billion people between now and 2050. Access to fresh food is already a problem in many countries, and will likely get worse with more mouths to feed. This is where the concept of agrivoltaics could create a massive change. This farming setup mixes water, energy, and plant growth all in one space. Solar panels collect energy from the sun's rays; underneath those panels is where the plants grow. The setup takes less water than the traditional way of farming, all-in-all creating a more sustainable way to grow food and create energy. Joining Ira to talk about the promise of agrivoltaics is Dr. Chad Higgins, associate professor of biological and ecological engineering at Oregon State University, in Corvallis, Oregon.  

Real Talk with Zuby
#189 Magda Osman - The Psychology of Decision Making

Real Talk with Zuby

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 63:02


Magda Osman, Ph.D., is a Principal researcher of basic and applied decision-making at the University of Cambridge. She is the author of a recent article: Nudges: four reasons to doubt popular technique to shape people's behavior (https://theconversation.com/nudges-four-reasons-to-doubt-popular-technique-to-shape-peoples-behaviour-174359). Her research interests include decision-making, unconscious processes, control, and pro-social behaviors. Follow Zuby - https://twitter.com/zubymusic Follow Magda - https://magdaosman.com/ Subscribe to the 'Real Talk With Zuby' podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify & more - https://fanlink.to/zubypodcast Join our Locals community - https://teamzuby.locals.com Support Zuby on Patreon - https://patreon.com/zubymusic Special thanks to GOLD TIER Patreon members: Andrea Mucelli, Edwin Chiang, Libbie Richardson, Matt Gallagher, Matthew Steinfeld, Paul Pugh, Mondo, Todd Weyl, Destiny Hillhouse, OnlineBookClub.org Website - https://zubymusic.com Online Store - https://teamzuby.com 'Strong Advice: Zuby's Guide to Fitness For Everybody' eBook - https://gumroad.com/l/zubyfitness

Woman's Hour
Mary Ward, Georgina Lucas & Ladette Culture

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 57:23


We discuss the life of Mary Ward the 17th century Catholic nun who actively championed education for girls - and even spent time in prison for her cause. Now, almost four hundred years after her death, Mary Ward's legacy lives on via a network of almost 200 Mary Ward schools worldwide – including St Mary's School in Cambridge. She is considered the first sister of feminism and a pioneer of female missionary work. Sister Jane Livesey and Charlotte Avery headmistress at St Mary's school for girls tell us about her life and legacy. We hear from Jo Richards from British Wheelchair Basketball about the start of the British Wheelchair Basketball Women's Premier League which begins on Saturday live on the BBC. The league is the first of its kind worldwide, and the UK's first women's professional Para-sport league. What do you remember about ‘ladette culture'? It was a term first coined in 1994 to describe young women who behaved boisterously, assertively and loved a drink. Some considered it a feminist movement – allowing girls to act ‘just like men'. Comedian Shappi Khorsandi – who grew up in the 90's – explores ladette culture in her new comedy stand up tour. Professor Angela Smith teaches Language and Culture at the University of Sunderland. Shappi and Angela both join Anita to discuss the significance of this time, and how our attitudes have changed. On 17th November 2019, Grey Atticus Fox was born, nine weeks early to author Georgina Lucas and her partner Mike. Weighing just three and a half pounds, he was taken to the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit and put on a ventilator. But less than two weeks later, a devastating prognosis left Georgina and Mike with an agonising decision of whether to withdraw Grey's life support. Georgina writes movingly about this experience and its aftermath in her memoir If Not For You. Woman to Woman is the all-star group founded back in 2018 and features musical artists Beverley Craven, Julia Fordham and Judie Tzuke. Now the trio are back with a new album, new tour and a new collaborator- singer-songwriter Rumer. Anita will speak to member Julia Fordham about their reunion, working with Rumer and their latest singles. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

The Thomistic Institute
The Intellectual Life of The Blessed Virgin Mary | Dr. Zena Hitz

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 47:36


This lecture was given at University of California, Berkeley on November 16, 2021. For more events and info visit thomisticinstitute.org/events-1. Zena Hitz is a Tutor at St. John's College where she teaches across the liberal arts. She is interested in defending intellectual activity for its own sake, as against its use for economic or political goals. Her forthcoming book, Intellectual Life, is rooted in essays that have appeared in First Things, Modern Age, and The Washington Post. Her scholarly work has focused on the political thought of Plato and Aristotle, especially the question of how law cultivates or fails to cultivate human excellence. She received an MPhil in Classics from Cambridge and studied Social Thought and Philosophy at the University of Chicago before finishing her PhD in Philosophy at Princeton.

Lit Society
ReLIT: Educated by Tara Westover

Lit Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 64:42


Have you heard? We got cooties and so season three of our show will now start Thursday, February 3rd. So, here's another favorite episode from our past! Have you ever had to cut someone out of your life? No phone calls, texts, and your friends know not to invite both of you to the same event? This week, our theme, How to Cut Someone Out of Your Life, is inspired by Educated, a memoir by Tara Westover. Tara didn't have a birth certificate until she was nine years old and she didn't see her first classroom until the age of 17. It's like The Village by M. Night Shyamalan, but interesting. . . Eventually, she's forced to choose between a life without her family or most certain death by their hands. It got real, real quick. Travel with us from the peaks of Idaho to the halls of Cambridge in Educated. Welcome to Lit Society. Let's get LIT! Find Alexis and Kari online: Instagram — www.instagram.com/litsocietypod/; Twitter — twitter.com/litsocietypod; Facebook — www.facebook.com/LitSocietyPod/; and our website www.LitSocietyPod.com. Get in on the conversation by using #booksanddrama.  

Royally Obsessed
Andrew, Dork of Yuck

Royally Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:46


This week, the ladies cover Andrew, the artist formerly known as HRH, the new ITV documentary about his relationship with Ghislaine, and why it took so long to get his titles stripped. They also discuss Prince Harry's security concerns, the Cambridges back to work (and school), Eugenie's new podcast, Downing Street #Partygate, Pippa Middleton's jumpsuit and so much more. Grab some royal cider and tune in!--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal happenings at purewow.com/royals. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Going Gray

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 164:15


Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on the CDC's messaging around Omicron, and threats to trans healthcare in Arkansas. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on the U.S. sending citizens free at-home tests and masks.  Juliette Kayyem talks about the unique challenges of protecting synagogues following the hostage standoff at Congregation Beth Israel in Texas. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Blair Miller and Elizabeth Bartholet discuss the state of adoption laws and child welfare amid the disappearance of Harmony Montgomery. Miller is a Boston Channel 25 reporter and the adoptive father of Harmony Montgomery's brother. Bartholet is the Morris Wasserstein Professor of Law, Emeritus, at Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director of the Child Advocacy Program.  Nia Grace and Gabriel O'Malley share their experiences running restaurants in one of the toughest winters for the industry, and their reactions to Mayor Michelle Wu's vaccine mandate. Grace is owner of soul food restaurant Darryl's Corner Bar & Kitchen in Roxbury and the recently opened The Underground Café + Lounge, and co-founder of the Boston Black Hospitality Coalition. O'Malley is co-owner of The Plough and Stars in Cambridge. Matt Gilbert recommends the best of TV from 2021, including “Succession” and “The White Lotus,” and what he's looking forward to in 2022, including “All Creatures Great and Small” and “The Gilded Age.” Gilbert is the TV critic for The Boston Globe. We end the show by asking listeners their opinions on letting hair go gray and the sexism in cultural norms around gray hair.

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Practically-A-Book Review: Yudkowsky Contra Ngo On Agents

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 36:48


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/practically-a-book-review-yudkowsky   I. The story thus far: AI safety, which started as the hobbyhorse of a few weird transhumanists in the early 2000s, has grown into a medium-sized respectable field. OpenAI, the people responsible for GPT-3 and other marvels, have a safety team. So do DeepMind, the people responsible for AlphaGo, AlphaFold, and AlphaWorldConquest (last one as yet unreleased). So do Stanford, Cambridge, UC Berkeley, etc, etc. Thanks to donations from people like Elon Musk and Dustin Moskowitz, everyone involved is contentedly flush with cash. They all report making slow but encouraging progress. Eliezer Yudkowsky, one of the original weird transhumanists, is having none of this. He says the problem is harder than everyone else thinks. Their clever solutions will fail. He's been flitting around for the past few years, Cassandra-like, insisting that their plans will explode and they are doomed.

Unbelievable?
Classic Replay: Old Testament grill-a-Christian with Peter J Williams

Unbelievable?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 56:08


First broadcast in Oct 2011. Peter J Williams the Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge and a first class scholar of both Old and New Testament, responded to non-Christian listeners' sceptical questions on the Old Testament. More Resources: • For exclusive resources and to support us:  USA: http://www.premierinsight.org/unbelievableshow  Rest of the World: https://resources.premier.org.uk/supportunbelievable  • For our regular Newsletter: https://www.premier.org.uk/Unbelievablenewsletter  • For more faith debates: http://www.premierchristianradio.com/Shows/Saturday/Unbelievable  • Facebook https://www.facebook.com/UnbelievableJB  • Twitter https://twitter.com/unbelievablejb  • Insta https://www.instagram.com/justin.brierley 

The Roundtable
Book Picks - Battenkill Books

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 15:09


This week's Book Picks come from Heather Boyne and Eve Macneill of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, New York.

The One Away Show
Kate O'Neill: One Recruitment Away From Being an Innovator

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:53


Kate O'Neill is the author of “A Future So Bright,” a book that argues that the best way to confront challenges and build a better tomorrow is to allow ourselves to envision the brightest future possible, while at the same time acknowledging the ways the future could go dark and working to prevent them from happening. Widely known as the “Tech Humanist,” Kate is helping humanity prepare for an increasingly tech-driven future with her signature strategic optimism. Kate is also the founder and CEO of KO Insights, a strategic advisory firm committed to improving human experience at scale. As a professional global keynote speaker, Kate regularly speaks with leadership audiences around the world, exploring how data and emerging technologies like AI are shaping the future of human experiences, and advocating with her signature strategic optimism for humanity's future in an increasingly tech-driven and exponentially-changing world. Her clients and audiences include many Fortune 500 and World's Most Admired companies and brands, including tech giants like Google and IBM, household-name brands like Coca Cola and Colgate, future-forward cities like Amsterdam and Austin, top universities like Cambridge and Yale, and even the United Nations. Read the show notes here: https://bwmissions.com/one-away-podcast/

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Solar Maverick Podcast
SMP 117: European Commercial Solar Discussion with the Pioneer of PPA Financing in Europe

Solar Maverick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 50:59


Episode Summary In this episode of the Solar Maverick Podcast, Benoy speaks with Harald Overholm who is the CEO and Founder of Alight Energy.  Alight Energy is the leading solar Power Purchase Agreement provider in the Nordics and developing more than 500 MW of PPA-based onsite and offsite projects across Europe.  Harald speaks about many interesting topics like the European PPA market, how the European solar market has evolved, and how higher electricity prices in the past year is allowing more solar. Benoy Thanjan Benoy Thanjan is the Founder and CEO of Reneu Energy, as well as an advisor for several solar startup companies. Reneu Energy is a premier international solar energy consulting firm and developer, and the company focuses on developing commercial and industrial solar, as well as utility-scale solar plus storage projects. The company also sources financing for solar projects and hedges both energy and environmental commodities.  Benoy received his first experience in Finance as an intern at D.E. Shaw & Co., which is a global investment firm with 37 billion dollars in investment capital. Before founding Reneu Energy, he was the SREC Trader in the Project Finance Group for SolarCity, which merged with Tesla in 2016. He originated SREC trades with buyers and co-developed their SREC monetization and hedging strategy with the senior management of SolarCity, to move into the east coast markets. Benoy also worked at Vanguard Energy Partners, Ridgewood Renewable Power, and Deloitte & Touche. Harald Overholm Harald was previously a cleantech venture capitalist and an advisor on solar markets to the WWF and the Swedish Government. He earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge with a thesis on solar diffusion and PPA. He is a member of the International Energy Agency's PVPS workgroup on solar business models, a former associate with leading global sustainability think tank Stockholm Environment Institute, and a former board member of the Swedish Solar Energy Association.   Stay Connected: Benoy Thanjan Email: info@reneuenergy.com  LinkedIn: Benoy Thanjan Website: https://www.reneuenergy.com   Harald Overholm Website:  https://www.alight-energy.com Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/haraldoverholm/   Additional Notes Benoy wrote two articles on Power Purchase Agreements(“PPA”) in Renewable Energy World and PV Magazine.  The links are below. https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/wind-power/achieving-affordable-clean-energy-goals-through-offsite-corporate-ppas/ https://static1.squarespace.com/static/553e8897e4b0836f4e9a5ccd/t/59bd51a4e5dd5b51a03c20ab/1505579432776/09050_Corporate_PPAs.pdf   Below is a link with Solar Maverick Podcast Episode 52 called PPA 101. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/smp-52-ppa-101/id1441876259?i=1000455375187   Subscribe to our podcast + download each episode on iTunes,Podbean, youtube, and most of the major podcast platforms. This episode was produced and managed by  Podcast Laundry (www.podcastlaundry.com)                

Scummy Mummies - Podcast
221: Fashion, sex and turning sixty with Karen Arthur

Scummy Mummies - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 72:24


Our guest for this episode is the amazing Karen Arthur - educator, fashion creative, dancer, mum, grandmother, founder of Wear Your Happy and host of the brilliant podcast Menopause Whilst Black. She's a multimedia node! We talk about why she's encouraging everyone to wear clothes that lift their mood, and why it all starts with our knicker drawer. There's a bit of serious chat about how the Black Lives Matter movement inspired Karen to start her podcast, and we get to ask her what she wishes she'd known before she went through the menopause. Plus we hear about Karen's experience of going through therapy, why she thinks it's good to cull your insta feed, and what she looks for in a sex toy.You can find out more about all Karen's awesome work, including her podcasts, styling sessions and sewing lessons, via her linktree. She is @therealkarenarthur on instagram. **WE HAVE A SHOP!** Visit scummymummiesshop.com for our ace t-shirts, mugs, washbags, sweatshirts and beach towels. FREE UK DELIVERY!Tickets for our 2022 shows are now on sale - we are coming to Newcastle, Leeds, Chesterfield, Milton Keynes, Barnsely, Tamworth, Norwich, Taunton, Swindon, Newbury, Horsham, Wellingborough, Portsmouth, Cambridge, Devizes, Southampton, Leamington Spa, Trowbridge, Nottingham - and new dates are being added all the time! Keep an eye on scummymummies.com for announcements and tickets. We're on Twitter (@scummymummies), Instagram, and Facebook. If you like the podcast, please rate, review and subscribe. Thanks for listening! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:17


Photo:  Cambridge 21st August 1775. Wanted for the Continental Army .  Public requisition of supplies, including bricks, firewood, lumber, charcoal, hay, straw, corn, oats, shovels, spades, pickaxes, handsaws, and lime. 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E75: Free Speech and Cambridge | James Orr & Arif Ahmed | The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 84:23


As an alternative for those who would rather listen ad-free, sign up for a premium subscription to receive the following: • All JBP Podcast episodes are ad-free. • Monthly Ask Me Anything episodes (and the ability to ask questions). • Presale access to events. • Premium, detailed show notes for future episodes. Sign up here: https://jordanbpeterson.supercast.com/ This episode was recorded on October 11th, 2021. Dr. Arif Ahmed and Dr. James Orr come on to discuss what led to the University of Cambridge rescinding my invitation to speak there. We get into the difficulty of change in universities, anonymous reporting, the dangers of limiting free speech, microaggressions, the importance of humor, and more. Arif Ahmed MBE is a philosopher, lecturer at Cambridge, and author of “Saul Kripke”. His interests include decision theory and religion from an atheist and libertarian point of view. In the aftermath of the Cambridge incident, Dr. Ahmed remained a vocal advocate for political diversity.  Dr. James Orr is a university lecturer in philosophy of religion at Cambridge and author of “The Mind of God and the Works of Nature.” He is a regular contributor to The Times Literary Supplement and The Critic. Dr. Ahmed's profile: https://phil.cam.ac.uk/people/teaching-research-pages/ahmed “Saul Kripke”: https://amazon.com/Kripke-Bloomsbury-Contemporary-American-Thinkers/dp/0826492622 Dr. Orr's profile: https://divinity.cam.ac.uk/directory/dr-james-orr “The Mind of God and Works of Nature”: https://amazon.co.uk/Mind-God-Works-Nature-Philosophical/dp/9042937629 _______________ Timestamps  _______________ [00:00] Intro  [01:13] The Cambridge repeal [09:41] A case for the repealers, their potential fears [10:19] Photos “don't imply a position—that was one of the most outrageous things, ‘endorsement by association…' As if standing next to someone implies [you're in agreement]" - Dr. Ahmed [14:11] Changes in free speech policy  [19:54] Speaking Up: Consequences [25:28] The difficulty of change in university [27:36] “You become what you practice” - Jordan Peterson [27:45] “If you put off fights, they don't usually get better” - Jordan Peterson [35:53] Being Silent: Perils [36:04] “In general, with any coercive principle, think what might happen in the hands of someone wicked and tyrannical. That's how we should think about these things” - Dr. Ahmed [41:46] "The idea that you should remove everything that could threaten someone's identity and you should make that a university-wide policy is actually, exactly the opposite of what you should do, speaking clinically if you're trying to help people become more resilient" - Dr. Peterson [44:32] Microaggressions and the importance of humor [44:33] "There's no such thing as a joke that isn't a microaggression. Jokes aren't funny unless they're microaggressions–especially witty ones" - Dr. Peterson [47:19] Anonymous voting & reporting [49:52] "Politics is downstream from culture [and, for better or worse,] culture is generated in universities" - Dr. Peterson [49:59] “What happens on campus doesn't stay on campus" - Dr. Orr [50:50] "The point about anonymous reporting is that... you can't come back to them to check their evidence. The person who has been accused can't face their accuser. There's no possibility of due process” - Dr. Ahmed [54:51] Anonymous reports circumventing due process [57:55] Tyranny & Free Speech [59:17] Details about the vote; university bureaucracy [01:05:56] UK legislation post-Cambridge   [01:13:06] Anti-education & ideological purity tests at university [01:15:36] "I've heard students say ‘Well, I just write what the professor wants...' It's like no – writing is thinking and if you don't think, that becomes part of you – those words become part of you [and] that's not bad education, it's anti-education" - Dr. Peterson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley
#41 Henry, sind Deepfakes das Ende des Internets?

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 90:07


Kannst du deinen Augen im Netz trauen? Deepfakes produzieren Fake-Videos die täuschen echt aussehen - aber können sie auch was Gutes haben?///Die besten Job-Angebote der ambitioniertesten Start-Ups: http://www.digitaleoptimisten.de/jobsAlle Gründergeschichten auf http://www.digitaleoptimisten.de/storiesAlle Hear-Us-Grow Folgen Folge Digitale Optimisten auf Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/digitaleoptimisten//// Herzlich Willkommen bei Digitale Optimisten!Ich bin Alex, und wir sind in diesem Podcast auf der Suche nach den Elon Musks von morgen, also den Gründerinnen und Gründern, die ganz große Visionen mit ihren Start-Ups haben, damit aber noch ganz am Anfang stehen.Und genau darum geht es in dieser Folge. Es ist ein Thema, was mich wirklich umtreibt, weil es so krass ist - und für mich nicht klar ist, ob das ganze eine gute, oder eine ablehnenswerte Entwicklung ist. Es handelt sich um das Thema Deepfakes. Was sind jetzt schon wieder Deepfakes? Vielleicht hast du auf YouTube oder TikTok schonmal Videos gesehen, in denen Trump, Obama oder Tom Cruise irgendwie merkwürdige Sachen sagen. Vielleicht haben die das gar nicht gesagt, sondern es waren ebenjene Deepfakes, computer-generierte, synthetische Medien, die es so gar nicht gibt. Ein bisschen so wie ein Photoshop-Bearbeitung, nur irgendwie krasser.Zu dem Thema habe ich übrigens schon mit dem Chef des Bundesamts für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik, Arne Schönbohm, in der Folge 31 gesprochen. Da habe ich gefragt, was der deutsche Staat eigentlich gegen diese Bedrohungen so unternimmt. Heute spreche ich aber mit vielleicht dem größten Experten auf diesem Gebiet, es ist Henry Ajder. Er ist sonst zu Gast in der New York Times, BBC, Sky, Wired und sogar der Cosmopolitan -r und heute eben hier bei Digitale Optimisten.Wenn du dich also jemals gefragt hast was diese Deep Fakes sind, ob die das Ende der Gesellschaft sind oder - Achtung Kapitalismus - sogar eine Chance für smarte Geschäftsideen sind, dann hör dir jetzt das Interview mit Henry an, das ich aus Termingründen vor ein paar Wochen aufgenommen habe.Wie immer freue ich mich über 5 Sterne Reviews und dein Feedback an alexander@digitaleoptimisten.de. Und jetzt rein in das Interview.Bevor es mit dieser Folge losgeht: Bitte erzähle zwei Freundinnen oder Kollegen von diesem Podcast, wenn Dir diese Geschichten gefallen. Es hilft ungemein, neue Hörer zu finden und den Podcast weiter wachsen zu lassen. Wenn Du magst kannst Du mir auch einen Review auf Apple Podcasts oder Spotify geben.

Women Are Here
S2E37 - Women Are Here Season 3 Episode 2 1-14-22

Women Are Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


This week listen as Mayor Siddiqui and Vice Mayor Mallon discuss the series finale of Insecure (a fave!), current COVID19 rates and upcoming booster shot clinics, our first City Council meeting of the term, Bike Lane Policy Orders, Dr. MLK Jr. Day events, the City's Scholarship program and more. Stay up to date on all the Cambridge happenings with us!

National Day Calendar
January 16, 2022 - National Nothing Day | National Fig Newton Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 3:30


Welcome to January 16th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate deep thoughts and a bite of cookie history.  According to some philosophers, there is no such thing as nothing. With the very idea of thinking of the concept of nothingness, you're proving that it doesn't exist. That may sound like a big concept, but I think we can all relate. In the middle of our hectic lives, there's almost no time for nothing. But the truth is we need to take a step back and relax— and basically, do nothing. Turn off your phone, stay away from social media, take a nap. Embrace the nothingness. It's not often that you can get away with it, but on National Nothing Day, you've got the perfect excuse. When someone asks you what you're doing, feel free to tell them to buzz off because you're busy doing nothing. Which is actually something. Kinda. 19th Century physicians believed that most illnesses were caused by digestive problems. The remedy they most often prescribed was a small biscuit or cookie. So when Charles Roser invented a machine to fold fig jam into dough, the Kennedy Baking Company saw an opportunity. Based in Cambridge, Massachusetts they were already naming cookies after nearby cities. When they purchased the recipe for Roser's fig cookie in 1891 they had a few choices for the name. One was Shrewsbury. And thank goodness they had the sense to choose Newton, Massachusetts instead. And that is how Fig Newtons got their name. No offense to Shrewsbury—the Fig Shrewsbury just doesn't have quite the same ring to it. On National Fig Newton Day, pour yourself a glass of milk and enjoy this bite of cookie history.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm John McClain. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #494 - The Brave and The Beard

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 166:47


A search for a new host leads to a frozen tundra filled with enormous snow beasts, masked luchadores, heavily bearded hosses, and the men that have adorable schoolyard crushes on them. On Episode 494 of Trick or Treat Radio we are joined by podcasting luchador El Goro from the Talk Without Rhythm Podcast to discuss The Show, the first feature film written by comic book legend Alan Moore! We also discuss controlling your narrative, weird goths, the best cinematic Hitlers, and the legendary body of work of Alan Moore. So grab your slingshot, stay away from men with crescent moon beards, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: El Goro, Coffin Corner, Saturday Night Fever, Cabaret, Talk Without Rhythm, similarities between Staying Alive and Rambo, Sylvester Stallone, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Grease, Les Miserable, popping claws, Logan, Gladiator, Ipswitch, Woodbridge, Cambridge, UK, Alan Moore, sexual misadventures, Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The League of Extraordinary Gentleman, Alan Moore's eternal wizard battle with Grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, Neil Gaiman, Dave Gibbons, layered storytelling, From Hell, Swamp Thing, Vertigo, John Constantine, Preacher, Tom Strong, Killing Joke, The Show, ABC Comics, what is reality?, what is narrative?, Dennis the Menace, slingshot, David Lynch, massive preaches of PHI, what is a web search?, Bing, internal/external monologue, Matches Malone, poetry is magic, springtime for hitler, The Producers, Terry Gilliam, Grave Before Shave, beard talk, Darrell D'Silva, Guy Ritchie, Snatch, Alien 3, Tom Burke, Only God Forgives, Furiosa, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Ambulance, Michael Bay, Gareth Evans, Havoc, Tom Hardy, Undying Love, Deathstroke, Speed Racer, Alita: Battle Angel, chocolate Lex Luther, Charlton Comics, Sebastian Stan, Romania, Robert Pattinson, Ghostbusters Afterlife, The Sandlot, Street Smart, The Book of Eli, Cobra Kai, Karate Kid 3, Terry Silver, Hillary Swank, Stone Cold Jane Austin, Saint Maud, Titane, The Green Knight, Psycho Goreman, Last Night in Soho, The Empty Man, Fucli Talks, Nobody, RZA, Many Saints of Newark, Dinner in America, Pig, Spider-Man: No Way Home, Suicide Squad, Evangelion, Godzilla vs Kong, Dune, The Book of Boba Fett, Trick or Treat Radio Love Line, the definition of chuffed, and Alan Moore's tears.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)

The Frye Show
#170: Roberto Salcedo - Cofounder & CEO Baubap - Los Resultados Se Cuidan Solos

The Frye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 94:40


“Dedica unos minutos a pensar que quieres hacer de tu vida, cómo quieres ser recordado, cuál es la característica que la gente va a decir que eras cuando ya no estes aquí y empieza a actuar en función de esa decisión consciente de yo quiero ser esta persona.” - Roberto Salcedo ( 

BBC Inside Science
The Rutland ‘Sea Dragon', An Astronomer's Christmas and some Animal Magic

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 28:02


After 20 years of planning, preparation and a nail-biting build up fraught by delays The James Webb Space telescope finally launched on Christmas day 2021. Anxious astronomers across the globe looked on as the JWST then completed even riskier manoeuvres to unfurl the 18 hexagonal components that make up its 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror. Cosmologist Dr Sheona Urquhart from the Open University tells us about the astronomical community's tense Christmas day. Fresh from a TV spot on BBC Two's Digging for Britain this week, Dr Dean Lomax and PhD candidate Emily Swaby share their excitement unearthing Rutland's ‘Sea Dragon' and explore what this find could tell us about Ichthyosaurs. At over 10 meters long this ancient ocean predator is the largest complete fossil of its kind to be discovered in the UK. Ichthyosaurs are commonly associated with Dorset and Yorkshire coastlines where fossils are often revealed as surrounding rock is eroded by the elements. Finding an ichthyosaur fossil inland is unusual but not unexpected as the higher sea levels 200 million years ago would put the east midlands underwater. And whilst the palaeontologists have been struggling through the Jurassic mud, cognition researchers at the University of Cambridge have been wowing their birds with magic tricks. Professor Nicky Clayton FRS, Professor of Comparative Cognition, explains what we can learn about the way jays think by assessing their reaction to different sleight-of-hand tricks. Corvids, the family to which these feathered friends belong, have long interested researchers due to their impressive cognitive abilities and Nicky's team has shown that their Jays are not fooled by all of the same mis-directions as we are, but are fooled by some. And it could be down to not being able to tell the difference between a finger and a feather. Presented by Marnie Chesterton Produced by Alex Mansfield Assistant Producer Emily Bird Made in association with The Open University

Pod Save The Queen
Judge Kaplan's announcement, platinum plans and talking to plants

Pod Save The Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 45:35


It's been an exciting week for the royals with the Duchess of Cambridge's 40th birthday celebrations and the Queen's Platinum Jubilee plans revealed in full. Zoe Forsey and Russell Myers discuss what's in store for the bumper four-day celebration in June to mark the Monarch's 70 years on the throne, including the very exciting pudding competition. We also look in detail at the three stunning photos released by Kate on her landmark birthday and hear why Prince Charles was right when it comes to talking to plants. In a late addition to this week's episode, we also have an update on Prince Andrew's legal battle after Judge Lewis Kaplan refused to dismiss the sexual assault case against him by Virginia Giuffre - meaning he faces a court showdown.

Bring It In
#71: Alex Hutchinson — Author of "Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance, 2X Canadian Olympic Runner, Cambridge Ph.D.

Bring It In

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 26:50


What do we mean when we say “hitting our limit?” Especially in a time when reports of burnout are hitting record high for workers across the globe, it's never been more important for employees and employers to understand how to effectively and safely push themselves. Today's guest, Alex Hutchinson, has a bold idea. In his book “Endure” Alex claims that hitting your limit and giving up is always a mental decision. As a lifelong runner, 2X Canadian Olympic eam member, repetitive ultra marathon runner, a prolific award winning journalist, and even a quantum computer researcher, Alex is no stranger to pushing, and exceeding, one's own limitations. In a time when companies are often having to get more done with less workers, and workers everywhere are feeling more pressure than ever, being able to safely, and effectively push yourself to your limits is an essential skill, so with that it's time to kick off Season 3 of the pod. Let's bring it in!

Growth Mindset Podcast
199: Roeland Decorte, CEO - DFI: Driving the shift from reactive to preventative healthcare , Entrepreneurship Mistakes and Learning, Ancient Code-Breaking Explained,

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:12


Roeland Decorte Roeland Decorte is the CEO and Founder of Decorte Future Industries (DFI). His doctoral work on code-breaking is cited by world experts in his field. He started DFI inventing and personally engineering the exoskeleton tech. He has also experience in mechanical engineering, prototyping, fundraising, politics, political economics and academia. He was the youngest student from Belgium to have joined the University of Cambridge in its 800-year history. Takeaways * Do the things that really define your life and the problems you want to solve. * It is a mistake if you don't act and learn from it. * Longevity becomes relevant when we start with small baby steps. * You need to have a clear structure of hierarchy and responsibilities of your people to run the business well. * It is good to keep people know with what you are doing. CONNECT WITH ROELAND Decorte Future Industries (https://decorte.co.uk/) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-roeland-p-j-e-decorte-340066185) Twitter (https://twitter.com/decortedr) Connect with Sam: Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: Roeland Decorte.

Royally Obsessed
Paolo's Portraits and Prince Andrew

Royally Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 49:03


Disclaimer: This episode was recorded before the news broke of the judge's ruling in Virginia Giuffre's civil case against Prince Andrew, but we still break down the legal proceedings thus far and will have more next week. This week, the ladies do a deep dive into Kate's birthday portraits (still not over them!!), her birthday celebrations and a bit of coverage controversy. They also chat about the Platinum Jubilee events, Prince Charles's Newsweek essay and so much more. Grab a gin & tonic and tune in!--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal happenings at purewow.com/royals. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Big Boo Cast
The Big Boo Cast, Episode 268

The Big Boo Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 47:31


We waited until after the National Championship game (congrats, Georgia Bulldogs!) to record this episode, so naturally we talk about the game and all the reasons why we felt like it was the best of college football. We also discuss Melanie's weekend with Caroline and her college friends, plus a new kind of exercise I recently tried for the first time. On top of that, we offer our thoughts on the Duchess of Cambridge's 40th birthday portraits, and it's Melanie's turn for Five Favorites. Enjoy, y'all!  - Our Amazon Shop - Become a Patron Show Notes: - Bowls, bowls, all types of bowls - Sally O'Malley kick and stretch and kick - Yellowstone - Emily in Paris renewed - 40th birthday photographs of the Duchess of Cambridge - Mario Testino's photographs of Diana - Kate in the gold dress  - ANRABESS long-sleeve v-neck sweater - microfiber cleaning cloths - H&M v-neck satin blouse - high waist bell bottom yoga pants - Charlotte Tilbury Magic cream Sponsors: - Helix (use this link for up to $200 off mattress orders and two free pillows) - Hello Fresh (use code BIGBOO16 for up to 16 free meals and 3 free gifts) - Jesus Listens (available wherever books are sold) - Framebridge (use the promo code BIGBOO to save an additional 15% off your first order)

Josh Swallows Broadway
Ep57 - Quarantining with YDE, Paravi Das, Luke Ferrari & Michael Williams

Josh Swallows Broadway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 61:33


Josh's Cambridge production of WILD with Idina Menzel and Javier Muñoz might have been shut down due to COVID, but that doesn't stop Josh from recording these episodes. Literally recording in rooms right next to each other, Josh interviews the "kids" from the WILD cast, and we even get a special sneak peek of one of the songs from the cast album *spoiler alert*! The superstars include: YDE (she/her) Paravi Das (she/her) Luke Ferrari (they/them) Michael Williams (he/him) Produced by Alan Seales and Elizabeth Wheless. A proud member of the Broadway Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue
SUFB 1256: Invasive species arriving in Antarctica buy boats

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 21:54


Is visiting the Antarctic on your bucket list? If so, you may want to take the right boat to get there.  PhD researcher at the University of Cambridge, Arlie McCarthy, wrote a great piece that we should all be talking about regarding invasive species reaching the Antarctic on Conversation.com. The article describes the difficult path invasive species have had to travel to reach the shores of the Antarctic. The Southern Ocean's currents rotate clockwise around the continent deflecting many of the species. If the invasive species do make it to the coastal area, then they would have to survive the freezing cold temperatures and rough waters. These conditions make it difficult for invasive species to settle. Unless they travel by boat. Humans visit the continent for a variety of reasons: tourism, research, fishing, and supply researchers. The ships they take to reach the frozen continent provide invasive species with a direct pathway to the coastal area increasing the chance of species survival and colonization.  Invasive mussels and crabs can pose problems for local species. Mussels can outcompete local species for space by forming mussel beds and altering the habitat. Crabs can be a new threat to local populations as they become new predators. The results can alter the Antarctic coastline as we know it. There are measures that can be taken to reduce the level of exposure to invasive species. Add a coating to the hull of the boat to ensure animals and plants do not stick to the hull. Exchanging ballast water outside the coastal zone would also help. Preventative measures are helpful, but enforcement will be necessary to ensure success.  Link to article: https://theconversation.com/antarcticas-unique-ecosystem-is-threatened-by-invasive-species-hitchhiking-on-ships-174640 Connect with Speak Up For Blue: Website: https://www.speakupforblue.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/speakupforblue  

Drunkard United Football Show
FA cup 3rd round review: “The Veneers went Bling”

Drunkard United Football Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 62:36


The 3rd round of the FA Cup didn't disappoint, lots of upsets and the Sam's enjoy Whiskey Advocates #19 whiskey of 2021 Wheel Horse Bourbon. Hartlepool, Kidderminister, Boreham Wood, Cambridge and Nottingham Forrest all knock off bigger clubs including Grahams Gunners. Producer Mel's Villa feel out to Man U yet somehow Big Sam Everton managed to advance. There was also a 9 goal barn burner between two unexpected sides.   FA Round 3 Matches: Hartlepool 2 - Blackpool 1 Kidderminister 2 - Reading 1 Boreham Wood 2 - Wimbledon 0 Cambridge 1 - Newcastle 0 Nottingham 1 - Arsenal 0 Barnsley 5 -  Barrow 4 Middlesboro 3 - Mansfield 2 Man City 4 - Swindon 1 Chelsea 5 - Chesterfield 1 Liverpool 4- Swersbury 1 Everton 3 - Hull 2 Man U 1 - Villa 0   Like what you hear?  Leave us a review and tell a friend.  Love what you hear?  Then support the show:   Buy a shirt  https://www.teepublic.com/user/du-football-show    Join our club: https://www.patreon.com/dufootballshow www.Dufootballshow.com   Send your questions to DUfootballshow@gmail.com   Facebook @DUfootballshow Instagram @DUfootballshow Twitter @DUfootballshow

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: To bike or not to bike

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 164:26


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about the debate between in person and remote learning as Omicron surges. Michael Curry updates listeners on how community health centers are responding to Omicron, and the state of schools as cases rise. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID-19 vaccine advisory group. He's also a member of the national NAACP board of directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Trenni Kusnierek talks about a U.S. speedskater giving her winter olympics spot to a teammate, and the Yankees promoting Rachel Balkovec to manager of their minor league Tampa team, becoming the first woman working as full-time manager of a major league affiliated team. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani discusses why President Joe Biden hasn't been able to take action on former President Donald Trump's Remain in Mexico policy, and population slowdown in the U.S. Noorani is the president and chief executive officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Cindy Hughes shares the impact of eliminating parking spots in favor of bike lanes on her business in Cambridge. Cindy Hughes is co-founder of Fast Phil's barbershop on Mass Ave in Cambridge. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on bike lanes versus parking spots in Cambridge. John King updates listeners on the latest national politics headlines, including the state of voting rights legislation and opinions on term limits. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their opinions on term limits.

Leadership and the Environment
549: Abdal Hakim Murad, part 2: High and low tech in the new green mosque in Cambridge, UK

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 37:52


Many people and mainstream society seem to view technology as the solution to our environmental problems---and the more and the newer the better. Abdal Hakim and I agree technology isn't the glowing solution many believe. It can play a role, but as part of a mix, including low-tech and non-tech components.This topic led to the new green mosque in Cambridge that he helped make happen, how to mix technologies and harmonize with its location. It won awards and created networks and support from the community.He shared the role of sacred spaces in life, less available now, as well as natural spaces. Nobody dislikes trees, but there are fewer around than ever for many people.He also shares his commitment on reducing meat with a widespread social and Muslim perspective.Cambridge Central MosqueThe World Architecture Community article, The UK's first green mosque: "The Cambridge Mosque", with lots of pictures See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everything is Black and White - a Newcastle United podcast
Wood interest, Cantwell possibility, Botman and Carlos latest | #NUFC's January transfer window with The Mirror's Simon Bird

Everything is Black and White - a Newcastle United podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:47


Hello and welcome to The Everything is Black and White Podcast. Andrew Musgrove is joined by The Mirror's Simon Bird to discuss the latest ongoings at Newcastle United. That includes- Fallout to Cambridge defeat- NUFC's search for a striker - is Chris Wood the answer?- Kieran Trippier's arrival - Sven Botman and Diego Carlos latest - will NUFC move on to new targets?- The midfield: Wijnaldum, NDombele and Ramsey linked- Todd Cantwell - Norwich would sell, so why? - Plus listeners' Qs on Dubravka, Lascelles and the work of the ownersAnd here's the link to be within a chance of winning TWO tickets to Newcastle vs Everton. Head here: https://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/your-chance-win-two-tickets-22698822

Discovery
The painless heart

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 27:18


Dr Mitch Lomax is a sports scientist at the University of Portsmouth. She helps actual Olympic swimmers get faster. She explains how most of the muscles attached to our skeletons work: Tiny fibres use small-scale cellular energy, which, when all these fibres work in concert, turns into visible muscular movement. Mitch also explains how the dreaded Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or DOMS, can hit, taking a stair-wincing 48-72 hours to peak after exercise. But skeletal muscles turn out to be quite different to heart muscles, as consultant cardiologist Dr Rohin Francis explains. Heart cells are more efficient and don't get fatigued like skeletal muscle cells. They are extremely energetic and 'just want to beat'. He also explains that the sensory feedback from the heart muscles is different too. They have a different sort of nerve supply, with fewer sensory nerves, so that there is less chance of pain signals being sent to the brain. However, heart cells' incredible abilities are counterbalanced by one Achilles-like flaw: They cannot easily heal. Professor Sanjay Sinha is a British Heart Foundation (BHF) Senior Research Fellow and a Professor in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the University of Cambridge. His job is to fix broken hearts and he explains to Adam how new research into stem cells could be used to fix normally irreparable heart cells. Producer - Jennifer Whyntie and Fiona Roberts Presenters - Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo, Daniel Storey, Adrian Clarke and Lynsey Hooper review a monumental weekend in the FA Cup and beyond. Non-league Kidderminster and Boreham Wood are through to round 4 as we have a bit of a moan about TV scheduling. And we enjoy the magic of smashing in a free-kick from 35 yards. There's more than a few mentions of Nottingham Forest knocking out Arsenal. And individually there were bad weekends for Butland, Tavares and Ndombele. Also AFCON gets underway and the biggest shock of the whole weekend comes in the WSL as Birmingham beat Arsenal. RUNNING ORDER:  • PART 1a: Nottingham Forest 1-0 Arsenal (01m 00s) • PART 1b: Kidderminster and Boreham Wood through to round 4 (05m 00s)  • PART 1c: Hull 2-3 Everton (13m 00s)  • PART 1d: Newcastle 0-1 Cambridge (18m 00s) • PART 2: The rest of the FA Cup weekend (22m 00s) • PART 3: Big shocks in the WSL + AFCON underway (43m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR 33% OFF THE PRICE OF AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Football Weekly
FA Cup cheer for Cambridge and Harriers jet into fourth round – Football Weekly

Football Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 53:33


Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Simon Burnton, Jonathan Wilson and Suzy Wrack to discuss the FA Cup third round, the return of the WSL and the start of the Africa Cup of Nations. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/footballweeklypod

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Jean Hanff Korelitz

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 59:30


Jean Hanff Korelitz was born and raised in New York City and educated at Dartmouth College and Clare College, Cambridge. She is the author of the novels: The Plot, You Should Have Known (Adapted for HBO as “The Undoing”), Admission (adapted as the 2013 film of the same name), The Devil and Webster, The White Rose, The Sabbathday River and A Jury of Her Peers, as well as a middle-grade reader, Interference Powder, and a collection of poetry, The Properties of Breath. A new novel, The Latecomer, will be published by Celadon Books on May 31, 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Football Daily
FA Cup 3rd round magic

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 42:25


Extra time, cup upsets and goals galore - the FA Cup third round didn't disappoint. Ben Haines is joined by former Hull City and Ipswich Town defender Alex Bruce and ex-Everton and Birmingham City forward James McFadden to look back on a day that summed up 'the magic of the FA Cup'. League One Cambridge United went to St James' Park and stunned Newcastle United. Hear from their manager Mark Bonner and a very shocked fan who made the journey. Meanwhile, we ask if the exit could be a blessing in disguise for Newcastle later in the season, as Eddie Howe's men fight to stay in the Premier League. The lowest team left in the competition - Kidderminster Harriers - who play in the sixth tier of English football, caused an upset of their own beating Championship side Reading. Assistant manager Jimmy O'Connor pulls over on his way home to join the pod and we hear from their speechless manager Russ Penn. Plus Borehamwood's Adrian Clifton tells us who he fancies in the fourth round, after his winner ensured the National League side knocked out League One AFC Wimbledon. Also, after a scare for Everton, did their win over Hull City do anything to ease the pressure on Rafa Benitez? And as VAR made headlines in games featuring Premier League sides, the panel debate if it is fair to use the technology in some ties and not others. Should it be scrapped from the competition? TOPICS: 4'00 Delight for Cambridge United 9'00 Cambridge United manager Mark Bonner 10'40 Cambridge fan Anouska 14'30 Kieran Trippier and Newcastle 19'00 Kidderminster Harriers assistant manager Jimmy O'Connor 22'10 Kidderminster Harriers manager Russ Penn 25'30 Borehamwood's Adrian Clifton 26'20 A lucky escape for Everton 36'00 Should VAR be scrapped in the FA Cup?

Football Daily
Man City's Cole-powered win and Coutinho heads to Villa

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 40:33


Emma Saunders looks ahead to the weekend's FA Cup 3rd round ties with the help of former Aston Villa striker Dion Dublin and ex-Stoke City manager Tony Pulis. They react to Manchester City becoming the first side into round four following a 4-1 win at Swindon, with Cole Palmer impressing for the Premier League side. There's also a look at Chesterfield's run to the 1997 FA Cup semi-finals, with ex-player Jamie Hewitt joining the podcast. And Spanish football journalist Eduardo Alvarez tells us about Kieran Trippier's move from Atletico Madrid to Newcastle and Philippe Coutinho's loan to Aston Villa. 03:30 - Potential upsets, including Newcastle v Cambridge and Millwall v Crystal Palace 10:00 - Jamie Hewitt on Chesterfield's extraordinary FA Cup run in 1997 18:00 - Preview of Manchester United v Aston Villa 25:00 - Trippier to Newcastle, Coutinho to Aston Villa 34:30 - Reaction to Swindon 1-4 Man City

Royally Obsessed
Happy 40th Birthday, Kate!

Royally Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 46:57


The Duchess of Cambridge turns 40 this weekend, so we recorded an exciting new episode with special guest Bethan Holt, fashion news & features director for The Telegraph and author of The Duchess of Cambridge: A Decade of Modern Royal Style. We have predictions for the duchess in 2022, a look at the media profiles released ahead of the big day, and how she'll celebrate her milestone birthday. We also talk the Sussex family Christmas card (!!!), the Queen's Christmas speech and Windsor castle intruder, the carol concert, a christening pic and so much more! Grab something hydrating to sip on while you listen in!--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal happenings at purewow.com/royals. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.