Podcasts about Cambridge

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  • 8,131PODCASTS
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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
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    Best podcasts about Cambridge

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    Latest podcast episodes about Cambridge

    The Thomistic Institute
    Music in the Catholic Tradition | Dr. George Corbett

    The Thomistic Institute

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 74:25


    This lecture was given on April 21, 2022 at The Christian Heritage Centre at Stonyhurst as part of "Catholicism and the Arts: An Intellectual Retreat." For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Dr George Corbett joined the School of Divinity in 2015. Previously, he held positions as Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Trinity College, and affiliated lecturer in Italian, University of Cambridge, where he also taught English literature and theology. He received his BA (double first), MPhil (distinction), and PhD (AHRC-funded) from the University of Cambridge. He has also studied in Pisa (as an Erasmus-Socrates exchange scholar at La Scuola Normale Superiore), Rome (Institutum Pontificium Alterioris Latinitatis), and Montella (Vivarium Novum). Dr Corbett directs CEPHAS (a Thomistic Centre for Philosophy and Scholastic Theology), TheoArtistry (a project linking up theologians and artists), and is leading on a new collaborative MLitt in Sacred Music.

    Boundless Body Radio
    The BioDiet with Dr. David Harper! 319

    Boundless Body Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 71:27


    Dr. David G. Harper is a health educator and cancer researcher, and has studied the impact of diet on human health for many years. The culmination of that extensive work is the BioDiet , a ketogenic food regimen that he created in 2012. The significant weight loss and health improvements he experienced led Dr. Harper to counsel thousands of people on the BioDiet, in clinical trials and on a personal basis, with consistent, impressive results. He is the author of the bestselling book BioDiet: The Scientifically Proven, Ketogenic Way to Lose Weight and Improve Health, which has become an international best-seller, reaching as high as #18 globally for books overall on Amazon.com. Dr. Harper is an Associate Professor of Kinesiology at the University of the Fraser Valley and a Visiting Scientist at the BC Cancer Research Center, Terry Fox Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in comparative physiology at the University of Cambridge. He is on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Canadian Clinicians for Therapeutic Nutrition and a member of the Institute for Personalized Therapeutic Nutrition. His present research investigates the therapeutic benefits of ketogenic diets for women with metastatic breast cancer. He is a great friend and a great human being!Find Dr. Harper at-https://www.biodiet.org/LK- Dr. David G. HarperFB- @Dave HarperCheck out his amazing talk at Keto Salt Lake 2022!Find Boundless Body at-myboundlessbody.comBook a session with us here! 

    Phil in the Blanks
    Free Speech And The Effects Of Cancel Culture

    Phil in the Blanks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 57:08


    Solveig Gold, a senior research assistant at Princeton's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions and PhD candidate in classics at the University of Cambridge, joins Dr. Phil to discuss free speech and the effects of cancel culture. Gold and Dr. Phil discuss her relationship with Dr. Joshua Katz, and why she says he went from one of the most popular professors at Princeton to a pariah. New episodes drop Tuesdays. Listen, follow and subscribe. For more information: https://www.drphilintheblanks.com/ NUTRISYSTEM: Go to https://www.nutrisystem.com/Phil22 right now and receive over $300 in savings. Don't wait. This special offer will not last long. KA'CHAVA is offering 10% OFF for the listeners of our podcast. Go to: https://www.kachava.com/collections/blanks-podcast to get 10% OFF your order.   Interested in advertising on the show? https://www.advertisecast.com/PhilintheBlanks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    History Tea Time
    10 Future Monarchs of Europe

    History Tea Time

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:41


    Only 10 hereditary monarchies endure in Europe. Let's meet the heirs who are in line to wear the crowns: Belgium: Princess Elisabeth, Duchess of Brabant Denmark: Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark; Prince Christian, Count of Monpezat The Netherlands: Catharina-Amalia, Princess of Orange Norway: Haakon, Crown Prince of Norway; Princess Ingrid Alexandra Spain: Leonor, Princess of Asturias Sweden: Victoria, Crown Princess of Sweden The United Kingdom: Charles, Prince of Wales; Prince William, Duke of Cambridge; Prince George Luxembourg: Guillaume, Hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg; Prince Charles Liechtenstein: Alois, Hereditary Prince of Liechtenstein; Prince Joseph Wenzel Monaco: Jacques, Hereditary Prince of Monaco Join me every Tuesday when I'm Spilling the Tea on History! Check out my Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/lindsayholiday Please consider supporting me at https://www.patreon.com/LindsayHoliday and help me make more fascinating videos! Intro Music: Baroque Coffee House by Doug Maxwell For business inquiries, please contact LindsayHoliday@ellifyagency.com #RoyalFamily #RoyalsofEurope #HistoryTeaTime #LindsayHoliday --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historyteatime/support

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show
    Rob McConnell Interviews - JAMES ABBOTT - The Outsider's Guide to UFOs

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 46:47


    Following a short scholarship to Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, Abbott completed a bachelor's degree in politics and economics at the University of York, England and later researched a master's thesis at the University of Cambridge on global trade in the aerospace industry. His career has encompassed time in the aerospace sector, marketing, university teaching and commercial research. He's written and contributed to around a dozen academic books on political theory, business, several editions on applied economics, and countless lengthy reports including a good few on the aerospace industry. His greatest professional love is research; having the view that there aren't that many jobs in which one gets paid for having fun, but that's what research is like for him. Abbott is a member of the Market Research Society, the Chartered Institute for Human Resources, and the British Interplanetary Society, and lives with his wife in Yorkshire, England. Website: www.jamestabbott.com

    Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
    206 | Simon Conway Morris on Evolution, Convergence, and Theism

    Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 76:59 Very Popular


    Evolution by natural selection is one of the rare scientific theories that resonates within the wider culture as much as it does within science. But as much as people know about evolution, we also find the growth of corresponding myths. Simon Conway Morris is a paleontologist and evolutionary biologist who's new book is From Extraterrestrials to Animal Minds: Six Myths of Evolution. He is known as a defender of evolutionary convergence and adaptationism — even when there is a mass extinction, he argues, the resulting shake-up simply accelerates the developments evolution would have made anyway. We talk about this, and also about the possible role of God in an evolutionary worldview.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Simon Conway Morris received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Cambridge. He is currently an emeritus professor of evolutionary paleobiology in the Department of Earth Sciences at Cambridge. Among his awards are the Walcott Medal of the National Academy of Sciences and the Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London. Cambridge web pageGoogle scholar publicationsWikipediaAmazon author pageSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The Douglas Coleman Show
    The Douglas Coleman Show w_ David M Kelly and Richard Stephens

    The Douglas Coleman Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:29


    David M. Kelly writes fast-paced, near-future sci-fi thrillers with engaging characters, cynical humor, and plausible science. He is the author of the Joe Ballen series, Logan's World series, and the Hyperia Jones series, and has been published in Canadian SF magazine Neo-opsis.David's interest in science and technology began early. At the age of six his parents allowed him to stay up late into the night to watch the television broadcast of Neil Armstrong stepping on to the surface of the moon. From that day he was hooked on everything related to science and space.An avid reader, he worked his way through the contents of the mobile library that visited his street, progressing through YA titles (or ‘juveniles' as they were known back then) on to the classics of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and Harry Harrison.David worked for many years in project management and software development. Along the way his interests have included IPSC combat (target) pistol shooting, crew chief on a drag racing team, and several years as bass player/vocalist in a heavy rock band. He also managed to fit in some real work in manual jobs from digging ditches and assembly lines jobs to loading trucks in a haulage company.http://davidmkelly.comBorn in Simcoe, Ontario, in 1965, I was raised and still reside in Cambridge, Ontario. I began writing circa 1974, a bored child looking for something to while away the long, summertime days. My penchant for reading, 'The Hardy Boys,' led to an inspiration one sweltering summer afternoon, when my best friend and I thought, ‘We could write one of those.' And so, I did.As my reading horizons broadened, so did my writing. 'Star Wars' inspired me to write a 600-page novel about outer space that caught the attention of a special teacher, Mr. Woodley, who encouraged me to keep on writing.A trip to a local book store saw the proprietor introduce me to Stephen R. Donaldson and Terry Brooks. My writing life was forever changed.At 17, I left high school to join the working world to support my first son. For the next twenty-two years I worked as a shipper at a local bakery. At the age of 36, I went back to high school to complete my education. After graduating with honors at the age of thirty-nine, I became a member of our local Police Service, and worked for 12 years in the provincial court system.In early 2017, I resigned from the Police Service to pursue my love of writing full-time. With the help and support of my lovely wife Caroline and our 5 children, I have now realized my boyhood dream. http://richardhstephens.comThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. We also offer advertising. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

    Bible Reflections
    Spiritual superheroes - the next generation

    Bible Reflections

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


    Graham Daniels from StAG Church, Cambridge on 24/04/2005

    The C3 Church Podcast
    Living Like Jesus - Online Only Series with John

    The C3 Church Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 23:42


    The C3 Church Podcast
    Living like Jesus - Church Online series with Rosemarie

    The C3 Church Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 19:49


    Members of the Chamber
    Family Business, with Robertson Kadwell

    Members of the Chamber

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 17:01


    Today we're joined by Nancy Robertson and her children Andrew & Joanna Kadwell. Together, they make up Robertson Kadwell, a Real Estate business serving Oakville, Halton, Hamilton, Cambridge & Toronto.On this episode we cover a few different perspectives of a family business, including starting your own business & bringing in your family, joining a business that was started by your parent, and achieving career goals while working in the family business.

    Hey It Gets Better
    27 - Caitlin Rozario: Breaks, Anxiety and You Don't Need To Fix Yourself

    Hey It Gets Better

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 42:29


    This week I am joined by Caitlin Rozario, an incredibly impressive human. Caitlin is the co-founder of interlude, a new way for businesses and workers to supercharge their productivity through the power of high-quality work breaks. Caitlin is determined to drive positive change in workplace culture and ultimately make work days better. A content marketer by trade, Caitlin graduated from Cambridge and UCL and recently completed her MBA.In this episode, Caitlin talks about her experience of losing her sight whilst she was at university, how taking breaks was important for her and inspired Interlude. Caitlin also shares her experience of anxiety and why we don't need to fix ourselves. Not only is Cailtin an example of how life gets better but she is making the lives of others better too. If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and share it with your friends.

    Bums On Seats
    The Cambridge Film Show 06/08/2022

    Bums On Seats

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 56:45


    We take a fortnightly foray into the latest film releases with discussion on stylish action comedy Bullet Train, thrilling rescue drama Thirteen Lives, and pet-based superhero fun in DC Leagues […]

    Forward Church Cambridge Sermons
    Filtered: The Truth Filter (Kirk Giles)

    Forward Church Cambridge Sermons

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 33:56


    We live in a world where it can feel impossible to determine what is true. As Christians, we determine truth by starting with Scripture. Jesus reminds us in John 17:17 that, God's word is true and in John 16:13, we're reminded that every Christian has the Holy Spirit living in them who is also referred to as the Spirit of Truth. In contrast to that, we face an enemy in Satan, who is a liar (John 8:44) and he uses lies to attack us. If we are to not only survive but thrive as followers of Jesus, we need to commit ourselves to being people who filter every word and thought through the truth of God's word.

    Car Talk
    #2263: Sister Mary Anne's Tire Fund

    Car Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 35:09 Very Popular


    On the occasion of moving to their new fair city of Cambridge, MA the brothers tempt fate by weighing in on Sister Mary Anne's problems with her Plymouth as well as Karl's Honda horn and Scott's unalignable minivan. All this and the new puzzler on this episode of the Best of Car Talk.

    The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast
    On the Shelf for August 2022 - The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast Episode 236

    The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 31:16


    On the Shelf for August 2022 The Lesbian Historic Motif Podcast - Episode 236 with Heather Rose Jones Your monthly roundup of history, news, and the field of sapphic historical fiction. In this episode we talk about: Call for submissions for the 2023 LHMP audio short story series. See here for details. Daughter of Mystery is out in audiobook QueerPodcasts.net Vintage Lesbians (podcast) Recent and upcoming publications covered on the blogCastle, Terry. 1993. The Apparitional Lesbian. Columbia University Press, New York. iSBN 0-231-07653-3 Huebner, Sabine R. & Christian Laes (eds). 2019. The Single Life in the Roman and Later Roman World. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. ISBN 978-1-108-47017-9 New and forthcoming fictionThe Valkyrie's Daughter by Tiana Warner Infamous by Lex Croucher My Lady's Shadow: Power and intrigue in Medieval France by Coirle Mooney The Lady's Keeper by Coirle Mooney The Cloistered Lady by Coirle Mooney Set in Stone by Stela Brinzeanu Mademoiselle Revolution by Zoe Sivak The Inconvenient Heiress (The Spinsters of Inverley #1) by Jane Walsh Ashthorne by April Yates The Lady Adventurers Club by Karen Frost The Drowned Woods by Emily Lloyd-Jones The Oleander Sword (Burning Kingdoms 2) by Tasha Suri What I've ConsumedThe Grief of Stones by Katherine Addison An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole This month we interview Rebecca Fraimow and talk about:The Yiddish theatre in late 19th c Russia and after Rebecca's series of queer Jewish historic fantasy stories Sienna, Noam (ed). 2019. A Rainbow Thread: An Anthology of Queer Jewish Texts from the First Century to 1969. Print-O-Craft, Philadelphia. ISBN 978-0-9905155-6-2 (link is to LHMP blog entry) “Further Arguments In Support of Yudah Cohen's Proposal to Bluma Zilberman” by Rebecca Fraimow (Podcastle) “Shaina Rubin Keeps Her Head Under Circumstances Nobody Could Have Expected” by Rebecca Fraimow (Podcastle) “Gitl Schneiderman Learns to Live With Her In-Laws” by Rebecca Fraimow (Podcastle) “God of Vengeance” by Sholem Asch (Wikipedia link for Sholem Asch) Indecent xx (link to IMDb.com) ”Fearfully and Wonderfully Made” by Rebecca Fraimow (in Kaleidotrope) A transcript of this podcast is available here. (Interview transcripts added when available.) Links to the Lesbian Historic Motif Project Online Website: http://alpennia.com/lhmp Blog: http://alpennia.com/blog RSS: http://alpennia.com/blog/feed/ Twitter: @LesbianMotif Discord: Contact Heather for an invitation to the Alpennia/LHMP Discord server The Lesbian Historic Motif Project Patreon Links to Heather Online Website: http://alpennia.com Email: Heather Rose Jones Twitter: @heatherosejones Facebook: Heather Rose Jones (author page) Links to Rebecca Fraimow Online Website: https://rebeccafraimow.com/ Twitter: @ryfkah

    Keeping Up With The Windsors
    Princess Charlotte Steals The Show | Is William the #princeofpegging? | Commonwealth Games Royal Engagements

    Keeping Up With The Windsors

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 23:55 Very Popular


    Listener Discretion Advised:  *We talk about adult themes in this week's episode so if you have little ones around, you may want to wear headphones or listen at a more convenient time.  Thank you so much for listening.    What you will hear during today's episode: - Princess Charlotte has fun at Royal engagements for the Commonwealth Games  with Prince William and The Duchess of Cambridge and we see a cute video cheering on the Women's England Football Team. - Prince William hit the rumour mill this week with the trending hashtag #princeofpegging. How did he bounce back from this week's salacious gossip? - Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn were out and about at the Commonwealth Games with the Earl and Countess of Wessex  - And, Prince Charles and The Duchess of Cornwall opened the Commonwealth Games on behalf of The Queen Lots and lots to talk about Royal Community, so press play and let's get going.

    On the Media
    Handle with Care

    On the Media

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 50:06 Very Popular


    A group of climate scientists warn that the potential for humanity's mass extinction has been dangerously underexplored. On this week's On the Media, we hear how facing our planet's fragility could inspire hope, instead of despair, and a physicist explains how creation stories are essential for understanding our place in the universe. Luke Kemp [@LukaKemp], a Research Associate at Cambridge's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, on a new study that says we need to put more attention on the possibility of human extinction and other climate catastrophes. Bryan Walsh [@bryanrwalsh], editor of Vox's ‘Future Perfect,' also explains why our brains have a hard time processing catastrophes like climate change. Listen. Charles Piller [@cpiller], investigative reporter for Science Magazine, on his six month investigation into how faulty images may invalidate groundbreaking advancements in Alzheimer's research. Listen. Guido Tonelli, a particle physicist at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on the importance of creation myths, and what scientists can tell us about the fragility of the universe. Listen.

    LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
    Keynote 3: Sunaina Maira on a long war of position: Palestine, BDS, and besieging the siege

    LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 32:55


    This keynote lecture took place at the Gramsci in the Middle East & North Africa Conference organised by the LSE Middle East Centre in cooperation with Ghent University. The conference explored, through empirically-grounded research, how Gramsci's work can help us make sense of our contemporary moment in the region marked by a significant expansion in resistance and uprising. Sunaina Maira is Professor of Asian American Studies, and is affiliated with the Middle East/South Asia Studies program and with the Cultural Studies Graduate Group at the University of California, Davis. Her research and teaching focus on Asian, Arab, and Muslim American youth culture, migrant rights and refugee organizing, and transnational movements challenging militarization, imperialism, and settler colonialism John Chalcraft is Professor of Middle East History and Politics in the Department of Government at the LSE. He graduated with a starred first in history (M.A. Hons) from Gonville and Caius college Cambridge in 1992. He then did post-graduate work at Harvard, Oxford and New York University, from where he received his doctorate with distinction in the modern history of the Middle East in January 2001. He held a Research Fellowship at Caius college (1999-2000) and was a Lecturer in Modern Middle Eastern History in the Department of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Edinburgh University from 2000-05. This conference was supported by the Departments of Government, Sociology, and the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme based at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE.

    MILLWALL No 1 Likes Us Talkin!
    OUR MILLWALL FAN SHOW Sponsored by Dean Wilson Family Funeral Directors 05/08/22

    MILLWALL No 1 Likes Us Talkin!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 58:36


    Join Gary Staff and his panel of Patricia Maslin, George Lampey, and Dave Hart for our third show of the season. The team reviewed our matches against Stoke and Cambridge. Former Millwall player and Millwall Exec Lounge Host Brian Horne considered Millwall's season ahead, and spoke about his own career. Tim Sells, Football and Sports Development Manager at Millwall Community Trust reflected upon the Player Performance Pathway, Premier League Kicks, and mental health sessions. Jeff Burnige looked back upon Phil Walker's funeral and the celebration of Phil's life. Libby Stubbs, former Millwall Lionesses skipper gave her thoughts on departing the Lionesses in the closed season. The team previewed our match against Sheffield United.

    Nightside With Dan Rea
    The Feud Continues... (8 p.m.)

    Nightside With Dan Rea

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 40:18


    The feud continues between Cambridge business owners and the Cambridge City Council over the city's 2020 Cycling Safety Ordinance that requires installation of separated bike lanes. As a result of the constructed bike lanes, local businesses have had some of their parking and loading zones removed, which they claim has had a huge negative impact on their businesses. Dan checked in with multiple Cambridge business owners about the ongoing lawsuit between Cambridge Streets For All and the City of Cambridge.

    Interviews by Brainard Carey
    Meghann Riepenhoff

    Interviews by Brainard Carey

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 20:29


    Meghann Riepenhoff © Geoffrey Berliner Meghann Riepenhoff's (b. 1979; Atlanta, GA) work has been presented internationally in exhibitions across the globe, including at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR; Denver Art Museum, CO; C/O Berlin, Germany; Aperture Foundation, New York, NY; and Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX. Her work is held in permanent collections across the United States, including those of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA; Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, MA; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL, among others. In 2018, the artist was selected as the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow. Riepenhoff earned her BFA in Photography from the University of Georgia, Athens, and her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. The artist divides her time between Bainbridge Island, WA, and San Francisco, CA. Her book, mentioned in the interview is Ice. Meghann Riepenhoff , Waters of the Americas: Eastman Kodak's Emissions A (Confluence of the Genesee River and Lake Ontario, Rochester, NY, 03.14.2022), 2022 Three Dynamic Cyanotypes, Approximately 59 1/2" x 42" (151 x 106.5 cm) each element. © Meghann Riepenhoff, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York  Meghann Riepenhoff, Waters of the Americas: Eastman Kodak's Emissions C (Confluence of the Genesee River and Lake Ontario, Rochester, NY, 03.13.2022), 2022. Dynamic Cyanotype, Approximately 59" x 59" (150 x 150 cm) © Meghann Riepenhoff, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York 

    Royally Obsessed
    A Whole Lotta Lottie

    Royally Obsessed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 30:36


    Looking for royal news? A good laugh? A healthy distraction? Just a cocktail recco? You've come to the right place! This week, the ladies are chatting all about Princess Charlotte's RENAISSANCE era, Meghan's birthday celebrations, Omid Scobie's new book, Earthshot updates, Charles's latest scandal, the Prince of Pegging and more. Grab a Kir Royale (and an In-N-Out burger) and tune in.--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal happenings at purewow.com/royals. Shop Royally Obsessed sweatshirts and totes at shop.royallyobsessed.com. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Pod Save The Queen
    Royals at football, Royals at Commonwealth games... Are we a sport podcast now?!

    Pod Save The Queen

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 26:25


    It's been a very sporty week for the royals! Zoe Forsey and Russell Myers sit down to look back at the Cambridges' day out at the Commonwealth Games, which was Princess Charlotte's first official engagement without her big brother George. Proud mum Kate also revealed her daughter's favourite sport and Charlotte got to meet some exciting stars. She also sent a special good luck message to England's Lionesses ahead of their Euro 2022 Final - and Prince William couldn't hide his excitement when the Ladies finally brought football home! We also look ahead to the royals' summer and what's happening with the Cambridge family's move to Windsor.

    The Gramophone podcast
    A Gramophone Archive Podcast: Andrew Nethsingha on the new album from St John's College, Cambridge

    The Gramophone podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 31:27


    During holiday periods, we occasionally revisit past podcasts, and this week, prompted by the announcement that Andrew Nethsingha will be succeeding James O'Donnell as Organist and Choirmaster of Westminster Abbey, we return to a conversation from November last year. Editor Martin Cullingford was joined by Andrew, Director of the Choir of St John's College, Cambridge to discuss the choir's new album on Signum, 'The Tree' - as well as the recent announcement that the choir will soon welcome female voices for the first time in its history. 

    Language of God
    77. Bill Newsome | Neuroscience, Faith & Free Will

    Language of God

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 57:32


    In this conversation with acclaimed Stanford neuroscientist Dr. Bill Newsome, we hear about his journey to becoming a neuroscientist, how hundreds of millions of neurons enable the fantastic emergence of a unified visual world, and how free will might operate in relation to the seemingly infinite causal chains which bring us all to this moment. Along the way, Dr. Newsome shares his own experiences with science and faith and why biological explanations should not be seen as weapons beating back the claims of Christianity.  This episode originally aired on May 27, 2021 Join a conversation about this episode on the BioLogos Forum. UK listeners, we're coming your way! Check out the live podcast event in Cambridge on 7th September and get your tickets here.

    The Thomistic Institute
    Dante's Beatrice and the Beauty of the Christian Faith | Dr. George Corbett

    The Thomistic Institute

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:57


    This lecture was given on April 20, 2022 at The Christian Heritage Centre at Stonyhurst as part of "Catholicism and the Arts: An Intellectual Retreat." For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Dr. George Corbett is a Senior Lecturer in Theology and the Arts at the University of St Andrews. Previously, he held positions as Junior Research Fellow in Philosophy, Trinity College, and affiliated lecturer in Italian, University of Cambridge, where he also taught English literature and theology. He received his BA (double first), MPhil (distinction), and PhD (AHRC-funded) from the University of Cambridge. He has also studied in Pisa (as an Erasmus-Socrates exchange scholar at La Scuola Normale Superiore), Rome (Institutum Pontificium Alterioris Latinitatis), and Montella (Vivarium Novum). Dr. Corbett directs CEPHAS (a Thomistic Centre for Philosophy and Scholastic Theology), TheoArtistry (a project linking up theologians and artists), and is leading on a new collaborative MLitt in Sacred Music.

    Queries, Qualms, & Quirks
    Author and Poet Donna Gordon and the Desire to Put Words Together

    Queries, Qualms, & Quirks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 27:08


    Author and Poet Donna Gordon joins Queries, Qualms, & Quirks this week to discuss switching from poetry to prose, the impact of mentors, a long interruption of her writing career, how her visual art helps her writing, needing to write, learning to put herself first, going from being a writer to an author, the stamina it takes to write and sell a book, and collaborating with people who can see things you can't see. Donna Gordon is a Cambridge, MA-based writer. She graduated from Brown, and was then a Stegner Fellow at Stanford, a PEN Discovery, and Ploughshares Discovery. She was a 2017 Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers Conference, and a fellow at the Vermont Studio Center in 2017 and 2018. She received the 2018 New Letters Publication Award for What Ben Franklin Would Have Told Me, which has been named by the Independent Book Review as one of the top 45 they're excited about for 2022. Donna: Query | Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Amazon | Bookshop | IndieBound QQQ Home Base | Support on Patreon Read the full transcript. If links aren't clickable, find them here: https://bit.ly/qqqdonnagordon This page includes affiliate links. Please use them if you'd like to support the show.

    Italian Wine Podcast
    Ep. 1028 Action Not Perfection...Internalizing Climate Change | Wine2Wine Recorded Sessions

    Italian Wine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 45:29


    Welcome to Episode 1028; Action not perfection the business sense of internalizing Climate Change Welcome to Wine2Wine Business Forum 2021 Series. More about today's speaker: Riccardo Pasqua, 43, took over the role of CEO at the end of 2015. Riccardo began his career with Pasqua in2007 and in 2014 was appointed Sales Director, a role that he is still involved with today. He was head of business in the United States before being nominated to lead the company. To find out more visit: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pasquawinesitaly Instagram: @riccardo.pasqua @pasquawines Twitter: @ny_pasqua @pasquawinery Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/riccardo-pasqua-5a7b1443/ More about today's Speaker: Marta Mendonca has built most of her career in Marketing & Sales, having worked with various brands, countries, industries and companies. In the years prior to joining Porto Protocol, Marta built her own brand and consultancy project, through which she took sustainability and climate advocacy to schools, events and companies, promoting awareness and encouraging change. Since 2019 Marta has been managing The Porto Protocol Foundation, building a collaborative network of change makers and an open platform of climate solutions, with the purpose of accelerating the response of the wine industry to the climate emergency. To find out more visit: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/martamendonca/ To find out more about today's Speaker: Michele Manelli was born in Sassuolo (northern Italy, close to Modena), raised in Paris and is living in Tuscany since more than twenty years. As a vintner in Montepulciano, he founded and developed Salcheto, a wine producing operation, as a model of sustainable efficiency, firmly convinced that businesses in general are the key actors for a new social progress. Over the last decade he has been directly engaged in promoting projects of research, development and wine value-chain lobbying oriented to sustainability, such as the “Charter of Montepulciano for the Wine Carbon Footprint (2010) or the “Forum for Wine Sustainabilty (2013-2015), for which he acted as co-founder and author of the “2014 Report on Sustainability. To find out more visit: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Salcheto Instagram: @salcheto Twitter: @salchetowinery More about today's Speaker: Nick Breeze is a British journalist currently based in Italy reporting on wine and climate change. He writes for his own wine blog, Secret Sommelier, as well The Ecologist and, more recently, GENN.cc. In 2011 he began a filmed series of interviews with internationally renowned scientists and climate experts. In 2017 he cofounded the Cambridge Climate Lecture Series inviting leading experts to give lectures at the University of Cambridge. Over the last decade Nick has interviewed hundreds of climate experts and winemakers and documented the convergence of the two subjects as they entered mainstream discourse. To find out more: Instagram: @nickgbreeze Twitter: @nickgbreeze LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nickgbreeze/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, cin cin!

    TNT Radio
    Dr Stephanie Seneff & Hon Matthew Robson on The Mike Ryan Show - 03 August 2022

    TNT Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 55:54


    GUEST 1 OVERVIEW: Dr Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. She has a BS degree from MIT in biology and MS, EE and PhD degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. Her recent interests have focused on the role of toxic chemicals and micronutrient deficiencies in health and disease, with a special emphasis on the pervasive herbicide, glyphosate, and the mineral, sulfur. Since 2008, she has authored over three dozen peer-reviewed journal papers on these topics. She is the author of a book on glyphosate, titled "Toxic Legacy: How the Weedkiller Glyphosate Is Destroying Our Health and the Environment", which was released by Chelsea Green publishers on July 1 2021. This book was selected by Kirkus Reviews as one of the best non-fiction books of 2021. GUEST 2 OVERVIEW: The Honorable Matthew Robson is an Auckland barrister, and a former cabinet Minister of the New Zealand Parliament. In the Labour-Alliance coalition government of 1999 to 2002, he was Minister of Disarmament, Minister of Corrections, Minister for Courts, Minister for Land Information, and Associate Minister of Foreign Affairs (with responsibility for foreign aid).

    Skip the Queue
    From award winning breakfast cereal to award winning visitor attraction. The story of Pensthorpe with Bill and Deb Jordan

    Skip the Queue

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 46:27


    Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.pensthorpe.com/about-us-history/https://www.edp24.co.uk/news/business/why-running-pensthorpe-near-fakenham-makes-you-feel-good-by-1395106https://www.bbc.co.uk/norfolk/content/articles/2008/05/23/springwatch_jordans_interview_20080523_feature.shtml Leading the flock are the enigmatic owners of Pensthorpe; Bill and Jordan. Prior to purchasing Pensthorpe in 2003, the couple lived in Bedfordshire where Deb had a successful career in fashion and photography, and Bill ran Jordans, the hugely successful cereal business he co-founded with his brother.Wanting to raise their two children in Deb's native Northfolk, they jumped at the chance to buy Pensthorpe and combine Bill's knowledge of sustainable farming practices with their longstanding love of nature.They've been part of the landscape ever since. Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world. In today's episode, I speak with Bill and Deb Jordan, owners of Pensthorpe. Bill and Deb share the heartwarming highs and lows of creating this multi-award-winning tourist attraction. Have a listen in to find out what part Bill Oddie played in it all. If you like what you hear, subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Bill and Deb, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. It's absolutely lovely to see you both. We're going to start off with a few small icebreaker questions just to get us warmed up. So we're going to talk a little bit about cereal today. It's going to be part of the conversation. I want to know, what has been the worst food that you've both ever eaten?Bill Jordan: Oh, my word. I think school food didn't exactly do much for us.Kelly Molson: School dinners?Deb Jordan: One of my flatmates once complained that I had a tin of meatballs in the fridge that was open. So now I realise that many moons ago, I did used to eat badly in London.Kelly Molson: All right. Tins of cold meatballs in the fridge. To be fair, I quite like cold beans straight out of the tin.Bill Jordan: Oh, really.Kelly Molson: So I'd probably go for the cold meatballs, actually.Bill Jordan: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I might be all right with that. Let's go for your unpopular opinions.Deb Jordan: An unpopular opinion. I get very wound up about spin. I really do go off on one. It could be about anything where people actually say, so they pick up on something like children using mobile phones. Therefore, they will say that their business prevents that, and it's all to do with the fact that X, Y, Z. I just get frustrated when people use something that they've heard of in the press that is good for people. Even if it's like a cereal packet where it's saying this is healthy for you. Probably because I'll know that Bill will tell me exactly how many calories it's got in it. It's all a load of rubbish. But that is an opinion I get very wound up about. I hope I don't then fall into the frame of actually being accused of doing the same thing.Bill Jordan: I think when I heard the question, I got slightly concerned that I'd reached a sort of age where I didn't even recognise whether the views are unpopular or not.Kelly Molson: We're all getting there, Bill. Oh, I love that. Well, that's a good opinion to have. I wouldn't say that's very unpopular, but I think that's a good opinion to have.Bill Jordan: Might be the definition of being out of touch.Kelly Molson: I doubt that very much considering what we're going to talk about today. We're going to talk about Pensthorpe today. I mean, I think it's one of Norfolk's best-kept secrets. Whenever I talk about Pensthorpe, I have been describing it to people recently and telling them how fabulous it is, and they go, "I've never been there. We go to Norfolk quite a lot." And I'm like, "Right. Well, you have to go there now." So I've convinced at least 10 people recently that Pensthorpe is top of their list of places to go. It's just phenomenal.Kelly Molson: But, I want to know what were your backgrounds prior to Pensthorpe? Because they're very different. They weren't in the attractions industry at all, were they?Deb Jordan: No, not at all. I think Bill needs to lead on that one.Bill Jordan: Okay. Well, mine, for about 30 ... Probably more years than that. I'd founded and was running with my brother a breakfast cereal company. I guess you'd call it such a natural food company in the days when there was a natural food movement. There was quite a reaction against factory food, which of course still goes on today. So my background was much more about food and land use and farming practice and local food and nutrition and all of those things, which I still find very fascinating. Although, thankfully, I'm not that closely involved as I used to be, because it's hard work.Kelly Molson: I can imagine that's hard work. Did you come from a farming background prior to that? Did you grow up in that environment?Bill Jordan: Yeah. We all grew up at on a flour mill, which still exists in Bedfordshire. Our mum still lives there. She's 96.Kelly Molson: Oh, wow.Bill Jordan: She's lived in the same house for over 70 years. Yeah, we were lucky. We got brought up as kids kind of above the shop, really. It was a mill that made white flour. It made brown flour. It made animal feed. It was an interesting place to live. A lot going on.Kelly Molson: Wow. You were kind of in it, right? You lived and worked there?Bill Jordan: Yeah. School holidays, you had to bag up animal feed or pack flour or something. It was kind of went with living there, really.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Deb, what about you? What's your background?Deb Jordan: Well, I was very lucky to be born and live in Ringstead in Norfolk, which is only about 20 minutes, 25 minutes drive away. My dad was a farmer on the Le Strange Estate. The farm ran at the back of old Hunstanton. Yeah, idyllic. In the summer holidays, we were very lucky to just be out, left to just roam. I think actually once I ran away. I found a really nice spot to sit for the day. And by about 7:00 PM, I thought, "Actually, nobody cares. Nobody's noticed." And that did actually really make me laugh. I remember saying to my mum when I got back, "Did you not know? Did you not notice I'd run away? So she'd, "No. I know you went out in a very mad mood. But no, I hadn't noticed yet, darling. The good thing is you were hungry and here you are."Deb Jordan: I just remember thinking, "Gosh, when you look back, how lucky that was." It sort of made you stand on your own two feet. You used to get involved with a bit of wild oat picking and have jumps around the farm, around the house. But sadly ... I say sadly because it didn't really suit me. I was sent away to boarding school quite a long way away and was rather rebellious and unhappy, but a very privileged start. I think that probably stays with you forever about the nature and the fun. There's so much to explore, and you don't really need too much else other than a bicycle and the nature to make a very happy childhood.Kelly Molson: Oh God, that's really lovely. Ringstead is a very beautiful place as well. There's a lovely pub there called The Gin Trap that I've been to a number of times. Yes.Deb Jordan: Spent a lot of my youth in The Gin Trap. Yes. Sipping gin and orange or something ghastly with a boyfriend from cross lake.Kelly Molson: Oh, what a lovely, so that's really nice to hear, actually. I didn't realise how kind of embedded nature had been into both of your childhoods really, which I guess brings us to Pensthorpe. And you purchased it in, it was in 2003, wasn't it? And it was originally a bird reserve. What made you make the jump into buying something like this and you know, how did that happen?Bill Jordan: Well, it was a very unusual day when we first got to see the Pensthorpe, we had the children were, I don't know, kind of able to walk by that time. And we had a day in wandering around Pensthorpe.Deb Jordan: Six and eight.Bill Jordan: Six and eight. There you go. I'm no good at it. So we had a day looking around Pensthorpe which kind of came out of the blue and no, I think we were sort of rather bowled over, knocked out by it all. It was, the kids was surprisingly quiet and reflective. We were having a good time and we'd read somewhere that it was possibly up for sale. So when we were walking out of Pensthorpe, we asked the lady behind the counter, "Is it still for sale? Has it been sold?" And they said, "Well, you better go and speak to that gentleman over there. That's Bill Mackins." And we did. And then we kind of got pulled into the whole site. Yes that's how it happened.Deb Jordan: It was actually, Bill had been looking for some years. He was always interested in properties for sale in Norfolk. I think he may have been thinking that his connection with Jordan's and conservation and great farming and that he, I think he was already feeling he needed to put his money where his mouth was and start something to do with food in the countryside. A bit like the sort of taste of north, but type thing I think was going on in the back of his head. So he was often buzzing around on the bicycle looking and when Pensthorpe came up, I actually saw it and he was looking at my magazine and I said, "No way, no, no, no." So actually then we were visiting Norfolk because we did a lot with our children to see my parents and it sort of came to that.Deb Jordan: Well, why don't we just go and look? And I really wasn't very on board at all, but I have to admit that once here it's an extraordinary site and it sort of pulls you in. It's a place that you sort of, not too sure why, but you feel very connected to it. And I think that it really surprised us that day that it took us in and it took us along and then meeting the owner and him connecting with the children. It must have been about this time of year because then obviously the birds molt and there was a lot of feathers that the children have just spent the whole time looking for feathers and putting them in a bag. And we had to sort of say to the owner, look, we haven't been plucking your birds. This whole collection is then explaining to us the molting, that how at this time of the year, everything, all the ducks and geese use their feathers and can't fly.Deb Jordan: So they're all on the ground. And it's extraordinary at the moment how we've got hundreds of gray legs and geese all sitting, waiting for that time where the feathers have grown through and they can then take off again. But it was just that he then had some peacock feathers and said, "Look here kids take these home." And he knew my dad. So he was saying that he had known my dad before he died. And so there was a sort of an immediate connection there. And then I think he could see that Bill was very interested. And then he suggested before we left, because we'd asked about it being up to sale, he told us that it'd fallen through and he suggested that Bill meet somebody called Tim Neva, that was working in Cambridge and was working locally. And that sort of rather started the ball rolling. Yeah.Bill Jordan: Yes. I think another sort of link had been the fact that with Jordan, so amongst other things, we'd done quite a lot of work on the supply chain for the cereals. So we were working by then with quite a lot of farmers who were quite conservation minded and were putting habitats onto their farm for increasing wildlife and doing all of those sort of things, which of course was being done at Pensthorpe. So it was an aspect of what we'd been used to in the food industry. And it was done being done very well here at Pensthorpe. So yeah, that's kind of how it fitted in as well.Kelly Molson: What a wonderful story. You went to visit and then ended up buying the place. I love that.Bill Jordan: Well, it was bit of a shock. It wasn't kind of on the cards that's for sure.Deb Jordan: No, I think it was funny things to, you could have looked back and at the time I think we could see the beauty of the place, the fact that you thought, oh my goodness, Nancy's bringing up a family here and getting connected to all this and the bird life and everything else. I think what probably happened, which was, in hindsight, wasn't so good was that this connection with somebody that was a very good salesperson on behalf of filmmakers, who was saying I'll bring my family from Brisbane in Australia because they ran the Mariba wetland out there. So I can run this for you. So we actually spent a lot of time working with Tim prior to buying it and hearing how he was going to bring his wife and do the total daily running of the place. And that it would be Deb, you can get involved in the hub and bringing in crafts people and local produce and local gift and Bill can get involved in farm when we see him, because it's going to, you were still at George.Deb Jordan: And it wasn't. So we signed on the dotted line up on December 20th, 2002. And about three weeks, four weeks later, we had a phone call from Tim Neva there about saying, "I'm really sorry, but my wife, my boys are older than I thought. They're very at home in Queensland. And Gwyneth doesn't feel that it's actually something she could do at the minute, but I will be very supportive and I will come and be helpful." So that was a big shock. And so we put the house up for sale and pretty well moved during Jan, Feb, March 2003.Bill Jordan: I think within about 10 weeks, poor Deborah had to move the children from one school to another and make sure he got some housing. You trying to sell the housing you're in Bedfordshire. So it was a bit of a traumatic time.Kelly Molson: Oh my goodness.Bill Jordan: Amusingly, our children, children. They're big. Now they remind us every now and then that what we put them through and shouldn't we be guilty. We have to take it on the chin every time they raise it.Kelly Molson: I bet. I mean, that's incredible. Isn't it? So you, so suddenly you've gone from, oh, okay, well we're going to do this, but we've got someone that will manage it for us to that's it. They're not coming and you are in it. This is your deal. You've got to do it. So Bill, were you still juggling Jordans at the same time? So you had,Bill Jordan: Yeah.Kelly Molson: You had both responsibilities.Bill Jordan: Jordans were still going full ball. Yeah.Kelly Molson: How did you manage that?Bill Jordan: Well the usual thing, I handed it over to the lady on my left here.Kelly Molson: Of course.Bill Jordan: We done most of it since then.Kelly Molson: Wow, Deb. That was, so that was not what you were expecting at all. And then suddenly you've had to completely change your life, move your children, move them to school, move home, and now you are managing a bird reserve.Deb Jordan: Yeah, we were very naive and it was a struggle. Yeah. I think we're both quite resilient and there really wasn't much that could be done other than let's just crack on. And just try and keep really focused and learn from all the people that were already here. And Tim was definitely in the mix, but I hadn't realised that it would mean moving that quickly or looking for somebody to manage it. It was pretty full on to suddenly find yourself as the person. They had an amazing book in the shop, which was all the garden and it was wildlife of the waterfowl of the world. And I remember putting it under my bed and got some binoculars and looked out at the lake every morning to see what was on there to identify what we'd got.Deb Jordan: And then it was such a small team. There was just four ladies in the shop that ran seven days. Two of them did. You know, and we had about two, two wardens or yes on the farm banding Paul and you know, it was, it was just a very small team and they were really helpful and they explained what I was meant to be doing what happened. And then Tim came and went and we sort of, and it grew. We didn't really have much of a plan I don't suppose. Bill kept saying to me all along whenever I said, "Look, we need a five or a 10 year plan." Or we just sort of, it evolved. We worked with the team and we started to sort of move slightly more towards trying to, we realised our kids aren't kids all get nature you don't have to explain it to them.Deb Jordan: It's just ingrained in them. So we realised we haven't got any young members. That everybody was older and more bird related. We'd really upset one or two of them who wrote in, we just, we had a woman that would offer to become a volunteer here. And she was a fabulous lady and she'd actually been GM at the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust. And she said, "Look Deb it's really important. We need to get more of a younger generation here. And so what we're going to do is we're going to do play. I worked at Fowl and Wetlands trust. And they did Wellie Boot Land and I'll eat my hat if it doesn't work." And Bill said, "I'll eat my hat if it does work." So we had to park Bill, luckily because Bill went home every Monday night, we'd sort of work on it quietly, Veronica, I and Mark, as to how we were going to get round Bill.Deb Jordan: But by actually investing in an outdoor play area that was as though it was in the water as though it was a nature child. We encouraged people to bring their kids so that by getting them further out into the park, they could learn more about nature. But actually sometimes I think it's the parents that you have to encourage to come to a nature reserve, because they sort of think, what am I going to do with the kids and the kids actually get it and love it. So and one or two of the members that sort of said, I'm sorry, but we are now dropping out. We think that you are making a big mistake. I'm pleased to say that I bumped into the grandparents one day who said, look, I'm going to own up we're the people that wrote to you and were very rude, but this is Dudley and he's our grandson and we can't get enough enjoyment and make enough lovely memories with Dudley. So we forgive you.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's so nice.Deb Jordan: Yeah.Bill Jordan: So we found quite a lot of the heavy duty birders might have started a bit nervous when they saw children's play and different things happening. But yeah, just as Deb explains, after a bit, they realised that yeah, they got grandchildren and here was somewhere that worked for them and you know, actually got to a couple more levels of generations within their family. So we were lucky there. And within the year I told Deb that it was all my idea anyway.Deb Jordan: As you do.Bill Jordan: As I like to.Kelly Molson: It's interesting because earlier you used the word reflective about Pensthorpe and that's very much how I felt when I visited there. And what I found really interesting is that the children's play areas because now you have an indoor play area and the outdoor play area, they have been designed so well that they don't detract from that reflective feeling. Does that make sense? Like I could, I came on my own, I didn't bring my daughter, but I could still see how you could bring your children there and just have the most brilliant day of fun. But it is still a very calm and peaceful. It has a very calm and peaceful energy to it, the place that, and that's, I think that really comes through the minute you arrive. That's that's how I felt.Deb Jordan: Yeah. I think when we tried to look at the site, which is really unique, because it's got so many different habitats and we sort of said to ourselves, "So how can we best use this?" And I think what we've tried to do is just like the play, which looks very natural. We've tried to continue the journey and so that you leave the play and then you head towards the wetland area. But there is a diversion where at the top of the Sandhill, there's in the wood, on the top of the Sandhill, overlooking the lake, there's this amazing den building area. And when you go up there you know very well that this is a family affair. There's no way that the kids have done the den building, but you pass through an area where we cut into the wetland and put a big ponder thing.Deb Jordan: And then we sort of take you further along to a wood at the end where if a huge tree has fallen in the middle of it Richard leaves it there. And then the root base is all explained as to what's going on there, wildlife and we mow a path to it. So you can actually know that you're meant to get on the tree and run along the trunk. And, and I think, in fact we had a meeting here two weeks ago, Eco Attractions and they were saying, which was the best thing I'd heard, best acclaim I'd had. They said, "We've been out there Deb. And we sort of get what you're talking about, that you come across all this wild play, this just natural what's there is being used to tell a story, but have fun with. And we think that the best way of explaining you is a bit like the lost gardens of Halligan." Well boy, that was-Bill Jordan: We didn't mind that at all.Deb Jordan: We didn't mind that.Kelly Molson: That is perfect.Deb Jordan: What we are trying to do is keep the natural, but just encourage people to go out and get further and further from the hub with the trails that Natalie does and her team, which is so brilliant.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it definitely comes across. So that is a perfect description of how I felt when I was there. I want to go back a little bit though, because we've kind of jumped forward. Let's go back to 2008 because you get a call from Springwatch. That must have been pretty exciting at the time. What did that do for the venue?Bill Jordan: Well, perhaps even before answering that, you ought to hear how it actually happened.Kelly Molson: Okay. Ooh, share!Bill Jordan: To tell you about a conversation we had with.Deb Jordan: Yeah. We'd been told that Bill Oddie wanted to come to Pensthorpe for his really wild show. And he was here specifically to look at corn crakes, which we were breeding and releasing with the RSPB and [inaudible 00:24:25] isn't it? And so he came and I hadn't really seen much of him because he'd been whisked away and he'd met the agriculturalist and the team and looked at the corn crakes and then he'd had a little wander as Bill does. And then he came back to the hub and I thought, oh, I'm not very good at selling myself, but there is nobody else. You just got to do this. I went out with my camera and I just said, look I'm Deb Jordan, and I hope you don't mind. Could I take your photos for our newsletter because it's so exciting to have you here.Deb Jordan: And he did this amazing sort of thumbs up picture and he said, "I'm going to do this. And then you can write the copy dead because I absolutely love this place. You can say whatever you like and I'll be happy." Yeah. And it was about three weeks after that, when he'd gone that we received a letter to say, Bill Oddie has put you forward as a possible site for the next move at Springwatch. So I think they'd only done three years in the farm in Devon.Bill Jordan: They had. Yeah.Deb Jordan: And so they felt, and then with it, since then they've moved, I think almost every three years. So when I got this letter, I turned to Martin and said, this is special. Put it under my pillow and it stayed there.Bill Jordan: Until they said, "Yes."Deb Jordan: It stayed there until, until we'd heard we've got it.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's amazing. Well done Bill Oddie. Thumbs up to Bill Oddie. So what, but what did that do that must have brought so much attention to the attraction?Deb Jordan: It was amazing for us because although we can hear sky larks on the hill, above the scrape and we can hear our wildlife and we see our wildlife, it was fantastic for us to really get a grip. But when you see those nests that these guys are so clever and professional about finding, and I remember taking the children to school one day and on the way, hearing Terry Wogan talking about the little ring lovers that had been seen the night before at Pensthorpe on the way to scrape. And I just have pulled into a laid iron with banging my head against the wheel think, oh my God, doesn't get any better than Terry Wogan talking about little ring lovers at Pensthorpe. But it was fabulous. It allowed people to see the breadth of everything, wildlife and habitat wise because it is unusual because we've got the river that runs straight right through the middle. We've got farmland and we've a farm that's running. We've got wetland, we've got gardens, we've got-Bill Jordan: It's 50 acres of lake.Deb Jordan: There's just every sort of habitat you could really want. And I think that allowed people to sort of think, well, that honey little place that we hear about might be worth a visit. So it did help put us on the map.Bill Jordan: I think we all learned quite a lot from it having us when I think there was probably up to 50, 60 people on site producing and one of the sort of excitements of the day for us was that we'd all been pulled back to the cafe building here, which they'd taken over and had about 40 different TV screens and monitors there. And we could see exactly all the bits that they filmed during the day and the night and all the bits that were current from being talked about and the interviews that were happening. Just to see the whole program put together a that end of the day, which was fascinating. And just the way they handled it and the way the sort of information they imparted to audiences is just, no, it was very clever, very clever indeed.Kelly Molson: Was it strange to see the place that you live on the telly?Deb Jordan: Very strange. In fact, one day, I can't quite remember what had happened, but because for eight o'clock they go live. I think it was something like a Muntjack in my garden. It was upsetting me. So I ran as I usually do, got my saucepan and banged my saucepan and prop people. Oh no. You know, and somebody said the next day, what was that noise we had to sort of cover up? But yeah, to tuck into the television, knowing, I mean, some nights we'd creep down and hide or be allowed quite close, but to have those people, to have Kate Humble here, Bill Oddie and then Bill Oddie swapped with Chris Packham. So to have Chris here for a couple of years and yeah, it was very, very special and-Bill Jordan: It was quite a good set for them. They used to, where we're sitting right now, just below us was a sort of room that was completely derelict. So the whole, all of these five cottages here were derelict and poor BBC took pity on us and put a few glass windows and things. And so we wouldn't look too impoverished.Kelly Molson: How kind of them.Bill Jordan: Very kind of them. Yeah.Kelly Molson: I want to ask a little bit, and it's something that you talked about right at the beginning where you said where you grew up, you kind of lived and worked and again now is where you live, and you work. How difficult is it for you to make that work in terms of your kind of like work life balance? Because you are kind of immersed in your business from the minute you wake up in the morning.Deb Jordan: Yeah.Bill Jordan: That not the clever bit, is it? It is hard work. It's quite hard work. And it needs to be mentioned just in case anyone else gets vague and puts their name down for a similar thing. It is hard work and you need to get on well with people and yeah, you are seven days a week, which is how an operation like this has to go. You've got people on site quite a lot of the day when they go home at five o'clock we get the park to ourselves and we can wander around.Deb Jordan: Yeah, I think even as far as the work side of thing, when I look out at the window, I'll immediately think, wow. How lucky. This is extraordinary. And then I'll immediately think all the things that I haven't yet achieved or are on my list for this week that's never long enough. And I think that, on its own, would've been enough. I think, to go through some of the hiccups that life throws to the whole COVID thing, the avian flu thing, those make you pause and really think. That was tough. So we've had some brilliant times, some really big successes, but those things sort of leave you slightly wounded. But there again you've got a big team and everybody's been through the same thing. The whole world has had to reorganise and regroup and move on.Deb Jordan: So yeah, I think that looking forward, one needs to be optimistic that we probably had our fair share of things that haven't really gone our way recently. But on the other hand, there's an awful lot to look forward to. And we've just done the new rebranding and we're very lucky with our marketing team that they totally understand this product. And when you've got a team behind you like that are so inspired by the site and are able to get that message across for all generations, whatever bit it is, whatever age you are, whether it's gardens or birds or families. It's a place for people to come and make memories. And thankfully, hopefully we are now, hopefully COVID is now a thing of the past and sadly avian flu won't be because it's still out there. And it's sort of becoming a real problem. You know, it hasn't really gone away this year for the UK even on Springwatch, we were watching the problems they've got in Scotland at the minute and even slightly closer to home again. So it is something that we are aware of and that we have to sort of rethink going forward, how, how you know, that we work with what we've got.Bill Jordan: We do. But I think we've also sort of figured out that actually there is even more sort of requirement, demand, whatever you call it for getting out there. And nature in its best form and walking and space and all of those things seem to be even more important to a lot of the visitors we talk to.Deb Jordan: Yeah. I think it definitely focused us on what is so special about this place? It's the freedom, it's the feeling of wellness out there, feeling of being able to put things that are worrying you that week away when you come to Pensthorpe. You get out there and you get diverted by the beauty of the place. You know, COVID was really problematic for everybody. I had started six months of chemotherapy in January 2020. So it was going into Norridge weekly for my chemo. So then when the country locked down, I would be sort of driving all with sweet leaf on the bad week. Somebody would be kind enough to drive me and whether it was with my daughter or whoever was kind enough to come with me, it seemed odd to be out on the roads.Deb Jordan: Because the first lock down, there was no one anywhere and you'd get to the hospital and the nurses were amazing, but concerned obviously. It was new to us all. So seeing them afraid but resilient and just pushing on whatever. It was a very unusual time and we did do some furlough, so it was very quiet here because we'd have like one warden in and one avian came and the gardener stayed and the maintenance guy stayed, but everybody in the hub was gone. It was a very extraordinary thing to know that our visitors sadly had no access and were really needing it. There were some very ill people that I was coming across in hospital that were really totally needing nature at that time. And they weren't allowed out in it. So that also, it was a time of sort of looking and seeing, and then the wonderful thing was when we were able to open up, just knowing that at last you could open the doors and people could do what they had so badly been wanting to do and get here and get back outside.Deb Jordan: And so we were very lucky that there was no fear from people that they would come and might get COVID here because there's so much space, as soon as we'd managed to alter the way into the park and get them through quickly. Yeah, sure. It was very rewarding to allow people to.Bill Jordan: Some people were very cautious, wouldn't they, for quite a long time for all the obvious reasons and all worked well.Kelly Molson: Gosh, you've really been through some very big highs and some very big lows there. Haven't you thank you for sharing that with us, Deborah and I'm really glad to see that you are recovered and enjoying your beautiful place again today. So let's talk about the future then, because we've talked loads about what's happened and what, what you've been through the venue has just won some really phenomenal awards. And I have to mention, so you were winners of the Large Visitor Attraction of the Year and winners of the Marketing Camp Campaign of the Year at the East of England Tourism Awards. But you also, you just won a bronze at a very large attractions award, very large toys of award didn't you?Deb Jordan: Yes, we did. We were absolutely thrilled. Yes. We couldn't quite believe that because we'd achieved winner of the east. Then I think they put all the winners of the east and maybe others as well, all the other regions. So you get put into a pot and then the whole thing starts again. And somebody from the nationally won then comes out and looks so you don't know when they're going to come or when they've been. But when we heard that we've been put through, that was extremely exciting. Yeah. To go to Birmingham with the team and accept that award. We had some huge competition with Chester Zoo and actually public actually.Kelly Molson: Oh yes.Bill Jordan: Some pretty huge sort of attractions. So we felt we'd done well to get in that sort of elevated company.Kelly Molson: Yeah. It's wonderful. It was so fabulous to see you get that, get that prize. I was really thrilled for you all. So what next? You've just had a beautiful rebrand and may I say also a beautiful website and it's really, you are in a really wonderful position of kind of exciting new things happening. So what's the plans for the venue?Deb Jordan: Well, I think, the site itself is always going to need investment. Whether it be a cafe which has got a kitchen that needs work on, we're looking at how to get visitors further afield of more exciting things. But those would probably be more about a planning application. We've been working on a new sculpture garden, which is absolutely in its infancy at the moment. And the whole idea is actually to try and encourage sculptors to loan work. So that we've been buying sculpture on a yearly basis, which the visitors seem to love. I often come across the stag with people, with their children sitting on it or the wild boar or whatever it is. And we've just got the new fantasy wide ferry and the dandelions, which are a huge, seem to be pleasing everybody.Deb Jordan: But the whole idea about that garden is actually to try and so that we can, when we've progressed it a little bit further, we can take photos and say to people, look it's not that we wanting to become a sculpture park, but we'd like for our members to be able to see other people's sculpture here, that they could have the opportunity to buy. So that's something that we're working on and it's very much in its infancy.Bill Jordan: There's a sort of ongoing program with reintroductions, which is pencil QNS. We've got a very good agricultural team led by Christy. And yeah, we're working with the MOD, ministry of defense, who are collecting eggs from various different air fields around the east of England. We're then incubating the eggs here, looking after the chicks until they're ready to be released in the washes or Ken Hill farm, which features in spring wash at the moment or this spring anyway. So yeah, there's a lot of that work goes on, which again our visitors, like they can't see a huge amount of it because obviously it's all got to be bio secure, but it's something they like to feel that they're supporting. And it's sort of something that suits the area and yeah, it's something fortunate that some members of the team here are very good at. So yeah, that continues a pace. What else?Deb Jordan: I think it's probably now sitting with the team and working on a more five, 10 year plan where we all know exactly where we're going and we are trying to just even become more wild. It's just trying to find that happy balance of people with giving them something to do that actually helping them want to get their kids further out into.Bill Jordan: Yeah. And there is a lot of space here. We keep going on about that. But you know, the reserve itself is probably 200 acres, but you've got in total more like 500 and we take the discovery tours, land Rover tours out onto the farmland where we're, the wardens are working hard on the habitats there, fulfill encouraging more biodiversity and more wildlife out in that part of the reserve as well. So yeah, it's all part of the same thing and I don't know that we're going to run out things to do.Kelly Molson: No, I think Deb's to-do list is getting longer by the minute. Isn't it? Thank you. This has been so lovely to talk to you. I would implore all of our listeners to please go and visit Pensthorpe because it is a really magical place. Bill Oddie was absolutely right about it. We were at the end of the podcast and we always ask our guests to recommend a book that they love. So it can be something that you've found useful for your career. It can be something that you just love from a personal perspective.Deb Jordan: Well mine, the one I'd suggest that everybody should read, is Fingers In the Sparkle Jar by Chris Packham. I think it may have won best book in the wildlife somewhere. But it's a very remarkable, raw. It gets absolutely into the vulnerability of people with Asperger's. And so Chris did this extraordinary program on television, which was Asperger's and me. And I was amazed by that and how he put himself into that position of saying what was going on in his life and how difficult it had been for him. And this book is very much his early memoir, probably from about five to about 17.Deb Jordan: And I think that it's just as any parent, anybody that has any sort of difficulties with actually fitting into a peer group. And I'm sure there are many people that either went through that themselves, when you are reading that book, you actually sort of feel the pain and you feel the vulnerability. And actually, I think it just makes us all as adults, especially aware if we've had that in our family, it helps us understand it. If we haven't got it in our family, it helps us understand it somewhere else. But it is a mesmerising read. So it's not like a chore. Everybody will read it and his descriptions and the way he explains his life in nature. It's just an absolute extraordinary book.Kelly Molson: I have not read that. That's going top of my list. That sounds wonderful. Bill, what about you?Bill Jordan: Well, we've just had a week away, which was rather nice. I read Sitopia by Carolyn Steel, which is a fascinating book. And it's talks about the way that we haven't been valuing food. We should be doing more on a local scale. The regenerational farming thing comes into it. And of course, Jake Finds and Holkham are all involved. And that's very much a Norfolk thing as well. So, no, I thought it was just a brilliant book. And again, we shouldn't be just talking about buying the cheapest food, although for some it's certainly necessary, but we should be looking at the importance of food in the civilisation rather than just what we can get away with and then factory farming and intensive farming it's got to change. Yeah. So that's my book.Kelly Molson: Very topical book. Thank you both. As ever listeners, if you would like to win those books, if you head over to our Twitter account and you retweet this episode announcement with the words I want Bill and Deb's books, then you will be in with a chance of winning a copy of them. Thank you both so much today. It's been such a pleasure to talk to you. I know that you've got a really exciting summer coming up. There's loads going on at Pensthorpe, and I'm looking forward to coming back and bringing my daughter over to see the place as well. I'll see you then.Deb Jordan: Fantastic. Thank you very much.Bill Jordan: Thank you very much.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us and remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by rubber cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

    UK True Crime Podcast
    The Cambridge Rapist: Episode 298

    UK True Crime Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:42


    Cambridge was a city full of terror. A masked man was on the loose violently sexually assaulting women in the City. And as the number of attacks increased, he was becoming ever more confident. He needed to be stopped....

    Virginia Water Radio
    Episode 633 (8-1-22): Two Great Waterbirds

    Virginia Water Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022


    CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:58).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-1-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 1 and August 8, 2022.  This is a revised repeat of an episode from August 2015. SOUNDS – ~4 sec – call from Great Egret then from Great Blue Heron. In this episode, we feature two mystery sounds, and a guest voice, to explore two striking birds—striking in looks, and striking in how they hunt.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess these two long-necked, long-legged wading birds. SOUNDS AND GUEST VOICE – ~30 sec – Voice: “At once he stirs and steps into the water, wading with imperial self-possession on his three-pronged, dragonish feet.  The water could not tremble less at the passage of his stilt legs as he stalks his dinner.  His neck arches like the bending of a lithe bow, one of a piece with the snapping arrow of his beak.” If you guessed, egret or heron, you're right!  The first call was from a Great Egret and the second from a Great Blue Heron.  The guest voice was Alyson Quinn, reading part of her “Lesson from an Egret,” inspired by a September 2007 visit to the Potomac River.  The word “egret” derives from an old German word for “heron,” a fitting origin for the many similarities between these two big birds.  The Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron are the two largest of 12 North American species of herons, egrets, and bitterns.  The Great Egret is strikingly white, while the Great Blue has only a partially white head over a bluish-gray body.  But a white subspecies of the Great Blue, called the Great White Heron, occurs in Florida.  Great Egrets and Great Blues both typically feed in shallow water, taking fish, amphibians, and other prey by waiting and watching quietly, then quickly striking with their long, sharp beaks.  The two species also share a history of having been widely hunted for their long plumes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the impact on their populations helped lead to nationwide bird-conservation efforts and organizations. Distinctive looks, behavior, and history make these two “Greats” a memorable and meaningful sight along Virginia's rivers, ponds, marshes, and other areas.  Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and thanks to Alyson Quinn for permission to share her “Lesson from an Egret,” which gets this episode closing words. GUEST VOICE – ~18 sec – “I want to be more like the egret, with the patience to be still without exhaustion, to never mind the idle currents or be dazzled by the glamour of light on water; but, knowing the good thing I wait for, to coil my hope in constant readiness, and to act in brave certitude when it comes.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 277, 8-10-15. The sounds of the Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Excerpts of “Lesson from an Egret” are courtesy of Alyson Quinn, from her blog “Winterpast” (September 21, 2007, post), available online at http://www.winterispast.blogspot.com/, used with permission.  Ms. Quinn made the recording after a visit to Algonkian Regional Park, located in Sterling, Va. (Loudoun County), part of the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.  More information about the park is available online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/algonkian-regional-park. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES (Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Upper two images: Great Egret along the New River near Parrott, Va. (Pulaski County); photos by Robert Abraham, used with permission.  Third image: Great Blue Heron in a marsh at Wachapreague, Va. (Accomack County), October 5, 2007.  Bottom image: Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, July 28, 2015. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREAT EGRETS AND GREAT BLUE HERONS The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service”: Great Egret “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202; and Great Blue Heron “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202. Great Egret Physical Description“Large, heavy, white heron with yellow-orange bill, black legs, long, slender neck, and long plumes extending beyond tail….” Behavior“Male selects territory that is used for hostile and sexual displays, copulation and nesting.  Adjacent feeding areas vigorously defended, both sexes defend.  …Migration occurs in fall and early spring along coast; winters further south than Virginia. …Foraging: alone in open situations; prefers fresh or brackish waters, openings in swamps, along streams or ponds; wader: stalks prey; known to participate in the 'leap-frog' feeding when initiated by cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis).  Prey are taken in shallow waters; prey usually includes insects, fish, frogs (adults and tadpoles), small birds, snakes, crayfish, and many others.  Nesting: in trees or thickets, 3-90 ft. above water in willows, holly, red cedar, cypress, and bayberry on dry ground in marshes.” Population Comments“Dangerously near extermination in early part of [20th] century due to plume hunting; population comeback hampered by loss of habitat, exposure to DDT and other toxic chemicals and metals. …[Predators include] crows and vultures….” Great Blue Heron Physical Description“Large grayish heron with yellowish bill, white on head, cinnamon on neck, and black legs,” Behavior“Territoriality: known to have feeding territory in non-breeding seasons, defended against members of same species.  Range: breeds from central Canada to northern Central America and winters from middle United States throughout Central America; in Virginia, is a permanent resident of the Coastal Plain. …Foraging: stands motionless in shallow water waiting on prey; occasionally fishes on the wing along watercourses, meadows and fields far from water.  They also take frogs, snakes, insects, and other aquatic animals.  Nesting: predominately in tall cedar and pine swamps, but may also be found on the ground, rock ledges, and sea cliffs; nests on platform of sticks, generally in colonies….” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“Salt or fresh shallow waters of lakes, ponds, marshes, streams, bays, oceans, tidal flats, and sandbars; feeds in surf, wet meadows, pastures, and dry fields.” SOURCES Used for Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home  (subscription required). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2006. Merriam-Webster  Dictionary:“Egret,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/egret;“Heron,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heron. National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation,” online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation. Oxford Dictionaries/Oxford University Press:“Egret,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/egret;“Heron,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/heron. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/:Great Blue Heron entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;Great Egret entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.The Waterbird Society, online at https://waterbirds.org/. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on birds in the family of herons, egrets, night-herons, and bitterns.Episode 118, 7-9-12 – Summertime sampler of birds, including Great Blue Heron. Episode 127, 9-10-12 – Green Heron. Episode 235, 10-13-14 – Black-crowned Night Heron.Episode 381, 8-14-17 – Midnight sounds near water, including Great Blue Heron.Episode 430, 7-23-18 – Marsh birds in Virginia, including Great Blue Heron and Least Bittern.Episode 478, 6-24-19 – Little Blue Heron.Episode 603, 11-15-21 – Fall bird migration, including Green Heron and Snowy Egret. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. 3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. 4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.