Podcasts about free thinking

positions regarding truth should be formed only on the basis of logic, reason, and empiricism

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Best podcasts about free thinking

Latest podcast episodes about free thinking

Arts & Ideas
Soil, Chickens and City Farms

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 43:13


Soil degradation threatens our ecosystem and is among the most significant problems at a global level for agricultural production, food security and sustainability. World Soil Day 2022 on December 5th aims to heighten soil awareness so ahead of this, Anne McElvoy explores changes to both rural and urban farming. Mike Collins charts the evolution of the city farm; Jim Scown considers the relationship between soils, science and literary realism in Victorian Britain; Catherine Oliver asks why a growing number of city dwellers are rising with the rooster & discovering community in chicken keeping and Peter Wright, a film director, discusses his documentary, Arcadia, which captures the magic of rural Britain and our changing views towards the land and has a soundtrack from Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp). Jim Scown is a New Generation Thinker and Post Graduate Researcher at Cardiff University Catherine Oliver, Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Geography, University of Cambridge Mike Collins is Head of Public Engagement for the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and has written an article for the BBC History magazine Peter Wright's documentary, Arcadia is being screened with the soundtrack by Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp) performed live in Sunderland on November 30th and can be seen in Leeds and London March 2023 You can find more discussions about Green Thinking in a collection on the Free Thinking programme website also available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - programmes includes episodes about mushrooms, forests, rivers, eco-criticism and designing the home https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2

Arts & Ideas
Morgan - A Suitable Case for Treatment

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 44:41


A smouldering gorilla suited man racing through London on a motorbike is one of many striking images from Karel Reisz's 1966 film that starred David Warner (who had just played Hamlet at the RSC) alongside Vanessa Redgrave and Robert Stephens. Matthew Sweet is joined by Stephen Frears who worked as assistant director on the film, the director's son Matthew Reisz and film historian Lucy Bolton to look back at the talents of both Karel Reisz (21 July 1926 - 25 November 2002) and David Warner (29 July 1941 – 24 July 2022). Producer: Torquil MacLeod You can find other episodes of Free Thinking focused on key films and TV programmes in a collection called Landmarks on the Free Thinking programme website including discussions of Enter the Dragon and Bruce Lee, Asta Nielsen and a silent Hamlet, Dirk Bogarde and The Servant, Glenda Jackson and Sunday Bloody Sunday https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01jwn44

Arts & Ideas
Arabian queens, Bangladeshi mothers and women's tales

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 44:52


Shahidha Bari looks at the voices of women emerging from new writing in novels, plays and histories. Zenobia, Mavia, and Khadijah are Arabian queens and noblewomen who feature in the new book by Emran Iqbal El-Badawi which looks at the way female rulers of Arabia were crucial in shaping the history of the region. Hannah Khalil's new play at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at the Globe in London imagines a writers room of women weaving the tales that will last Scheherazade for 1,001 nights. And, Abdul Shayek's new production at the Tara Theatre in London is based on the testimony of women who survived Bangladesh's war of independence, a subject familiar in the writings of Tahmima Anam, including her novel A Golden Age. Queens and Prophets - How Arabian Noblewomen and Holy Men Shaped Paganism, Christianity and Islam by Emran Iqbal El-Badawi is published in December 2022 Hakawatis: Women of the Arabian Nights is co-produced by Tamasha and runs at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at Shakespeare's Globe from December 1st 2022 to January 14th 2023. Amma runs at the Tara Theatre in Earlsfield, London from November 30th to December 17th 2022. You can hear Tahmima Anam discussing her latest novel about a tech start up The Start Up Wife in this episode of Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000wc3p On the Free Thinking programme website is a collection of discussions about women in the world from goddesses to Tudor families, women warriors to sisters, witchcraft to artists' models https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p084ttwp Producer: Ruth Watts

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Game of Thrones and history

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:31


House of the Dragon draws on ‘The Anarchy' - a 12th century war of succession. What does this conflict tell us about power, succession, class, and the status of medieval women ? New Generation Thinker Sarah Peverley is joined by Professor Carolyne Larrington of St John's College Oxford, and Danielle Park, lecturer in Late Medieval History at the University of York. A 12th century war of succession between Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I, and her cousin Stephen of Blois which caused widespread breakdown in law and order in England and Normandy inspired the premise of House of the Dragon, with King Viserys Targaryen I lobbying for his eldest daughter Rhaenyra to be his heir whilst his nobles prefer his son Aegon II. And the warring dynastic families of the Starks and Lannisters in Game of Thrones are based on the 15th century Houses of York and Lancaster who battled for the throne of England throughout of the Wars of the Roses. This New Thinking episode of the Arts and Ideas podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI You can find other episodes showcasing New Research in a collection on the programme website of BBC Radio e's Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zws90 It includes episodes on Beowulf https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0db7883 What language did Columbus speak https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0d0tk22 Hey Presto magic in medicine and the history of panto https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p090yn26

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Game of Thrones and history

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:31


House of the Dragon was inspired by a medieval period known as The Anarchy. What do the real historical conflicts tell us about power, succession, class, and the status of women in medieval times, and why are fantasy writers so drawn to them? New Generation Thinker Sarah Peverley is Professor English Literature at Liverpool University. She is joined by Professor Carolyne Larrington of St John's College Oxford, and Danielle Park, lecturer in Late Medieval History at the University of York. A 12th century war of succession between Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I, and her cousin Stephen of Blois which caused widespread breakdown in law and order in England and Normandy inspired the premise of House of the Dragon, with King Viserys Targaryen I lobbying for his eldest daughter Rhaenyra to be his heir whilst his nobles prefer his son Aegon II. And the warring dynastic families of the Starks and Lannisters in Game of Thrones are based on the 15th century Houses of York and Lancaster who battled for the throne of England throughout of the Wars of the Roses. Producer: Ruth Thomson This New Thinking episode of the Arts and Ideas podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI You can find other episodes showcasing New Research in a collection on the programme website of BBC Radio e's Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zws90 It includes episodes on Beowulf https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0db7883 What language did Columbus speak https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0d0tk22 Hey Presto magic in medicine and the history of panto https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p090yn26

The Dispassionate Observer Podcast Series
Free Thinking, By Master Zi and Vindesh

The Dispassionate Observer Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 57:50


This week Master Zi and Vindesh discuss the liberation and liability of being a free thinker.  When we look back in history, we often find that people who dared to invent and innovate, were often on the fringe of society.  Galileo was punished for believing the earth wasn't flat and set out to prove it.  He became an outcast.  We need to be challenged to evolve and Zi talks about the repercussions of not changing.  Just asking questions begins the process and they discuss why the current cultural landscape is not set up for evolution.

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Breakthroughs at Being Human 2022

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 41:37


The African American inventor Lewis Latimer who lived in South London and worked with Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison on developing light bulbs; Benjamin Franklin was one of the founders of the United States of America but what was he doing pouring oil on Derwent Water in the Lake District? How did theatrical department store demonstrations help sell Kenwood Chefs ? And Ganzflicker - the online experiment that depending on your neural pathways might make you see animals, fairies, and monsters – or nothing at all. Catherine Fletcher meets the academics whose research was showcased as part of the annual Being Human Festival of the Humanities which puts on a series of public events linked to universities across the UK. Her guests are cultural historian Christopher Donaldson from Lancaster University, design historian Alice Naylor from the University of Portsmouth and the British Science Museum, Ayshah Johnston from the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton and the University of Surrey, and cognitive neuroscientist Reshanne Reeder from Edge Hill University in Ormskirk. Benjamin Franklin's Scientific Adventures in the English Lakes Putting on a Show with the Kenwood Chef at The Spring Arts & Heritage Centre in Havant A Lightbulb Idea: Lewis Latimer's Scientific Breakthroughs at the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton Ganzflicker: art, science, and psychedelic experience at The Atkinson in Southport Producer in Salford: Ruth Thomson This New Thinking episode of the Arts and Ideas podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI You can find a host of conversations showcasing New Research in a collection on the Free Thinking programme website and available to download as Arts & Ideas podcasts https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zws90 This includes information about research showcased in previous Being Human festivals available to listen or download Lost Words and Language https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00013xg Death Rituals https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0001419 Buses Beer and VR https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00014qk Covid comics and codes in Dickens https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011d1v

Arts & Ideas
Experimental writing

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:10


"Creative daring" is the quality rewarded by the Goldsmiths Prize, now in its tenth year. What does it mean for an artist or writer to be daring and experimental? Shahidha Bari is joined by this year's winners Natasha Soobramanien and Luke Williams who have co-written their novel Diego Garcia, composer Matthew Herbert whose latest project is making music from the skeleton of a horse, and poet Stephen Sexton who has written a poetry collection structured round every level of the 90s video game Super Mario World. Producer in Salford: Ruth Thomson. The Goldsmiths Prize of £10,000 is awarded to "a book that is deemed genuinely novel and which embodies the spirit of invention that characterises the genre at its best" https://www.gold.ac.uk/goldsmiths-prize/prize2022/ Matthew Herbert's new piece for the Estuary Sound Ark will have its interactive world premiere at the Gulbenkian Arts Centre in Canterbury on Sunday 27th November at 3pm before being archived and left untampered with in a carefully selected location for 100 years. https://thegulbenkian.co.uk/events/estuary-sound-ark/ He has also published a novel The Music: An Album in Words Stephen Sexton won the Forward Prize for Best First Collection in 2019 for If All the World and Love Were Young. This year he is judging the prize You can find a collection of discussions exploring Prose and Poetry on the Free Thinking programme website including a discussion of mould-breaking writing featuring Max Porter and Chloe Aridjis, poet Will Harris and academic Xine Yao https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000pxn0 and a series of episodes exploring modernism hearing from Will Self and Alexandra Harris and looking at Mrs Dalloway, Finnegans Wake, Dada and Wittgenstein https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07p3nxh

Arts & Ideas
Going Underground

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 43:06


As Nottingham's network of 800 man-made caves inspire an exhibition called ‘Hollow Earth' at the city's contemporary art gallery, Shahidha Bari and guests explore the underground world. Archaeologist Chris King discusses discoveries under Nottingham's streets, literary historian Charlotte May suggests stories to read, curator Sam Thorne picks out images, and award-winning cave explorer Andy Eavis, tells us about his career discovering more territory on earth than anyone else alive - all of it underground. Producer: Ruth Thomson Hollow Earth: Art, Caves & The Subterranean Imaginary runs at Nottingham Contemporary until January 22nd 2023. Organised in collaboration with Hayward Gallery Touring, the exhibition features works by René Magritte, Santu Mofokeng, Kaari Upson, Jeff Wall and Aubrey Williams, as well as new commissions from Sofia Borges, Emma McCormick-Goodhart, Goshka Macuga, Lydia Ourahmane and Liv Preston. In 2023, the exhibition will tour to The Glucksman in Cork and to RAMM in Exeter. The Being Human Festival which showcases academic research has several events in Nottingham exploring the city's caves and underground history throughout November 2022. You can find another Free Thinking episode exploring Breakthroughs in electricity research showcased at this year's Festival https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0dhyp89 The Green Thinking collection on the Free Thinking programme website features a host of discussions about the environment and our landscapes https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 You can find a discussion about holes in the ground featuring Prof Paul Younger from Glasgow University, Geoscientist magazine editor Ted Nield and writer Rosalind Williams in the Free Thinking archives https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06vs6g0 And poet Sean Borodale, archaeologists Francis Pryor, Paul Pettitt and Ruth Whitehouse join Sharon Robinson Calver in an episode called What Lies Beneath; Neanderthal Cave Art to Fatbergs

Arts & Ideas
St Teresa/Vivekananda/Nietzsche

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:25


St Teresa formulated a specifically Catholic version of contemplative religion in response to the 16th-century Protestant Reformation; Vivekananda was a Hindu holy man who articulated a religious path that set the template for much 20th-century spiritual thinking; Friedrich Nietzsche set out to subvert 1,800 years of religious thinking in his iconoclastic book Thus Spoke Zarathustra, which has been newly translated by poet Michael Hulse. Rana Mitter is joined by New Generation Thinker Dafydd Mills Daniel, historian Ruth Harris, and philosopher Katrina Mitcheson to discuss. Producer: Luke Mulhall. On the Free Thinking progamme website you can find a collection of Free Thinking episodes exploring religious belief including programmes about Cardinal Newman, early Buddhism, the links between Judaism and Christianity, Islam Mecca and the Quaran and a collection exploring philosophy

Arts & Ideas
Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 44:19


Matthew Sweet gathers together four Proust fans from very different backgrounds - the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Jane Smiley, the psychotherapist, Jane Haynes, Christopher Prendergast, who has a translation of the book and written Living and Dying with Marcel Proust, and from France, the writer, Marie Darrieussecq. The actor Peter Marinker tackles the difficult task of giving an English voice to Proust. The novel In Search of Lost Time is a modernist masterpiece which offers a symphonic account of what it meant to be alive in France as the 19th century became the 20th. Producer: Zahid Warley You can find a collection of programmes on the Free Thinking website exploring different aspects of modernism around the world https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07p3nxh On Sunday Nov 20th at 5.30pm and for a month afterwards BBC Radio 3's curated selection of Words and Music inspired by the writing of Proust will be available on BBC Sounds.

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Net Zero Design

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 28:03


What does zero carbon look like if you are planning a new housing development in your town. The UK's building stock is one of the oldest in Europe, accounting for nearly 40% of the nation's total carbon emissions, so how possible is it for our cities to cut them to zero before 2050? Lecturer Lara Salinas explains how she has worked with local residents in the borough of Southwark in South London, encouraging them to take up zero carbon building design and retrofit. Professor Ljubomir Jankovic describes working with Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council, supporting their thinking about how housing developments could be built in future and how to build in net zero principles as part of the design process. New Generation Thinker Des Fitzgerald hosts the conversation. Ljubomir Jankovic is Professor of Advanced Building at the University of Hertfordshire and leads the Zero Carbon Lab. Lara Salinas is Lecturer in the Design School at London College of Communication and Senior Research Fellow in Knowledge Exchange at University of the Arts London. Professor Des Fitzgerald is a New Generation Thinker who has co-written a book called The Urban Brain: Mental Health in the Vital City. This New Thinking episode of the Arts and Ideas podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. If you want to dig out other episodes you can find a collection called Green Thinking on the website of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking programme – there are discussions about a range of topics including climate justice, energy, trees and transport. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: Responding to climate change – UKRI or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. Producer: Jayne Egerton

Arts & Ideas
George Bernard Shaw

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 51:26


Disillusionment with war and how you sue for peace are at the heart of Shaw's drama Arms and the Man, being staged in Richmond this autumn. Whilst in Bath a touring production of Mrs Warren's Profession stars Caroline Quentin and her daughter Rose Quentin as the former prostitute and her disapproving daughter. Anne McElvoy is joined by director Paul Miller, Professor Sos Eltis who has edited Shaw's work and theatre critic and writer Mark Lawson to look at Shaw's ability to construct arguments on stage and the resonances of his plays now. Arms and the Man runs at the Orange Tree Theatre in London directed by Paul Miller from 19 November 2022 – 14 January 2023 Mrs Warren's Profession directed by Anthony Banks runs at the Bath Theatre Royal from 9th - 19th November starring Caroline Quentin and her daughter Rose Quentin as Mrs Warren and her daughter Vivie. It then tours to the Richmond Theatre from 22nd November to 26th November 2022 and goes on to visit theatres including the Chichester Festival Theatre, the Hall for Cornwall, the Yvonne Arnaud in Guilford. My Fair Lady - a production from the Lincoln Centre directed by Bartlett Sher - is at the Cardiff Millennium Centre from November 8th to 26th and it then tours to Edinburgh, Southampton, Sunderland, Bristol, Birmingham and Manchester. Producer: Ruth Watts You can find other Free Thinking conversations about drama past and present including discussions about Moliere, Ibsen, the playwright Rona Munro, John McGrath's Scottish drama, in a collection called Prose, Poetry and Drama https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p047v6vh

Arts & Ideas
Plastic and Clay

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 44:07


It revolutionised domestic chores, signified modernity and has been made into packaging, textiles, electrical machinery but plastic has also contributed to our throw-away society. Clay is turned into bricks, cookware and used in industrial processes including paper making, cement production, and chemical filtering and increasingly contemporary artists are taking up the material. As exhibitions at the V&A Dundee and the Hayward Gallery in London display the different qualities and associations of these materials Lisa Mullen is joined by ceramic artist Lindsey Mendick, curators Cliff Lauson and Johanna Agerman Ross, and Kirsty Sinclair Dootson who studies materials in visual culture. Plastic: Remaking Our World is at the V&A Dundee. It features product design, graphics, architecture and fashion from the collections of the V&A and Vitra Design Museum, and other collections. It is the first exhibition produced and curated by V&A Dundee, the Vitra Design Museum and maat, Lisbon, with curators from V&A South Kensington. Strange Clay: Ceramics in Contemporary Art is at the Hayward Gallery in London until 8 January 2023 and features 23 international artists. You can find a collection of programmes exploring Art, Architecture, Photography and Museums on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026wnjl Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Arts & Ideas
The Imperial War Museum Remembrance Discussion 2022

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 44:02


Do video games help explore war? An exhibition at the Imperial War Museum includes Sniper Elite 5, and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and a military training simulator. For the 2022 discussion about how we look at warfare past and present Anne McElvoy is joined by writer & broadcaster Louise Blain, retired Colonel Lincoln Jopp, game designer Florent Maurin and IWM curator Chris Cooper. War Games runs at IWM London until May 2023 and is a free exhibition. Louise Blain presents Radio 3's Sound of Gaming - a monthly show looking at the music written for games. You can find previous discussions available on BBC Sounds and downloadable as the Arts & Ideas podcast: Former soldier Lincoln Jopp, war reporter Christina Lamb, novelist Elif Shafak and curator Hilary Roberts explore the impact of the words we use to describe conflict in 2021 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011cxv What does it mean to make art to commemorate histories of conflict? Anne McElvoy's talked to the artists Es Devlin and Machiko Weston, Art Fund director Jenny Waldman, chair of the Fourth Plinth Commissioning Group Ekow Eshun and Paris Agar from the IWM as Radio 3 joined with the Imperial War Museum for the 2020 Remembrance Debate https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000p85j On the Free Thinking programme website is a collection of programmes called Free Thinking on War and Conflict which includes episodes on Odesa Stories; Abdulrazak Gurnah and Margaret McMillan on War in Fact and Fiction; architect Marwa al-Sabouni on Syria: Hope and Poetry Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Doubts Aloud Podcast
Episode 58 - Biblical Cosmology and the Rise of the Flat Earth Movement

Doubts Aloud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 59:25


Episode 58– Show Notes Andrew is on a roll again, reporting his research into flat earth beliefs in the Bible. Actually, it is just a component in a whole cosmology of how the ‘heavens', earth and under the earth fit together. Spoiler – no turtles. This eventually moves on to Ed getting excited over whether Jesus was a flat earther. We can't help but see how this leads to literalist Bible interpreters becoming flat earthers - as in members of the modern conspiracy theory – and how important they were in the rise of that movement.Links:The link with the picture that Andrew mentioned early onhttps://pursuingveritas.com/2014/05/14/ancient-hebrew-cosmology/ The Dr Heiser 20 min video lecture that's really helpfulhttps://youtu.be/CGQDa9Ojk64 Another discussion from 2 evangelicals if you want it“Heaven & Earth • Episode 1 - What is the Old Testament referring to as "Heaven"?”https://bibleproject.com/podcast/heaven-earth-part-1/ We mentioned Skydive Phil debating on this.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6eEmfcMjDk Finally the 2018 documentary film to google is “Behind the Curve”.Doubts Aloud Links:Please give feedback and ask questions using : doubtsaloud@gmail.com Join the Facebook Group discussions:https://www.facebook.com/groups/1023280847835278/ Meet us all in person again at the monthly “Unbelievable Christian and Skeptic Discussion Group” in central London, see:https://www.meetup.com/Unbelievable-Christian-and-Skeptic-Discussion-Group-London

Arts & Ideas
Goethe, Schiller and the first Romantics

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 44:55


Putting I at the centre, the Ich, was the creed of philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte whilst Friedrich Schelling, saw the self as at one with the rest of nature: naturphilosophie. These competing ideas were debated in literary salons in the German town of Jena in the 1790s and Andrea Wulf's new biography Magnificent Rebels: The First Romantics and the Invention of the Self tells this story. She joins Anne McElvoy alongside New Generation Thinker Dr Seán Williams and the musicologist and Classical music biographer, Stephen Walsh, author of The Beloved Vision: Music in the Romantic Age. Producer: Ruth Watts This edition features discussion of music inspired by the Jena writers and extracts of: Franz Schubert, “Gretchen am Spinnrade” sung by Bernarda Fink (soprano) with Gerold Huber (piano), Harmonia Mundi, HMC901991 Weber, Der Freischütz, Rundfunkchor Leipzig, Staatskapelle Dresden, Carlos Kleiber Deutsche Grammophon, 4577362 You can find other programmes exploring German culture and thinking in the Free Thinking archives and available to download as Arts & Ideas podcasts including ETA Hoffmann https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00188r7 Rainer Maria Rilke https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0016k0v Wittgenstein's Tractatus https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000wcwk The 1920s Philosophy's Golden Age https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000q380 The Tin Drum https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05stw9v Thomas Mann https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m001025h

Arts & Ideas
Alexander the Great

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 45:06


King of Asia and Pharoah are two of the titles taken by Alexander, ruler of Macedonia from 336 B.C. to 323 B.C. He died aged 32 having conquered a vast area and founded the city of Alexandria in present day Egypt but his reputation stretched even further as a kind of philosopher king, and in myths and stories, as someone who travelled to paradise, created the first flying machine and explored underwater. Rana Mitter has been to visit a new exhibition at the British Library which illustrates these different images of Alexander and he's joined by New Generation Thinkers Dr Julia Hartley, Professor Islam Issa and by Peter Toth, curator of ancient and medieval manuscripts at the British Library. Plus we hear about the books on the shortlist of this year's Cundill History Prize from the chair of the judges, Professor J.R. McNeill. Julia Hartley teaches on French, Italian, and Iranian art and literature at King's College London . You can find an Essay she wrote for Radio 3 on Alexander and the Persians available on BBC Sounds https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0016rpp Islam Issa is Professor of Literature and History at Birmingham City University. His book, Alexandria: The City that Changed the World, will be out in 2023. Alexander the Great: The Making of a Myth runs at the British Library until February 19th 2023. The Cundill History prize has shortlisted the following books (the winner is announced on December 1st) https://www.cundillprize.com/ Cuba: An American History by Ada Ferrer All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley's Sack, a Black Family Keepsake by Tiya Miles Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union by Vladislav M. Zubok Producer: Ruth Watts. You can hear an episode of Radio 3's Words and Music on the theme of Egypt co-curated by New Generation Thinker Islam Issa available on BBC Sounds for a month after being broadcast on Sunday November 6th at 5.30pm. And an episode of Free Thinking available now on BBC Sounds and as an Arts & Ideas podcast explores Dead Languages and the deciphering of hieroglyphics.

Filthy Armenian Adventures
SPECIAL EDITION 10: Descent Into Manness w/ Jack Mason, Salomé, Norah Vincent

Filthy Armenian Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 58:18


Freethinking lesbian writer Norah Vincent quit the punditry game to go undercover and investigate what it's really like to be a man in America. What she discovered eventually killed her. But her bombshell book, Self-Made Man (2006), though promptly memoryholed as its ominous warnings about the gender wars came to pass, survives as a prescient model of honest journalism and feminism for men. Jack Mason of The Perfume Nationalist and Salomé of Twitter join me for an Art Right Halloween Pride Parade in honor of the book and its author, who committed suicide in July.   This is the first hour. For the full 3 hour episode, subscribe at patreon.com/filthyarmenian   If you like what you hear, please rate, review, and spread the word.

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Dead Languages

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 44:56


John Gallagher discusses the latest research on the languages of the ancient world that weren't Latin and Greek. We associate places like Italy and Cyprus with those two best known ancient languages. But both were linguistically diverse. What informed people's choice of language in these places? How were alphabets developed and used? Plus, an exhibition at the British Museum explores the world opened up when Egyptian hieroglyphics were deciphered 200 years ago, and how the invention of the Cyrillic alphabet, developed in the Balkans over 1,000 years ago, still has political repercussions today. With Dr Katherine McDonald, Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Durham, Dr Mirela Ivanova, Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Sheffield, and a BBC/AHRC New Generation Thinker, Dr Philippa Steele is Senior Research Associate in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge, and Dr Ilona Regulski, an Egyptologist based at the British Museum. The British Museum exhibition Hieroglyphs: Unlocking Ancient Egypt runs until Feb 189th 2023. This New Thinking episode of the Arts and Ideas podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. Producer: Luke Mulhall You can find other episodes exploring language in the New Research playlist on the Free Thinking programme website

Arts & Ideas
Orhan Pamuk and the Ottoman Empire

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 44:59


A pandemic, crumbling empire and new nationhood are the backdrop for Orhan Pamuk's latest novel Nights of the Plague. He talks to Rana Mitter about the historical basis for his novel. They're joined by historian and BBC/AHRC New Generation Thinker Michael Talbot and literary scholar Keya Anjaria. Some of the books they recommend at the end of the conversation are Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar (1901 – 1962) whose The Time Regulation Institute and A Mind at Peace have been published in English by Penguin Halide Edib Adıvar (1884 – 1964) whose memoirs have been published in English Yasher Kemal (1923 – 2015) author of Mehmet My Hawk Orhan Kemal - the pen name of Turkish novelist Mehmet Raşit Öğütçü (1914 - 1970) whose books describe the life of the poor in Turkey Oğuz Atay (1934 - 1977) a pioneer of the modern novel whose The Disconnected has become a best-seller Latife Tekin (1957 - ) and the film-maker Yılmaz Güney (1937 - 1984) Producer Luke Mulhall You can find more conversations about Turkish history via the Free Thinking website

Arts & Ideas
British Academy Book Prize 2022

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:02


Deafness and communication, writing Chinese, women as killers in Chile, German postwar history, testimony from a Swedish village and a global history of science are the topics explored in the books shortlisted for this year's prize for Global Cultural Understanding run by the British Academy. Rana Mitter talks to the six authors about their findings. The books are: The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness by Katie Booth Aftermath: Life in the Fallout of the Third Reich by Harald Jähner Osebol: Voices from a Swedish Village by Marit Kapla Horizons: A Global History of Science by James Poskett When Women Kill: Four Crimes Retold by Alia Trabucco Zerán Kingdom of Characters: A Tale of Language, Obsession and Genius in Modern China by Jing Tsu The prize of £25,000 will be awarded on October 26th 2022. You can find interviews with writers shortlisted in previous year's on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00106pn and https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000n0bv Producer: Tim Bano

Free Thinking with Montel
THE COMMON SENSE VET | KAREN BECKER, DVM

Free Thinking with Montel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 60:14


Montel talks with Dr Karen Becker on this episode of Free Thinking. Dr Becker has been dubbed THE COMMON SENSE VET due to her deliberate, common-sense approach to creating vibrant health for companion animals that has been embraced by millions of pet lovers around the world, making her the most followed vet on Facebook with 2.2 million followers. She has spent her career as a small animal clinician, empowering animal guardians to make intentional lifestyle decisions to enhance the wellbeing of their animals. Co-author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller The Forever Dog. She writes and lectures extensively and serves as a wellness consultant for a variety of health- oriented organizations. She is the first veterinarian to give a TEDx Talk on species appropriate nutrition, which has been a lifelong passion of hers.

Arts & Ideas
Romanticism Revisited

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 45:04


The ridiculous side of Romanticism, a new biopic of Emily Brontë and an exhibition about Fuseli and women are on today's agenda as Shahidha Bari is joined by New Generation Thinkers Emma Butcher, Sophie Oliver, Chris Harding and by Andrew McInnes. Emily from writer/director Frances O'Connor starring Emma Mackey as Emily Brontë opens at cinemas across the UK this week. Fuseli and the Modern Woman: Fashion, Fantasy, Fetishism runs at the Courtauld Gallery in London from Oct 14th to Jan 8th 2023 Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born 21 October 1772. You can find more about Fuseli in the book Dinner with Joseph Johnson written by New Generation Thinker Daisy Hay and longlisted for the Baillie Gifford prize - she discussed it in an episode of Free Thinking called Teaching and Inspiration Producer: Luke Mulhall

Arts & Ideas
The Frieze/Radio 3 Museum Directors Debate 2022

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 44:24


Hong Kong, Paris and New York galleries and museums are in the spotlight as we hear the latest in a series of discussions exploring what it means to run museums and galleries in the 21st century. For the Frieze/Radio 3 Museum Directors Debate 2022 Anne McElvoy is joined by Suhanya Raffel (director of M+ Museum for Visual Culture, Hong Kong), Richard Armstrong (director of the Guggenheim Museum, NYC) and Nathalie Bondil (head of museums and exhibitions at the Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris). The directors chose 3 artists whose work is either currently on show or has been recently displayed at their institutions: the graffiti painter Tsang Tsou-choi, better known as "King of Kowloon"; Cecilia Vicuña (currently showing at Tate Modern in the Turbine Hall 16 April 2023) and the Jordanian sculptor Mona Saudi who died earlier this year and whose work can be seen outside the Institut du Monde Arabe. They also discuss issues including their approach to questions about donors, decolonisation and digital displays. You can find other discussions with directors from galleries in Singapore, Dresden, Washington, Paris, Beijing and London in the Free Thinking collection exploring art, architecture, photography and museums https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026wnjl Frieze London runs from Oct 12th - 16th 2022 Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Accents

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 45:24


How Manc are the Gallaghers? John Gallagher hears about the results of a project to map accents in the city talking to Prof Rob Drummond. In Northumbria Dr Robert McKenzie has discovered that a Northern accent can cost you marks at school and job opportunities. However you speak, your accent reveals something about you. Dr John Gallagher talks to two researchers whose projects explore the variation in accents across England, and the way those accents shape our place in society. Rob Drummond is Reader in Sociolinguistics at Manchester Metropolitan University. With the help of an Accent Van and archive recordings, his project Manchester Voices maps the accents of Greater Manchester, documenting people's relationships with their own accent and charting how accents have changed over time, from lost rhotic Rs to the made-up Manchester accent of the Gallagher brothers. https://www.manchestervoices.org/ You can find an earlier New Thinking conversation with Rob about setting up the project in an episode called City Talk which is available in the New Research collection on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zws90 Robert McKenzie is Associate Professor in Sociolinguistics at Northumbria University. His project Speaking of Prejudice analyses both explicit and implicit attitudes towards accents in the South of England compared to the North, revealing that prejudices still exist towards particular accents and the effect on school progress and job opportunities. https://hosting.northumbria.ac.uk/languageattitudesengland/ This podcast was made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. Producer: Tim Bano

Arts & Ideas
Miles Davis and On The Corner

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 44:47


From James Brown to Stockhausen, the influences which fed into Miles Davis's 1972 album On The Corner are explored by Matthew Sweet and guests, 50 years after its release. Bill Laswell, Chelsea Carmichael, Kevin LeGendre and Paul Tingen join Matthew to celebrate an album that was dismissed by some jazz critics as evidence of Davis 'selling out' when it came out, but that has gone on to be appreciated as an important and influential milestone. Producer: Torquil MacLeod Bill Laswell's many recordings and productions include Panthalassa: The Music of Miles Davis 1969-1974. Chelsea Carmichael is a saxophonist and composer. Her most recent album is The River Doesn't Like Strangers. Paul Tingen is the author of Miles Beyond: The Electric Explorations of Miles Davis, 1967-1991. Kevin Le Gendre is one of the presenters of BBC Radio 3's J to Z broadcast Saturdays at 5pm You can hear Matthew and Kevin exploring the politics, history and music which fed into Marvin Gaye's What's Going On in a previous episode of Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011l7t Radio 3 will be broadcasting a range of programmes from the London Jazz Festival between Nov 11th and 20th https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011l7t

Making Footprints Not Blueprints
S05 #06 - Tiny seeds and tiny words of love, freedom and justice. Scatter them. — Resisting the neoliberal onslaught - A thought for the day

Making Footprints Not Blueprints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 10:42 Transcription Available


The full text of this podcast can be found in the transcript of this edition or at the following link:https://andrewjbrown.blogspot.com/2022/10/tiny-seeds-and-tiny-words-of-love.htmlPlease feel to post any comments you have about this episode there.Music, "New Heaven", written by Andrew J. Brown and played by Chris Ingham (piano), Paul Higgs (trumpet), Russ Morgan (drums) and Andrew J. Brown (double bass)Thanks for listening. Just to note that all the texts of these podcasts are available on my blog. You'll also find there a brief biography, info about my career as a musician, & some photography. Feel free to drop by & say hello. Email: caute.brown@gmail.com

Arts & Ideas
How We Read

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 44:34


The word 'reading' may appear to describe something specific and universal, but in reality it's more of an umbrella term, covering a huge range of ways in which people interact with text. Dyslexia and hyperlexia may be two of the more obvious departures from normative ideas of reading, but whether we're neurodivergent or not we all read in different ways that can vary significantly depending on what we're reading and why we're reading it. Matthew Sweet is joined by Matt Rubery, Louise Creechan and poets Debris Stevenson and Anthony Anaxagorou. Matt Rubery, Professor of Modern Literature at Queen Mary, University of London has worked on books including The Untold Story of the Talking Book; Audiobooks, Literature, and Sound Studies, Further Reading and Reader's Block: A History of Reading Differences. You can hear more from him in an episode about the history of publishing called Whose Book is it Anyway? https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b080xzm6 Dr Louise Creechan is studying is a Lecturer in Literary Medical Humanities at Durham University and a New Generation Thinker on the scheme run by the BBC and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to showcase academic research. You can hear her discuss Dickens' Bleak House in an episode called Teaching and Inspiration https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00169jh Debris Stevenson describes herself as 'Dyslexic educator, Grime-poet and Dancehall raving social activist'. Anthony Anaxagorou's latest collection of poetry is Heritage Aesthetics, published on 3rd November 2022. Free Thinking has a playlist featuring discussions about prose and poetry https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p047v6vh The theme of this year's National Poetry Day is the Environment and you can hear Radio 3's weekly curation of readings and music inspired by that topic on Sunday at 5.30pm and then on BBC Sounds for 28 days https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006x35f Producer: Torquil MacLeod.

Arts & Ideas
Female power and influence past and present

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 44:52


Kamila Shamsie's new novel Best of Friends follows two women from Pakistan who take different route to power. Rona Munro's new plays explore the courts of James IV and Mary Stuart. Caroline Moorehead has written a biography of Edda Mussolini, the Italian leader's favourite daughter. Anne McElvoy talks to them about power and influence past and present. Best of Friends by Kamila Shamsie is out now. You can hear her discussing her novel Home Fire and the Antigone story in a previous episode of Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b095qhsm Edda Mussolini: The Most Dangerous Woman in Europe by Caroline Moorehead is out on October 27th 2022. James IV - Queen of the Fight by Rona Munro:is touring from Sept 30th to Nov 12th 2022 It is presented by Raw Material and Capital Theatres in association with National Theatre of Scotland www.capitaltheatres.com Mary by Rona Munro runs at the Hampstead Theatre in London from 21 Oct to 26 Nov 2022 www.hampsteadtheatre.com You can hear Rona discussing previous plays in the James trilogy and a drama inspired by Manchester in the Industrial Revolution in a previous episode of Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b050xpsd And Free Thinking has a playlist exploring Women in the World https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p084ttwp Producer: Ruth Watts

Free Thinking with Montel
EMOTIONAL SOURCE CODE | DOV BARON

Free Thinking with Montel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 65:15


On this episode of Free Thinking, Montel speaks with world renowned leadership guru Dov Baron on what unites us and what divides us on a global scale, and they break down human behavior from the perspective of the emotional source code. Dov is the bestselling author of One Red Thread and Fiercely Loyal: How High Performing Companies Develop and Retain Top Talent. His focus on human behavior combined with neuroscience has made him the leadership authority on emotional source code and the anatomy of meaning. He is the founder & host of the top rated podcast, Leadership and Loyalty.#DovBaron #leadership #emotional 

Making Footprints Not Blueprints
S05 #05 - The reflection worth indulging doesn't know where it is going—A fantasia on a passage by Henry Bugbee - A thought for the day

Making Footprints Not Blueprints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 8:40 Transcription Available


The full text of this podcast can be found in the transcript of this edition or at the following link:https://andrewjbrown.blogspot.com/2022/10/the-reflection-worth-indulging-doesnt.htmlPlease feel to post any comments you have about this episode there.Music, "New Heaven", written by Andrew J. Brown and played by Chris Ingham (piano), Paul Higgs (trumpet), Russ Morgan (drums) and Andrew J. Brown (double bass)You can take a quick preview of Henry Bugbee's wonderful book, The Inward Morning,  at the following link:https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/The_Inward_Morning/SRr8AAAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1 

Arts & Ideas
Claude McKay and the Harlem Renaissance

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:47


From a farming family in Jamaica to travelling in Europe and Northern Africa, the writer Claude McKay became a key figure in the artistic movement of the 1920s dubbed The Harlem Renaissance. Publishing under a pseudonym, his poems including To the White Friends and If We Must Die explored racial prejudice. Johnny Pitts has written an essay about working class community, disability and queer culture explored in Claude McKay's Romance in Marseille, which was published for the first time in 2020. Pearl Cleage's play Blues for an Alabama Sky is set in 1930s New York. The African-American playwright is the daughter of a civil rights activist, and has worked as speechwriter for Alabama's first black mayor, founded and edited the literary magazine Catalyst, and published many novels, plays and essays. Nadifa Mohamed's novels include Black Mamba Boy and her most recent The Fortune Men (shortlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize). They talk to Shahidha Bari about Claude McKay and the flourishing of ideas and black pride that led to the Harlem Renaissance. Producer: Tim Bano Blues For an Alabama Sky runs at the National Theatre in London from September 20th to November 5th. Johny Pitts presents Open Book on Radio 4. His books include Afropean: Notes from Black Europe which you can hear him discussing on Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0005sjw His collaboration with Roger Robinson Home Is Not A Place exploring Black Britishness in the 21st century is out this month. You can hear more from Nadifa talking about her latest novel The Fortune Men and comparing notes about the writing life with Irenosen Okojie in previous Free Thinking episodes available on our website in the prose and poetry playlist and from BBC Sounds https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000x06v and https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000k8sz Alongside Verso's reissue of Home to Harlem they have 3 other books out: Not Without Laughter by Langston Hughes, The Blacker The Berry by Wallace Thurman, and Quicksand And Passing by Nella Larson. On BBC Sounds and in the Free Thinking archives you can find conversations about Black History https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08t2qbp and a Radio 3 Sunday Feature Harlem on Fire in which Afua Hirsch looks at the history of the literary magazine https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06s6z0b

Psychology in the Classroom
Aphantasia - Image Free Thinking with Tom Ebeyer

Psychology in the Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 36:35


Aphantasia is the inability to visualize, people with aphantasia don't create any pictures of familiar objects, people, or places in their mind's eye. Not for thoughts, memories, or images of the future.  This conversation is a fascinating insight into the condition itself but also how our assumptions about other people's perception and understanding of the world may differ from our own.  Whilst research into Aphantasia is in its infancy this conversation is full of thought provoking ideas about the uniqueness of individual perception and a reminder that we need to be mindful in the classroom about assuming one-size-fits all. If you would like to find out more check out the Aphantasia Network and you can find out where you fall on the imagination spectrum.

The Human Dream
Walking On Air

The Human Dream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 36:20


In this Episode The Madness Journalist discusses Free Thinkers and how to achieve that state of mind. Question: How would it feel if you could walk on air as you would a stone? Can we reimagine our beliefs and thus alter our abilities? T.M.J explores the Magic Of Instinct and how it relates to the phases of popular status in society over time, from the sailor to the athlete; all of these roles in life and our capabilities are based on our belief in Self. How would it feel to disassemble our Selves and Recreate oneself? Also covered is a look at the structure of our systems in society and what they are lacking and possible ways to improve. As Tolstoy once said, Free Thinking is not common but essential state of mind for Right (correct) Thinking. Tune in and explore Walking On Air with The Madness Journalist! Enjoy! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/awakekinwithmatthewforbes/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/awakekinwithmatthewforbes/support

Arts & Ideas
Ibsen

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 43:37


The individual versus the masses is at the heart of Enemy of the People. A bank manager speculating with his customers' money is the story told in John Gabriel Borkman. Lucinda Coxon and Steve Waters have written new versions of these Ibsen plays. They join Norwegian actor and director Kåre Conradi, theatre critic and writer Mark Lawson and presenter Anne McElvoy to explore the ways in which Ibsen's characters and dramas resonate now. John Gabriel Borkman starring Simon Russell Beale, Lia Williams and Clare Higgins runs at the Bridge Theatre, London September 24th to November 26th. Drama on 3 scripted by Steve Waters will be on air early in 2023. Kåre Conradi has established The Norwegian Ibsen Company which has brought productions to the Print Room at the Coronet Theatre in London. Conradi is an actor and a lifetime employee at The National Theatre of Norway. Mark Lawson is theatre critic for The Tablet and has written many radio dramas for BBC Radio 4. Producer: Ruth Watts On BBC Sounds and the Free Thinking programme website you can find previous discussions about Adapting Molière https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00138km John McGrath's Scottish drama https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0017tzt Shakespeare https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06406hm Lorraine Hansbery https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06tpdh3 and other key thinkers and writers on morality like Hannah Arendt/ Iris Murdoch/ Thomas Mann in our landmarks collection https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01jwn44

Arts & Ideas
The Normans

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 44:56


Ruthless mercenaries who happened to be very good at PR or a dynamic force in Medieval European politics? Rana Mitter and guests Judith Green and Eleanor Parker discuss the current state of scholarship on the Normans. Plus: from the idea of the Norman yoke, to dreams of Hereward the Wake, to contemporary discussions about the right to roam and Brexit, what role have ideas of the Normans and Anglo-Saxons played in the British political imagination? Historian of ideas Sophie Scott Brown, and Phillip Blonde, director of the think tank Res Publica join Rana to debate. Judith Green's book The Normans: Power, Conquest and Culture in 11th Century Europe looks at the role the Normans played in shaping their world, from Northern France and England, to Southern Italy, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East. Eleanor Parker's book Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England looks at the generation that came of age as the Normans invaded and consolidated their hold over England, and examines the role they played in shaping the society that followed. Dr Sophie Scott-Brown is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of East Anglia, where she teaches intellectual history and is the author of The Histories of Raphael Samuel - A Portrait of A People's Historian (2017) Producer: Luke Mulhall You can find past episodes of Free Thinking discussing Tudor history, The Vikings and Victorian streets all available to download as Arts & Ideas podcasts.

Arts & Ideas
Cuba, cold war and RAF Fylingdales

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 44:55


Ian McEwan's new novel Lessons sets a relationship against the backdrop of the Cuban missile crisis and the fall of the wall in Berlin. Researcher and artist Michael Mulvihill, from the University of Newcastle, has been recording the sounds of radar interference and uncovering the archives held at RAF Fylingdales in Yorkshire which depict the replacement of the "golf balls" and the technology involved in operating the early warning systems. Jessica Douthwaite, University of Stirling, is looking at how the cold war is collected and represented in museum collections across the UK and is a historian of civilian experiences of the cold war in Britain. Christoph Laucht, from Swansea University, researches responses the the nuclear threat They join Anne McElvoy to discuss the impact of the Cuban missile crisis in October 1962 and public fears about nuclear conflict. You can find out more at https://fylingdalesarchive.org.uk/ Operations began there on 17th September 1963 and about Michael Mulvihill's Arts and Humanities Research Council project at https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=AH%2FS013067%2F1 Lessons by Ian McEwan is published in September 2022. His other books include On Chesil Beach set 3 months before the Cuban missile crisis. Producer: Ruth Watts You can find other discussions about history in the Free Thinking archives including an episode looking at the Stasi poetry circle https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m001556q

Arts & Ideas
Immortality

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 44:54


Karel Čapek's 1922 play The Makropulos Affair about a famous singer who has lived for over 300 years was adapted into an opera by the composer Leoš Janáček and premiered in 1926. George Bernard Shaw's play Back to Methuselah, which premiered in 1922, also looks at human destiny and ideas about long life. As Welsh National Opera's new touring production of The Makropulos Affair opens in Cardiff, Matthew Sweet and guests New Generation Thinker Sarah Dillon, classicist Charlotte Higgins and philosopher Rebecca Roache explore the quest for endless youth in literature, film and myth and discussions of the idea by philosophers including Bernard Williams. The Makropulos Affair opens at the Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff on Friday 16th September for three performances and then goes on tour to Llandudno, Plymouth, Birmingham, Southampton and Oxford. Professor Sarah Dillon is working on a student guide How to Study the Contemporary and researching a literary history of AI. Her books include Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning and she is on the editorial boards of C21: Journal of Twenty-First Century Writing and Fantastika. Charlotte Higgins' books include Greek Myths: A New Retelling and Red Thread: On Mazes and Labrynths Producer: Torquil MacLeod The Free Thinking programme website has a playlist called Free Thinking the Future which includes discussions about AI, robots and an interview with Ray Kurzweil https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zwn4d

Free Thinking with Montel
MS TOOLBOX | ED TOBIAS

Free Thinking with Montel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 53:11


Imagine being diagnosed with a chronic illness at a time when there are no disease modifying drugs available. On this epsiode of Free Thinking, Montel talks with Ed Tobias, author of The Multiple Sclerosis Toolbox; Tools &Tips for Living with MS. Ed was 32 years old when he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis 42 years ago. At that time there were no disease-modifying drugs for MS, and MRI's were just coming on the scene for diagnostics. Despite little information available at the time on living with MS, he was determined to carry on with his life and not let MS get in his way. Ed wrote this book to help guide the newly diagnosed and their loved ones down this path. As Montel often says, “I have MS but MS doesn't have me!”

Kingchakaent
Free Thinking Witch

Kingchakaent

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 19:36


Free Thinking. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kingchakaent/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kingchakaent/support

Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends
Ep 180 | Makeup for Free Thinking Women w/ Vivi from American Woman Beauty

Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 39:29


In this episode Mal interviews Vivi, the founder of American Women Beauty. You have probably seen all of your favorite conservative influencers promoting their brand. Well take a listen to hear from the founder about why she started the brand, industry secrets, and much more. You're going to want to switch out your old make up and head over to www.americanwomanbeauty.net. (Use the code Mal15 to get 15% off) Instagram: @american_woman_beaty This is a Those Other Girls Media production. You are able to listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Google Podcast, Amazon Music, Pandora, Anchor, Breaker, OverCasts, Pocket Casts, and Radio Public PLUS YouTube and Rumble. Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thoseothergirls If you want to help us change culture donate here Get 10% off Culture of Life using the code "thoseothergirls1972" at https://col1972.com/ Get 10% off Future Female Leaders using the code "malpal" at https://futurefemaleleader.com/ Get 15% off America Women Beauty using the code "mal15" at https://americanwomanbeauty.net/ Check out our website for our blogs and exclusive content: www.thoseothergirls.com Order Merch: https://www.thoseothergirls.com/merch Support Gorgeous Gorgeous Girls Vote: https://www.bonfire.com/store/those-other-girls/ Those Other Girls Rumble Channel: https://rumble.com/user/thoseothergirls Those Other Girls Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrq5L5VF05PEHFnMTaKTIHg Follow us on GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/thoseothergirls Make sure you follow our Instagram: @thoseothergirlspodcast Mallory's Personal Instagram: @lifeasmalpal Like our Facebook: Those Other Girls with Mallory and Friends Follow our Twitter: @podcast_tog Follow along with our weight loss journey: @thoseothergirlshealthyliving --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/those-other-girls/support

The Lonely Palette
BonusEp. 06 - Tamar Avishai interviews Dr. Charlotte Mullins, Art Critic and Broadcaster

The Lonely Palette

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 57:15


Art history textbooks, so excellent for flattening curled-up rug corners and holding open doors, are expected to tell us the entire story of our civilization, one painting at a time. It's more than any book, even one that weighs a spine-crunching twenty-five pounds, should be expected to do. And it opens our eyes to the way that history is narrated, and taught, and even, it follows, to how paintings are displayed, and museums are curated. So much is touched on; so much is left out. It's too much, and far too little, all at once. Dr. Charlotte Mullins has decided to lean into the brevity, and in doing so, manages to tell us so much more. In her new book, "A Little History of Art," she tells the story of 100,000 years of art history, in, in her words, language akin to a haiku, every word intentionally chosen, every artwork telling its own story. She turns us into time-travelers in a scant 300 pages. We talked about reading art history, teaching art history, writing art history, and much more. Charlotte is the art critic for Country Life and has written for specialist titles and newspapers including the Financial Times, Telegraph, Independent on Sunday, RA Magazine, Art in America and Tate Magazine. A former editor of Art Quarterly, V&A Magazine and Art Review, she has appeared on BBC TV arts programmes and is a regular on BBC Radio 4's Front Row and Radio 3's Free Thinking. She is the author of more than a dozen books including a monograph on Rachel Whiteread and A Little Feminist History of Art, both for Tate, and the internationally acclaimed Painting People, and its companion volume Picturing People, both for Thames & Hudson. Music used: The Blue Dot Sessions, "Spark" Rod Stewart, "Every Picture Tells A Story" Episode webpage: https://bit.ly/3ARd17U Charlotte's book: https://amzn.to/3TksKDl Episodes referenced: Anselm Kiefer: https://bit.ly/31gUSwW Sarah Sze: https://bit.ly/3NRnGmr Support the show: www.patreon.com/lonelypalette

Arts & Ideas
Egyptian Satire

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 12:47


Dina Rezk from the University of Reading looks at politics and the role of humour as she profiles Bassem Youssef, “the Jon Stewart of Egyptian satire”. As protests reverberate around the world, she looks back at the Arab Spring and asks what we can learn from the popular culture that took off during that uprising and asks whether those freedoms remain. You can hear her in a Free Thinking discussion about filming the Arab Spring https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0005sjw and in a discussion about Mocking Power past and present https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000dzww You can find of Dina's research https://egyptrevolution2011.ac.uk/ New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to select ten academics to turn their research into radio. Producer: Robyn Read

Arts & Ideas
Pogroms and Prejudice

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 14:09


New Generation Thinker Brendan McGeever traces the links between anti-Semitism now and pogroms in the former Soviet Union and the language used to describe this form of racism. Brendan McGeever lectures at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck University of London. You can hear him discussing an exhibition at the Jewish Museum exploring racial stereotypes in a Free Thinking episode called Sebald, anti-Semitism, Carolyn Forché https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00050d2 New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to select ten early career academics each year to turn their research into radio. Producer: Robyn Read

The Freed Thinker
The Free Thinking Argument Review - Part 2

The Freed Thinker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 132:37


I'm joined again by Colton Carlson as we review the recent video put out by Tim Stratton and JP Moreland to discuss (but not really) their upcoming version of the free thinking argument.  Enjoy the show! 

The Freed Thinker
Free Thinking Argument - Review Part 1

The Freed Thinker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 85:03


I'm joined again by Colton Carlson as we review the recent video put out by Tim Stratton and JP Moreland to discuss (but not really) their upcoming version of the free thinking argument.  Enjoy the show! 

The Grimerica Show
#562 - Rachel Varga

The Grimerica Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 127:26 Very Popular


Interview starts at 37:40   Rachel Varga joins us to chat about what is radiance, skin problems, spiritual practice, biohacking, toxic beauty products for women, and how we can be authentic with no pure being.   We also get into mindset, fasting, skin - the largest organ, silver blankets, protection from EMF, cleansing and parasites, how out of touch the implant and beauty industry has been and how it's making a turn back to some semblance or normalcy.   info@rachelvarga.ca https://rachelvarga.ca/   In the intro talk about the Tychos video, the book - Behaviour of Crowds, and outlawed books as well. Adult brain is updated.    See links for stuff we chatted about during the show and the intro:   https://www.canadiancovidcarealliance.org/   https://adultbrain.ca/   https://www.tychos.space/   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1e2NKtC4Ms  Tychos.Space   https://vivarays.com/   https://yeshua.org/who/what-does-yeshua-mean/   Help support the show because without your help we can't continue to address these controversial topics. If you value this content with 0 ads, 0 sponsorships, 0 breaks, 0 portals and links to corporate websites, please assist. Many hours of unlimited content for free. Thanks for listening!!   Support the show directly: http://www.grimerica.ca/support https://www.patreon.com/grimerica  http://www.grimericaoutlawed.ca/support www.Rokfin.com/Grimerica   Get your Magic Mushrooms delivered from: Champignon Magique  Mushroom Spores, Spore Syringes, Best Spore Syringes,Grow Mushrooms Spores Lab Get Psychedelics online Other affiliated shows: https://grimericaoutlawed.ca/The newer controversial Grimerica Outlawed Grimerica Show https://www.13questionspodcast.com/ Our New Podcast - 13 Questions   Join the chat / hangout with a bunch of fellow Grimerican's  www.grimerica.ca/chats   1-403-702-6083 Call and leave a voice mail or send us a text   Check out our next trip/conference/meetup - Contact at the Cabin www.contactatthecabin.com   Leave a review on iTunes and/or Stitcher: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/grimerica-outlawed http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/grimerica-outlawed   Sign up for our newsletter http://www.grimerica.ca/news   SPAM Graham = and send him your synchronicities, feedback, strange experiences and psychedelic trip reports!! graham@grimerica.com   InstaGRAM https://www.instagram.com/the_grimerica_show_podcast/  Tweet Darren https://twitter.com/Grimerica   Connect through other platforms: https://www.reddit.com/r/grimerica/  https://gab.ai/Grimerica    Purchase swag, with partial proceeds donated to the show www.grimerica.ca/swag   Send us a postcard or letter http://www.grimerica.ca/contact/ ART Napolean Duheme's site http://www.lostbreadcomic.com/  MUSIC Felix's Site sirfelix.bandcamp.com Something Elated - Broke for Free Aeternum - Fifty Dollar Dynasty

Arts & Ideas
Dam Fever and the Diaspora

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 14:25


New Generation Thinker Majed Akhter explores how large dam projects continue to form reservoirs of hope for a sustainable future. Despite their known drawbacks, our love affair with dams has not abated – across the world more than 3,500 dams are in various stages of construction. In Pakistan this has become entwined with nationalism, both inside the community and in the diaspora - but what are the dangers of this “dam fever” ? This Essay traces the history of river development in the region, from the early twentieth century “canal colonies” in Punjab, to Cold War mega-projects, to the contemporary drive to build large new dams. Previously an engineer and a resource economist, Majed Akhter now lectures in geography at King's College London. you can hear him discussing the politics of rivers in a Free Thinking episode called Rivers and geopolitics https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00051hb New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to select ten early career academics each year to turn their research into radio. Producer: Alex Mansfield

Arts & Ideas
Not Quite Jean Muir

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 14:08


Jade Halbert lectures in fashion, but has never done any sewing. She swaps pen and paper for needle and thread to create a dress from a Jean Muir pattern. In a diary charting her progress, she reflects on the skills of textile workers she has interviewed as part of a project charting the fashion trade in Glasgow and upon the banning of pins on a factory floor, the experiences of specialist sleeve setters and cutters, and whether it is ok to lick your chalk. Jade Halbert is a Lecturer, Fashion Business and Cultural Studies at the University of Huddersfield. You can find her investigation into fashion and the high street as a Radio 3 Sunday Feature https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000gvpn and taking part in a Free Thinking discussion called The Joy of Sewing https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002mk2. She has also broadcast another Essay for Radio 3 looking at the fashion label Droopy & Browns https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0014ysq New Generation Thinkers is a scheme run by the BBC and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to select ten early career academics to turn their research into radio. Producer: Torquil MacLeod