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Fifth Roman emperor, from AD 54 to 68

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Nero

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Latest podcast episodes about Nero

Life Of Caesar
Nero #26 – The Circus Games (take 3)

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 46:56


When one of the praetorian prefects joins the conspirators, they decide it's time to act. But they can't agree on a plan. It takes a woman to move things along. The post Nero #26 – The Circus Games (take 3) appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

Roast Mortem Cast
216 - Agrippina the Younger: Move Over Dummies, Mom's Driving

Roast Mortem Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 137:28


You thought the Antichrist Nero was bad? Try Nero's mom, Agrippina the Younger. One of the most powerful woman of ancient Rome, Agrippina schemed, murdered and fucked her way to the top in an all out incest-fest. Tits out for the Empress!

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

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Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy

Welcome back to the grim darkness of the 41st Millennium. I am Inquisitor Temperance Pryce, keeper of the Inquisition's Black Library, and this is the second volume in a report on the Valentyne Heresy - an actual play podcast set in the Genesys Adaptation of Warhammer 40K's Dark Heresy RPG. This report features Game Master Ryan LaPlante (@theryanlaplante) and players Tom McGee (@mcgeetd) as Interrogator Nero Abagnale, Laura Elizabeth (@elhamstring) as Piper Fairley, Tyler Hewitt (@Tyler_Hewitt) as Seth Corbyn and Del Borovic (@deltastic) as Sister Olianne Mina. With the day of the race upon them, the Inquisitorial band decided that Olianne would be their runner. Olianne sought Ignatious Ironforth's skill for protection against power armour, Nero got advice on how to run the race safely, and Seth discovered that the wildcard team was led by Jacinta Skullshield. With Jacinta acting without House protection, can the band eliminate that threat before the race begins?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Life Of Caesar
Nero #25 – Effeminate Vice

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 45:36


We're talking about the Pisonian Conspiracy of 65. Who started it and why? Theories involve an angry poet and an angry gay man seeking revenge. The post Nero #25 – Effeminate Vice appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

Pablo Munoz Iturrieta
0102 - El feminismo y los estudios de género

Pablo Munoz Iturrieta

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 74:08


Curso Posmodernismo: https://pablomunoziturrieta.com/2021/07/20/curso-el-postmodernismo-y-las-ideologias-del-siglo-21/ Cursos: https://pablomunoziturrieta.com/cursos/ Donar y/o apoyar mensualmente: https://pablomunoziturrieta.com/apoyo/ / https://www.patreon.com/PabloMunozIturrieta Comprar mis libros: https://pablomunoziturrieta.com/2021/09/01/donde-comprar-mis-libros/ Te invito a seguirme en estos sitios: ✅ Website: https://pablomunoziturrieta.com/acerca/ ✅ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pablomunoziturrieta/ ✅ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pablomunoziturrieta/ ✅ Twitter: https://twitter.com/PMunozIturrieta ✅ Youtube: http://youtube.com/c/pablomunoziturrieta ✅ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/pablomunoziturrieta ✅ Canal de Telegram: https://t.me/PabloMunozIturrieta ✅ Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/pablo-munoz-iturrieta/id1530397605 ✅ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1WPZVBwj2QAwUjelfSePUT © Pablo Muñoz Iturrieta 2022

The Rest Is History
12 Days: Nero's succession and the fall of the Byzantine Empire

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 28:30


In a distinctly Roman start to 2022, Tom sets the scene for Rome's "Year of the four Emperors", while Dominic recounts a battle which was the beginning of the end for the Byzantine Empire. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Crystal Chronicles
Episode 181 - Bring the Paine! w/Black Nero

The Crystal Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 114:19


The Crystal Chronicles, your DissidiaFFOO Podcast!- TCC Apparel/T-Shirts: https://stores.inksoft.com/tcc_podcast- Website: www.tccpodcast.com- Discord: https://discord.gg/kraX4cC- Facebook: @fftccpodcast https://www.facebook.com/fftccpodcast- Twitter: @fftccpodcast https://twitter.com/fftccpodcast- Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/thecrystalchronicles- You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeG1OXfid1nE_Na1YueuMlQ TCC Crew @ Friends- Mark & Pierre [co-founders]- Aarolei [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/user/Leilee- Kriese [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/kriese- Black Nero [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEJAJL12xx9uZ38d4CJDTbQ- Inkwelder [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiUSnpMtE4TlIwQkOzlrv_A- JdotA [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTeLWwpIq0tPrPgrIwVT54A- Jin Lee [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwmwZjpt-ZFgMwzXMIVCSRQ- Macnol [Dissidia Info]: https://dissidiainfo.com/- Mino Spelgud [Reddit]: https://www.reddit.com/user/MinoSpelgud- Quetzalma [Materia Bot]: https://www.patreon.com/MateriaBot/posts- Strafe [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzbej72VAxyEg1kTLVLI4Mw- PoteauCedar [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/poteau_cedar Special Thanks!- Shootz [ryanisthebomb203] Intro Music: https://www.youtube.com/user/ryanisthebomb203 The Tonberry Troupe- https://www.tonberrytroupe.com/ TCC Friends [Fellow Content Creators]- Resphoina [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC09bB9tz9h9zL0m9WA6A8mw- Neclord [Reddit]: https://www.reddit.com/user/TelephoneCalls/- Bl'Artagnan [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCevYQyJ7A9T1w_vSd3xknlQ- VL [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG27I158orDbTSvr6zUSoBA- Forty, The Broadway Saiyan [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/thebroadwaysaiyan- Lidz87 [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWTKEOTf0VlElSwWxqiMZ6Q- SoulDFFOO [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_CXww4I0bEO485MLOo6Fvw- Dissopia [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7c8InDC-6YUB2l9cE7Q2yg- Chris5258 [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/chris5258- Xeno [TXB Gaming]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwvOArJvU1BP6B4ejI2ckYA- Macilento [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/macilentogames- Life Stream [Twitch]: https://www.twitch.tv/lifestreamdffoo- Indolent Lard [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzJVavNAdOBwB74HZ_oWQLw- rvkDFFOO [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/user/rvkfc71- Goose [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnwI3NFTsv_XcuRau06Jiww- Scott Ong [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/c/DFFOOGLSO- Silo Cons [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYN3ytXU9cV2tQUjw8L7rBA- CrossXIII [You Tube]: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeuTqSpKmoWikRr2PjgeT5Q Official Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/DissidiaFFOO/ [Thanks Shera!]FFOOTIP: https://ffootip.com/forecast [Thanks Nidre!]OOTracker: https://ootracker.com/Dissidia DB [Thanks Rem!] https://dissidiadb.com/Dissidia Compendium https://dissidiacompendium.com/? Thanks to all our viewers, supporters, and our collaborators! 

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy

Welcome back to the grim darkness of the 41st Millennium. I am Inquisitor Temperance Pryce, keeper of the Inquisition's Black Library, and this is the second volume in a report on the Valentyne Heresy - an actual play podcast set in the Genesys Adaptation of Warhammer 40K's Dark Heresy RPG. This report features Game Master Ryan LaPlante (@theryanlaplante) and players Tom McGee (@mcgeetd) as Interrogator Nero Abagnale, Laura Elizabeth (@elhamstring) as Piper Fairley, Tyler Hewitt (@Tyler_Hewitt) as Seth Corbyn and Del Borovic (@deltastic) as Sister Olianne Mina. The Inquisitorial band continued to play politics while wrestling with themselves. Piper was returned to her original state, Seth's new “friend” Lucia promised more assistance if they continued to help her secure the governorship, Nero had a vision of gunning down an Ultramarine, and Olianne realized it was her duty to help Seth redeem himself. How will they prepare for power armour at tomorrow's race? Enjoying The Valentyne Heresy? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun.   You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice   Want to play the 40K adaptation of Genesys yourself? You can find the rules at: https://genesys40k.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

After Hours with Dr. Sigoloff
2. Nero Plays as Rome Burns

After Hours with Dr. Sigoloff

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 29:13


Francis Collins makes some parodies of songs and Anthony Fauci says some vaccines can make the disease worse.

Es la Mañana de Federico
La República de los Tonnntos: Despilfarro de Irene Montero en un estudio sobre el impacto de los huracanes en el género

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 10:11


Santi González comenta la felicitación de Mónica García y el despilfarro de Montero en un estudio sobre el impacto de los huracanes en el género.

Es la Mañana de Federico
Prensa económica: Yolanda Díaz reparte 688 millones de los fondos europeos "con criterio de género"

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:33


Libre Mercado sigue desgranando el despilfarro de los fondos europeos.

Bonita Radio
MDUM | Corrieron desde San Juan hasta Arecibo para levantar conciencia sobre la violencia de género.

Bonita Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 40:43


Karla Vázquez y Jaileen Rentas completaron un ultra-maratón de 50 millas para levantar conciencia sobre la violencia de género y recaudar fondos para el Hogar Ruth. Conversamos con Karla sobre las motivaciones que las llevaron a hacer la carrera y sobre la preparación física y mental que se requiere para lograrlo.

Life Of Caesar
NERO #24 – The Pisonian Conspiracy

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 45:36


Nero has some freedmen executed but the stories are murky. The Parthians decide to try their luck taking back Armenia while Corbulo tries to keep the peace. The post NERO #24 – The Pisonian Conspiracy appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

Mesa Central - RatPack
Nuevos destinos turísticos en Chile y la perspectiva de género en las políticas públicas

Mesa Central - RatPack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 26:47


En una nueva edición del Rat Pack, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Paula Comandari y Carmen Gloria López sobre lugares turísticos inéditos en Chile para visitar durante el verano y cómo la falta de perspectiva de género en las políticas públicas, afectan la vida de las mujeres.

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy

Welcome back to the grim darkness of the 41st Millennium. I am Inquisitor Temperance Pryce, keeper of the Inquisition's Black Library, and this is the second volume in a report on the Valentyne Heresy - an actual play podcast set in the Genesys Adaptation of Warhammer 40K's Dark Heresy RPG. This report features Game Master Ryan LaPlante (@theryanlaplante) and players Tom McGee (@mcgeetd) as Interrogator Nero Abagnale, Laura Elizabeth (@elhamstring) as Piper Fairley, Tyler Hewitt (@Tyler_Hewitt) as Seth Corbyn and Del Borovic (@deltastic) as Sister Olianne Mina. The Inquisitorial band was once again forced to make difficult decisions. Owing Lucia Bane a favour, Seth tried to persuade the rest that Vance was Homo Novus and must be executed despite a lack of evidence, Piper agreed mainly to protect Seth from Nero finding out about the favour, and an overly-medicated Olianne was thrilled at the idea of bloodshed. What will Vance's death mean if Krungus Marcus is in fact Homo Novus? Enjoying The Valentyne Heresy? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun. You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice Want to play the 40K adaptation of Genesys yourself? You can find the rules at: https://genesys40k.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mañanas BLU 10:30 - con Camila Zuluaga
California, primer estado en EE.UU. con ley para que jugueterías tengan sección de género neutro

Mañanas BLU 10:30 - con Camila Zuluaga

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 12:44


La ley empezará a regir a partir del 2024 en los grandes almacenes, esto, para realizar un estudio y ver cómo reacciona el mercado. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy
2.28 - Every Man Is His Own World

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 48:03


Welcome back to the grim darkness of the 41st Millennium. I am Inquisitor Temperance Pryce, keeper of the Inquisition's Black Library, and this is the second volume in a report on the Valentyne Heresy - an actual play podcast set in the Genesys Adaptation of Warhammer 40K's Dark Heresy RPG. This report features Game Master Ryan LaPlante (@theryanlaplante) and players Tom McGee (@mcgeetd) as Interrogator Nero Abagnale, Laura Elizabeth (@elhamstring) as Piper Fairley, Tyler Hewitt (@Tyler_Hewitt) as Seth Corbyn and Del Borovic (@deltastic) as Sister Olianne Mina. My report shows that the band convinced Vulcan that Piper was Rancid and acquired the crown from the heist. Nero and Olianne interrogated witnesses and procured a sample of Vance's blood, Seth's investigation of the corpses left him with more questions than answers, and Piper approached Ignatious Ironforth to examine the weapons used in the attack. Will their collective evidence yield any real answers? Enjoying The Valentyne Heresy? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun. You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice Want to play the 40K adaptation of Genesys yourself? You can find the rules at: https://genesys40k.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Es la Mañana de Federico
Prensa económica: Yolanda Díaz asigna 3 millones de los fondos europeos al "empleo con transversalidad de género"

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 3:00


LD publica cómo Trabajo cambiará "la cultura del Sistema Nacional de Empleo", siguiendo las pautas recomendadas por el ministerio de Igualdad.

Psicocast
Gênero Neutro e Comunicação - Psicocast # 186

Psicocast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 62:53


Nesse podcast a equipe do Psicocast fala sobre Gênero Neutro e Comunicação de forma natural e tentando mostrar sua importância e sua complexidade.

Storia d'Italia
Non Angli, sed Angeli (Gregorio Magno, II), ep. 103

Storia d'Italia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 65:46


In questa seconda parte dell'episodio dedicato a Gregorio Magno, andremo in giro per il mediterraneo e verso gli estremi confini del mondo geografico e culturale di Gregorio. Lo vedremo all'opera nella sua relazione con i vescovi e i Re, fino alla sua decisione – di colossale importanza futura – di coraggiosamente andare lì dove nessun papa era mai giunto prima.---Ti piace il podcast? Sostienilo, accedendo all'episodio premium, al canale su telegram, alla citazione nel podcast, alle première degli episodi e molto altro ancora:https://www.patreon.com/italiastoria o con una donazione su https://it.tipeee.com/storia-ditalia o https://italiastoria.com/---►Informazioni sul mio libro "Per un pugno di barbari":https://italiastoria.com/libro/►Trascrizioni episodi, mappe, recensioni, genealogie:https://italiastoria.com/►FacebookPagina: https://www.facebook.com/italiastoriaGruppo: https://www.facebook.com/groups/italiastoria►Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/italiastoria/►Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ItaliaStoria►YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzPIENUr6-S0UMJzREn9U5Q►Canale Discord:https://discord.gg/cyjbMJe3Qk►Contattami per commenti, idee e proposte di collaborazione: info@italiastoria.com---Musiche di Riccardo Santatohttps://www.youtube.com/user/sanric77---Livello Dante Alighieri: Musu Meci, Massimiliano Pastore, Manuel Marchio, Mauro, Marco il Nero, Massimo CiampiconiLivello Leonardo da Vinci: Paolo, David l'apostata, Massimo, Pablo, Simone, Frazemo, Arianna, Jacopo, Jacopo F., Riccardo, Enrico, Alberto, Davide, Andrea, Federico, Bruno, Settimio, Giovanni, Cesare, Jerome, Diego, Francesco, Alanchik, Flavio Ruggeri Fo, Edoardo Vaquer, Stefano Po, Luca Casali, Nicol Bagnasco, Carlotta lo dico, Mariateresa, John Ellis, Nicol Bagnasco, Lorenzo Fanelli.Livello Galileo Galilei: Davide, Francesco, Jacopo Toso, Riccardo, Stefano, Roger, Anna, Pierangelo, Luigi, Antonio, Giulia, Ezra, Andrea, Paola, Daniele, Mariano, Francesca, Gabriella, Alessio, Giovanni, Alessandro, Valerio, Angelo, Alberto, Viviana, Riccardo, Giorgio, Francesco G., Francesco B., Emanuele, Giacomo, Francesco M, Giacomo, Martina, Yuri, Lorenzo, Jamie, Gianluca, Danilo, Echtelion, Matteo, Valerio P., Guglielmo, Michele, Massimo, Tommaso J, e Francesco C., Stefano, Giulio S., Davide P., Elisabetta C., Don Fabrizio, Massimo S., Luca F, Luca Mottadelli, Dario Pirola, Venus Schiavonia, Annalaura Benincasa, Marcus Walker, Michael Kain. Grazie anche a tutti i miei sostenitori al livello Marco Polo!---Musiche di Riccardo Santato

Three Brothers Talking
Episode 74: 666, Nero, 7 Heads, Ancient Rome, and Literal Eschatology (Book Club)

Three Brothers Talking

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021


https://youtu.be/jKllmz2AOok Book Club: Heaven Misplaced Jeremy and David talk about Chapter 13 of Heaven Misplaced: all about having a “literal hermeneutic,” historic and biblical arguments for the identity of the beast, the 7 Heads, and what the original Christians who heard Revelation would have likely believed about all of the signs/symbols of the Revelation. Wading … Episode 74: 666, Nero, 7 Heads, Ancient Rome, and Literal Eschatology (Book Club) Read More »

Living Words
To the Church in Smyrna

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021


To the Church in Smyrna Revelation 2:8-11 by William Klock St. John's second letter sees us travelling up the road, about fifty kilometres north of Ephesus to the city of Smyrna. Ephesus may have been the chief city of the Roman province of Asia, but Smyrna was more ancient and a close competitor. It was a beautiful port city that the Greek geographer Strabo dubbed “the glory of Asia”. On the waterfront, at the bottom of Golden Street, the main thoroughfare, was the Tempe of Cybele. If you were a tourist and made your way up the street through the city, you'd pass other grand temples dedicated to Apollo, Askelpios, and Aphrodite. And at the end of the street, where it met the foothills, was the great Temple of Zeus. The Christians of Smyrna lived surrounded by the glory of the gods of Greece. But those weren't the only temples in Smyrna. The city fathers of Smyrna prided themselves on being forward-thinking and wisely pragmatic. Theirs had been the first of the cities of Asia Minor to align itself with Rome. In 197 B.C they appealed to the Senate for aid against Antiochus III and two years later, proving their loyalty, built the first temple in that part of the world to the goddess Roma. Through the Roman civil wars, they'd always managed to choose the side of the victor. Smyrna knew which way the wind was blowing. For their loyalty, the emperors granted Smyrna the status of “free city” and the construction of an imperial temple—and two more to follow in the years after the time period of Revelation. The citizens of Smyrna were loyal Romans. And that posed a problem for the Christians there as well. Look now at our text, it's just a short four verses beginning a 2:8. Jesus says: “And to the angel of the church in Smyrna write: ‘The words of the first and the last, who died and came to life. As I've said before, Revelation is about tribulation, kingdom, and perseverance. Jesus' people live in the midst of tribulation and it's only going to get worse for them, and so Jesus addresses them first by reminding them who he is. As he speaks to each of these seven churches, Jesus calls to mind the image that John gave of him in Chapter 1. For the Ephesians he reminded them that he is the one who holds the seven stars in his hand and who walks in the midst of the lampstands. He sustains his church. For the Smyrneans he reminds them that he is the one who is first and last, the one who died and came to life. In each case, Jesus is urging his people to persevere in the midst of tribulation and he doesn't just say, “I know it's hard, but just do it.” He reminds them that he is with them. The kingdom is now. The kingdom is here. As his church, they are his kingdom and their king is with them. They're not walking through territory that is unknown to their Lord. Jesus has travelled this path before them and he stands with them now. That's what he's getting at in reminding them that he is the first and the last. He is the Lord of history. It was by Jesus—the word—that God created all things in the beginning and it is by him that God is now making all things new. And he is the one who was crucified and rose from the grave. Not only is that how he inaugurated his kingdom, not only is it how he broke the chains of death and sin and is making all things new, it's an apt exhortation in light of what the Christians in Smyrna are facing. They are united with Jesus—yes, in his suffering, but that also means they are united with him in his resurrection and have no reason to fear death. As St. Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “Death is swallowed up in victory” (1 Corinthians 15:54). Now look at Jesus' message itself, verses 9-11: “‘I know your tribulation and your poverty (but you are rich) and the slander of those who say that they are Jews and are not, but are a synagogue of Satan. Do not fear what you are about to suffer. Behold, the devil is about to throw some of you into prison, that you may be tested, and for ten days you will have tribulation. Be faithful unto death, and I will give you the crown of life. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches. The one who conquers will not be hurt by the second death.' The first thing we should note is that Jesus has nothing bad to say about the people of this church. We can gather from the other letters that had there been a serious problem in Smyrna, Jesus would have mentioned it. These brothers and sisters were faithful. And that's just what's getting them into trouble. Jesus tells them that he's fully aware of their tribulation and their poverty—although he quickly adds that despite their poverty, they are in reality rich. This is in contrast to the Laodiceans who are materially rich, but whom Jesus condemns for being poor in faith. It's because of their faithfulness that the Smyrnean Christians are facing opposition. The immediate cause of the problem, he says, is that they've been slandered by “those who say that they are Jews and are not”. He goes so far as to call them a “synagogue of satan”. What does that mean? Given what we know of the historical situation in Smyrna, it's not too hard to piece together. At this point in time, the Romans weren't really the immediate problem. Until about the time of the Emperor Nero—during whose reign John wrote to these churches—Christians enjoyed a certain amount of freedom. Everyone in the empire was required to offer at least nominal worship to the emperor, but the Jews had made such a fuss over this and caused the Romans so many problems, that they'd been granted an exemption. They agreed to pray for and to offer sacrifices for the emperor and that allowed them to live in a somewhat uneasy tension with Rome. And for some decades Christians were seen as a Jewish sect and enjoyed the same privilege. But during Nero's reign that began to change. The empire didn't approve of new religions and the Jews about that time not only started distancing themselves from Christians, but were only too happy to insist that Christians weren't Jews and to point them out to the Roman authorities. Why would Jews do this? Some Jews were angry that many of their brethren along with Gentile god-fearers were becoming Christians. As far as they were concerned, Jesus was most decidedly not the Messiah. He was a criminal who had been crucified and anyone claiming he was the Messiah was a blaspheming heretic. They were also angered at the Christian approach to the law. And the idea that unclean Gentiles could become Jews apart from total obedience to the law, well, that just had them fuming. Think of Paul telling his story to Agrippa in Acts 26: “I myself was convinced that I ought to do many things in opposing the name of Jesus of Nazareth. And I did so in Jerusalem. I not only locked up many of the saints in prison after receiving authority from the chief priests, but when they were put to death I cast my vote against them. And I punished them often in all the synagogues and tried to make them blaspheme, and in raging fury against them I persecuted them even to foreign cities.” (Acts 26:9-11) Jesus words to the Smyrneans about Jewish slander leading to Roman imprisonment fits with what we know from the historical record. Repeatedly in Acts we see unbelieving Jews working with the Romans and other Gentiles to persecute Christians. Paul refers to this in 1 Thessalonians and we read about it in Tertullian and in the Martyrdom of Polycarp, who was Bishop of Smyrna and martyred about ninety years later. Remember that people like Paul, when they became Christians, wouldn't have thought of themselves as having converted to a new religion. They were Jews and they continued to be Jews. It was simply that in fulfilling God's promises, Jesus had created a new and better way of being Jewish. So the Jews would go to the Romans to report Christians and would argue that these Christians, contrary to their claims, weren't actually Jews and their claims to be so were disturbing the status quo. Worse, they'd argue, these Christians were only use Judaism as a cover for their refusal to recognise the divinity and lordship of Caesar. And, particularly in a place like Smyrna, that sort of accusation could be disastrous, because the Smyrneans were zealous patriots of Rome and loyal worshippers of Caesar. In Smyrna the imperial cult permeated everything. Everyone, rich and poor, was required by law to offer sacrifices to the emperor. In Smyrna, the city fathers thought this so important, that they actually provided the citizenry with money from the treasury to purchase their offerings, just so no one would have an excuse not to. And so to have any real part in public life, in government, in trade, in a guild, in various social circles you had to take part in the imperial cult and from the time that John wrote it only got worse for Christians. The empire demanded its citizens proclaim the lordship of Caesar, but for the Christians that was impossible. Jesus is Lord. They knew it and they could not betray him. And that faith was the basis for their perseverance in the truth. This is just how it went down for Polycarp, one of the most famous martyrs of the early Church. At one particular festival, a Christian name Germanicus was thrown to wild animals in the arena and told to renounce Jesus. He refused and was killed, but seeing his faith only made the crowd angrier. They called for Polycarp, the bishop, to be brought next. He was seized and brought to the arena. He fearlessly confessed that he was a Christian and he was given the choice: Worship the divine Caesar or die. The Jews of Smyrna shouted, “This is the teacher of Asia, the father of the Christians, and the overthrower of our gods, he who had been teaching many not to sacrifice or to worship the gods.” Polycarp would not renounce his Lord and was sentenced to death. The account reports that despite being the Sabbath, the Jews were foremost in gathering wood for the fire to burn the bishop. And as the fire was laid, Polycarp said, “It is well. I fear not the fire that burns for a season, and after a while is quenched. Why do you delay? Come, do your will.” And as he was consumed by the flames he prayed, “I thank thee that thou has graciously thought me worthy of this day and of this hour, that I may receive a portion in the number of the martyrs, in the cup of thy Christ.” The mob that martyred Polycarp echoed the Good Friday mob that shouted to Pilate, “We have no king but Caesar! Crucify him!” Is it any wonder then that Jesus would appeal to his own death and resurrection as the root of faith and source of perseverance for these Christians? They were truly to share in the same suffering that he did, and so he reminded them: I am the one who died and came to life. And in the same way that the unbelief of those Jews who cried out for Jesus' crucifixion exposed them as false Jews by their rejection of the Messiah, so these Jews in Smyrna exposed themselves as false in rejecting the Messiah's people. That's where the “synagogue of satan” part comes from. And in accusing Jesus' people falsely, these unbelieving Jews show who they really belong to. It's much like Jesus statement in John 8: If God were your Father, you would love me, for I came from God and I am here. I came not of my own accord, but he sent me. Why do you not understand what I say? It is because you cannot bear to hear my word. You are of your father the devil, and your will is to do your father's desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. (John 8:42-44) The Church is the true synagogue—the kingdom of God and the temple in which his Spirit dwells—and because of that Jesus' people need have no fear of tribulation. Jesus urges his people to persevere even as they are thrown into prison. That didn't quite mean the same thing then as it does now. Prison itself wasn't a punishment. Prison was where you were held pending trial or execution, which usually came swiftly. The devil would see them thrown in prison. For many of them, release from prison would mean execution. “For ten days you will have tribulation,” Jesus says. That's not so much a literal statement about how long this time of persecution will last. It's a reference to the first chapter of Daniel. Daniel and his three friends were tested for ten days as they went without eating the king's food. The point of the test was to see if they would come out the other side as healthy as the young men who at the king's choice food. The temptation was to compromise with pagan gods by eating from the king's table, eating meat that had been offered to idols. To eat at the king's table was also a symbolic act of loyalty—and remember that the king claimed to be divine. These young Jewish men just couldn't do that. What Jesus is saying is that this time of tribulation will test his people's loyalty to him in the same way that Daniel and his friends were tested. But it's not just a warning; it's also an exhortation. They will come out the other side of this time of testing vindicated, even though it may mean their deaths—because they have already been united with Jesus in his resurrection. “Be faithful unto death,” Jesus tells them, “and I will give you a crown of life….the one who conquers will not be hurt by the second death.” The “second death” is a rabbinic expression. John uses it again in Chapter 20. And if you look at the Targums, the rabbinic commentary on the Old Testament, it means exclusion from the resurrection. As St. Paul wrote in First Corinthians, Jesus it the firstfruits of the resurrection of the dead. Where he has gone, his people will surely follow if they are steadfast in faith. He has triumphed and holds the keys of death and hades. There will be tribulation, but we must persevere, following where Jesus leads and knowing that we face nothing that he has not faced himself. Now, what does this mean for us? There is a general application here for Christians everywhere. No matter how good times are for Christians, we will always face some kind of opposition. The empire and the Caesars that once persecuted and murdered the saints would, several hundred years later be conquered by the gospel and Caesar himself would bow his knee to Jesus. That part of the world over which Caesar had claimed his pagan lordship would gradually be transformed by the gospel into “Christendom”. And yet even then, there were pockets and times of resistance. Jesus reminds Christians everywhere in all times of the need to stand firm in faith. We are his kingdom and we not only must persevere, but we have every reason to do so. And it is by our perseverance, even to death, that our proclamation of the kingdom is validated—that it becomes credible in the eyes of the world and spreads. But, Brothers and Sisters, “Christendom” is no more. In our post-Christian world we face ever-increasing resistance and opposition. And whereas a few decades ago—I think of growing up during the Cold War—we tended to think of opposition in terms of Communism and an authoritarian government shutting churches and kicking in doors to search our houses for Bibles and march us off to prison, things have gone in quite a different direction—a direction I think even more troubling, in part because it's far more subtle and insidious. The Smyrnean Christians faced ostracism, imprisonment, and sometimes martyrdom because they refused to offer that pinch of incense to Caesar. In our day the pressure comes from a post-modern culture in which objective truth has been forsaken and replaced with whatever a person feels to be true. We have become our own gods, creating our own realities and truths. Nevermind that those truths are, in reality, false. And along with that—in combination with it—we've made everything about the therapeutic and about the self. The worst thing that can happen to a person is suffering. And this worldview is everywhere and permeates everything. If you struggle with same-sex attraction, you don't fight it; you embrace it. Anyone who tells you otherwise be damned, because not embracing it brings suffering, shame, and oppression. A man can claim to be a woman because who's to say he isn't—not biology, not genetics, not reality. Science is no longer the basis for truth, feelings are—and if you say otherwise, you're labelled a bigot and oppressor. In one of the latest applications of Critical Theory, a doctor who tells an overweight patient that his diabetes or heart disease is because he's overweight becomes an “oppressor”. If science makes us feel bad, well it's wrong—it's labelled “oppressive”. Once we allow our feelings to define our truth, there's no limit to how absurd the claims become. And we not only make our truths; we put ourselves at the centre of them. Our relationships are increasingly centre on self rather than others. Fix a relationship? Sacrifice for a relationship? No way. If someone is difficult or unpleasant—nevermind that we might be at least part of the reason for that—you cut them off and cut them out. As they say, “You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.” No, you've got to take care of yourself. In fact, we've now got a term for this obsession with self, “self care,” and it's fast becoming as idolatrous a cult as anything the pagan Greeks and Romans did. But all of this isn't just “out there”. The western Church has increasingly embraced what's been dubbed Moralistic Therapeutic Deism—the general belief that God wants nothing more for us than to be happy and good—however you define good. How we “do” church, how we worship, everything about the church is increasingly becoming centred on the self. Worship has been turned into an experience to be judged by how good it makes me feel. Biblical sermons have been replaced by pop-psychology and self-help. Commercialism increasingly dominates how we do things. We stop asking if what we do will please God and instead ask how it will increase our marketshare. And without any deep biblical and theological anchors, Christians are increasingly compromising the good—and truth and everything else—because it's easiest just to go with the cultural flow. The Church is leaving people utterly unprepared for the cultural tide that's now breaking over us. Rod Dreher wrote last year, ““Relatively few contemporary Christians are prepared to suffer for the faith, because the therapeutic society that has formed them denies the purpose of suffering in the first place, and the idea of bearing pain for the sake of truth seems ridiculous.” If you have a chance, find a copy of his book, Live Not by Lies, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest it. And there's a flood of Christians now capitulating to the culture, offering their pinch of incense to the gods of post-modernism. It's become so common we now have a term for it: Deconstruction. And it grieves me to see friends and colleagues going through this process, sliding down this slippery slope that inevitably ends in apostasy. Once orthodox Christians face the pressure and the conflict between Church and culture and they begin to “deconstruct” their faith, pulling it apart piece by piece and then rebuilding it after reconsidering the pieces. It's so often presented as a faithful, mature, intellectual and spiritual exercise, but it's telling that in the end the result is the same very time. You end up retaining whatever bits of Christianity you can without being in conflict with the culture, and whatever is at odds, whatever causes conflict is cast aside. It's always the same bits discarded. The uniqueness of Jesus? Gone. A biblical sexual ethic? Gone. The reliability and authority of Scripture? That's gone too. Justice? Oh, they held on to that, they say. But the version of justice they've got after deconstruction is no longer the biblical understanding of justice; it's a post-modern concept of justice that has far more to do with Marxist ideology than it does the Bible. At least as often as not, you'll find that the person who has gone through this process has a close family member, often a child, who has “come out” as “gay” or “trans”. That's a difficult situation to be in. If you stand firm in faith, there's going to be conflict. But after deconstruction the conflict is gone. You can once again be at peace with yourself and with the world—and most importantly, no one out there can call you a hater or a bigot or whatever the insult of the month is. I've seen it happen over and over again. I've watched friends slide down this slope. I've watched pastoral colleagues slide down this slope. I've watched churches that slide down this slope—listening to one acquaintance locally whose last few sermons have been full of apologies for the sexist and patriarchal language of the Bible. Brothers and Sisters, if you find yourself apologising for the Spirit-inspired words of Scripture, stop. Now. Something's gone wrong. But this is the problem. Our culture values niceness and the therapeutic. The worst thing you could do in Smyrna was to be disloyal to Caesar. In our culture it's to make someone feel bad—even if they should. Shame, which until now we've always understood to be a positive in that it discourages us from doing things we know we shouldn't, well, now shame is a dirty word. And almost as bad as making someone else feel bad is to feel bad ourselves—to be in conflict with the mainstream, to be called out as a hater. Oddly enough, in the incoherence of post-modernism, the one time it is okay—and not just okay, but necessary—to shame someone is when they aren't on-board with the spirit of the age. And Brothers and Sisters, if you think it's hard to be called a hater or a bigot or intolerant, consider how difficult it is for our children. Especially if they've live in the environment of government schooling, they've been immersed in this culture to an extent you and I may struggle to grasp. This is why we need to be diligent and faithful in teaching them the faith, in discipling them, in ensuring they know what's true and what's false, and making sure they are not overcome by our therapeutic and self-centred culture. We need to recover a deep sense of the sinfulness of sin and of the holiness of God. We need to grasp the deepness of the love and grace and mercy of God and to recover a sense of the costliness of the sacrifice that Jesus made to show us that love and grace and mercy. And we need to know that if we are going to identify ourselves with Jesus, it means that we will walk with him in his suffering—in conflict with the gods and kings of this age—but that we do so in faith and in hope—even in joy—knowing that in doing so we are carrying his kingdom to the world and knowing that our kingdom hope is for life and for a world set to rights—truly set to rights by God's standards, which are far higher than those of our culture. It's not just about perseverance in the face of tribulation. We persevere—we will only persevere—because we know the deep truth of the kingdom: Christ has died. Christ has risen. Christ will come again. Let's pray: O Lord, come among us, we pray, with your power and strengthen us with your great might; that whereas, through our sins and wickedness we are grievously hindered in running the race that is set before us, your bountiful grace and mercy may speedily help and deliver us; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, to whom with you and the Holy Spirit, be honour and glory, now and for ever. Amen.

Notícia no Seu Tempo
Entenda o que é identidade de gênero

Notícia no Seu Tempo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 8:26


Na definição da Organização das Nações Unidas (ONU), identidade de gênero é a percepção que uma pessoa tem de si mesma como sendo do gênero masculino, feminino ou de alguma combinação dos dois, independentemente do sexo atribuído no nascimento. Entender o assunto é importante para que não se perpetue um ciclo de violências. Segundo o Dossiê dos Assassinatos e da Violência Contra Pessoas Trans Brasileiras (2020), o Brasil é o país que mais mata essa população no planeta — e está nesse lugar há anos.  Neste episódio do Expresso na Perifa, o radialista Artur dos Anjos ouve Lucas Lourenzo Ribeiro, homens trans e morador de Guaraituba, na cidade de Colombo, região metropolitana de Curitiba. Podcast Estadão Expresso na Perifa  Pauta, coordenação e direção: Lucas Veloso  Reportagem, apresentação e edição: Artur dos Anjos Locução de abertura e encerramento: Viviane Zandonadi See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Devocionales Cristianos para Mujeres
2021-12-17 | Mujeres | PINCELADAS DEL AMOR DIVINO - EL CAMINO PARA LOGRAR LA IGUALDAD DE GÉNERO

Devocionales Cristianos para Mujeres

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 4:30


Devocional Cristiano para Mujeres - PINCELADAS DEL AMOR DIVINO Fecha: 17-12-2021 Título: EL CAMINO PARA LOGRAR LA IGUALDAD DE GÉNERO Autor: Erna Alvarado Locución: Analía Hein

Paola Rojas en Fórmula
Es importante terminar con los chistes machistas para erradicar la violencia de género: Geraldina González

Paola Rojas en Fórmula

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 3:33


En entrevista con Paola Rojas, Presidenta del Consejo para Eliminar y Prevenir la Discriminación en la Ciudad de México, dio unos ejemplos de como eliminar la violencia de género.

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy
2.28 - Every Man Is His Own World

Warhammer 40,000: The Valentyne Heresy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:00


Welcome back to the grim darkness of the 41st Millennium. I am Inquisitor Temperance Pryce, keeper of the Inquisition's Black Library, and this is the second volume in a report on the Valentyne Heresy - an actual play podcast set in the Genesys Adaptation of Warhammer 40K's Dark Heresy RPG. This report features Game Master Ryan LaPlante (@theryanlaplante) and players Tom McGee (@mcgeetd) as Interrogator Nero Abagnale, Laura Elizabeth (@elhamstring) as Piper Fairley, Tyler Hewitt (@Tyler_Hewitt) as Seth Corbyn and Del Borovic (@deltastic) as Sister Olianne Mina. My report shows that the band convinced Vulcan that Piper was Rancid and acquired the crown from the heist. Nero and Olianne interrogated witnesses and procured a sample of Vance's blood, Seth's investigation of the corpses left him with more questions than answers, and Piper approached Ignatious Ironforth to examine the weapons used in the attack. Will their collective evidence yield any real answers? Enjoying The Valentyne Heresy? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun. You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice Want to play the 40K adaptation of Genesys yourself? You can find the rules at: https://genesys40k.com/

From My Standpoint
Episode 044: What is Christmas

From My Standpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 28:30


Christmas is a time of year where we spread cheer and joy by giving gifts and spending time with family and loved ones. But what exactly is that “Christmas Spirit” that we keep speaking of? Listen to some history about this special holiday and how some past events share similar meanings. Learn some new insights and understandings, and learn to look at things from a new perspective. Learn what Christmas is really about and what it really is.         Intro/Outro Bumper Music: Evening Melodrama Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ The Wisdom of Dad Joke Music: The Curtain Rises Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Es la Mañana de Federico
Federico a las 8: La ideología de género comunista

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 18:14


Federico analiza cómo los comunistas están imponiendo su ideología, en esta ocasión a través de Irene Montero y la “violencia de género".

Wisteria Lane
Wisteria Lane - Las claves de la violencia intragénero - 12/12/21

Wisteria Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 31:24


La violencia en el seno de parejas del mismo sexo está absolutamente invisibilizada en nuestra sociedad. La Junta de Andalucía ha publicado una guía para dar a conocer esta realidad y las maneras de atajarla. Hablamos con su autora, la abogada y activista LGTBI+, Charo Alises. También hablamos de la figura del artista y activista contracultural Miguel Benlloch, aprovechando que puede visitarse una retrospectiva suya en el Instituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno. Con su comisario, Alejandro Simón, hablamos.   Escuchar audio

Glow Podcast with Dr. Lan
How To Be Joyful All The Time

Glow Podcast with Dr. Lan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 40:00


In the book of Philippians, Paul addresses the issue of joy and happiness extensively. The word joy or rejoice was repeated several times in the book? However the background of the book reveals that Paul was the unlikely encourager. The last 4 years of Paul's life were tough: 2 years in prison in Caesarea, a voyage to go to Rome to appear before Nero. He was shipwrecked, stranded on an island, bitten by a poisonous snake, survived the winter there, got to Rome, then spent 2 more years in prison, chained to a guard 24-7, while waiting for trial and then execution. Why would Paul who has just gone through all these and under house arrest write to others encouraging others? How did Paul learn to be joyful all the time no matter what? He reveals the secret in the book of Philippians. Gregory Lan Ijiwola shares some of Paul's secrets to joy in this message.

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE
“Light Breaks Into Darkness” – Isaiah 9:1-7

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


Well, you have your Bible, please open up with me to Isaiah. We're going to be in Isaiah 9:1-7. Over the last couple of weeks or so leading up to Christmas, Pastor Jacob has been working through the story of Christ's birth in the Gospel of Matthew, one of the most popular text. I think we would all agree in the Bible and yet the events that we read about in that passage and Mark or in Matthew Chapters one and two and in the corresponding infancy narrative in Luke's Gospel are stories and events that didn't arise out of the blue. In other words, the event of Christ's birth were events that were planned before the foundation of the world and events that were anticipated in the Old Testament. Today we're going to look at just one of those prophecies that looks forward to Christ's birth. It looks forward to Christ's incarnation some seven hundred years before it actually took place. So hear now the word of the Lord from Isaiah 9:1-7, I will be reading out of the English Standard Version. "But there will be no gloom for her who was in anguish. In the former time he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, but in the latter time he has made glorious the way of the sea, the land beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations. 2 The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shone. 3 You have multiplied the nation; you have increased its joy; they rejoice before you as with joy at the harvest, as they are glad when they divide the spoil. 4 For the yoke of his burden, and the staff for his shoulder, the rod of his oppressor, you have broken as on the day of Midian. 5 For every boot of the tramping warrior in battle tumult and every garment rolled in blood will be burned as fuel for the fire. 6 For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. 7 Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this. Isaiah 9:1-7, ESV This is the word of the Lord. In the year sixty-nine A.D., about two thousand years ago or so, a year that's been called the so-called "Long Year" by historians. The Roman Empire went through something of a tense period of conflict and civil war. It actually all started the previous year back in sixty-eight A.D., when one of the most deranged emperors to ever govern Rome died. His name was Nero, and in 68 A.D., Nero killed himself. His successor, a guy named Galba, Emperor Galba, became emperor. Now, when word of this event, this transition of power, reached the eastern boundaries of the empire, where two generals named Vespasian and his son, Titus, were busy leveling Jerusalem and the surrounding area because of a large scale Jewish revolt that was underway. The younger of the two generals, whose name was General Titus dropped everything to go back to Rome and congratulate the new emperor who had ascended to the throne. You see, if you were among the first to greet the new guy and to make sure that he likes you, well, in the end, that would work out on your behalf. So that was Titus' plan, get the new guy to like me. So he began his long journey back to Rome to greet Emperor Galba. On his long, way back, a few things happened. First, long before Titus even got to Rome, Emperor Galba was assassinated a few months after he took control in January of 69 A.D. A new emperor named Otho took power of the empire in Rome. Right when that happened, something else happened. Another general and another area of the empire whose name was Vitellius decided that now was his opportunity to become emperor, and so he declared himself emperor and decided to march upon Rome and against Otho and his supporters. A few months later, Vitellius successfully overthrew the second guy named Otho as emperor. Given all of this upheaval that was going on in Rome, what was Titus, the first general who was going back to Rome to congratulate the first guy who had now died, what was he going to do? In the midst of all of this upheaval, he was kind of stuck in the middle and wondering, who should he get behind? You see, if you tied yourself to the wrong guy. That wasn't good because their downfall would eventually be your downfall. Well, in the end, here's what Titus did. He decided that with all of this turmoil unfolding, he'd go back and make sure that his dad Vespasian became emperor, and a few months later, Vespasian and marched on Rome, and he became emperor, too. Now, if you found that whole historical synopsis to be somewhat dizzying and confusing, that's because it is. Un the history of the Roman Empire sixty-nine A.D. was a dark and tumultuous year of political upheaval. It saw, if you were counting four different emperors in the course of a year, it was a year of backbiting and civil war. If, like General Titus, you were caught in the middle of all that, well, your next move would seal your own fate as well. You see, your future was bound up in who you supported. Support the wrong guy and you're not going to have much of a future. When you think about it, even if you support the winner and this is the kind of environment you call home, how long do you think you really have until somebody comes for you next? Now, on the one hand, the events of that story of sixty-nine A.D. and the tumultuous time of the Roman Empire are far removed in a variety of ways from our own context. On the other hand, you and I are always faced, we're always faced with decisions in life like Titus about who or what to support who or what to hitch our future ambitions to. Whether we're talking about the world of politics or our own future ambitions, or even something that's inconsequential as the world of sports. We're always trying to navigate this world and hopefully come out on top by supporting the right causes and the right people. Be that as it may, the Bible tells us that whatever we decide to get behind in this world, whatever alliances we gravitate towards and however shrewd we are in navigating this environment of competing forces, no amount of skillful maneuvering in the present can give us the kind of triumph that we look for or the satisfaction that we long for. You see, the Bible tells us that there are many good things and right things to get behind in this world, spiritually speaking, we live in a world of sin and unbelief and darkness. This world could never and will never yield a solution to its own problems. Our only hope then, while we live in this world, is to get behind somebody who is not of this world, but who nevertheless came into this world some two thousand years ago to triumph over the present darkness. So our big idea this morning is this walk in the light of the Son. Now we'll talk about the historical setting of our passage, Isaiah chapter nine, in just a moment. For now, keep in mind that when Isaiah writes what he writes here in Isaiah nine, some seven hundred years before Christ's birth and incarnation, Isaiah is speaking into a bleak and dark situation that's unfolding in his own day. He sees God's people descending into a time of darkness and gloom. Yet, in the context of that, he also looks forward to a future day where he sees a dramatic reversal on the horizon, a reversal that subverts expectations. So as we look at our passage, we'll see first how Isaiah describes this reversal as glory that overcomes gloom and then how he explains this reversal as deliverance that overcomes bondage. First, a description of how glory overcomes gloom and versus one through three and then an explanation deliverance, overcoming bondage and verses four through seven. Most commentators break this passage down and those two parts, and so I'm following accordingly. 1. How Glory Overcomes Gloom 2. Deliverance that Overcomes Bondage How Glory Overcomes Gloom So let's begin with seeing how glory overcomes gloom. Now throughout this passage, again, keep in mind that Isaiah is looking forward. He's looking forward to a future day. He's standing in about the seven hundred B.C., and yet he's looking to a future day on the horizon. To appreciate the descriptions that Isaiah provides of that coming day, we have to first appreciate when he says what he says. In other words, we have to appreciate something about the historical context in which Isaiah is prophesying. As we'll see, it's a context of doom and gloom and darkness. Understand that in the lead up to what Isaiah tells us here in Isaiah chapter nine, the prophet has been speaking from Isaiah seven through Isaiah eight, and now into Isaiah, nine, into a particular situation that was transpiring in Judah during the reign of King Ahaz around seven hundred thirty-four B.C. You see at that time, King Ahaz and the kingdom he led, known as Judah, were faced with a kind of international turmoil of their own. You see immediately to their north and alliance was forming. Actually, an alliance had already formed between two nations between Syria and the 10 northern tribes of Israel. This new alliance that had formed just north of Ahaz decided to put Ahaz and the Kingdom of Judah in their crosshairs. In fact, they were intent with overthrowing Ahaz and the Kingdom of Judah. As Isaiah is writing what he's writing, those armies from the North are already on the move. They're already pressing down southward, taking over city after city in Judah intent on overthrowing Ahaz and his kingdom. So Ahaz is faced with the potential loss of the kingdom he governs. He has a choice to make. Would he get behind the Israel-Syria alliance so that they would stop attacking him? Perhaps he could surrender to them while he still has time left and promised to pay them tribute so that they wouldn't attack him any longer? Kind of like paying the mafia for protection. Or on the other hand, maybe Ahaz would rather than align himself with that alliance to turn to the real superpower of the day a nation known as Assyria and get behind them so that they would offer him protection from this alliance forming in the north. In short, Ahaz is faced with a decision about what alliances to form, about who to get behind so that perhaps his kingdom that was under attack would be spared. Before he makes that decision, the prophet Isaiah comes to him in Isaiah chapter seven, and he pleads with Ahaz not to get behind anyone. Rather, he tells him to forsake all of these worldly alliances and the geopolitical wheeling and dealing that's going on in the day and instead look to the Lord. To trust that the Lord is going to deliver Judah from international threats near and far, just like he's always done throughout their history. Does Ahaz listen to Isaiah's advice? Well, no, he doesn't. Instead, and we would find this out if we were looking at Isaiah seven, he proceeds with forming an alliance with Assyria and though it saves Judah in the short term, ultimately, it's the decision that would lead to the devastation of his kingdom. First, after he makes that decision, Syria and the 10 northern tribes of Israel would be devastated by Assyria, the superpower of the day. That might have been good news for someone like Ahaz, who was only living in the short term by what he could see. After Ahaz is gone later, in history after he dies, Judah would suffer at the hands of that superpower too. Throughout Isaiah chapter seven and eight in the lead up to Isaiah nine, the prophet Isaiah looks forward to the future, and he outlines the consequences for rejecting the way of faith that he held out for Ahaz. Isaiah announces that because many in Judah, including the king himself, have rejected the way of faith and have chosen instead to live in the short term by what their eyes could see, the nation as a whole would be plunged into deep darkness and gloom. Even in that darkness, here's the good news. God would preserve a faithful remnant, a portion of his people who still trusted in him. Who were marked not merely by their national identity as Israelite or Judahites, but by their spiritual identity as a people who hunger and thirst for the Lord and for his promises. For people like that, here's where we come to the burst of light in Isaiah 9:1, the day of salvation would eventually dawn. Look again at verse one where we read, "But there will be no gloom for her, who was in anguish." There will be gloom after Ahaz, gloom will set in for the nation of Judah. Isaiah is looking beyond that at this point, and he says, "But there will be no gloom for her who was in anguish. In the former time he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, but in the latter time he has made glorious the way of the sea, the land beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations." Back in the early 1990s, and some of you might remember this, one of the most dangerous cities in the world was Medellin, Colombia. In fact, at the time, I think it was labeled the most dangerous city in the world. During the heights of Pablo Escobar's drug cartel, which was based in Medellin. The city had something like a murder rate of nearly 400 murders per 100,000 people. It was by far the highest in the world. To give you a comparison, the highest murder rate in the United States today is St. Louis, which is about 64 murders per 100,000 people. So that was, you know, doing the math something like eight fold what St. Louis is today. Moreover, the poverty rate in Medellin in the early 1990s was something like 50 percent. The infrastructure of the city left much to be desired. After Escobar's death that the city underwent this incredible transformation, the homicide rate plummeted, the poverty rate fell too. Over the course of the next few decades, Medellin has been transformed into what one publication calls it one of the smartest cities in the world. Now, of course, all cities have issues Medellin included, but the transformation that city has undergone in three decades is truly remarkable. Well, when our text opens in verse one, we hear Isaiah announce an even more remarkable transformation than that. He tells us that the lands to the north of Judah and Jerusalem, the lands of Zebulon and Neftali would be transformed. Now this was land that was originally settled by God's people all the way back in the book of Joshua. The people of God who lived there, the Israelites who lived there under King David and under King Solomon, they flourished in that place. After Solomon died, well, that land quickly became a land of idolatry. False worship sprang up on the mountains of Zebulon and Neftali and the surrounding regions, and the land became a setting for international conflict. It was eventually land that was devastated by Assyria, in Ahaz's own day. We learn in the Bible that after a Syria devastated the land of Zebulon and Neftali, the carried away the Jewish population that lived there and then repopulated it again with pagan gentiles who didn't worship the Lord instead. In God's providence Assyria turned this land into a place of deep darkness and gloom in more ways than one. Yet, Isaiah looks forward to a day when that depleted and dark territory would be the first to be transformed. Of course, the kind of transformation that Isaiah envisions and Isaiah 9:1 has nothing to do with the implementation of any social or technological program. It has nothing to do with any kind of earthly glory whatsoever. Rather, Isaiah sees transformation of this territory because God himself is on the move. Understand that whenever we hear about light breaking into darkness in the Bible, it's nearly always associated with the presence of the glory of God. For example, the psalmist proclaims in Psalm 104:1-2, "You are clothed with splendor and majesty, covering yourself with light, as with a garment." The advent of light into the world, then, is nothing more and nothing less than the emergence of God's presence into the world, to dwell with his people. And to deal with the dominance of spiritual darkness that had overtaken not only the land but also the world. As Isaiah looks forward to this day, the advent of God's glorious presence, well, he tells us in verse three that this really has nothing to do at all with a geographical plot of land. Rather, it has everything to do with what this will mean for God's people. Look at verse three, where the prophet Isaiah proclaims quote, "You have multiplied the nation, you have increased its joy; they rejoice before you, as with joy at the harvest as they are glad when they divide the spoil." Again, Isaiah is peering forward to a future day just like he was in versus one through two. As an aside, what's interesting is that throughout these verses, these first three verses in Isaiah, he sees these events of the future as so certain that he actually speaks about them in the past tense. He did that when he spoke of God's presence back in the land, and now he does that again when he talks about the effects that this has on God's people. So what is the effect that God's presence has on God's people? Well, first he talks about the multiplication of God's people. Remember, in Isaiah's own day as he's writing this prophecy, those who were actually looking to God by faith were few. It was maybe a small remnant among the people of Judah and Israel who actually believed in the Lord and love the Lord. In the future, Isaiah tells us when light breaks through the darkness, he sees a dramatic increase in numbers. Not only Jews, but also pagans from the nations would soak in the light of God's presence. Remember, because of Assyria, those northern regions became a mixture of gentiles and Jews, which is why Isaiah calls them here Galilee of the Nations. When light arrives, when God's presence breaks into human history, he paints this picture where even a remnant of the Gentiles will be transformed from a people of unbelief to a people of faith. God's people, then we learn when God's presence arrives would swell numerically. They would spread out geographically, and we only need to read through the book of Acts to see how that takes shape and in their growth. We also learn that their joy would increase, too. If you're looking at the imagery of verse three Isaiah likens the joy of God's people when God's presence arrives to that of a farmer after a bountiful harvest. Much of you farmers are joyful right now, that's the kind of joy that's envisioned here. Then he pictures that likewise as joy of a victorious army dividing up plunder after a battle that they won. But that leads to the question why? Why are they so joyful? Why are they filled with such joy? Well, very simply, the joy of God's people is conditioned by nothing other than the fact that with the advent of this light, they now dwell secure in the presence of God. When I was a kid, my parents were kind enough. Year in and year out to take my sister and I on a number of great vacations. Often one of the places we would go to was the happiest place on Earth, Walt Disney World. Now, as a kid who was spoiled and got to go to Walt Disney World fairly often, you would think that I would appreciate the thoughtfulness of my parents and the sacrifice that it was to take me there year in and year out and that as a kid, I would have simply just appreciated being at Walt Disney World, but that that would have been enough for me. But if that's what you're assuming, then you've never vacationed with kids. You see, without fail, every time we went on one of these extravagant vacations as a kid, even to Disney, it was never enough just to be on vacation. I always wanted something more. I remember one year in particular as a kid, that there was this toy Davy Crockett rifle that I saw in one of the gift shops, the gift shop that Disney strategically locates just to drive every parent crazy. I had to have it. For days in the so-called Happiest Place on Earth, all I thought about was this toy rifle asking my parents for every five minutes and unable to find any semblance of joy in the so-called Happiest Place on Earth until I held this overpriced faux wooden rifle in my hands. Talk about needing to shift my priorities. If we're all honest with ourselves, I think this also captures how we too often live in God's world, too. You see, when we become Christians, I think many of us can attest to the fact that God was enough. To be in his presence, to be in his church and to study his word might have felt like drinking water from a fire hose. It was a lot, but it was also a satisfying place to be. At some point we settle in and we often begin to obsess over comparatively insignificant things. Remember, in verse three of our passage, God's people are rejoicing with exceedingly exceeding joy simply because they're in God's presence. Their joy isn't conditioned by anything else other than God is in their midst. Friends, that's a game changer for God's people. That's everything in dictating our joy in the Christian life, too. But is that enough for you? Does that reality by itself produce joy in your life, or is your joy conditioned by a host of far more insignificant factors? If you profess Christ, let me ask you this, do people know you by your joy? You see, one of the fruit of the Holy Spirit is joy, and we're called to be known as God's people for our joy. So do people know you as someone who professes steadfast joy in Christ? Or are you on the flip side, known more is a critical curmudgeon, as a bitter killjoy, always upset about something and always with an axe to grind. Now, of course, that's not to say we need to fake it when we walk through real suffering in life and when the world feels like a two ton elephant on our back. But even in suffering, the Bible tells us that there is a profound, not superficial, but substantive joy in knowing God and being in his presence. Joy in trusting that our identity as Sons of God is rooted and secured through the work of Christ. Friends, it's true that we live in an angry and scared and delusional world, but we're a people who don't belong to this world. We don't think like this world. We don't relate with each other in the back biting and exhausting way that citizens of this world relate with each other. Our joy is not and cannot be conditioned by anything in this world because if it is, it's understandable why we would be a miserable kind of people. We have what the world does not. So let me exhort you with this don't so obsess over the scraps of life that you fail to appreciate the feast that's laid before us in the gospel of Jesus Christ. Find your joy, real joy, substantive joy in Jesus Christ. So Isaiah describes this future day when God's glorious presence would powerfully break into the world and his people would flourish in quantity and quality as a result. When we turn to verses four through seven, Isaiah puts meat on the bones, as it were, by describing for us more about the character of God's presence in the world and more reason that we have to be a joyful people as we pilgrim in this world. Deliverance that Overcomes Bondage So this leads to the second point deliverance that overcomes bondage. Now, when we turn to verses four through seven, if you're looking at your Bible, you may notice that in verses four or five and six, Isaiah begins at least in the English translation. With this word for the idea here is that in each of these verses, Isaiah is explaining both the nature of God's advent and the reasons we have to be a people of joy. In doing this, he gives us three what we call vignettes, three pictures to explain God's advent as our deliverance out of bondage, the bondage of darkness. So let's take a look at these three vignettes. First look at verse four, where Isaiah tells us that through the advent of God's glorious presence, God's people are delivered from bondage. They're pictured here as a people who were once pressed down with a wooden bar on their necks. That's this idea of a yoke with a rod in the hands of a taskmaster used against them. This symbolism pictures God's people living under an oppressive burden, a burden that that clearly goes beyond merely physical things. When the light arrives, what happens? Well, this burden is dramatically broken. Notice that the relief they experience is also likened in our passage to the relief that was brought about by Gideon in the book of Judges. That's what this reference at the final line of verse for when we hear about Midian, that's what that calls to mind. If you don't know the story in the book of judges. When God's people, particularly in the north of Israel, the land of Zebulon and Naftali were oppressed by the Midianites, God raised up Gideon to deliver them. If you were to look at the book of Judges and read about that deliverance, you would find that Gideon's triumph over the Midianites was, by all accounts, unexpected. It subverted expectations because the Lord called Gideon to go up against Midian with only 300 men. Yet, through that unexpected band of men led by Gideon, God saved his people. In the same way, I say, tells us that the deliverance that God's advent brings will come about in an equally, actually an even more unexpected way. A way that subverts expectations. We'll have to wait until verse six to hear more about that. In verse five Isaiah tells us that through the advent of God's presence, it's as if a war has also been won. The imagery is that of a military equipment being burned by fire. What's important in this imagery is that at no point in Isaiah's forward looking future picture that he gives; do we hear anything about God's people actually fighting a battle or winning a battle. In fact, the only picture we have is that of God's people enjoying the end of a battle that's already been won. As Alec Motera puts it, "They have entered the battlefield only after the fighting is done." They win a victory without actually fighting a war on their own. Now these two vignettes the one in verse four and the one in verse five are both helpful for us in explaining God's advent. They explain the character of God's presence and what it means, what he breaks into human history. They explain the reasons that we have to be a people of joy. When we come to verses six and seven, the final two verses in our passage, we also come to the vignette, the picture that holds everything else together, this is the one in verses six through seven that explains the victory. This is the one that explains the nature of the burdens lifted, and this is the one that puts flesh and blood to the coming of God's presence into the world. Unexpectedly, at least for those hearing and reading this and Isaiah's own day, the climax of deliverance is a child. Talk about deliverance through unexpected means. Yet in this child, we find that God himself has come. Notice in verse six that there are four names that are ascribed to this child. This is a famous passage; it was read for us earlier. Most of us probably all know what these titles are, we read Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Now, each of these four names, when you really get down to it, would simply be inappropriate to give to any ordinary child, even a child who's born into royalty because each one of these titles are packed with notions of divinity. Let's just look at two of these. First, the title wonderful counselor may seem tame on the surface of things. It may seem as if this is simply somebody who doles out pious and positive advice, and that's about it. Kind of like a motivational speaker of sorts. That's not at all with this title suggests. In fact, one commentator named Paul House opts for a translation "wonderful planner", because this title points to one who plans supernatural things and then carries them out. It has nothing to do with somebody who just sits on high and doles out positive advice that you can take or leave. In short, the language here suggests that this child is vested with the knowledge to plan redemption and then the authority to carry it out. The next title, Mighty God, suggests even more clearly that than the first the divinity of this child. This is a child who embodies the power of God in his person. Who defeats the enemies of God, and then, like God himself, is the rightful object of worship for the people of God. Understand, then, that the descriptions and the titles that are given to this son point to a ruler that the world could never produce on its own. This is one who represents perfectly God's people before God and who in turn perfectly rules over God's people as God's true king. It's no surprise, then, that Isaiah nine, this passage that we've been reading and studying and preaching on is cited in Matthew chapter four at the outset of Jesus's public ministry in Galilee of the Gentiles and applied to Jesus. It's no surprise that Jesus, in his incarnation, is described in John one as light that had broken into the world. John 1:09 tells us of Jesus, the true light which gives light to everyone, has come. The future hope that Isaiah declares then for the small and faithful remnant in his own day, living in darkness, living in gloom has nothing to do with political deliverance from an international enemy. It has nothing to do with anything earthly whatsoever. It has nothing to do with getting behind the right earthly power or the right earthly king or the right earthly kingdom. Rather, the ultimate hope that Isaiah holds out to them and us is Jesus Christ. The one who has dealt with our greatest enemies of sin and death and the devil and the only one through whom, to paraphrase the Apostle Paul in Colossians one, transfers us his people from the domain of darkness to his own glorious kingdom of light. Application Friends, the gospel tells us that the things this world values, things that may have a veneer of wisdom and power, of things that we might be really tempted in our own lives to invest all of our capital into are ultimately things that are powerless to do what we really need from them. So often the world pulls us into thinking that our ultimate hope depends on what we get behind in this world. You see these metaphors of light and darkness, metaphors that we find all over the scriptures, are also commonplace elsewhere in life. Typically, when the world wants to baptize something as good, even if it's not good, it's associated with light. Any time the world wants to identify something as evil, it cloaks it in the metaphor of darkness. For example, the Philadelphia Eagles are a team of light, and the Dallas Cowboys are a team of deep, deep darkness. That's true. Yet the Bible tells us that the true light, the true light that has come into this world has nothing to do with this world. The true light is not found in what looks powerful in this world. Rather, it's found in what the world considers lowly and despised. It found in the one who is born to a teenage girl from a backwater town in Galilee of the nations, on the fringes of the most powerful empire in the first century A.D. By all accounts, the light that dawns in the first century A.D. in Jesus Christ subverts expectations in a plethora of ways. Yet in this child lies the power of God. Friends like General Titus and Ahaz before him, we're often driven by angst about being on the winning team. After all, nobody wants to be on the "wrong side of history". The Bible pleads with us to vest our hope not in anything that this world values, but in this child, Jesus Chris. The one who stands at the center of human history and the one who stands at the end of human history. So if you're not a Christian this morning, let me ask you this. What alliances in this world are you banking on right now? How's that working out for you? You see, the Bible pleads with us, as do I, to ally yourself above everything else with God's king, Jesus Christ through faith alone. That is our only hope in this ruthless and dark, dark world. At the same time, this passage calls all of us, whether you're a Christian or not, to check our allegiances and to align ourselves or realign ourselves with the true light and the true king. This is what I want to leave us with. That is just as we do not seek salvation from anything that this world offers, so too do not despair, the apparent dominance of darkness in this world. You see, there's much in this world that could distress us if we let it. I don't think I need to say that, but I'll say it when we look out into our neighborhoods and into our worlds, we see that the darkness of sin and unbelief hangs over everything. Then we turn inward and then we examine our own hearts and we see our own sin. When we do that, how many of us have cried out with the Apostle Paul, "wretched man that I am, who will save me from this body of death?" While there will always, always be much to pray for, and there's always much that could drive us to despair, understand the light of the glory of God's presence has already broken into this world. The church has already spread abroad all across the world and continues to do so to this very day, even in places that we would identify as places of deep darkness and persecution for the church. The Spirit, we know is also actively at work in the church, actively at work, even in our own local church, in our ministries, at work in our members. All of us are learning day by day what it means to walk in the light of the glory of God. The Bible tells us that the light has already dawned and far from disappearing or fading into the night sky, the Bible looks forward to the day when Jesus Christ will come again in a second advent and the light of the glory of God will be so bright that sun and moon will no longer have a purpose in the new heavens and the new Earth. Revelation 21 has something to say about that. Again, there's much we could despair over in this world, but brothers and sisters, the first advent that we celebrate has already come. The second, I promise you, is on its way. In the meantime, the Lord, our God, through his Spirit, is in our midst. What alliance could be any more consequential than that one? Pray with me. Father, we thank you for what Isaiah looked forward to, that we look back upon. That is the advent and appearing of your glory and your Son. Lord, we thank you for Jesus Christ. We thank you that Jesus Christ was and did everything that Isaiah looked forward to in his own day. Lord, I pray that as we walk, as sojourners and exiles in this often dark world that you would help us remember who we are and whose we are. That you would help us correct any battle allegiances that we have with this world. That you would instead realign us day by day with what is true and what is right and what is good. What we ask this in Christ name. Amen.

Sin Complejos
Al Margen. El Ministerio de Abuso de Género

Sin Complejos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 4:49


En el repaso a la prensa diaria, Carmen Carbonell destaca el artículo de opinión de Federico Jiménez Losantos en Libertad Digital

Fin de Semana
¿Los juguetes tienen género?

Fin de Semana

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 16:05


El gobierno propone una huelga simbólica de juguetes para trasladar el mensaje de que los muñecos están hechos para niños y niñas por igual. José Miguel Gaona y José Manuel AguilarEl gobierno quiere concienciar a la población de que los juguetes no tienen sexo. De que niños y niñas pueden entretenerse con los mismos muñecos. Para ello se ha organizado este fin de semana una huelga juguetes simbólica. La campaña que ha lanzado el ministerio de Consumo ha costado 80.000 euros. La pregunta está en la calle y nuestros José Miguel Gaona y José Manuel Aguilar han querido comentarla. “Necesitan un problema que no existe” señalaba el autor, “hablan de perder libertades”. “Ir contra una de las principales cartas de presentación a nivel internacional es suicida” comentaba el psiquiatra Gaona. Ambos colaboradores coincidían en el mismo mensaje: que cada padre haga lo que considere oportuno.Escucha ahora 'Fin de Semana'. "Fin de Semana" es un programa presentado por Cristina López Schlichting, prestigiosa comunicadora de radio y articulista en prensa, es un magazine que se emite en COPE, los sábados y domingos, de 10.00 a 14.00 horas. A lo largo de sus cuatro horas de duración, Fin de Semana ofrece otra visión, más humana y reposada, de la actualidad reciente, a la vez que reserva espacio para historias novedosas y sorprendentes; para reportajes y entrevistas en profundidad; para propuestas de ocio que...

Graveyard Grumbler Podcast

This episode we take a trip into the great Roman Empire to learn a little about one of the worst emperors of that time. Nero was a brutal, greedy dictator that might have been responsible for the great Roman fire that destroyed a good part of the empire. Tune in and enjoy the show.    Patreon- https://www.patreon.com/user?u=57302900&fan_landing=true Radio Link- https://www.radioking.com/play/graveyard-grumbler-radio

Radio Record
Record Classix #024 (10-12-2021)

Radio Record

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021


01. Dash Berlin - Waiting (Record Mix) 02. Alice Deejay - Better Of Alone (Record Mix) 03. Robert Miles - Children (Record Mix) 04. Bob Sinclar, Avicii - New New New (Record Mix) 05. Swedish House Mafia, John Martin - Don't You Worry Child (Record Mix) 06. Galantis - Runaway (U & I) (Record Mix) 07. Klaas - Flight To Paris (Record Mix) 08. Bodybangers, Ph Electro - For You (Record Mix) 09. Nicky Romero, Volt, State - Warriors (Record Mix) 10. Lost Frequencies, Dimaro - Are You with Me (Record Mix) 11. Zedd, Matthew Koma, Miriam Bryant - Find You (Record Mix) 12. Axwell, Ingrosso, 2Live - Something New (Record Mix) 13. Alesso, Tove Lo - Heroes (We Could Be) (Record Mix) 14. Tjr, Vinai, Bingo Players - Knock Your Generation (Record Mix) 15. Calvin Harris, Ne-Yo - Let's Go (Record Mix) 16. Steve Angello - Knas (Record Mix) 17. Don Diablo - Momentum (Record Mix) 18. Knife Party - Internet Friends (Record Mix) 19. Sander Van Doorn, Firebeatz - Guitar Track (Record Mix) 20. Martin Garrix, Brooks - Byte (Record Mix) 21. Showteck, Mc Ambush - 90's By Nature (Record Mix) 22. Oliver Heldens, Throttle - Waiting (Record Mix) 23. Tim Berg - Seek Bromance (Record Mix) 24. Duke Dumont - Won't Look Back (Record Mix) 25. Dimitri Vegas, Moguai, Like Mike - Body Talk (Record Mix) 26. Romero, Nervo - Like Home (Record Mix) 27. Flo Rida, Pitbull - Can't Believe It (Record Mix) 28. Avener, Dj Nil - Fade Out Lines (Record Mix) 29. Lana Del Ray - Summertime Sadness (Record Mix) 30. Sean Finn, Tinka, Ben Delay - Summer Days (Record Mix) 31. Serge Devant - Addicted (Record Mix) 32. Armin Van Buuren - We Are Here To Make Some Noise (Record Mix) 33. Deadmau5, Gartner - Animal Rights (Record Mix) 34. Nero, Sub Focus - Promises (Record Mix)

Revelations Radio Network

But the Lord God helps me; therefore I have not been disgraced; therefore I have set my face like a flint, and I know that I shall not be put to shame.  Isaiah 50:7 (ESV) LFR Show 76 Pastor Dave joins GK to discuss ‘Living in the Empire’. Are we now living under empire-like conditions? The basis for our discussion is the first Book of Peter, written during the time of Nero to believers in Asia Minor, within which, Peter advises them as to how they should live their lives in the Empire. We are going to discuss the position of Christians today, giving some current examples, and then go on to discuss what we can learn from Peter;  that is, how do we respond as believers living in the empire?  SHOW NOTES https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/dropping-lord-s-prayer-would-help-state-parliament-better-reflect-our-diversity-20210802-p58f0w.html https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/gay-conversion-legislation-puts-andrews-on-a-collision-course-with-churches-20201204-p56ks6.html https://www.theadvocate.com.au/story/7415859/state-greens-leader-claims-pm-belongs-to-a-death-cult/ https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-30/religious-discrimination-bill-people-with-disability-lgbtqi/100659144 https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-55765514 https://www.eternitynews.com.au/australia/martyn-iles-gets-good-reviews-after-a-tough-night-on-qa/   DOWNLOAD SHOW LFR ARCHIVE INDEX LFR Show 76 with your host, GK https://likeflintradio.com/lfrShow76.mp3 ← Philo Rock ep.10 nowheretorun1984@gmail.com (Revelations Radi

Conspicuous Trenchcoats
39. The Psychic (sette note in nero)

Conspicuous Trenchcoats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 38:46


The coats are channeling their clairvoyant sides for Lucio Fulci's 1977 giallo: "The Psychic". Visions of a wall bodies, yellow paper cigarettes, and horse girls, OH MY! One of the final few directors to seriously take on the subgenre past its prime, Fulci offers a compelling tale that's spoiled due to its own tagline. Will the coats be compelled by the power of the psychic or will they want to bury it behind a wall of cement and bricks? Listen now!Director - Lucio FulciStarring - Jennifer O'Neill - Gabriele Ferzetti - Marc PorelIf you like the show, stab the follow button on your podcast app and write a nice 5-star review to help us grow the show!And if you want some more conspicuous content, support the show on Patreon at: https://www.patreon.com/ConspicuousTrenchcoatsCatch the Coats on:instagram https://www.instagram.com/con.coats/Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ConCoatsconcoats.buzzsprout.comGet your tickets to see your conspicuous host in the new Army of the Dead VR game at: https://armyofthedeadvr.comSpecial Thanks to:Lucas Brahme for our music https://www.lucasbrahme.comUptownStyleStudio for designing our artwork https://www.instagram.com/uptownstylestudio/Veronica Maccarihttps://www.instagram.com/iamveronicamaccari/?hl=enMichael Mackenzie (http://theses.gla.ac.uk/4730/1/2013Mackenziephd.pdf)Troy HowarthArrow VideoJ&B WhiskeyIMDBSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/ConspicuousTrenchcoats)

Temprano en la Tarde... EL PODCAST
Mujeres en el espiritismo puertorriqueño, más allá del género

Temprano en la Tarde... EL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 59:20


Anuncios de actividades Mujeres en el Espiritismo Marta Román Odio - Autora MUJERES ESPIRITISTAS EN PUERTO RICO (1880-1920) Ass Mujeres Espiritistas Puertorriqueñas en Acción Espiritismo como práctica y filosofía de observación La observación se hace mediante personas que se entienden tienen contacto con los desencarnados ¿VIsión de las mujeres en el espiritismo? Influencia de la cultura en la forma que los espiritistas ven “la mujer” Ejemplo de Hostos El problema de las mujeres es que no se rescataron sus obras y experiencias versus el dominio masculino del discurso público Mujeres en el Espiritismo es un proyecto de rescate del discurso escrito y oral de las mujeres Falta de presencia de las iglesias en muchas comunidades dejaba el espacio abierto para la discusión filosófica de otras visiones Trabajo de recopilación de las historias Hallazgos El espiritismo en Puerto Rico es muy complejo El espiritismo como reflejo de la diversidad de la sociedad del siglo XIX El pensamiento libertario como hilo conductor Las mujeres se centran en los problemas prácticos. Formato del libro: 8 historias de 8 mujeres y una posdata ¿Dónde se encuentra el libro?

Movie Wars
Star Wars: The Force Awakens Vs. Star Trek (2009) (Ep. 0018)

Movie Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 81:35


It's hard to argue that Star Wars and Star Trek have two of the most dedicated fan bases in film history. JJ Abrams took on the challenge of reviving these two beloved franchises with Star Wars: The Force Awakens and Star Trek (2009). Traverse the galaxies with the Movie Wars crew as they examine these intergalactic giants.  Support Movie Wars for the price of a latte a month! A $7 monthly contribution helps us make more content while growing the show. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=27742081 (Click here to become a patron! ) Film Summaries:  Star Wars: The Force Awakens Thirty years after the defeat of the Galactic Empire, the galaxy faces a new threat from the evil Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) and the First Order. When a defector named Finn crash-lands on a desert planet, he meets Rey (Daisy Ridley), a tough scavenger whose droid contains a top-secret map. Together, the young duo joins forces with Han Solo (Harrison Ford) to make sure the Resistance receives the intelligence concerning the whereabouts of Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), the last of the Jedi Knights. Rating: PG-13 (Sci-Fi Action Violence) Genre: Sci-Fi, Adventure, Action, Fantasy Original Language: English Director: J.J. Abrams Producer: Kathleen Kennedy, J.J. Abrams, Bryan Burk Writer: Lawrence Kasdan, J.J. Abrams, Michael Arndt Release Date (Theaters): Dec 18, 2015  Wide Release Date (Streaming): Apr 5, 2016 Box Office (Gross USA): $123 Runtime: 2h 16m Distributor: Walt Disney (Info courtesy of Rotten Tomatoes https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/star_wars_episode_vii_the_force_awakens) Star Trek (2009)  Aboard the USS Enterprise, the most-sophisticated starship ever built, a novice crew embarks on its maiden voyage. Their path takes them on a collision course with Nero (Eric Bana), a Romulan commander whose mission of vengeance threatens all mankind. If humanity would survive, a rebellious young officer named James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) and a coolly logical Vulcan named Spock (Zachary Quinto) must move beyond their rivalry and find a way to defeat Nero before it is too late. Rating: PG-13 (Sci-Fi Action|Brief Sexual Content|Violence) Genre: Sci-Fi, Adventure, Action, Fantasy Original Language: English Director: J.J. Abrams Producer: J.J. Abrams, Damon Lindelof Writer: Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman Release Date (Theaters): May 7, 2009  Wide Release Date (Streaming): Nov 17, 2009 Box Office (Gross USA): $257.7M (Info Courtesy of Rotten Tomatoes https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/star_trek_11)

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
Violencia de género en el norte de Centroamérica dispara la migración

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:29


La violencia de género es una de las principales causas por las que mujeres y niñas del norte de Centroamérica se ven obligadas a migrar, afirmó la la Agencia de la ONU para los Refugiados (ACNUR), que instó a los gobiernos de El Salvador, Guatemala y Honduras a tomar medidas. Escucha el informe del corresponsal de SBS Spanish en Latinoamérica, Wilfredo Salamanca.

AMA DE CASA
AMA DE CASA - LA CRIANZA SIN GÉNERO - TEMP 4 - EP 03

AMA DE CASA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 54:04


PODBOX.mx powered by RSS.com#PODBOX #PODCAST #AMADECASA See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A vivir que son dos días
El antropólogo Inocente | Ken Follet: "Una nueva guerra mundial supondría la desaparición del género humano"

A vivir que son dos días

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 27:45


Hablamos con el autor de "Los pilares de la Tierra", que nos presenta su última novela, publicada en Plaza y Janés. Tráfico de armas, tráfico de personas, yihadismo... confluyen en una trama que puede conducir a la tercera guerra mundial. 

Chente Ydrach
SoLpresa! - ANUEL: el artista más calle en la historia del género???

Chente Ydrach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:51


REDES CHENTE: Instagram: http://instagram.com/chenteydrach Facebook: http://facebook.com/chenteydrachoficial Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/chenteyd... Twitter: http://twitter.com/chenteydrach iTunes Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/m...

Life Of Caesar
NERO #23 – The Great Fire Of Rome

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 56:05


Nero has some freedmen executed but the stories are murky. The Parthians decide to try their luck taking back Armenia while Corbulo tries to keep the peace. The post NERO #23 – The Great Fire Of Rome appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

Es la Mañana de Federico
Resumen de prensa: Pedro Sánchez riendo las gracias a Bildu en un acto de violencia de género

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:00


La prensa recoge la aprobación de los PGE y las cesiones que ha hecho a sus socios de Bildu o los golpistas.

Martha Debayle
Lifetime: Violencia de género. Lunes 22 de noviembre de 2021.

Martha Debayle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 7:11


¿Sabían que, a nivel mundial, una de cada tres mujeres sufre de violencia física o sexual? Y con la pandemia, esto se agravó terriblemente, porque en la mayoría de los casos, la violencia proviene de su pareja.

Curiosity Daily
Birthday Effect, Psychological Richness, Star or Satellite?

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 20:05


Learn about the link between birthdays and COVID-19; “psychological richness” for a good life; and satellites vs. stars. More from Dr. Bapu Jena: Listen to Freakonomics, M.D.: https://freakonomics.com/freakonomics-md/  Covid and the “Birthday Effect” (Freakonomics, M.D. Ep. 1) - Freakonomics. (2021, August 4). Freakonomics. https://freakonomics.com/podcast/covid-and-the-birthday-effect-freakonomics-m-d-ep-1/  Follow @AnupamBJena on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnupamBJena   Follow @DrBapuPod on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrBapuPod  Harvard faculty page: https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/anupam-b-jena  We've neglected the role of “psychological richness” when considering what makes a good life by Steffie Drucker We've Neglected The Role Of “Psychological Richness” When Considering What Makes A Good Life, Study Argues. (2021, September 14). Research Digest. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2021/09/14/weve-neglected-the-role-of-psychological-richness-when-considering-what-makes-a-good-life-study-argues/  Oishi, S., & Westgate, E. C. (2021). A psychologically rich life: Beyond happiness and meaning. Psychological Review. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/rev0000317‌  Beyond Happiness: Why a Psychologically Rich Life Is a Good Life. (2021). Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/living-single/202108/beyond-happiness-why-psychologically-rich-life-is-good-life  How to tell an artificial satellite from a star by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Nero in Ghana) Space. (2021). Brown.edu. https://www.brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/courses/13things/7656.html Palma, C. (2018, April 5). Look up – it's a satellite! The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/look-up-its-a-satellite-94272  The Savvy Satellite Spotting Guide. (2014, November 8). AeroSavvy. https://aerosavvy.com/satellite-spotting/  GPS.gov: Space Segment. (2021). Gps.gov. https://www.gps.gov/systems/gps/space/  Carter, J. (2020, April 25). Is That A Planet, A Star Or A SpaceX Starlink Satellite? The Stargazing Apps You Need During Lockdown. Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecartereurope/2020/04/24/is-that-a-planet-a-star-or-a-spacex-starlink-the-five-best-augmented-reality-stargazing-apps-you-need-during-lockdown/?sh=7997cff244fe  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Life Of Caesar
NERO #22 – CONSTANTINE AT THE BRIDGE

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:05


Nero has some freedmen executed but the stories are murky. The Parthians decide to try their luck taking back Armenia while Corbulo tries to keep the peace. The post NERO #22 – CONSTANTINE AT THE BRIDGE appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

Chente Ydrach
SoLpresa! - El "género nuevo" de Farruko: BAJO MUNDO (marketing para un tema???)

Chente Ydrach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 29:04


REDES CHENTE: Instagram: http://instagram.com/chenteydrach Facebook: http://facebook.com/chenteydrachoficial Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/chenteyd... Twitter: http://twitter.com/chenteydrach iTunes Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/m...