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Best podcasts about louis post dispatch

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Latest podcast episodes about louis post dispatch

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: Making a List, Checking it Twice

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 90:40


The Best Podcast in Baseball begins its 10th year with a brand new and extended episode and a discussion about baseball's past and the Cardinals' future. St. Louis Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold faces questions from Kevin Wheeler (KMOX/1120 AM) about the 2022 National Baseball Hall of Fame ballot and the players he voted for this year. Lists are the theme, after all. Goold brought his list of 10 players who appeared on his ballot, and Wheeler discussed his list of Top 20 prospects in the Cardinals' system. The podcast explores the nature of ranking players for what they could do in the game, and then years later having to research and assess what players did in their careers and whether that merits Cooperstown. Warning: There is a rant about how underappreciated third basemen are, historically. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design of St. Louis, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: SC Coach that fits vision

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 8:17


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on St. Louis City SC on hiring inaugural coach Bradley Carnell, and thoughts on Aaron Rodgers taking exception to a sports writer not giving him a MVP vote. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Redistricting prone to greed

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 8:29


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on Missouri legislators releasing a proposed state redistricting map. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Only Fredbird available right now

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 9:47


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the bleak outlook growing for Major League Baseball, longtime journalist Ken Rosenthal being ousted from MLB Network, plus more. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

The Big 550 KTRS
Dave Matter: Win-win with CFP expansion

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 10:29


The Mizzou beat writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on the upcoming rematch of Alabama vs. Georgia,

The Big 550 KTRS
Dave Matter: Historical Mizzou upset

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 6:34


The Mizzou beat writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Mizzou women's basketball taking down top ranked South Carolina, and what to expect from the College Football Playoff semifinal games. Follow Dave for more: https://twitter.com/Dave_Matter

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: No secret where violence occurs

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 10:19


The columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, also the proprietor of Taha'a Twisted Tiki (https://www.stltiki.bar/), explains the issues facing the City of St. Louis as leaders continue to try to curb violent crime. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Football clashes with NYE

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:48


The sports columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on college football postseason being a bit flat so far, having hope for Mizzou basketball down the line, the Blues skating well from their COVID pause, wondering about baseball, plus more! Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:14


Photo:  The tea-tax-tempest, or the Anglo-American Revolution. 8/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021 New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
7/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 12:25


Photo:  A key identifying the subjects of John Trumbull's painting Declaration of Independence, a well-known work which hangs in the United States Capitol building (purchased from the painter in 1819). Also known as Declaration of Independence in Congress, at the Independence Hall, Philadelphia, July 4, 1776. 7/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021   New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
6/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:05


Photo:   The east prospect of the city of Philadelphia in the Province of Pennsylvania 6/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
5/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:45


Photo:  American paper currency, 1776 5/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021    New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:04


Photo:  Political electricity; or, an historical & prophetical print in the year 1770 / Bute and Wilkes invent. ; Veridicus & Junius fect.              Print shows a variety of scenes relating to the politics and government of England and how their actions at home and abroad may result in the loss of the American colonies; scene numbered 24 depicts Boston, Massachusetts, as a European city and shows the industriousness of the Americans. 4/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021    New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice   •   Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now"   •    St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
3/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:33


Photo:    Map from Battles of the American Revolution. 1775-1781. Historical and military criticism, with topographical illustration. 3/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by  Joseph J. Ellis, Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:30


Photo:  Daughters of the American Revolution 2/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021 New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D. Hardcover – September 21, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:14


Photo:  The Battle of Kings Mountain depicts colonial riflemen advancing on the British position. 1/8  The Cause: The American Revolution and its Discontents, 1773-1783, by Joseph J. Ellis Ph.D.  Hardcover – September 21, 2021  New York Times Book Review ― Editors' Choice • Chicago Tribune ― "60 Best Reads for Right Now" • St. Louis Post-Dispatch ― "50 Fall Books You Should Consider Reading" A culminating work on the American Founding by one of its leading historians, The Cause rethinks the American Revolution as we have known it. In one of the most “exciting and engaging” (Gordon S. Wood) histories of the American founding in decades, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Joseph J. Ellis offers an epic account of the origins and clashing ideologies of America's revolutionary era, recovering a war more brutal, and more disorienting, than any in our history, save perhaps the Civil War. For more than two centuries, historians have debated the history of the American Revolution, disputing its roots, its provenance, and above all, its meaning. These questions have intrigued Ellis―one of our most celebrated scholars of American history―throughout his entire career. With this much-anticipated volume, he at last brings the story of the revolution to vivid life, with “surprising relevance” (Susan Dunn) for our modern era. Completing a trilogy of books that began with Founding Brothers, The Cause returns us to the very heart of the American founding, telling the military and political story of the war for independence from the ground up, and from all sides: British and American, loyalist and patriot, white and Black. Taking us from the end of the Seven Years' War to 1783, and drawing on a wealth of previously untapped sources, The Cause interweaves action-packed tales of North American military campaigns with parlor-room intrigues back in England, creating a thrilling narrative that brings together a cast of familiar and long-forgotten characters. Here Ellis recovers the stories of Catherine Littlefield Greene, wife of Major General Nathanael Greene, the sister among the “band of brothers”; Thayendanegea, a Mohawk chief known to the colonists as Joseph Brant, who led the Iroquois Confederation against the Patriots; and Harry Washington, the enslaved namesake of George Washington, who escaped Mount Vernon to join the British Army and fight against his former master. Countering popular histories that romanticize the “Spirit of '76,” Ellis demonstrates that the rebels fought under the mantle of “The Cause,” a mutable, conveniently ambiguous principle that afforded an umbrella under which different, and often conflicting, convictions and goals could coexist. Neither an American nation nor a viable government existed at the end of the war. In fact, one revolutionary legacy regarded the creation of such a nation, or any robust expression of government power, as the ultimate betrayal of The Cause. This legacy alone rendered any effective response to the twin tragedies of the founding―slavery and the Native American dilemma―problematic at best. Written with the vivid and muscular prose for which Ellis is known, and with characteristically trenchant insight, The Cause marks the culmination of a lifetime of engagement with the founding era. A landmark work of narrative history, it challenges the story we have long told ourselves about our origins as a people, and as a nation. 6 illustrations; 7 maps

The Big 550 KTRS
Joe Holleman: Men or women more competitive?

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 15:56


Editor for the St. Louis Post Dispatch talks about celebrations in sports, beliefs on proper sportsmanship, marathons, and much more. https://www.stltoday.com/ Follow Joe on Twitter: @STLsherpa

The Big 550 KTRS
Jane Henderson: Best books of 2021

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 19:54


Book editor for the St. Louis Post Dispatch discusses the best books from the past year, her favorite genres, how book sales have been during the pandemic, and much more. Follow Jane on Twitter- @STLbooks https://www.stltoday.com/

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Contradicting public safety law

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 8:59


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on the new Missouri state law forbidding local police from enforcing federal gun laws. Also, another shot at riverfront homeless encampment. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: MIZ needs more NIL

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 9:35


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the rough and tough nights for Mizzou basketball and football, and where both go moving forward. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: New Year's Revolution

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 66:16


When baseball emerges from its long, cold, inactive winter, and players take the field again in spring, what should the game look like? Start with more improvisation of talent, less calculation of risks. That was the answer given by Kevin Wheeler, broadcaster at KMOX/1120 AM. He tackled the on-field product first, saving the off-field economics for another conversation. As baseball has shifted from probability management to risk management, the product and entertainment value on the field has shifted. Do good teams draw fans, or do teams also have to play an appealing style of baseball, and if every team is drawing from the same numbers does that mean they all play the same? Dullsville. In the final BPIB of 2021, Wheeler and host Derrick Goold, baseball writer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, talk about the changing dynamics of baseball on the field, from youth to majors, from development to debut, and how when the lockout ends and play resumes some changes (including one simple tweak that would address tanking, too) will give the team a jolt. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. Have a happy, healthy holiday season. BPIB will return in 2022.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Tony Messenger: The criminalization of poverty

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 21:11


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch metro columnist discusses his new book, "Profit and Punishment: How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice" (https://books.google.com/books/about/Profit_and_Punishment.html?id=oiEQEAAAQBAJ&source=kp_book_description).

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Consequences of political entertainment

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 9:07


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on the social media fight happening between Mayor Tishaura Jones and Attorney General Eric Schmitt, plus the struggles for the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County both looking for police chiefs. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Pandemic pausing sports again

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 10:03


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on COVID-19 postponing games and/or pausing seasons, mask mandates at sports events, plus not a peep from baseball. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: Big Stories of 2021, Bigger Storylines for 2022

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 63:04


Should St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist Ben Frederickson be able to decorate a window at his house with a "major award"? He turns this question -- which definitely has legs -- over to the listeners of the Best Podcast in Baseball. And that's just the beginning. As BPIB nears its 10th year in the podcast game, Frederickson joins St. Louis Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold to discuss the biggest stories of the past year for the St. Louis Cardinals. The acquisition of Nolan Arenado, a record 17-game winning streak, and the abrupt, confusing firing of the manager -- any of those would have been the biggest story of a non-championship season. And they all happened in 2021. The answer on what was the biggest shapes how the Cardinals should be viewed in 2022, and the podcast explores the rising expectations, the storylines, and who specifically is in the spotlight as the Cardinals also reach a decade milestone. That is, a decade without a title. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Ian Froeb: Best new restaurants

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 12:08


Restaurant critic for the St. Louis Post Dispatch discusses the best restaurants from this past year in the St. Louis area.

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Basic advice being ignored

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 7:58


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on back and forth on masks being used in schools, issues with the St. Louis County Department of Health budget, upgrades for Metro security, plus more. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Banner day for Mizzou recruiting

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 8:53


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the local success for Mizzou football with recruiting, the Jacksonville Jaguars firing head coach Urban Meyer, plus more. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

Sports Open Line
SOL: Modern Baseball Technology with Derrick Goold

Sports Open Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 37:21


In the second hour of Sports Open Line, Kevin Wheeler chats with lead Cardinals beat writer for the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Derrick Gould. The two discuss how modern technology affects the flow of major league baseball. Technology has created better athletes through use of replay, new forms of measurements/statistics, and even preventive measures to avoid and repair injuries; however, not all aspects of modern technology have a positive effect on the game we know and love. Find out why on Sports Open Line. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Have to address CTE more

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 16:14


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the issues with CTE (Chronic traumatic encephalopathy) following the death of former football player, Phillip Adams.

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: The Artist Behind the Logo You'll Never Forget

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 64:00


Todd Radom is the artist whose work you know and whose name you should. You probably have one of his designs on a t-shirt or a hat, on a sticker or a pennant or a flag or bobblehead or beer stein. You might even have it as a tattoo. As I type this, I can see at least a half dozen items in my offense -- from patches to baseballs -- that have one of the logos he created. Radom, an author and graphic designer, is the hand behind Busch Stadium II's final year logo, Busch Stadium III's first year logo, and so many others, from the Washington Nationals' logo and look to the Colorado Rockies, Minnesota Twins, New York Mets, and other teams' anniversary logos. He designed the patches for the final year of old Yankee Stadium and the first year of current Yankee Stadium, and the Wichita Wind Surge -- yeah, that's his work, too. Radom joins St. Louis Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold to discuss the history of logos, the history he invests into his logos, and along the way the two add a few stitches of trivia. The Birds on the Bat are about to celebrate their 100th anniversary, and their place in logo legend is discussed. Plus, Radom offers his definitive opinion on whether the Cardinals should wear blue caps on the road. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Joe Holleman: Packers-Bears Rivalry

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:04


Reporter for the St. Louis Post Dispatch talks about attending the Packers/Bears game, why St. Louis are still more of a baseball town than hockey, and much more. Visit: https://www.stltoday.com/

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: Needed tax revenue stream

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 8:42


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on the City of St. Louis backing off marijuana enforcement, the St Louis Police Officers Association suing the City, and a recent plea from Hugh Hewitt about the Missouri U.S. Senate campaign. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/antoniofrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Mizzou basketball expectations

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 10:45


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the status of Mizzou basketball head coach Cuonzo Martin following a bad loss to Kansas, and former Cardinals manager Mike Shildt finding his next job in the MLB Commissioner's Office. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: The Game's Caretakers Must Take Care

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 64:09


Fans want baseball's caretakes to take care of the game they love, argues The Sporting News baseball writer Ryan Fagan, a stack of baseball cards nearby and a work stoppage all around. With Major League Baseball's lockout entering its second weekend, two baseball writers meet at a local St. Louis comic book shop to open some baseball cards and talk about the precarious spot the game and the card industry find themselves in, both on the brink on significant change, and possibly not for the better. Fagan joins St. Louis Post-Dispatch baseball writer and Best Podcast in Baseball host Derrick Goold to talk about the goals of the owners and players in the stalled negotiations for a new Collective Bargaining Agreement. The two writers discuss changes to the draft, to the on-field rules, and to the economy of baseball that could rise from a new CBA. They also discuss baseball cards -- best designs, favorite individual cards -- and the similarity between the game on the field and what's happening with wax packs as Topps, after 70 years of making cards, is on the verge of being replaced by Fanatics. This episode was recorded on location at Apotheosis Comics on Grand Boulevard in St. Louis. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: French honor Josephine Baker

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 8:55


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on the St. Louis native becoming the first Black woman honored at the Pantheon in Paris. Also, the City being able to get past a virtual coin toss to settle on redistricting, and a ballot initiative about the St. Louis County Executive being able to work a second job. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/AntonioFrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Blues using EBUGs, still short

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 8:59


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the NHL COVID-19 protocols causing more and more roster challenges for the Blues. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

The Big 550 KTRS
Ray Hartmann: Parson not fit to be governor

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 11:35


Frustration with Governor Mike Parson over his claims of criminal wrongdoing by a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter for exposing a system flaw. Also, the latest on the race for the Missouri U.S. Senate seat. Hear Ray weeknights from 9-11p: https://ktrs.com/stlintheknow/

The Big 550 KTRS
Antonio French: When not running on principles

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:05


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist on former Governor Eric Greitens possibly revealing his true feeling on gun laws, and Rep. Nick Schroer proposing some changes St. Louis criminal justice systems. Follow Antonio for more: https://twitter.com/AntonioFrench

The Big 550 KTRS
Ben Frederickson: Mizzou will take it, and like it

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 7:06


The St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist on the unfortunate scheduling for Mizzou on December having football and men's basketball play at the same time. Also, the potential rematch of Alabama against Georgia, and waiting for baseball to begin solving it's problems. Follow Ben for more: https://twitter.com/Ben_Fred

St. Louis on the Air
How should St. Louis spend its $500M Rams settlement?

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 34:24


St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnist Ben Frederickson discusses the road to St. Louis' settlement over the Rams' departure, why an expansion team was never in the mix, and his thoughts on how to spend the money.

Signal Boost
Tony Messenger!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 27:21


Author Tony Messenger joins Jess and Zerlina on the show to talk about his new book 'Profit and Punishment!'As a columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Tony Messenger has spent years in county and municipal courthouses documenting how poor Americans are convicted of minor crimes and then saddled with exorbitant fines and fees. In PROFIT AND PUNISHMENT, Messenger exposes the tragedy of modern-day debtors prisons, and how they destroy the lives of poor Americans swept up in a system designed to penalize the most impoverished.

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry
Tony Messenger, Pulitzer-Prize Winning Journalist and Author of Profit and Punishment: How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 48:58


The wealth gap in America creates any number of problems—but perhaps the most pressing is its expansion of poverty. When this poverty intersects with a broken criminal justice system, it becomes criminalized. The cycles of poverty and incarceration can span generations, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tony Messenger of the St. Louis Post Dispatch has spent years covering the stories of the people affected. In his new book Profit and Punishment: How America Criminalizes the Poor in the Name of Justice, he exposes the tragedy of modern-day debtors' prisons, and how they destroy the lives of poor Americans swept up in a system designed to penalize the most impoverished. Review "Messenger is one of the few columnists―maybe the only one―in America whose beat is the poor who are preyed upon by public officials" ―St. Louise Magazine “With the keen eye and compassionate heart of an award-winning journalist, Messenger shows us that Ferguson is everywhere, putting a human face on the millions of Americans being crushed every year by cash register injustice.” ―Jeffrey Selbin, Chancellor's Clinical Professor of Law "Timely and important... should enrage anyone who comes to understand it―and Profit and Punishment is the perfect place to start that understanding." ―Shelf Awareness "An eye-opening, relevant, and heartbreaking account on the epidemic of criminalized poverty.” ―Kirkus “Explores the byzantine paths of so-called justice… Profit and Punishment is persuasive and enraging, a book that will stir readers from both sides of the aisle to support reform.” ―Booklist “A heartbreaking study of how the American justice system is weighted against the poor. … Interweaving hard evidence with harrowing firsthand stories, this is a powerful call for change.” ―Publishers Weekly "A shocking account... In plainspoken and powerful language, Messenger exposes the unconscionable, unethical and utterly heartbreaking. Read these riveting accounts and be stirred to action!" ―Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Pulitzer Prize Finalist, author of Race for Profit "Tony Messenger's Pulitzer Prize-winning series on debtors' prisons in Missouri made a serious difference in real people's lives and his book will be a must read for a nation seeking a bipartisan path forward on criminal justice reform." ―Claire McCaskill, former US Senator and analyst for MSNBC “An intimate, raw, and utterly scathing look at the ordinary and everyday ways in which America's criminal justice system has directly increased the poverty of the many, and dramatically increased the profits of the few, in recent years. All will have zero doubt after reading this devastating account of the full scale human rights crisis that has been wrought by these policies that they must act, immediately, to overhaul them." ―Heather Ann Thompson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Blood in the Water --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alyssa-milano-sorry-not-sorry/message

News & Features | NET Radio
Lee Enterprises Blocks Play by Hedge Fund for Board Control

News & Features | NET Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 0:32


A fight for control of 77 newspapers, 24 of which are located in the Midwest, continued as a hedge fund known for slashing newspapers hit a speed bump in its plans to acquire Lee Enterprises Inc.On Friday, Lee rejected a trio of nominees Alden Global Capital nominated to its board of directors, claiming the nominations are invalid due to an error Alden made in the filing process that violated the board's by-laws.Lee, which owns the St. Louis Post Dispatch, the Omaha World-Herald and many other daily newspapers throughout the region, is staving off a takeover attempt by Alden Global Capital, a New-York based hedge fund.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 12.03.21 - Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 43:01


Hour 2 -  Nick Reed is live on location at Scramblers Diner for another Heroes Breakfast. Here's what he covers: KY3 reports that just before Gov. Parson condemned a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter for exposing a state database flaw, records show the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education was preparing to thank him for finding the glitch. Nick covers the story. 80 House Republicans voted with Democrats on Tuesday to pass the Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act, which if passed by the Senate and signed into law would fund a federal vaccination database. Missouri Republicans were split on the vote. The CIA was aware that at least 10 members of its staff allegedly committed sex crimes against children. Russian state media gleefully trumpeted a gaffe by U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, who said in a Thursday press briefing that he hopes the Soviet Union will not soon invade Ukraine.

St. Louis on the Air
Hedge fund known for gutting newspapers makes play for St. Louis Post-Dispatch owner

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 19:09


Alden Global Capital wants to buy the company that owns the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. An investigative reporter and the president of the union that represents Post-Dispatch staffers discuss what that could mean for the daily — and St. Louis.

Best Podcast in Baseball
A Special Best Podcast in Baseball: Sports on Tap with Post-Dispatch Scribes

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 76:01


What happens when the tables turn on seven deadline writers and people get to ask them questions? Sports on Tap does. The Best Podcast in Baseball brings you the 2021 St. Louis Post-Dispatch Sports on Tap event as hosted by sports columnist Ben Frederickson. On Nov. 18, 2021, seven members of the Post-Dispatch sports staff fielded questions from readers at Ballpark Village. Frederickson was joined by Blues beat writer Jim Thomas, Mizzou beat writer Dave Matter, Hall of Fame baseball writer Rick Hummel, and sports columnists Jeff Gordon and Benjamin Hochman. BPIB host and baseball writer Derrick Goold also participated. The topics were not limited to baseball, but the Cardinals and baseball were a significant part of the conversation, from free agents chased to managers changed and even a question comparing the ownership of the Blues with the ownership of the Cardinals. Look for more Sports on Tap events in the near future. Tickets will be available at StlToday.com. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design of St. Louis, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best Podcast in Baseball
Best Podcast in Baseball: Hot Stove Cooking with Dan McLaughlin

Best Podcast in Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 51:36


In a BPIB crossover event hosted by Scoops with Danny Mac's Dan McLaughlin, the television voice of the Cardinals, St. Louis Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold talks about the Cardinals' search for a free-agent pitcher, the availability of St. Louis-area native and future Hall of Famer Max Scherzer, and the sudden, shocking manager change the Cardinals made this offseason. McLaughlin and Goold also discuss the oncoming expiration of the Collective Bargaining Agreement and how precarious baseball, a sport defined by its daily presence, rests on the minds of its fans, especially if the holidays are littered with squabbling between owners and the players' union and spring arrives without baseball in it. The Best Podcast in Baseball, sponsored by Closets by Design of St. Louis, is a production of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, StlToday.com, and Derrick Goold. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cubs Talk Podcast
Building a World Series contender, Cubs vs Cards w/ Derrick Goold

Cubs Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:35


The Cubs and Cardinals rivalry is one of the best in sports. Constantly in battles for supremacy over the NL Central. But how has each organization built playoff-bound teams over the years and is one method more effective than the other? Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch joins Tim Stebbins and Gordon Wittenmyer to discuss the two organizations, the outlook of the NL Central, and the important facts about the business of baseball that fans should know this offseason.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The infrastructure bill is an “unqualified huge deal”

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 19:38


After years and years of trying, Congress finally came through with a bipartisan infrastructure bill. On the show today, we’ll discuss what’s actually in the bill and what it means for the economy. Plus, you may have noticed more and more businesses are pulling back on what they offer their customers without reducing their prices. Well, it’s not your imagination, it’s a thing dubbed “skimpflation.” And, finally, we end the show on a literal smile! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Roads, transit, internet: What’s in the infrastructure bill” from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch “Countries' climate pledges built on flawed data, Post investigation finds” from The Washington Post “Moms with access to remote work were most likely to leave their jobs in pandemic, new research shows” from The 19th Opinion | “American Airlines’ cancellations are a window into why people are so upset with the economy” from The Washington Post Here’s a photo of a smiley face on the side of a hill in Oregon Video: Jurassic Park but with a cat! Don’t miss tomorrow’s deep dive into the Great Resignation. If you’ve quit your job during the pandemic, we want to hear from you. Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).