Podcasts about Bayer

German pharmaceuticals company

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Latest podcast episodes about Bayer

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio
Episode 670: 1-23-23 Monday_LACM_Dr Robert Royal_Andrea Picotti-Bayer_Alyssa Murphy

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 50:33


Dr Robert Royal talked about his article, "Dead men do tell tales" Andrea Picotti Bayer discussed religious liberty and the equality act. Alyssa Murphy shared the top news trends in Catholic media. 

How Did We Get Weird with Vanessa Bayer and Jonah Bayer
Remember The Guns N' Roses Video Trilogy?

How Did We Get Weird with Vanessa Bayer and Jonah Bayer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 58:27


This week on the podcast, Jonah and Vanessa are back with another one-on-one episode to stage an in-depth discussion of Guns N' Roses' classic nineties video trilogy of "Don't Cry," "November Rain" and "Estranged." In the process Jonah recalls the time their mom took him to see Guns N' Roses with Skid Row in 1991 on the "Use Your Illusion Tour" (where he used dried blood as a fashion accessory), Vanessa's childhood fascination with Stephanie Seymour and, seriously, what was the deal with that dolphin? We also discuss the time that Jonah interviewed Slash, our favorite moments from the aforementioned videos and the time the Bayer kids saw GNR together in Cleveland in 2006 and were kicked out of the backstage area just moments before the band took the stage. Judging by this timeline we are overdue to see the band again soon, so if any of the members are listening to this podcast please feel free to reach out!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

kicker News
kicker News vom 22.1.2023, 00:00 Uhr

kicker News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 1:47


BVB fährt glückliche drei Punkte gegen Augsburg ein - Bayer stürmt den Borussia-Park, Union holt Juranovic, Arsenal behauptet sich an der Spitze der Premier League, Frankreich wartet auf Deutschland oder Norwegen, Deutsche Staffeln beim Biathlon-Weltcup in Antholz mit Podestplätzen

FohlenPodcast
Warm-up #51 - #BMGB04

FohlenPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 10:28


Für die Fohlen steht das erste Pflichtspiel im Kalenderjahr 2023 an – da darf das „Warm-up“ natürlich nicht fehlen. In der 51. Ausgabe dieses „FohlenPodcast“-Formats blickt Moderator Torsten „Knippi“ Knippertz selbst auf das Heimspiel am Sonntagabend (17:30 Uhr) gegen Bayer 04 Leverkusen. „Ich freue mich tierisch, dass es endlich wieder losgeht mit der Bundesliga. Ich freue mich tierisch, dass das Stadion fast ausverkauft ist“, betont „Knippi“. Vor allem aber lässt Borussias Stadionsprecher EUCH zu Wort kommen. Per eingesendeter Sprachnachrichten beschreiben einige VfL-Anhänger, wie sie auf den Wiederbeginn der Bundesliga schauen. „Ich glaube, wir alle sind voller Vorfreude, dass wir wieder Bundesligaspiele haben und unsere Borussia hoffentlich auch diese Rückrunde beziehungsweise den Rest der Hinrunde positiv gestaltet“, sagt zum Beispiel ein Hörer. Darüber hinaus wollte „Knippi“ auch wissen, worauf die Borussen am meisten gespannt sind und was sie speziell vom Auftaktspiel gegen Bayer Leverkusen erwarten. „Ich erhoffe mir vom Spiel gegen Leverkusen, dass unser neuer Keeper direkt ein Zeichen setzen und voll in der Liga beziehungsweise in der Mannschaft ankommen kann“, unterstreicht derweil eine Anhängerin. Auf der anderen Seite erwarte sie eine große Konsequenz und Effizienz vor dem gegnerischen Tor. „Damit wir das Ding am Ende mit der richtigen Mentalität nach Hause holen können.“ Das alles und noch viel mehr gibt's in der neuen Folge des „FohlenPodcast – Warm-up“. Hört jetzt rein!

The Top Line
January 20th, 2023

The Top Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 33:09


Fierce's JPM Week event was packed full of informative panels, executive interviews and fireside chats. So for today's episode, we've pulled out a couple of snippets to take you inside the gathering. First up, listen in on Fraiser Kansteiner's lively panel discussion on how companies will keep their bottom lines strong while navigating the drug pricing policies that the Biden administration rolled out just last year. You will also hear from Zoey Becker's interview with Bayer's Christine Roth. As head of the oncology strategic business unit, Roth talks about the plans to establish Bayer as a strong competitor in the cancer space. To learn more about topics in this episode: 2023 forecast: Despite Biden's drug pricing win, the biopharma industry is not 'anywhere near done with this conversation' To bolster IRA, lawmaker calls for new action to scrutinize cancer drug launch prices Pfizer, GSK, AbbVie and many more celebrate New Year with price hikes: report JPM23: Bayer hikes sales targets for Kerendia, Nubeqa to $3B each Look out, Pfizer. With new approval, Bayer's Nubeqa is set to challenge Xtandi's prostate cancer crown Bayer's blockbuster hopeful Nubeqa debuts in later-stage prostate cancer in UK under early access program Bayer poaches GlaxoSmithKline exec to lead expanding oncology business—including a blockbuster hopeful Fierce JPM Week The Top Line is produced by senior multimedia producer Teresa Carey and managing editor Querida Anderson with editor-in-chief Ayla Ellison and senior editors Annalee Armstrong, Ben Adams, Conor Hale and Eric Sagonowsky. The sound engineer is Caleb Hodgson. The stories are by all our “Fierce” journalists. Like and subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Dr. Hank Laskey - The Global Pharmaceutical Industry: Economic Structure, Government Regulation, and History

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 47:11


Hank A Laskey, PhD holds a Bachelors degree in Chemistry and a Masters degree in Management, both from Clemson University and a Doctorate in Marketing from the University of Georgia. He was the Director of the MBA program in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Studies at Fairleigh Dickenson University prior to leaving academia to pursue business interests in 2004. During the next ten years, he was involved in the start up of four companies in the field of pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. He has been an invited speaker for major companies within the industry and also at numerous industry conferences. Dr. Laskey has taught specialized courses for Bayer, Johnson & Johnson and Schering-Plough. He brings a broad-based perspective on the pharmaceutical industry from both academia and the private sector.https://www.amazon.com/Global-Pharmaceutical-Industry-Government-Regulation/dp/1543463509

Canary Cry News Talk
WEF WIPES

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 128:16


Canary Cry News Talk #583 - 01.18.2023 - Recorded Live to Tape WEF WIPES | John Kerry Aliens, New Geopolitics, Cardigan Conspiracy, Cold Women A Podcast that Deconstructs Mainstream Media News from a Biblical Worldview Harvard: Index of MSM Ownership (Harvard.edu) Logos Bible: Aliens Demons Doc (feat. Dr. Heiser, Unseen Realm) A Podcast that Deconstructs Mainstream Media News from a Biblical Worldview Harvard: Index of MSM Ownership (Harvard.edu) Logos Bible: Aliens Demons Doc (feat. Dr. Mike Heiser, Unseen Realm)   This Episode was Produced By:   Executive Producers Sir Captain Redbeard Pirate King of the Deemoochers** Dame Lynn Lady of the Lakes** Kevin M***   Producers Lydia G, puddin22, Miguel O, Sir Morv Knight of the Burning Chariots, Sir Morv Knight of the Burning Chariots, Sir Darrin Knight of the Hungry Panda's, Dominik J, Dame Gail Canary Whisperer and Lady of X's and O's, Runksmash,    Audio Production Sir Darrin Knight of the Hungry Pandas   Visual Art Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   Microfiction Runksmash - Acting fast the two scavengers dig through the drone's precious cargo, carefully packaging the eggs in bags. They pause as Jade, the small one, finds a box labeled DMTX-S5, they know the value of this one parcel, Ver grabs it and signs “Time to go.”   Stephen S - Agent Lilywater's first AUNT assignment teams him with Agent Street to counter misinformation through “news deconstruction.”  They launch a podcast sponsored by HUGE Pharma, named “Canaries Lie News Talk with hosts Chris and Charisse.”   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin   TIMESTAPERS Jade Bouncerson, Christine C   SOCIAL MEDIA DOERS Dame MissG of the OV and Deep Rivers   LINKS HELP JAM   REMINDERS Clankoniphius   SHOW NOTES HELLO, RUN DOWN WEF/ALIENS 10:15 V /  John Kerry WEF's 'almost extraterrestrial plan' to save the planet (Fox, Clip)   DAY JINGLE/PERSONAL/EXEC. 17:35 V /    FLIPPY 28:30 V /  A Novel Robotic Arm with Ultrasonically Actuated Glass Needle (AZO Robotics)   WEF 36:30 V /  Clip: Klaus introduction WEF 2023 → Tweet: Elon responds to clip of Klaus saying “Master the Future”                                                                                           BBB 42:15 V /  Stakeholder Geopolitics, ESG plan for NEW kind of Geopolitics (WEF) →Clip: Bank of America CEO says new ESG rules are needed to reboot capitalism (CNBC) Note: The system is NOT NEW! It's ESG!! They want a NEW NARRATIVE! Image: List of Americans attending WEF   METAVERSE  Clip: Klaus on “Global Collaboration Village” in the Metaverse → 7 chief digital officers on how they are navigating an unstable world (WEF)   TRANSHUMAN 1:01:50 V /  Clip: WEF has the “write level” permissions with mRNA to edit gene   BIBLICAL 1:06:00 V /  → How close to midnight is humanity? 2023 Doomsday Clock announcement (USA Today)   PARTY TIME: http://CANARYCRY.PARTY 1:08:05 V /  BREAK 1: TREASURE: https://CanaryCryRadio.com/Support 1:09:07 V /    POLYTICKS/BBB/WEF 1:20:03 V /  Missouri Rules Package (Legiscan) Who is Missouri Speaker? (MO INDY) Speaker Law Firm (MO Lawyers) Speaker Law Firm Special Master in Monsanto Case (Blitz) Speaker visits israel on trade mission (STL Today)  Hawthorn Foundation is https://www.hawthornfoundation.org/ Bayer (owns Monsanto based in ST. Louis) Edward Jones (Based in St. Louis and large scale ESG investor https://www.edwardjones.com/us-en/market-news-insights/guidance-perspective/sustainable-investing) Ameren (big investor in clean sustainable energy https://www.ameren.com/company/environment-and-sustainability) Kansas City Southern Rails (had member on Israel trip) ICL (icl-groups) MO Public Private Pratnership Org (MOPartnership.org) WEF Office opens in MO (SE MO) MO US Rep speaks at WEF (YT) MO's Agenda 2030 (GreaterSTLinc.com) Meta Selects MO for $800m Data Center (MPpartnerships) $430m EV lithium factory in MO (FOX)  ICL alternative protein factory in St Louis (Bussinesswire)   BREAK 3: TALENT 1:50:30 V /    ANTARCTICA/WOMEN RULE outta time - no can do Purdue Geochemist Leads All-Woman Team Antarctica, study Ancient History (IED)   BREAK 4: TIME 2:00:00 V /  END

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - My Approach to Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 26:47


Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or DLBCL is the most common type of lymphoma. Much progress has been made in treatment of the disease lately, particularly with emergence of CAR T-cell therapy, but not all patients are benefiting from it. This episode of Cancer Topics features Drs. Loretta Nastoupil and Chijioke Nze exploring treatment approaches for two cases of refractory DLBCL: a 60-year-old man with no comorbidities (1:30) and a 39-year-old woman with HIV (18:35). The guests also discuss improving patient access to CAR T-cell therapy and managing its toxicities (10:35), as well as emerging therapies for DLBCL (14:30). To learn more about management of refractory DLBCL, check out the ASCO course linked bellow. Guest Disclosures:Loretta Nastoupil, MD: Honoraria – Gilead Sciences, Novartis, Bayer, Janssen Oncology, TG Therapeutics, Bristol-Myers Squibb, ADC Therapeuitcs, Morphosys, Epizyme, Genmab, Takeda, Genentech/Roche; Research Funding – Janssen Biotech, Celgene, Genentech/Roche, Epizyme, Novartis, IgM Biosciences, Caribou Biosciences, Gilead Sciences, Allogene Therapeutics, Takeda Chijioke Nze, MD, MPH: No Relationships to Disclose Resources: ASCO Course: Second-line Therapy for Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (Free to Full and Allied ASCO Members) ASCO Podcast: Cancer Topics - New Therapies for Lymphoma (Part 1) ASCO Guideline: Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy ASCO Article: Navigating the Evolving Treatment Landscape of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma If you liked this episode, please follow the show. To explore other educational content, including courses, visit education.asco.org. Contact us at education@asco.org.  TRANSCRIPT The disclosures for guests on this podcast can be found in the show notes. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: So, I do have optimism that as we have more and more treatment options entering into the treatment landscape, we'll have fewer patients that are experiencing a refractory disease, and potentially succumbing to the lymphoma. Hello, my name is Dr. Loretta Nastoupil, I'm an Associate Professor and Deputy Chair of the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Welcome to this ASCO Education podcast episode. It's my pleasure to welcome Dr. Chijioke Nze. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Hello, everyone. I'm Dr. Chijioke Nze, a Hematology/Oncology fellow at MD Anderson, I'll be co-hosting this episode with Dr. Nastoupil. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: We've seen notable advances in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma research lately, with novel treatments including CAR T-cell therapy, offering the prospect of long-term remission for some patients, yet many patients are not even receiving second-line or later therapy, and even fewer are treated beyond the second line. How do you approach a patient with refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma? In today's episode, we'll explore strategies for management of refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through two patient cases. So, Dr. Nze, walk us through our first case. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Our first case is Frank. Frank is 60 years old and has no comorbidities. He presented with severe back pain in September 2021, and was evaluated locally. He had a CT scan that showed retroperitoneal mass, prompting further evaluation. He had a biopsy of the left retroperitoneal mass in November 2021, which was consistent with diffuse large B-cell, germinal center B-cell of phenotype Ki-67 of 90%. He had a subsequent PET-CT scan, which showed a large conglomerate, and invasive left retroperitoneal hypermetabolic mass with satellite nodularity and contiguous bulky retroperitoneal adenopathy. He had bulky, FDG-avid metastatic retrocrural and intrathoracic adenopathy as well. He was treated with R-CHOP for six cycles, and at the end, achieved complete remission. He had a PET-CT a year later that showed new and worsening intensely FDG-avid abdominal adenopathy. This was new from a PET scan he'd had in January 2022 of the same year. He had a biopsy of this retroperitoneal adenopathy, which was consistent with relapsed diffuse large B-cell germinal center phenotype, also Ki-67 of 90%. Locally, he was treated with ICE, times five cycles, and had a follow-up CT scan at the end, which showed persistent bulky nodal disease with periaortic regional nodes with double 5, consistent with persistent disease. He also was found to have new and more conspicuous nodes in other areas as well. He presented for his first visit at MD Anderson in September 2022. Dr. Nastoupil, when you see a patient like this coming into your clinic, what's your typical approach? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: For a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, we are always hoping for cure with frontline rituximab, containing anthracycline-based chemotherapy. And so, it's always a gross disappointment when patients experience relapse. The timing of that relapse right now informs our current approach. And the reason I mention that, is because there have been three large randomized studies conducted and reported out just in the last year demonstrating that CAR T-cell therapy is the preferred option for patients who experience either primary refractory disease, or relapse within 12 months. And that is because they resulted in better outcomes than standard salvage-based chemotherapy and high-dose therapy autotransplant in the setting of chemosensitive disease. I have to acknowledge, of the three studies that were done, two were positive trials, so that's why currently, we have axi-cel or Axicabtagene ciloleucel, or Lisocabtagene maraleucel, and not tisa-cel or Tisagenlecleucel, as CAR T-cell therapy options. And again, that's because two of the three studies were positive trials. Now, the challenge is why would we have two positive studies in one negative trial? There are a lot of caveats to how those studies were conducted, but I think one of the biggest important lessons to be gained is that if you're going to consider CAR T for these high-risk patients, you want to do it as soon as possible, because that delay from identifying CAR T as a preferred option to actually infusing cells in a disease-- in a case particularly like this, where patients may have bulky, aggressively-behaving disease - that prolonged time may actually have an impact on outcomes. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. Thank you. So, you've mentioned he had an early relapse. How would you define early relapse in this patient population? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Thinking back to how we've been approaching diffuse large B-cell lymphoma over the last two decades, the PARMA study, which was done prior to Rituximab, suggested that for patients who had chemosensitive disease to a platinum-based salvage chemotherapy, which generally, was at least a partial response on CT, if they went on to high-dose therapy autologous stem cell transplant, 50-60% of those patients could anticipate cure. Whereas for the folks who continued on salvage chemotherapy, 10-20% of those patients had favorable outcome. So, we generally do try salvage-based chemotherapy, and for patients with chemosensitive disease, go on to high-dose therapy autotransplant. However, in the modern era where we've approached patients who've had rituximab as part of their frontline therapy, at least two studies - the ORCHARD study, and the CORAL study suggested that only 20% of patients who relapse in the post-rituximab era, particularly within 12 months, were successfully salvaged with platinum-based chemotherapy and high-dose therapy autologous stem cell transplant. Now, fortunately for patients who fail salvage, we have had CAR T-cell therapy as an option based off of three pivotal phase II studies, demonstrating about 40% of patients could anticipate a cure with CAR T-cell therapy. So, it only made sense to try and move that therapy up into second line, and the preferred population was those that had progressed within 12 months of frontline rituximab and anthracycline-based chemo. Now, to qualify for those studies, patients had to be considered fit for the control arm, which was salvage and auto transplant. Nonetheless, I do think for a patient like this, who's 60, without any other significant comorbidities, whose biggest challenge to longevity of life is his aggressive lymphoma, CAR T-cell therapy should be considered as soon as possible for this patient. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Is there still a role for high-dose therapy and autologous transplant in the new era, given the efficacy shown with CAR T-cell therapy? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: I think there is. And the reason why I say that is, the trials that were done really did focus on the highest-risk patients, which were those with primary refractory disease or those who progress within 12 months of frontline. Now, there are patients that will have later relapse. And so, I do think for those patients, particularly those who are young and otherwise fit, should be approached first with a platinum-based salvage chemotherapy, in the setting of chemosensitive disease, proceed onto high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant. Now, what do we do for those patients who have a late relapse but are otherwise older, or who have comorbidities that would make them suboptimal candidates for the high-dose therapy preceding stem cell transplant? I have a couple other options for those patients - so, there was a trial done with liso-cel for patients who were otherwise older, or not fit for intensive therapy. It's a single-arm phase II without a randomized comparison, but also demonstrated that liso-cel in second-line, later relapsed patients who are not fit for intensive therapy, resulted in comparable outcomes to what we would anticipate on that third-line or later setting. We also have other non-CAR T-cell therapy options, such as tafasitamab, which is a naked CD19 antibody, which has been combined with lenalidomide in the L-MIND study, again, for patients without primary refractory disease and who would not be appropriate candidates for intensive therapy. So, I do think we have alternative options, it's just when we look at the totality of the data right now, my conclusion is that CAR T-cell therapy, particularly for high-risk patients, is the most likely chance to result in cure. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. In a patient who we are considering CAR T-cell therapy, what are some of the short-term and long-term consequences, or toxicities that we should worry about? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: One of the challenges right now with CAR T, and why it's still only available in specialized centers, is the acute toxicity, which is really a derivative of its mechanism of action. We take patients' own T-cells, we use a viral vector to introduce extracellular receptor, but also a co-stimulatory molecule. So, once these cells engage their antigen, sort of prime to react to that, and that can lead to pretty rapid T-cell expansion, release of cytokines, recruitment of other inflammatory cells to that tumor bed, and as a result, a large portion of patients can anticipate to experience cytokine release syndrome, which again, is the result of the activation of these T-cells, the expansion and the recruitment of other inflammatory cells. Fortunately, for most patients, this results in fever alone that can be managed with supportive measures. Occasionally, they'll have concomitant hypoxia or hypotension, and unfortunately, few patients will have significant or severe toxicity. The other toxicity that's less easily manageable or less predictable is the neurotoxicity that can vary according to patient-specific characteristics, such as age, and the amount of tumor burden, their performance status going into CAR, but even more importantly, the construct that's utilized, with highest rates of neurotoxicity associated with axi-cel. Again, likely speaking to its construct and the CD28 costimulatory domain that is unique to axi-cel. As a result of these acute toxicities, patients are required to stay within two hours of their treating center for the first four weeks, and they're also discouraged from operating heavy machinery, such as driving, for the first eight weeks following CAR T. So, I do you think this creates some barriers to access to this therapy, particularly the patients that are treated in community settings that may reside long distances from these certified CAR centers. Dr. Chijioke Nze: So, you mentioned that obviously, given the specialized care needed for the CAR T therapy, that they're kind of localized in certain sites. What are some of these issues with access that you're noticing both in the logistics of giving CAR T, and also in patient access? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: I'm hoping we're going to address one of those issues right now, which is, education and awareness, because we've had these three randomized studies, and two being positive readouts just in the last year. It's important to get the message out that CAR T-cell therapy for high-risk early relapsed refractory large cell lymphoma patients can result in a significant improvement in event-free survival and progression-free survival over the standard of care. And so, being aware that this therapy can result in more favorable outcomes is step one. Step two is, we have to ensure that there are minimal barriers to getting those patients into these treating centers as quickly as possible. So, recognizing who delivers the care - is it your traditional stem cell transplant physician? Is it a lymphoma doctor? What centers are certified? Some of these issues can be addressed with quick internet searches. So, for instance, in our center, we have a 1-800 number for anyone who's interested in CAR T-cell therapy that connects them directly to a CAR T coordinator who can help them understand do they meet the FDA-approved indication? Would they be interested in seeking consult? And we try and prioritize getting those patients in the door as soon as possible since time likely does have an impact on outcomes. And then, partnering with our community oncologist - you're going to be the primary oncologist for these patients leading up to CAR, and then after that four-week window, when we're keeping the patients in close proximity to our centers, we often send them back. And so, making sure that they're comfortable knowing what potential late toxicities to be on the lookout for, which include B-cell aplasia and risk for infection, or prolonged cytopenias, beyond just lymphopenia. And so again, there's a need for education and partnering with our community sites to make sure that there is successful handoff of these patients back after they've completed the monitoring for the acute toxicity. And then, really trying to explore opportunities to utilize some of the better tolerated CAR T, such as liso-cel, in your non-traditional academic centers. Those that are equipped to handle phase I studies or stem cell transplant, for instance, may not be affiliated with the university. So, I think those are all types of strategies that could be employed to try and improve access for patients. Dr. Chijioke Nze: And then, you mentioned the liso-cel, but in some of the toxicities, are there ways of predicting which patients will do better or worse? Are there ways to reduce toxicities? And is there any hope for things such as outpatient administration of CAR T? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: So, my answer today may improve over time as we get larger numbers and more experience, but what we currently understand is that the patient performance status, their degree of tumor, how quickly that tumor is increasing, LDH and some inflammatory markers such as CRP or ferritin pretreatment can provide some insight into a higher risk of toxicity. And then obviously, the construct that's utilized. Again, axi-cel has higher rates of neurotoxicity. All will have some form of cytokine release syndrome, generally speaking, but rates of grade three or higher are quite infrequent, particularly with liso-cel and tisa-cel. So, it's multifactorial. That then raises the question, can we do anything to alter those modifiable risk factors? Can we reduce the disease burden? Can we improve the performance status? Can we do anything to reduce the inflammatory markers pre-treatment? And so, those are strategies that are being discussed, and I think in general, as we get more effective therapies that enter into the treatment landscape, it's probably some of the best ways to try and reduce some of those risk factors. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Rounding that up, are there any exciting developments or things to look out for, for exciting therapies in the relapse setting? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: A couple of things beyond CAR T that I think we should all be aware of and anticipate to be in our toolkit relatively soon; probably, one of the most exciting, is the development of the bispecific antibodies. So, another challenge with CAR T is the requirement to collect these patients' own T-cells and send them off to a central manufacturing site, and the turnaround time can be anywhere from 3-4 weeks. And again, in a situation where you have an aggressive disease, that can be a long time to wait. And so, is there any treatments that are more readily available, that again, will be effective at reducing disease burden? And so, by specifics kind of fit those unmet needs to some extent - you have essentially two heads; one head is going to bind the endogenous T-cells that eliminates the need to leukapherese these patients and manufacture, and then the other head is going to generally engage CD20, which we know is an effective targeted antigen, particularly in B-cell lymphomas. And there are a number that are under development. We saw preliminary phase II data with glofitamab, epcoritamab, as well as combination strategies with mosunetuzumab. So, I do have optimism that the bispecific antibodies will potentially enter into the treatment landscape. I anticipate they'll probably be used first post-CAR T, but will likely move their way into earlier lines of therapy. I've already mentioned tafasitamab in combination with lenalidomide, which is an effective non-chemotherapy option. We have antibody-drug conjugates, such as Loncastuximab, which is a CD19 antibody-drug conjugate. It's essentially targeted delivery of chemotherapy, and it looks to have a pretty promising activity as a single agent in that third-line or later space, and then polatuzumab, which is a CD79b antibody drug conjugate, in the relapse setting has been combined with bendamustine and rituximab, but also demonstrated significant improvement in the frontline setting in the POLARIS study where vincristine was replaced with polatuzumab. So, I do have optimism that as we have more and more treatment options entering into the treatment landscape, we'll have fewer patients that are experiencing refractory disease, and potentially succumbing to the lymphoma. Dr. Chijioke Nze: And then, one additional question: How do you approach a patient who is not quite as fit, in thinking about what their options are for later-line therapies? You already mentioned some of these, but which of those would you prioritize in this setting? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Again, as we get more experience, we develop skills that help us sort of navigate all these different options. In my practice, if I'm even considering CAR T, I'm going to delay bendamustine until after I've collected those cells. I think that's one caveat that-- we do get nervous about the quality of those autologous CAR Ts if they're generated in someone who's had recent exposure to bendamustine. So, that may help me sequence that later on. We have questions right now about what's the optimal sequencing of CD19-directed therapy because we have several options beyond just CAR T-- As I mentioned, we have Lonca, we've got tafasitamab and lenalidomide. Currently, we don't have prospective data that really informs that question, and there's a number of research studies underway to try and help us understand if there is a preferred sequence, or even if it matters how we handle CD19 targeting. For my older, frailer patients where I'm really worried, they're not going to be able to tolerate something like liso-cel, or they're not going to be able to have that caregiver, and they're uncomfortable relocating to an area where CAR T might be available, my general approach right now is to consider tafasitamab and lenalidomide first in that relapse setting, followed by either Lonca or Pola-BR. Selinexor is another option. It's an oral agent, though again, in my opinion, if we look at the totality of the data, may be less effective than the other options. So, I might reserve that as a last option for someone, again, with relapsed/refractory large cell. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. Thank you. This has been very helpful. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: All right. So, Dr. Nze, now I'm going to turn the table and ask you some questions. I'm going to change this up a little bit - she's now a 39-year-old female. She has significant comorbidities. She has HIV, and again, large cell lymphoma. So, let me walk you through her case, and then we'll discuss some of the challenges, again, in a very different scenario, albeit a similar disease. So, our female is, I mentioned 39, pre-existing HIV, she's treated frontline with six cycles of R-CHOP and intrathecal methotrexate for CNS prophylaxis. Because of her comorbidities, again, not well controlled HIV, she also has a poor functional status at the time of relapse. This was a couple years ago, and CAR T was not an option in second line, though she is someone who had a relapse that was beyond 12 months. So, for her second-line approach, because of her comorbidities, she actually receives rituximab in combination with high-dose cytarabine, dexamethasone, and oxaliplatin for three cycles, and actually achieves a chemosensitive disease and is referred to our stem cell transplant colleagues. Unfortunately, at that time, due to comorbidities, she was deemed not to be an appropriate candidate for high-dose therapy, and she's been monitored for signs of relapse. Despite being in the minority, she actually does not have a recurrence of her lymphoma but has a number of other, again, challenges in regards to her comorbidity, including multiple infections, resulting in recurrent hospitalizations. And so, it's always been a challenge for me in being intimately involved in her case, deciding when she's presenting, how alarmed to be about recurrent lymphoma versus infection, and how I might approach her in the setting of relapsed large cell lymphoma. So, what role does prior type and response to therapy play in treatment selection at your next line of treatment? Dr. Chijioke Nze: I think in this patient, it sounds like she got one adequate therapy on and the initial presentation with R-CHOP, and then with IT chemotherapy as well. She looked like she had a good response. I think the fact that she achieved a complete response and the duration of her response, lets me know that she likely has chemosensitive disease. This, in turn, helps me to pick what to do next. As you mentioned previously, we know how efficacious the CAR T therapy is, but in someone like her who had a long duration, trying salvage therapy and proceeding to autologous transplant might make sense. I'd be interested in your thoughts. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Yeah, I agree. And I think part of the challenge, particularly when we're facing patients with HIV, they're often excluded from prospective studies. And so, we're often in a scenario where we may not have the wealth of data to inform our treatment decision. But I do think in general, comorbidities play a major role-- we're navigating treatment options. Because again, traditionally, we've used intensive chemotherapy as our mainstay of treatment, and there are clear criteria that patients generally should meet that help us predict how likely they are to have significant or severe toxicity from high-dose therapy. And this is a prime example of even though she was young, her comorbidity made her a poor candidate for intensive therapy. I think the other sort of non-clinical factors that we sometimes take into consideration, because CAR T was approved off of single-arm phase II studies, again, none of which would've included someone like her, because of her HIV status, how do we extrapolate-- for instance, if she had relapsed in that third-line space, and suggesting that she did not have significant infection or other significant comorbidities, do we have experience to proceed with an autologous CAR in that setting? So, again, there've been a few cases where we have case reports where people have reported on their standard of care outcomes, particularly with CAR T in patients with active HIV disease, but one of the concerns I have in these scenarios is very selected. If you have active infection, that can make the acute toxicity with CAR significantly worse. And so again, we're trying to navigate a sort of limited data zone to try and help her and choose the right therapy. Again, you've met this patient with me, you helped care for her for some time, and you have a unique experience of also practicing in a county hospital where comorbidities, particularly, like HIV, can be much more common. What is your perception regarding barriers to accessing CAR T as it pertains to social factors, clinical factors, and again, this is a case that highlights some of those issues. Dr. Chijioke Nze: You mentioned at first that she had uncontrolled HIV. So, I think which, one, speaks to her treatment reference of her non-malignancy-related diseases, and trying to get that under control would be one of the first things I could think about. Thinking about how her care is managed and what kind of support she has are very important for us to think about as well. The other thing that's very important is, a lot of patients who we're seeing in the community may not have access to such specialized centers such as MD Anderson, where patients do have access to clinical trials and CAR T therapy. So, patients who are unlike her, who might qualify, may not actually be able to get these therapies as well. Part of the reason is, it can be insurance status, which is what we see in a lot of our patients. So, a barrier to get into the door. And then too barriers, lack of social support can be a big issue as well. And then there's also a big push in the community to improve the trust and awareness of these novel therapies, as you've mentioned. So, in a lot of the community practice, some of the community practitioners may not be comfortable with these, and a lot of the patients may not have heard of these new technologies, and also want to defer trying new therapies before having other people try new therapies before they consider them themselves. I think all these things present specific significant barriers to patients in the community. One, their ability to adhere to care, two, their insurance and their ability to get care and the financial toxicities associated with that. And then third, really understanding the options that are available. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: And again, just to try and illustrate a couple other points. You know, we use a case here, which is a real case, with significant comorbidities such as HIV, which again, is something that is not frequently encountered, and will have a large impact on treatment selection. What if I just told you this patient has comorbidities, but she has moderate type-2 diabetes, and as a result, she has mild renal insufficiency, ejection fraction is actually adequate, would you have done anything different in this case? Dr. Chijioke Nze: No. I think in this particular case, I do think the fact that she did have a good response for a long duration of time, and did seem to have chemosensitive disease, I would probably still have tried a salvage therapy and autologous transplant in this patient. In the event that she was refractory, or had early relapse, and in that case, I would consider her to not be chemosensitive and would definitely have sought some more active therapies such as CAR T cell therapy through available products. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: And then one last question for you: What if we just changed her age and we made her 79, but no other significant comorbidities, how would that have impacted your approach? Dr. Chijioke Nze: I'm going to turn that one over to you, I'm not exactly sure how I would treat with older patient with the same disease. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: That's fair. So, if you have an older patient who has a late relapse, but not necessarily someone you would consider appropriate for salvage chemotherapy and high-dose therapy, then I think tafasitamab and lenalidomide would be probably my first choice in that setting, just based off of the L-MIND study. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Thank you, Dr. Nastoupil, for a great discussion of the management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. And thank you to all our listeners. We appreciate you tuning in to this episode of the ASCO Educational podcast.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

North American Ag Spotlight
Don't Tell Farmers How to Farm, with Jake Leguee

North American Ag Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 38:46


In this week's North American Ag Spotlight Chrissy Wozniak visits with third generation farmer Jake Leguee for a discussion about farm innovation and why top down government strategies are not as effective as producers collaborating & innovating to solve their own problems.Jake is from southeast Saskatchewan, Canada, where he farms with several family members, including his wife and 3 young sons. Jake is passionate about the agriculture industry and trying to share his farm's story to a broader audience to bridge the communication gap between farmers and consumers. He does this through his blog, A Year in the Life of a Farmer, along with speaking engagements and other opportunities to connect with people interested in where their food comes from.Jake is highly involved in the agriculture industry, currently serving as a director of the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission and as chair of the Canadian Wheat Research Coalition. Jake participates in advisory boards for companies such as Bayer and OCP and is a member of the Global Farmer Network.Leguee Farms is a third-generation grain, oilseed, and special crop producer from Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Canada. We grow canola, durum, hard red spring wheat, lentils, peas, and flax. Our vision is to build a strong and enduring business for the fourth generation on our farm. We will do that by enhancing our soils, our families, our communities, and the agriculture industry. Here is a link to the charts and Jake's article that Chrissy mentions in the episode - https://thelifeofafarmer.com/2022/12/21/we-have-never-lived-longer-healthier-happier-lives/Learn more about Jake at https://thelifeofafarmer.comNorth American Ag is devoted to highlighting the people & companies in agriculture who impact our industry and help feed the world. Subscribe at https://northamericanag.comWant to hear the stories of the ag brands you love and the ag brands you love to hate? Hear them at https://whatcolorisyourtractor.comNeed help with your agriculture based company's marketing plan? Visit https://chrissywozniak.comThis episode is sponsored by AMS Galaxy - BRINGING PRECISION DAIRY EQUIPMENT TO THE AMERICAN FARMER. Spend more time doing what you love. Use technology to your advantage.Visit https://agr.fyi/galaxyLasso helps the cattle sector decrease its emissions and farms receive the recognition and real dollars they deserve by doing so.Our platform will play a key role in making cattle farming carbon neutral and financially sustainable, eliminating nearly 15% of total global warming potential.Visit https://agr.fyi/lasso to learn more.Subscribe to North American Ag at https://northamericanag.com

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin
#79 Classic episode - A.J. Jacobs on radical honesty, following the whole Bible, and reframing global problems as puzzles

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 155:29


Rebroadcast: this episode was originally released in June 2020. Today's guest, New York Times bestselling author A.J. Jacobs, always hated Judge Judy. But after he found out that she was his seventh cousin, he thought, "You know what, she's not so bad". Hijacking this bias towards family and trying to broaden it to everyone led to his three-year adventure to help build the biggest family tree in history. He's also spent months saying whatever was on his mind, tried to become the healthiest person in the world, read 33,000 pages of facts, spent a year following the Bible literally, thanked everyone involved in making his morning cup of coffee, and tried to figure out how to do the most good. His latest book asks: if we reframe global problems as puzzles, would the world be a better place? Links to learn more, summary and full transcript. This is the first time I've hosted the podcast, and I'm hoping to convince people to listen with this attempt at clever show notes that change style each paragraph to reference different A.J. experiments. I don't actually think it's that clever, but all of my other ideas seemed worse. I really have no idea how people will react to this episode; I loved it, but I definitely think I'm more entertaining than almost anyone else will. (Radical Honesty.) We do talk about some useful stuff — one of which is the concept of micro goals. When you wake up in the morning, just commit to putting on your workout clothes. Once they're on, maybe you'll think that you might as well get on the treadmill — just for a minute. And once you're on for 1 minute, you'll often stay on for 20. So I'm not asking you to commit to listening to the whole episode — just to put on your headphones. (Drop Dead Healthy.) Another reason to listen is for the facts: • The Bayer aspirin company invented heroin as a cough suppressant • Coriander is just the British way of saying cilantro • Dogs have a third eyelid to protect the eyeball from irritants • and A.J. read all 44 million words of the Encyclopedia Britannica from A to Z, which drove home the idea that we know so little about the world (although he does now know that opossums have 13 nipples). (The Know-It-All.) One extra argument for listening: If you interpret the second commandment literally, then it tells you not to make a likeness of anything in heaven, on earth, or underwater — which rules out basically all images. That means no photos, no TV, no movies. So, if you want to respect the bible, you should definitely consider making podcasts your main source of entertainment (as long as you're not listening on the Sabbath). (The Year of Living Biblically.) I'm so thankful to A.J. for doing this. But I also want to thank Julie, Jasper, Zane and Lucas who allowed me to spend the day in their home; the construction worker who told me how to get to my subway platform on the morning of the interview; and Queen Jadwiga for making bagels popular in the 1300s, which kept me going during the recording. (Thanks a Thousand.) We also discuss: • Blackmailing yourself • The most extreme ideas A.J.'s ever considered • Utilitarian movie reviews • Doing good as a writer • And much more. Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world's most pressing problems: type 80,000 Hours into your podcasting app. Or read the linked transcript. Producer: Keiran Harris. Audio mastering: Ben Cordell. Transcript for this episode: Zakee Ulhaq.

kicker News
kicker News vom 12.1.2023, 10:30 Uhr

kicker News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 1:43


Knauff: Eintracht oder BVB?, Bleibt Weigl in Gladbach?, Mbamba steht auf dem Zettel von Bayer, ManCity scheitert überraschend in Southampton

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“Coty - die Jeremy-Fragrance-Aktie” - Binance zieht durch & Aptos zieht 30% an

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 11:28


Der DAX ist nicht zu stoppen, Bayer kann die Aktivisten nicht stoppen und Bernard Arnault will seine Kinder nicht stoppen. Binance hat derweil von Krypto-Crash nichts gehört und bei FTX haben die Insolvenzverwalter jetzt zumindest mal von einigen Milliarden gehört. Diese Firma riecht wie David Beckham, Kim Kardashian, Gucci und Adidas. Diese Firma will Handcreme für 1.000 $ verkaufen. Diese Firma gehört einer deutschen Familie. Diese Firma heißt Coty (WKN: A1WY6X). Die vielleicht schnellste Blockchain der Welt kommt von Facebook, hat 350 Mio. Dollar zum Start gekriegt und in einer Woche mehr als 30% Rendite gemacht. Diesen Podcast vom 12.01.2023, 3:00 Uhr stellt dir die Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) zur Verfügung.

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“Die Zerschlagung der Bayer AG” - Crash bei About You & 3% Dividende bei Ryder

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 11:13


Der DAX bewegt sich nicht. About You bewegt sich, aber mit zu vielen Rabatten. Außerdem wollen BioNTech und Microsoft viel Künstliche Intelligenz kaufen, Coinbase will Kosten sparen und Virgin Orbit hat keinen Satelliten im All. Bayer (WKN: BAY001) hat einen Aktivisten an Bord, der die Firma zerbrechen will. Die Börse feiert. Wie aus einem einzigen Ford-Truck ein milliardenschwerer Logistik-Gigant wird? Ryder (WKN: 855369) zeigt's euch. Diesen Podcast vom 11.01.2023, 3:00 Uhr stellt dir die Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) zur Verfügung.

Die Börsenminute
Geld regiert die Welt - die Aktionäre werden immer aktiver

Die Börsenminute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 3:29


So sind´s die Aktivisten: Die einen picken bzw. kleben sich an Stühlen, Straßen, Stehpulten fest, um etwas zu verändern. Die anderen werfen ihr geballtes Kapital in die Waagschale, so wie etwa der nicht unbekannte Shareholder-Activist Bluebell derzeit bei Bayer. Mit seiner 20-prozentigen Beteiligung am deutschen Pharma- und Agrarriesen will er kräftig in der Chefetage mitmischen und den Konzern zerschlagen, die Klagen-umworbene Agrarsparte – Stichwort RoundUp/Monsanto – abspalten und so mehr Geld aus dem Pharmakonzern Bayer quetschen zu können. Bluebell erwartet sich für die Bayer-Aktionäre einen Wertzuwachs von 70 Prozent. Der britische Hedgefonds hat bei Danone schon einen CEO zu Fall gebracht. Am Gründer und CEO des weltgrößten Vermögensverwalter BlackRock beißt sich der unbeliebte Investor gerade die Zähne aus. Im Herbst scheiterte Bluebell beim Schweizer Luxusgüterkonzern Richemont an der Hauptaktionärsfamilie Rupert. Richemont istbekannt vor allem für seine Marke Cartier. Die übrigen Aktionäre unterstützten den 72-jährigen Johann Rupert. Er blieb im Chefsessel. Shareholder-Aktivismus boomt wie nie zuvor, dabei will man vor allem einem Managementwechsel erzwingen, man ist der der Meinung, dass man bessere strategische Ausrichtung des jeweiligen Unternehmens kennt als der Vorstand. Nicht immer ist Geld und Gewinn wie beim berühmt und berüchtigten Active-Shareholder Carl Icahn das Motiv für ihr tun. Auch der Boom nachhaltiger Finanzprodukte sorgt für eine Schar von ESG-Aktivisten, die soziales und umweltgerechtes Handeln der Unternehmen erzwingen wollen und sich auch nicht vor den Karren anders motivierter Aktiv-Aktionäre spannen lassen. So wurde Icahn´s Forderung auf zwei Sitze im Aufsichtsrat bei McDonald´s im Vorjahr, natürlich nur zum Tierwohl, nur von einem Prozent der Aktionäre unterstützt. Auch die kurzfristig gehypten Spacs, Special Purpose Aquisition Companies, Investment-Hüllen, die Geld einsammelten um sich an zuvor noch nicht definierte StartUps zu beteiligen boten 2022 viel Angriffsfläche für Active Sharholders. Weltweit sollen es über 700 aktivistische Angriffe sein, die die Unternehmen von der Arbeit abhalten. Oder um es positiv zu formulieren: Die Aktionäre werden immer aktiver. Konkret bei Bayer sind ein ganzes Bündel gewinnorientierter Aktienaktivisten investiert, angeblich auch Aktivist Elliot. Die Bayer-Aktie bekommt durch die Aufspaltungsphantasien Rückenwind. Würe das Unkrautvernichtungsmittel RoundUp von der Bayer-Pharmasparte abgespalten, wäre das höchstwahrscheinlich lukrativ für die Aktionäre. Eine nachhaltige Lösung im Dienste der Umwelt wäre es deshalb aber noch lange nicht.... Und wenn Euch diese Podcastfolge der Boersenminute gefallen hat, dann abonniert die BÖRSENMINUTE und die GELDMEISTERIN doch gratis auf Eurer Podcastplattform Eurer Wahl oder auf YouTube, um keine weitere Folge mehr zu verpassen. Damit unterstützt ihr mich automatisch beim Podcast-Ranking. Vielen Dank! Auch gibt es eine LinkedIn- und Facebook-Gruppe GELDMEISTERIN, in die ich Euch sehr gerne einlade. Rechtlicher Hinweis: Für Verluste, die aufgrund von getroffenen Aussagen entstehen, übernimmt die Autorin, Julia Kistner keine Haftung. Denn handelt sich weder um eine Steuer-, Rechts- noch Finanzberatung, sondern nur um die persönliche Meinung der Autorin. #Börse #Anleger #Shareholder #Aktionäre #Unkrautvernichtung #Aktie #Rendite #Bayer ü #Activist #Monsanto #RoundUp #Inflation #BlackRock Foto: Unsplash/Markus Spiske

Alles auf Aktien
70-Prozent-Wette auf Bayer und ein Index voller Tenbagger

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 23:40


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Holger Zschäpitz über eine verheerende Rabattschlacht bei About You, eine unheimliche Rallye bei Curevac und die Statik der Märkte. Außerdem sprechen wir über Zalando, WeWork, Oatly, Siemens Energy, RWE, Linde, Airbus, Boeing, Coinbase, Vaneck Crypto and Blockchain Innovators UCITS ETF (WKN: A2QQ8F), GSK, Sanofi, AstraZeneca, Novartis, Danone, Next Generation Tech Indexzertifikat (WKN: VV8J2L), Intuit, Palo Alto, Crowdstrike, Equinix, Palantir, Snowflake, Kyndryl, Keysight, Nu Holdings, Paytm, Rigetti, Gitlab, Samsara, Confluent, Crown Castle, SBA Communications, Dassault Systèmes. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Euer Egmond von BNP Paribas Zertifikate
Tesla, Amazon, Bayer, Salesforce und US-Inflationsdaten im Fokus

Euer Egmond von BNP Paribas Zertifikate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 81:34


Der DAX ist zum Jahresauftakt im Rally-Modus, hingegen kommen S&P500 und Nasdaq nur langsam voran. Die Gründe dafür wird Finanzspezialist Egmond Haidt im Podcast ebenso ausführlich analysieren, wie die Nachrichten zu Tesla, Amazon, Bayer und Salesforce. Zudem sind Euro und Gold weiter auf dem Weg nach oben. Umso gespannter warten Investoren auf die Veröffentlichung der US-Inflationsdaten am Donnerstag, am Freitag startet die Quartalssaison beim S&P500. Wie sind in dem Umfeld die Aussichten für S&P500, Nasdaq, DAX, Euro-Dollar und Gold?Wichtige rechtliche Hinweise (www.bnp.de/service/disclaimer/rechtliche-hinweise)Grundsätze zur Weitergabe von Anlage- und Anlagestrategieempfehlungen sowie Informationen über eigene Interessen und Interessenkonflikte (https://www.derivate.bnpparibas.com/service/disclosure/mad-mar)Informationen über Interessen und Interessenkonflikte des Erstellers (https://news.derivate.bnpparibas.com/wp-content/uploads/egmond_pdfs/Offenlegung_EgmondHaidt.pdf

Las mañanas de RNE con Íñigo Alfonso
Las mañanas de RNE con Íñigo Alfonso - Empecemos el día con Reyes Magos: más Remedios Varo

Las mañanas de RNE con Íñigo Alfonso

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 4:32


Remedios Varo pintó a los Reyes Magos en un trabajo para la farmacéutica Bayer en Venezuela en 1947. La artista española ya era una exiliada en América por entonces. Murió en México con más reconocimiento allí que en España, como demuestran las escasas exposiciones monográficas que se le han dedicado aquí.  Informa Íñigo Picabea Escuchar audio

How to Get an Analytics Job
Keys to Becoming an Effective Analytics Leader and Manager

How to Get an Analytics Job

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 52:06


In this livestream Sangeeta Krishnan talks about how to thrive in the analytics industry. She is currently the Senior Analytics Lead of North American sales for Bayer and recently published a book called "Thriving in a Data World: A Guide for Leaders and Managers". In this episode she is going to break down the key takeaways from her book. Check out her book here: https://www.amazon.com/Thriving-Data-World-Leaders-Managers/dp/1637424167/ref=sr_1_1?crid=AMXNHO5GLN3C&keywords=Thriving+in+a+Data+World&qid=1671227132&sprefix=thriving+in+a+data+world%2Caps%2C84&sr=8-1 Trying to break into the Analytics Industry? You should check out the Greensboro College Analytics Apprenticeship program. Learn more here: https://learn.silvertoneanalytics.com/apprenticeship/ Already established as an analyst but ready to level up your career? Check out the Silvertone Analytics Career Servicers Program here: https://learn.silvertoneanalytics.com/career-services/ Welcome to the How to Get an Analytics Job channel. Discover how you fit into the analytics marketplace, what skills you should build, and how to land your analytics dream job. Analytics agency owner John David Ariansen and his team will give you tips and tricks to land your dream job and level up your analytics career. Check Out Our Playlists How to Get an Analytics Job Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX0D28bbnfRCV6M4zMQrhXsd Greensboro College Analytics Lecture Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX2UenX5FGME-n-KDjvKmeKp Looking to land an analytics job? Sounds like you need a solid resume... Sign up for our email list to get a free analytics resume guide: https://mailchi.mp/df01df1e8856/analyticsjob Follow us on LinkedIn: John David Ariansen https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndavidariansen/ Hunter Brown https://www.linkedin.com/in/hunterhbrown/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-david-ariansen/support

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Pesticide Regulators Actually Protect The Industry Instead Of The Public

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 11:41


Pesticide Regulators Actually Protect The Industry Instead Of The Public Andre Leu • contact: linkedin.com/in/andre-leu-a365861a• Growing Life: Regenerating Farming and Ranching #AndreLeu#RegeneratingFarming #HealthySoil Andre Leu is the Author of several books including his most recent; Growing Life: Regenerating Farming and Ranching. This book is about modern farming and ranching evolve away from mass consolidation and industrialization; a new strategy is rapidly emerging: regenerative agriculture. These new systems being implemented across the globe require a shift in the mindset of the land manager and operator, away from being primarily reliant on external inputs such as fertilizers and pesticides, and toward dependence on knowledge, measurement, and management. In this first-of-its-kind book, André Leu invites everyone to start moving a positive, regenerative direction where our actions support growing abundant life. Inside this book, the first in a series, explore the fundamentals of regenerative agriculture, including specific, proven steps designed to grow healthy food, while protecting our natural resources like clean water, soil and air. Readers will also learn: the role of photosynthesis in a farming system; successful tactics for ground cover and weed management; soil health and nutrition principles; ways to build functional biodiversity; and implementation and execution tactics. This includes a helpful appendix on vetted, natural inputs.  He is the International Director of Regeneration International, an organization that promotes food, farming and land use systems that regenerate and stabilize climate systems, the health of the planet and people, communities, culture and local economies, democracy, and peace. He was the President of IFOAM – Organics International, the world change agent and umbrella body for the organic sector from 2011 -2017. IFOAM – Organics International has around 850 member organizations in127 countries. He lectures and teaches at universities, institutions, and workshops around the world. He speaks at numerous conferences, seminars, workshops as well as United Nations events on every continent. He meets with governments, industry, farmers, consumers, and NGOs on the multi-functional benefits of regenerative organic agriculture. He has an extensive knowledge of farming and environmental systems across Asia, Europe, the Americas, Africa and Australasia from over 40 years of visiting and working in over 100 countries. Andre and his wife, Julia, have an organic tropical fruit farm in Daintree, Australia. He has published extensively in magazines, newspapers, journals, conference proceedings, newsletters, websites, and other media, as well as doing numerous media interviews for TV, Radio and online systems. You Can contact Andre Leu on Twitter and LinkedIn Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Emergency Medical Minute
Podcast 842: “History of Wound Care”

Emergency Medical Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 4:25


Contributor: Chris Holmes, MD Educational Pearls: Through world history, there have been various interesting approaches to wound care Ancient Egyptians applied honey, lint, and grease which provided antimicrobial, absorptive and moisturizing properties, respectively  Ancient Greeks irrigated wounds with clean water and applied wine and vinegar which may have been antimicrobial  One of the first synthetic topical antimicrobials was a dye researched by scientist Gerhard Domagk and later produced by Bayer under the name Prontosil  Some current wound care methods include wet-to-dry dressings, Dankin's Solution (sodium hypochlorite) and the use of maggots    References Fleck CA. Why "wet to dry"?. J Am Col Certif Wound Spec. 2009;1(4):109-113. Published 2009 Oct 6. doi:10.1016/j.jcws.2009.09.003 Shah JB. The history of wound care. J Am Col Certif Wound Spec. 2011;3(3):65-66. doi:10.1016/j.jcws.2012.04.002 Ueno CM, Mullens CL, Luh JH, Wooden WA. Historical review of Dakin's solution applications. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2018;71(9):e49-e55. doi:10.1016/j.bjps.2018.05.023   Summarized by Kirsten Hughes, MS4 | Edited by John Spartz, MD, & Erik Verzemnieks, MD   The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 

Servus. Grüezi. Hallo.
Als der Papst einen Kuheuter auf dem Kopf hatte

Servus. Grüezi. Hallo.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 54:06


Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger ist gestorben, der Bayer war von 2005 bis 2013 Papst und hat die katholische Kirche über Jahrzehnte geprägt. Was wurde aus dem “Wir sind Papst”-Stolz der Deutschen auf ihn? Welche Spuren hat er in der Schweiz und Österreich hinterlassen? Außerdem erzählen wir von einem Papst aus der Steiermark und davon, dass die katholischen Luzerner nicht für die Schweizer Garde zahlen wollen. Außerdem bei “Servus. Grüezi. Hallo.”: Was sich Österreicherinnen, Schweizer und Deutsche fürs neue Jahr vorgenommen haben und warum Berlin schon wieder über Böllerverbote diskutiert.

Brownfield Ag News
A soybean system that works

Brownfield Ag News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 4:00


Innovation and performance help farmers put more soybeans in the bin.In this Managing for Profit, Matt Goddard, Technology Development Manager for Bayer shares how the Roundup Ready Xtend Crop System offers weed control that works and helps farmers maximize their return on investment.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Coach's Corner
Patrick Berning '08 & Tim Bayer '08

Coach's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 19:35


Bomber legends and friends of the program Patrick Berning '08 and Tim Bayer '08 talk about being a part of arguably the greatest football team in St. X history, playing on ESPN, and having a young Coach Specht at the helm.

Alles auf Aktien
Milliardengeschäft im Kiffer-Paradies und die 50-Prozent-Aktien

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 19:57


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Laurin Meyer und Holger Zschäpitz über eine geplatzte transatlantische Milliardenhochzeit, Aktienrückkauf-Fantasien bei Tesla und gute Geschäfte bei Rheinmetall. Außerdem geht es um Brenntag, Univar Solutions, HomeToGo, Global X Cannabis ETF (WKN: A3DN58), Canopy Growth, Aurora, Tilray, Rize Medical Cannabis ETF and Life Sciences ETF (WKN: A2PX6U), HanETF Medical Cannabis and Wellness (WKN: A2PPE8), SAP, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Merck, Bayer, Rational, Sartorius, Bayer, Crowdstrike, Palo Alto, Sentinel One, Atlassian, Cloudflare, Zscaler, Zoominfo, Salesforce, Alphabet, Match, Nippon Telegraph & Telephone, Olympus, Nintendo, Lasertec, Keyence, Hexagon, Novo Nordisk, AstraZeneca, Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, TSMC und Netease. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Focus
Canadian users of Essure birth control coils take pharma giant Bayer to court

Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 5:32


Essure contraceptive implants were removed from sale a few years ago, but are now the subject of court cases in several countries. In Canada, their manufacturer, Bayer, faces a class action lawsuit. According to plaintiffs, the birth control devices cause a number of serious side effects. Bayer denies any link between the health problems and its product, saying it will defend itself vigorously in court. Our Canada correspondents report.

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
Dr. Steve Yacovelli - Founder of TopDog Learning Group, LLC

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 34:34


In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Dr. Steve Yacovelli. Dr. Steve (“The Gay Leadership Dude™”) is the Owner & Principal of TopDog Learning Group, LLC – a learning and development, leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA, with affiliates across the globe. Steve and TopDog have had the pleasure of working with some great client-partners who they consider to be members of their “pack.” He's worked with Fortune 500 greats like The Walt Disney Company and Bayer to amazing not-for-profits like The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and The American Library Association; large universities like The Ohio State University and The University of Central Florida, to small entrepreneurial rock stars like International Training & Development and GovMojo, Inc. Steve and TopDog have thoroughly enjoyed helping their client-partners grow, develop, expand, and be successful with their corporate learning, change management, diversity and inclusion, and leadership consulting goodness. With over twenty-five years' experience in leadership, strategy, organizational learning, and communication, Steve is a rare breed of professional that understands the power of using academic theory and applying it to the corporate setting to achieve business results. Oh, and he's quite fond of dogs, too.     Learn more and connect with Dr. Steve Yacovelli by visiting him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gayleadership Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/steveyacovelli/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gayleadershipdude/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegayleadershipdude/ Website: https://topdoglearning.learnworlds.com/home     Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* ****************************************************************************

Brownfield Ag News
Providing consistent weed control in 2023

Brownfield Ag News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 3:59


Having access to a corn herbicide that provides consistent control of broadleaf weeds and grasses is a game changer for farmers.In this Managing for Profit, Elizabeth Brand with Bayer CropScience talks about TriVolt, a powerful new tool available to retailers and growers for the upcoming growing season.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Morning Air
Emily Jaminet, June is for Jesus/ Ashley Noronha, Latest from the Vatican/ Andrea Picciotti-Bayer, Carson v Makin Ruling

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 51:08


full Relevant Radio 99760dc8-afb3-42f4-9c3d-af740102024f 99760dc8-afb3-42f4-9c3d-af740102024f Fri, 23 Dec 2022 15:41:21 +0000 3068

Morning Air
Brian Gibson, Courageous Action in a Post-Roe World/ Laura DeMaria, How to Promote a Culture of Life/ Andrea Picciotti-Bayer, SCOTUS Decision on Religious Liberty

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 51:08


full Relevant Radio 41e77876-b6db-4fb9-9aa3-af7400fb4a19 41e77876-b6db-4fb9-9aa3-af7400fb4a19 Fri, 23 Dec 2022 15:17:05 +0000 3068

Your Legal Rights
Bankruptcy: An Overview

Your Legal Rights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 59:24


A quick summary of just what bankruptcy is, different types of bankruptcy cases. How does all this work.In the aftermath of the various economic stimuli and protections born of the pandemic, are bankruptcies on the rise?It's been 14 months since last we examined the law of bankruptcy; any changes in store?Tonight, YLR host Jeff Hayden and tonight's co-host Dean Johnson host Leon Bayer to talk about bankruptcy, and debtor's rights; more importantly, we are here to take your calls and answer your questions.YLR host Jeff Hayden welcomes Leon Bayer. Certified as a Bankruptcy Law Specialist by the California Board of Legal Specialization, State Bar of California, Mr. Bayer is co-author of THE NEW BANKRUPTCY: WILL IT WORK FOR YOU? published by Nolo Press. Questions for Jeff, Dean and Leon? Please call us, toll-free, at (866) 798-8255.

Our Film Fathers
Episode 135: Office Christmas Party

Our Film Fathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 30:43


As the CEO of our own car, we are not canceling the end of year fun, so we watched Office Christmas Party (2016). Come with us to Downtown Chicago for one crazy night of debauchery with some of our favorite actors. Everyone in this movie was well cast and fit the movie perfectly. Its all happening.Subscribe, rate and review:Apple Podcasts: Our Film FathersSpotify: Our Film FathersGoogle Podcasts: Our Film FathersStitcher: Our Film FathersAmazon Music: Our Film Fathers-----------------------Follow us:Instagram: @ourfilmfathersTwitter: @ourfilmfathersEmail: ourfilmfathers@gmail.com

Vermont News
GlobalFoundries says it will lay off nearly 150 Vermonters

Vermont News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 2:54


ALSO: The state's largest health insurer announced Tuesday that it will not contract with OneCare Vermont in 2023; Attorneys for Monsanto's parent company, Bayer, filed a motion on Monday, seeking to temporarily halt the demolition of the closed-down Burlington High School building; Vermont Public is buying Northern Vermont University's radio station.

Scientist the Human Podcast
STH - E29 Dr. Derek Lowe - Blogging & Drug Discovery

Scientist the Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 41:33


Dr. Derek Lowe is a medicinal chemist, author, and blogger. He is currently Director in Chemical Biology and Therapeutics at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research (NIBR). Dr. Lowe's work in drug discovery has spanned multiple decades with tenures at Schering-Plough, Bayer, and Vertex Pharmaceuticals. In addition to his industry work, Dr. Lowe authors a popular blog covering topics in drug discovery; check it out here: In the Pipeline.

Rádio Gaúcha
presidente da Cooperativa Languiru, Dirceu Bayer - 15/12/2022

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:14


presidente da Cooperativa Languiru, Dirceu Bayer - 15/12/2022 by Rádio Gaúcha

LawHer
42. Carson Bayer Gillespie, The League — Strength and Vulnerability: Work-Life Integration for Women in Law

LawHer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 32:41


Women play a major role in the business of law firms but have few safe spaces to come together through life's highs and lows. If the people who champion and encourage you come from your professional network, why not invite them into your personal life? It is this crossover concept that helped founders Carson Bayer Gillespie and Melissa Lamore spark the idea for the League. A network woman in the legal field, The League, aims to support the whole woman at any stage in her career. Today, Carson discusses her current role at Legal Association Management and how she has thrown balance out the window for a different strategy: full integration. She digs into the role that vulnerability plays, why it's OKAY to not always be okay, and how women can rise together. Check out Melissa Lamore's recent LawHer episode: 35. Melissa Lamore, Velawcity — Nurturing Community: Cancer Survival and The League What's In This Episode? Who is Carson Bayer Gillespie? How does The League support the growth and evolution of women in the legal industry? When thinking about work and life, how is balance different from integration? How can women let go of the guilt that may come from not being able to do it all? When work and life are integrated, what is a good way to think about decompression?

Farm Food Facts
A Climate Smart Platform for Farmers

Farm Food Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 10:01 Transcription Available


Alyssa Cho, Sustainable Agronomy Field Team Lead at Bayer is our guest. Alyssa is building a team of Sustainable Systems Agronomists to provide support to farmers for a successful transition to regenerative practices as part of ForGround by Bayer. Alyssa was the Agronomy Lead for a drone-based technology start-up, Aker Technologies prior to joining Bayer. She has been a professor of sustainable cropping systems, serving as a researcher, extension faculty, and instructor. Alyssa holds a Ph.D. in Agronomy, a M.S. in Horticultural Sciences, and a B.S. in Natural Resources and Environmental Management.

The Leading Voices in Food
E191: Is today's food waste a consequence of historical public policy

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 25:37


Today's podcast is part of a series on food waste. When farmers produce more of a product than people are willing to buy, or when the demand for a product falls unexpectedly, food is wasted. What role do agricultural policies and politics play in creating and perpetuating cycles of supply challenges? Our guest today is Dr. Garrett Graddy-Lovelace of American University. Garrett is an agricultural policy expert and she studies the problem of food gluts through the lens of social sciences, international affairs, history and analysis of USDA data. Interview Summary   This podcast is co-sponsored by the Recipes Food Waste Research Network led by American University and funded by the National Science Foundation.   Norbert: Garrett, from your perspective, why do you think a historical policy analysis is useful in discussions of contemporary issues of food waste and loss?   It's a crucial question. The current situation of wasted food is uniquely contemporary and it's unprecedented, but its root causes have long roots. On one hand, there's a complicated but telling geography kind of spatial aspect to the wasted food fiasco we're in. We have vast global supply chains with pinch points of precarity. There are so few processors to butcher and process such vast quantities of meat. So few mega ports for all of these millions of shipping containers. So few companies owning all these markets and so few grain storage facilities for these mountains of corn and soy. So it's a spatial situation. But, it is also a historical situation. There are conditions and incentives driving commodity crop production and overproduction right now that have deep roots in US history, in global history, even in colonial history. So historical perspectives are crucial to help tell the why and the how. The current situation in configuration might seem natural or inevitable, but unpacking how we got here helps us understand, dismantle and reconfigure the policies, political economies and paradigms that got us in to this mess.   Brenna: Those are really interesting perspectives, Garrett, and I'm looking forward to hearing more. So since we are on the topic of policy now, how do you think Ag policy and particularly the Farm Bill has shaped or created food waste?   Good question. So the broader World Trade Organization began in the mid '90s and it's an extension of the general agreement on tariffs and trades, which was the Bretton Woods's Post World War II, World War I set of international governance paradigms. It really liberalized agricultural trade and arguably neoliberalized it. And so it set in motion a whole situation that we're in now which deregulated national and federal government policies around supply coordination, supply management. So from the mid '90s on, you've got a set of policies around the world that really opened up trade. But, it also opened up the incentives to compete with each other around the world. So farmers were competing with each other in this arguably race to the bottom of farm gate prices, which incentivized cycles of overproduction that we're in now. The policy shifts that happened domestically, and all of these countries around the world, emerged from the paradigms of the mid '90s. The WTO and the broader focused on moving enormous quantities of commodity crops around the world in a comparative advantage model. But it ended up creating enormous quantities of food circulating around the world that then is very conducive to supply chain gluts and to pinch points where there are blocks and a precarity that we're in now.   Norbert: Thank you for that. I would love for you to point out one particular historical policy that you think is critical for us to understand this.   The elimination of export subsidies was crucial and many of the intentions behind what ended up becoming the WTO were actually about decreasing dumping. So the anti-dumping measures are so crucial as a broader paradigm and a governance goal. But as you know better than others as Ag economists, the loopholes allowed for some countries like the US to continue overproducing a certain commodity crop and then offshoring it through complicated ways that were not explicit subsidization of exports. So the ending of export subsidies is a universal good, but it did not end the broader problem. And obviously, this is a exceptionally complicated topic, but the broader question of policy needs to be contextualized within political economy. So there's a set of political economies at work that we're in now, which gives inordinate power to private industry in terms of input suppliers and in terms of commodity crop purchasers. As a result, the situation we're in now is that you have a handful of firms who are price setters and they can really decide the price of inputs and the farm gate price of various commodity crops. And the broader configuration is that farmers are squeezed around the world with expectations and incentives of expensive input purchases, annually purchased inputs, and then farm gate prices that don't cover the cost of the production. So that's a political economic situation. The question is what's the role of policy? I think what's interesting for me and for Norbert and for others in our research team is that there's a long history of policies, governmental policies particularly in the United States, that have attempted to protect farmers from this squeeze. This treadmill of buying more inputs and trying to sell more and growing more to cover the cost of what they've invested in that particular season. And, it lends itself to overproduction unless there's a way to mitigate that kind of treadmill cycle of overproduction. So, the policies that we're interested in began in the 1920s and the 1930s which we'll talk about with the Agricultural Adjustment Act. They really were ended in the WTO in a convoluted way in the attempt to end trade distortions. There was a way in which the corporate interests or the private firms gained even more power and say in the broader trade and agricultural economics and practices around the world. I think the WTO is so fascinating because the intentions behind it are truly important. And many of the measures like the anti-dumping and the ending of subsidized, explicitly subsidized exports which are so deleterious, so destructive to local farm economies around the world were mitigated, but the loopholes have grown. And actually the disparity between kind of corporate interests and the private firms and farmers themselves, small and medium-sized farmers has grown even more egregious. So, the role of policy in that I think is what we're analyzing today.   Norbert: Garrett, you've done archival work looking at agricultural policy from the Agricultural Adjustment Act, the original Farm Bill legislation from 1933. What has inspired you to see food waste and loss as a critical issue?   It's a great question. The Farm Bill in its current iteration enables and exacerbates wasted food. But it would be, I think, reductive to say it causes it and stop the analysis there. So, this kind of takes some historical analysis. We're going to go back to the archives, but before we do, we kind of think about the 20th century. Over the course of the 20th century, the Farm Bill has become a behemoth mechanism for disposing of surplus commodity crop production. So if you think about Title I, Commodity, and Title II, Conservation, those actually have at their origin - the beating heart of the Farm Bill - an attempt to prevent another great depression economically, that's a commodity title, and another Dust Bowl. That is the environmental impacts of overproduction, Title II, conservation. So there was a supply management coordination attempt to end overproduction and end the price fallout of overproduction woven into the heart of Title I and Title II. Once you get to Title III which is Trade, and you go back to the archives, the justification for Title III was move this surplus. We've got to get rid of this growing pile of surplus. The Commodity Crop Corporation, the broader CCC arm of the government is trying to mitigate overproduction by buying the surplus and getting it off the backs of the farmers. But then it had a huge kind of glut. So trade was a matter of offshoring and offsetting the food aid and the food trade in the 1950s and the 1960s. And then frankly, Title IV nutrition, which has all of these noble crucial intentions of feeding the people actually is a surplus disposal mechanism as well when you look back at the archives. And even Title IX which is Energy, has a surplus disposal mechanism of corn in moving it into bioethanol. So the Farm Bill has kind of hidden overproduction through these surplus disposal mechanisms and not been able to prevent it. And then of course, we get into where we are now where why doesn't the research title fund investigations into wasted food interventions? Why aren't there discussion of composting systems or ecological biodigesters to divert methane from landfills in the research title? So right now, it's more what the Farm Bill doesn't do. It doesn't curtail excessive monopolies in the agrifood sector. It ends up subsidizing them. It doesn't provide nearly enough for regional adaptive supply chains or markets which are much more adaptive to shocks in the system like Ukraine or climate change. So the Farm Bill doesn't do what it needs to do, but it's not the root cause of wasted food.   Brenna: Those are really interesting points that I think many of us at least from an agricultural economist perspective don't necessarily talk about in that way. One thing I wanted to follow up is you mentioned the current Farm Bill doesn't really do much to address food waste. I think the most recent Farm Bill did establish the food waste and loss liaison to try to kickstart some food waste reduction initiatives. So I'm curious just to get your thoughts, would you say that that effort is not nearly enough?   Yes, it's such a good question. So the Miscellaneous Title is the best thing happening in the Farm Bill. All the farmers know and the practitioners and the activists and the scholars. And so, there's an optimistic way you could look at this and say there are such innovative, broadly far-reaching exciting pilot programs tucked into the Miscellaneous Title or even into the Horticultural Title around farmer's markets, around racial justice, around food waste prevention, wasted food prevention. But on a macro level, it's tucked into the Miscellaneous Title, oftentimes with discretionary funding, not mandatory, so you have to fight for it each five years. And the appropriations get divvied out, so it's not rock solid in terms of mandatory appropriations. And so there are wonderful pilot programs that began in the 2018 Farm Bill, frankly, directly because of scholars and activists and civil society clamoring for it. But on the macro level, the bulk of the Farm Bill itself is status quo in terms of commodity crop overproduction when you really kind of see where it's going and it's largely going to ethanol or to concentrated animal feeding operations, CAFOs, or to highly processed additives for foods that aren't nourishing. So yes, it's exciting that there are these micro provisions and there's these pilot programs that are so exciting tucked away into the Miscellaneous Title, but arguably the scale of the problem that we're in now demands a much more transformational approach to the Farm Bill.   Brenna: Thank you so much for weighing in on that. I was excited to hear your thoughts.   Norbert: Garrett, I know that you are committed to social justice, especially around food and agriculture. What is the social equity lens to food waste and loss that you think is important for people to consider?   Thank you for that. So wasted food is a tragedy of squandered farm work, top soil, water, energy, shipping containers, and single-use plastic wrapping. All of the labor, all of the time going into food that ends up becoming methane and egregious climate greenhouse gas. And so I think when we look at this situation, there's an issue of wasted resources, but there's also the injustice of the people who are doing much of the work along that supply chain to get that food to people's table themselves can't afford food. So the inequity, the acute injustice of food insecurity next to and even within the system of wasted food is a disaster. But, it's also defining of a failure of governance and a failure of our research institutions. There are so many smart people in the US, so many expensive labs, so many great research infrastructures and networks. Surely there's a way to coordinate these smart minds into analysis and interventions that prevent wasted food and that move agricultural production to where it needs to go, to hungry mouths and to people's plates and to remunerate food producers fairly for their harvests. So the urgency of wasted food has become one of the defining parts of my research and my teaching in my scholarship. In terms of the history of this, I was fascinated with how surplus is not used as a term. This is something that Norbert and I are researching. Ag economists and Ag policy experts don't use the words overproduction or glut or surplus these days. But if you go back into the archives, it is such a ubiquitous problem that in the archives, it's called the Farm Problem. It's actually just called the Farm Problem and it's the problem of overproduction. And so, a little bit of history here, World War I, there was a whole incentive structure by the US government to feed the allies over in Europe and win the war through wheat production. So all of these farmers in Europe and throughout the Middle East who were part of World War I were in the trenches. They needed wheat. So, the US ramped up wheat production. It actually incentivized farmers to go out into the prairies and dig up those deep-rooted prairie grasses and plant wheat, single season wheat. And prices were good. And so, what do farmers do when prices are good? They grow more. And so, there was more and more production in 1914, 1915, 1916. Then the survivors of World War I crawled out of the trenches, went back to their farms and grew their own wheat. Then there was too much wheat on the global market and prices started to go down. What do farmers do when prices go down? They grow more. So all of a sudden, US farmers were madly ripping up prairie grasses, deep rooted prairie grass, planting more wheat. There was so much wheat on the global market in 1918 that it crashed the prices. There was an agrarian economic crisis in the US in 1919 and 1920, and farmers went to DC and said, "Please help us end this cycle of overproduction. We're competing with ourselves, with each other, our neighbors, and it's suicidal." And so that began the broader political movement to have supply management with the price floor for farmer viability and a way to not overproduce and destroy the soil, which is what led to the Dust Bowl. By the time you get to the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933, you've got a whole system of supply management which was in place. It was dysfunctional. It was not perfect. It largely helped White male farmers and it had some other issues to excluding tenant farmers who were largely Black farmers in the deep south, but as a principle to stave off the ravages of just kind of capitalism unfettered in agriculture, it was important to think about as a precedent. And so, cut to 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, by the 1970s, it's really eroded the supply management and by the 1980s, 1990s, it's gone. By the 1996 Farm Bill, there's hardly any supply management or price floors left. I think what's interesting for us is that there's a powerful precedent from a governance perspective of ways to mitigate cycles of overproduction. Now we're in a situation where there's not only no mechanisms from a policy perspective to mitigate overproduction, it's enabled and totally forgotten. There's really an amnesia about these parody policies, these price floors, these supply managements, these non-recourse loans, these quotas, which again, were not perfect, but they were an honest recognition that you have to have some protection. Otherwise, the corporate buyers and the broader political economy will just drive down the farm gate price and the farmers individually will just overproduce to try to get out and exacerbate the problem. I think looking at the historical origin of the Farm Bill helps us have clues as to how we could update it. How we could expand it. How we could make it more fair for a broader diversity of farmers. How it could apply to much more diverse crops than just these eight commodity crops, these kind of handful of commodity crops that it was designed for. So how could parody pricing and supply management be updated for ecological production, nourishing food production for a whole new generation of BIPOC farmers? I think we're thinking about that history as inspiration for agricultural policies moving forward that coordinate supply and demand more wisely frankly.   Brenna: Those are really interesting perspectives. I had no idea about the Farm Problem language use and I'm really curious to hear more about what you and Norbert are doing and look forward to seeing those results in the future. I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit more about what food waste and loss looks like from an international perspective and what are some of the policies abroad or globally that you think contribute to the wasted food that we see today?   It's a great question, Brenna. I'll preface by saying there are myriad international perspectives. So I certainly don't want to presume to speak on behalf of these international perspectives, but I'll also say that one cannot address this issue from a national perspective alone. One never could, but particularly now because the US agricultural policies and practices and the actual food stuffs and the climate emissions are deeply connected to those around the world and vice versa. There's a dominant political economy that is really impacting farmers and fishers around the world. It's really fascinating that the millions of different agricultural, aqua agricultural food systems around the world are now related to each other through price setting that is globalized and through supply chain pressures. Even at this point, Ag extension and national governments are all working very closely with or for a few set of agro-corporate firms. There is this incredible interconnectedness and interconnectedness sounds great, but in this context, it is an interconnectedness to a set of private industries - Cargill, Archer-Daniels-Midland, Walmart, PepsiCo, Monsanto, Bayer - input suppliers and corporate buyers. They have inordinate influence on national governments and agricultural extensions and ministries of Ag around the world. And philanthropy - the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation - which is technically a philanthropic organization, but has deep ties to private industry from the standpoint of Microsoft data and agricultural data. Which is, frankly, as farmers say around the world, "my data is worth more than my product." There's an enormous political economy of agricultural data at work right now. So there is an interconnectedness around the world that we need to analyze.   There's also a set of political economies and paradigms around the world that are very powerful. A model of development that is so pervasive around the world is that there is, underdeveloped or developed, there is a paradigm or an expectation that farmers around the world will want to and need to industrialize their respective farms. And that expectation, that model or that paradigm demeans or denigrates a whole set of agricultures around the world that are small scale and that are low input and that are biodiverse and that are not export oriented. That are oriented toward feeding local farmer's markets or local village markets or local families or networks. So there's a systemic devaluation of farming practices that are oriented toward local or regional production that have agro-biodiversity at their heart, that have semi-subsistence or low input agricultural models at their heart. A systemic glorification of very high input, intensive export-oriented commodity crop monocultural overproduction. So that paradigm makes its way into Ag extension agents, makes its way into philanthropic donations, makes its way into agricultural aid, agricultural development funding. And that paradigm is global. Every village around the world is either internalizing the inferiority of their small-scale production and their biodiverse production or resisting it, frankly. There's a whole global movement that's resisting that paradigm and says actually a climate-resilient future would need to have agroecological production grounded in Indigenous and African diaspora foodways. A lot of culturally-specific, place-based agrarian knowledge, which is not necessarily export-oriented though it could be, but is more geared toward feeding or nourishing local villages or communities or networks. There is a whole global movement of farmers and farm coalitions that say why denigrate that as underdeveloped? Why not celebrate that as actually the future of climate-resilient, climate-just agroecological production.   Brenna: Garrett, I know that you are committed to social justice, especially around food and agriculture. So what is the social equity lens to food waste and loss that you think is really important for people to consider?   So thank you for that. I'll say the first one is that there is food insecurity. There's hunger in the system that's producing wasted food and that, as I've said before, is a tragedy and an injustice and a failure of research and governance to think through how we can prevent that. And, how we can move nourishing food to people who need it and while remunerating the farmers and the food providers and the fishers for the beautiful work of feeding people. So that's the most acute level. But I also want to say, getting back to history, I know that's one of the themes of today, looking at histories of policies are so important. The archives have so much to teach us. But also elders and farmer elders around the world have so much to teach us. So oral history is a methodology that I love and I respect and I use and particularly Indigenous and African diaspora and immigrant elders in the US who have such knowledge of agrarian practices, of agroecological production, of seed saving, of foodways, of nourishing foodways, of climate-resilient foodways. Those sets of knowledges have been frankly systematically devalued by academia - by my institutions - as underdeveloped or as passe or as irrelevant. But in fact, as climate crisis encroaches, those knowledges of how to forage in the forest, how to grow nourishing gardens, how to grow agrobiodiverse farms, how to raise livestock breeds, heritage breeds, these knowledges that have been devalued frankly along gender and class and racial lines need to be celebrated. There's an epistemic inequity at work in our current situation where the real knowledges of how to grow nourishing food and provide nourishing food have been devalued when right now we need those knowledges more than ever. So there's a whole reevaluation and reclamation of agrarian place-based agroecological knowledge that I think will help us, not just prevent wasted food and really re-localize and re-regionalize supply chains and markets and economies and ecologies, but also help us provide nourishing food for communities in a climate-resilient and climate-just way.   Bio:   Garrett Graddy-Lovelace researches and teaches agricultural policy and agrarian politics. A critical geographer, she draws upon political ecology and decolonial studies to research agricultural biodiversity conservation, agrarian cooperatives, land use decisions, and domestic and global impacts of US farm policies. This includes community-based research-action with grassroots groups on the Farm Bill (see disparitytoparity.org project). Her forthcoming book, The Power of Seeds & Politics of Agricultural Biodiversity, is with M.I.T. Press. She is co-PI for a SESYNC-NSF Pursuit, entitled "Diverse Pathways to Nourishment: Understanding How Agricultural Biodiversity Enhances Food Security, Sovereignty and Nutrition" and Senior Personnel for AU's $15M NSF RECIPES grant on Wasted Food. She was awarded the inaugural Provost Associate Professor title, the 2022 School of International Scholar-Teacher of the Year Award, and the SIS Excellence in PhD Mentoring Award. Graddy-Lovelace co-founded and co-leads School of International Service's Ethnographies of Empire Research Cluster, and the nation-wide Agroecology Research-Action Collective. She is a Faculty Affiliate for AU's Antiracist Research & Policy Center and Associate Director for the new Center for Environment, Community & Equity. Additionally, she works on and for open knowledge and Indigenous data sovereignty.