Podcasts about Bates

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  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Bates

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Latest podcast episodes about Bates

Deadtime Stories
Chapter 74: Mother Knows Best (Part Two)

Deadtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:48


Whelp we're still stuck in Plainfield and little Eddie Gein's all grown up now. Trust me you do not want to miss the exciting conclusion to his story. Much like Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho shocked the audience, you might be surprised by today's ending. I know I was shocked when I was researching it!Written and narrated by Schuyler Fastenau and executive produced by Daniel Jones. Additional voices by Tamara Perry, Jordan Katcher, Janette Zosche, Taylor Shurte, Jeremy Staple, Daniel Jones, and Gabriel Rivers. Cover artwork by Catherine Fastenau. Theme music by Tracy Zales. Editing and sound design by Brian Campbell.Follow us on:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/OGDeadtimeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theoriginaldeadtimestories/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadtimeStoriesPodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadtimeThe

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Ironman Events This Week

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 39:48


Any given weekend there are half a dozen IRONMAN races.  What is driving the weekly surplus of IRONMAN races?  How are they not canalizing themselves?  How can a single island support both IRONMAN and CHALLENGE races on the same day?  Speaking of big races on the same weekend, we are also discussing the Boston and Chicago Marathons that just happened this past weekend.  Plus "Remote Racing" by RemoteRacing.com and USAT.   Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible. Venga CBD is not like most CBD companies. Venga was started in Colorado by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster. That's why they created a SYSTEM of CBD products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. I use it every day in one form or another! Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life from training to racing to recovery.  All Venga CBD products are 100% THC Free and water soluble! Save a whopping 30% off & get free shipping when you buy the Venga Endurance System versus buying the products separately  - seriously, this is the best deal on the market. Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Discussion IRONMAN Races This Weekend and Next - Are there too many? Endurance News Chicago (Oct 10) and Boston (Oct 11) Marathon Results Remote National Championship, RemoteRacing.com and RaceX What's new in the 303 Utah's Unique Mountain Bike Hut System Unites a Group of Colorado Cyclists Behind the Scenes with Racing Underground Video of the Week Justin Metzler doing Ironman California   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance! You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Discussion: Upcoming IRONMAN Races - Too Many? IRONMAN Races Next Two Weekends 10/16: 70.3 and 140.6 Alcúdia-Mallorca Spain (east) 10/16: Challenge Peguera Mallorca (west) 77k away 10/17: AZ 70.3 10/23: NC 70.3, 140.6 Portugal, 140.6 Waco 10/24: 70.3 Portugal, 70.3 Greece Costa Navarino, 70.3 Waco, 70.3 Sardegna, 140.6 California   IRONMAN California IM California (ironman.com) American River (Folsom), CA water temperature in October (seatemperature.info) Ironman California 2021 (MPRO-only, Oct 24th) – Entry List | TriRating   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   2021 Boston Marathon results: The winners list and official times Men's race: Benson Kipruto won his first Boston Marathon after finishing 10th in 2019. Kipruto made a decisive move in Mile 23, running it in just 4:29. He then upped the tempo in Mile 24 (4:25), finishing with an average mile pace of 4:58 and a 46-second margin of victory. Benson Kipruto (2:09:51) Lemi Berhanu (2:10:37) Jemal Yimer (2:10:38)   Women's race: Diana Chemtai Kipyogei won her first Boston Marathon after withstanding a late charge from 2017 champion Edna Kiplagat. Kipyogei pulled away from Netsanet Gudeta at Mile 23. Diana Chemtai Kipyogei (2:24:45) Edna Kiplagat (2:25:09) Mary Ngugi (2:25:20)   2021 Chicago Marathon Results and Tracking: How To Track Runners For The 2021 Chicago Marathon - LetsRun.com Top 10 Men's Tura Abdiwak, Seifu (ETH) 02:06:12 – 0:06:28 (2:06:12) Rupp, Galen (USA) 02:06:35 – 0:06:42 (2:06:35) Kiptanui, Eric (KEN) 02:06:51 – 0:06:46 (2:06:51)   Top 10 Women Chepngetich, Ruth (KEN) 02:22:31 – 0:08:11 (2:22:31) Bates, Emma (USA) 02:24:20 – 0:07:33 (2:24:20) Hall, Sara (USA) 02:27:19 – 0:08:04 (2:27:19)   https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Triathlon/Remote-National-Championships USA Triathlon has partnered with RemoteRacing™ to host the first first Remote National Championships, an opportunity for athletes from across the United States to compete for an Olympic and sprint-distance national championship regardless of where they live and train. Using RaceX's RemoteRacing™, results are normalized to create a fair and level playing field and final results are localized to the course at the 2021 Age Group National Championships in Milwaukee. Finish times for all athletes will be as if everyone was competing on the same course, in the same climate, on the same day. RemoteRacing™ accounts for both environment and terrain, including heat, humidity, wind, elevation, and elevation gain. What is equalized? Results are equalized for both age and gender, so you can get a true sense of how you stack up. Note: RaceX is a sister company to TriDot.  Amazing software that solves a lot of problems with training.  Listen to episode 299 for more on that topic, and tune in in a couple weeks for our interview with Matt Bach from TriDot.   Event Details Dates – November 11–21 (registration opens October 7) Format – Sprint and Olympic distances   Cost – $45 for athletes who register by Oct. 21 and $50 starting on Oct. 22. A portion of the proceeds will support USA Triathlon Foundation's mission to transform lives through sport by opening pathways for all to swim, bike, and run. Qualification – No qualification is required to compete and competing in the event does not qualify you for anything, including 2022 Toyota Age Group National Championships nor Team USA. This event also does not earn you points toward your ranking. This competition is solely for bragging rights (and fun awards!). Race Format and Rules The Race Window will open at 12:01am CT, Thursday, November 11, 2021, and close at 6:00pm CT, Sunday, November 21, 2021. Race activities must be done in swim, bike, run order. Swim – Swims must be done in standard-length pools (25 yards, 25 meters, 50 meters) due to inconsistent access to open water for many athletes and inaccurate results from open-water swims due to various water conditions. Athletes may complete their swim at any time during the Race Window prior to starting their bike or run. T1 – The time between the swim and bike is unregulated due to inconsistent pool accessibility and proximity to adequate bike and run route Bike – The bike may be completed indoors or outdoors either with or without a bike power sensor. Differences in power sensor accuracy ratings is handled automatically by the system. T2 – The run must start within 10 minutes of finishing the bike Run – The run must be done outdoors Register today! For more details, please visit RemoteRacing.com.   What's New in the 303: Deb Connelly, Running Hall of Fame, Denver Athletic Club Deb Conley started running for the first time the summer before attending the University of Colorado at Boulder. She ran just to run with a new boyfriend. Like three miles. A couple of months later she walked on to CU's cross country team and has been running ever since. And just recently, she was inducted into the Colorado Running Hall of Fame. Wow. She never played sports growing up, never ran, never did anything but work and go to school. In this video interview, Deb expresses a surprised happiness after being selected for the Colorado Running Hall of Fame. But she also shares something vulnerable; how running in college was the first time she ever experienced feeling truly happy.  Whats not really discussed, is the rocky and almost impossible path she took to get here. If you knew Deb in high school you probably would never have foreseen her making the Colorado Running H.O.A.  But like 99% of her classmates, I had no idea how hard her life was until we reconvened about this honor almost 40 years later. My high school experience differed greatly from Deb's even though we both went to Wheat Ridge and graduated in 1983. I played sports, didn't work, had a car, stayed busy with practices and homework and hanging out with friends. Admittedly, I led the “Leave it Beaver” lifestyle (yes I'm dating myself), like a good chunk of my fellow “Farmers” (our mascot). Deb, living just a few miles away lived in poverty. Her mom forged her birth certificate when she was 13 so she could work. Her bed was an old army cot. They had no refrigerator and the house was in disrepair. Her parents didn't want her to go to college but rather help with the other kids. There was no modeling of “success” or “ambition” in her home. Yet she excelled at school and knew she had to figure out a way to go to college. She admittedly didn't understand true happiness and felt lonely. Her friend and fellow classmate, Chris Tomlinson, one of the few who knew of Deb's tough childhood said, “she was very smart, but seemed anxious and isolated. It seemed touch and go for her.”   Wendy Koenig A middle distance runner, Wendy Koenig competed seven times for the United States in international dual meets. She was a three-time AIAW Champion, in 1975 in the 880 yards, and in 1976 at both 800 and 1,500 metres. Koenig also won three AAU titles, outdoors in the 1973 880 and in 1976 in the 1,500, and indoors in the 1979 800. On 24 March 1973, she set one of the very early world records for the 400 hurdles with 59.08, the first woman to run the event under one minute. Koenig ran for Colorado State University, and competed at the 1972 Olympics as Wendy Koenig and the 1976 Olympics as Wendy Knudson. Personal Bests: 440y – 54.60 (1975); 800 – 1:59.91 (1976); 1500 – 4:21.80 (1976); Mile – 4:47.7i (1976); 3000 – 9:49.0 (1976); 2 Miles – 10:34.0 (1976); 100H – 14.8 (1971); 400H – 59.08 (1973); HJ – 5-5 [1.65] (1974); LJ – 19-10¾i [6.06] (1979); Pen - 4167 (1971).     Utah's Unique Mountain Bike Hut System Unites a Group of Colorado Cyclists Posted on October 12, 2021 By Bill Plock In south central Utah surrounded by National Parks, ancient river beds and views of what was once the floor of a great sea bed, lies a system of huts sheltering mountain bikers as they wind through the Escalante Plateau. The area, more than twice the size of Rhode Island is bordered by Zion, Bryce, Capitol Reef National Parks and Lake Powell. It offers a huge variety of terrain tempting all levels of cyclists to explore the high deserts, deep canyons, daunting plateaus and sandy washout basins.  Coming from Colorado, a beautiful drive takes you from Green River, Utah southwest to the town of Escalante where the 190 mile Aquarius Trail Hut System ends. When you arrive, someone from Aquarius takes you and your bike West to Brian Head where the adventure begins. The “huts” are shipping containers repurposed and carved up to make sleeping accommodations and a kitchen for 12 cyclists. As Jared Fisher, owner of Escape Adventures, who dreamed up this hut system says, “It's like putting together a lego house. It takes four containers to make a “hut” and we cut them, install windows and doors and add the bunks and appliances.” The huts are “off the grid” operating by solar and propane complete with compostable toilets and showers. When all the expenses are accounted for, a hut will cost about $200,000 to build and install. They are serviced by staff each day bringing in fresh food, linens, and fuel. Scattered on the Escalante Plateau National Monument, the huts are a welcome reprieve from some challenging days on single track and dirt roads taking riders up epic climbs to amazing views. They are fully stocked with gourmet food, snacks, beverages, water, showers and everything to make it as comfortable as possible. Guest can cook on the grills outside and cozy up to fire pits to take the high desert chill away. The group I joined is mostly from Colorado and gather once in a while at destinations like this. They had a sag truck to carry some provisions and the group dog. All seemed to love the hut and the route and the abundance of food and snacks. Said one rider, “they even have Peanut M&M's” which seemed to be an important provision. The daily routes are between 25 and 40 miles with options for longer treks to scenic spots. After the group breakfast, riders had all day to make it to the next hut and when possible the sag truck would park somewhere in between with refreshments. Said Jeff Oehm of Lakewood, “The huts are well thought out and stocked with good food and comfortable beds. The trails and roads were great and very challenging in places. This part of Utah is stunning and so uncrowded, was well worth the drive from Denver.” Fisher's company provides destination, endurance oriented travel experiences all over the world and discovered this area about 10 years. He lives in Las Vegas, operates three bike shops and has built a company revolving around the bike. It took a while to get the permits to start installing the huts and connecting the trails. He said, “Covid actually helped push this project to the finish as the Forest Service was able to re-evaluate the situation and we got approval last year. This is our first year of operations and it's gone very well. We have accommodated over 500 cyclists this summer. Any tour operator would be happy with that I think.” The experience can be customized to accommodate a private group or open to a single rider with a variety of diets and food preferences. They also have bikes, and e-bikes for rent.   Upcoming Guests Matt Bach from TriDot Jared Fisher Escape Adventures   Video Of The Week Deb Conley--Talks about her amazing journey landing her in the Colorado Running Hall of Fame   I'm doing IRONMAN CALIFORNIA - Justin Metzler   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

I'll Buy the Popcorn Podcast
Downton Abbey - S3E7

I'll Buy the Popcorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:00


Mr. Bates is free! Edith has a job prospect! Baby Sybil is baptized a Catholic! It's one of the best episodes we've seen so far.

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network
BRIGHT SIDE HOME THEATER:

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 79:41


What is HDR?Are there any clear examples of HDR vs SDR?How is the DTSX sound?All great questions. DJ does a deep dive into Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho from 1960 in 4K and has some answers to all of that and more!  Push play and to hear about one of the finest movies ever made.  PODCAST Time StampsPsycho 4K Review - 1:59Scene Reviews- 6:24To Help Support the Podcast you can sign up for a Monthly Donation HERE to become a Patreon Member

Make Maine Your Home
Little Ivy Colleges in MAINE

Make Maine Your Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:24


In this week's episode we are going to talk about Maine's little Ivy Colleges. While there are over 50 Colleges in Maine we wanted to focus in on three little Ivy Colleges. First we talk about Bates College located in Lewiston Maine. Bates offers Bachelor of Arts Degrees, they have amazing facilities and great programs! Next we talk about Bowdoin College located in Brunswick. This college also focuses on Liberal Arts, and 30 plus degrees! All located in the beautiful town of Brunswick Maine! Last but not least we talk about Colby College located in Waterville! With its 54 plus different majors offered Colby is an amazing school to attend in Maine. So let me know if you have any other questions about these schools? Are you looking at a different school or want us to do a longer video on one of them let us know in the comments! And remember if you Make Maine Your Home, you don't have to do it alone!View the blog post on my website... XXXXXTo checkout listings all over southern Maine visit: https://www.makemaineyourhome.realestate/You can listen to the audio podcast on any podcast app.  Just search for Make Maine Your Home. Be sure to subscribe, like, share and tell your friends. To contact Doug you can call or text to 207-838-5593, email to doug@makemaineyourhome.com or check out http://www.MakeMaineYourHome.com.,mainepodcast ,mainevideopodcast ,realestate ,liveinmaine ,maine ,lovemaine ,portlandmaine ,southportlandmaine ,capeelizabeth ,scarboroughmaine ,falmouthmaine ,westbrookmaine ,mainevideo ,buyahome ,sellahome ,homesforsale ,homevalue ,homeprices ,whatsmyhouseworth ,mainecoast, Litte Ivy Colleges in MAINE,the best colleges in maine,colby college in maine,bates college in maine,bowdoin college in maine,colleges in maine,best colleges in new england,colleges in brunswick maine,colleges in waterville maine,colleges in lewiston maine,little ivy colleges,ivy league reaction,are there good colleges in maine,are there liberal arts colleges in maine,best liberal arts colleges in maine,best liberal arts colleges,top colleges in maine

Noontime Sports Podcast
Brendan Costa (Bates College Quarterback)

Noontime Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:22


Bates College quarterback Brendan Costa joined Matt Noonan for a brand new Noontime Sports Podcast -- yes, it is Friday, so that means it is a "Football Friday" Podcast. On today's show, Costa and Noonan discuss his team's exciting win over Tufts University last weekend, which resulted in the Bates signal-caller earned the New England Gold Helmet (for Division II/III). Additionally, the two discuss Costa's final season with the Bobcats, which happens to be this fall, and his team's upcoming matchup on Saturday, October 16 against Trinity College. Stay connected with Noontime Sports on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, as well as follow us on Instagram at @NoontimeNation --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noontime-sports/support

No Higher Calling
Ep 46- Saturating Our Homes with God‘s Word with Erin Bates Paine

No Higher Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:21


Erin Bates Paine joins me on this episode to talk about the importance of saturating our homes with God's Word. No matter what we face, God's Word always has the answers that our hearts need. Erin shares how God used a trial to give her an intensity about abiding in Scripture, praying Scripture over her marriage and children, and filling her children's hearts with God's truth. She walks through why memorizing Scripture is important and ways she has incorporated Scripture memorization in her home.  As Erin sought to saturate her home, marriage, and motherhood with Scripture, God led to her create a resource to help accomplish this goal. She discusses ABC cards that have verses for children to memorize that correspond with character traits they should be growing in. This is a wonderful tool to help you use the Bible as you train and discipline, and as you seek to let God's Word take root in the hearts of your children. She also has shares about a set of 30 Bible promise cards for women to pray and claim.  Resources:  chadanderin.com (You can find Erin's ABC and Promise Cards under the store tab) Pray Big for Your Marriage Praying the Bible by Donald Whitney   Follow Brettnay's motherhood journey by subscribing to this podcast. You can also follow her at www.instagram.com/nohighercalling_, No Higher Calling Facebook Page and www.nohighercalling.org 

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast
Episode 371: Haunt

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 92:02


As the days of the calendar pass, Halloween creeps closer and closer our coverage of movies that take place on Halloween night continues. This week we are partaking in one of the great Halloween traditions — we are going to … Continue reading → The post Episode 371: Haunt appeared first on The Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast.

Deadtime Stories
Chapter 73: Mother Knows Best (Part One)

Deadtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:11


Today's episode finds us in Plainfield, Wisconsin. It seems to be a sleepy little town where everyone gets along with their neighbors...unless your neighbor happens to be the Gein family. Augusta Gein is a very religious woman and if you drink, swear, or wear clothing she deems too skimpy, you're a dirty sinner. One could say she's a lot like Mrs. Bates from Psycho. Could her son be on the same level as Norman Bates? Let's listen and find out!Written and narrated by Schuyler Fastenau and executive produced by Daniel Jones. Additional voices by Tamara Perry, Jordan Katcher, Janette Zosche, Taylor Shurte, Jeremy Staple, Daniel Jones, and Gabriel Rivers. Cover artwork by Catherine Fastenau. Theme music by Tracy Zales. Editing and sound design by Brian Campbell.Follow us on:Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/OGDeadtimeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theoriginaldeadtimestories/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadtimeStoriesPodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadtimeThe

The Modesty Files
#33: Or Your Girlfriend: Alex's Coming Out Journey with a Life Shaped Through Bob Jones University

The Modesty Files

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:46


On today's show, we're speaking with Alex, a woman who was raised in United Pentecostal Church International. She attended an Independent Fundamentalist Baptist school whose practices were heavily influenced by its neighbor, Bob Jones University. She frequently visited the campus for sports and music recitals, and had to follow all of the required rules. Alex is going to share with us what religious practices she followed growing up and how breaking away from the church allowed her to embrace her sexuality as a queer woman.Support us on Patreon! patreon.com/themodestyfilesFollow us on Instagram @themodestyfiles for updates and bonus content.

Future is Bright?
Ep. 57 The Murder of Kelly Anne Bates

Future is Bright?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:24


Welcome back to the Future is Bright? This week Lindsay tells Bridget about the awful murder of Kelly Ann Bates. This is a huge TRIGGER WARNING for a lot of gruesome and horrible thing that happened to 17 year old Kelly Ann Bates. She thought she was getting into a normal relationship but James "David" Patterson had other plans. Grab a support blanket or something when listening because this is a rough one.  P.S. we talk about the Gabby Petito case in this but recorded it prior to the new knowledge of her cause of death being released. Her cause of death was strangulation and she was dead for at least 3-4 weeks before being found.  FIB Podcast Check out our Instagram @fibpodcast. Like and follow our Facebook page @futureisbrightpod. Follow us on TIk Tok @fibpodcast! Please download, like, follow, and leave us a review it really helps out the show! If you have any suggestions for stories or person stories email us at futureisbrightpod@gmail.com Check out our network Podmoth and all the lovely podcast on there! https://podmoth.network --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 240: Football gets a big win at Tufts

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:58


This week on the Bobcast we're talking about the football team's 33-10 win at Tufts. Plus, the nationally ranked cross country teams continue to dominate and a trio of women's golfers qualified for the NESCAC Championships this spring. Hear from our student-athletes and coaches on the only podcast dedicated to Bates athletics!  Interviews this episode: 1:08 -- Ed Argast, Interim Head Coach, Football. 6:54 -- Spencer Adams '23, Linebacker, Football. (NESCAC Defensive Player of the Week) 12:52 -- Brendan Costa '22 (Male Bobcat of the Week) and Sean Bryant '23, Quarterback and Wide Receiver, Football. 23:53 -- Isabel May '24, Women's Cross Country. (Female Bobcat of the Week) 29:50 -- Andrew Mottur '25, Men's Cross Country. 40:03 -- Nerea Barranco Aramburu '25, Alex Voight-Shelley '24 and Maddy Kwei '25, Women's Golf.

Trade Secret
The Censorship – Jamie Bates Slone and Shoji Satake

Trade Secret

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:09


Ever wonder why some things are banned on social media and other content isn't? Or why art history is full of nude imagery, but we don't celebrate it in the media now? Shoji Satake and Jamie Bates Slone talk about how censorship affects their practice and how it has both promoted and hindered their reach to the general public. Skutt is a proud sponsor of Trade Secret. Skutt Ceramic Products has been manufacturing equipment for Potters since 1953. Skutt's reputation as a pioneer in innovative kiln design continues with the 4th generation of this family-owned Business. Their KilnMaster Touchscreen controller offers a sleek, smartphone like interface, that is intuitive and packed with powerful tools that allow potters to easily program, diagnose and remotely monitor their kilns. With 5 dedicated kiln technicians on staff and the most comprehensive network of distributors across the globe, you can be assured that Skutt will be there for you before and after the sale. For more information on their line of kilns visit www.skutt.com.

Building PA Podcast
The future of architecture

Building PA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:53


As the former international president of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and a current adjunct professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, William Bates joined the Building PA Podcast to discuss the future of architecture.  Before we discuss the future, Bates shared insight into his tenure with the AIA and discussed best practices from his time traveling the world to promote the architecture industry.  As an industry leader, Bates has seen his fair share of change and challenges, but as a professor, he discusses his success tips, which include taking pride in the work, following trends, understanding the estimating and construction management process, and acknowledging how these components are assembled to complete a successful project.Bates also shared his recommendations for future generations of architects.  Bates strongly encourages the next generation to work in construction during the summer months of college to understand the skills and training that are required.  He said, “future architects need to understand how a contractor not only builds but how the pre-construction phase impacts a project.”Listen in as Bates talks about the future of the industry related to retail space, general building, and the technologies he anticipates will become indispensable.

GoTigers247's Tigers in 20
Off the Boards: NBA Draft Analyst Matt Babcock discusses Memphis' high level of talent

GoTigers247's Tigers in 20

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:42


In this episode of Off the Boards, host and lead writer Christian Fowler is joined by Basketball News' Senior NBA Draft Analyst Matt Babcock to discuss Memphis' pro day, Jalen Duren, Emoni Bates and much more. Babcock was in attendance for the pro day earlier this week and was able to watch the entire Tigers' roster firsthand. In 2019, Babcock was at Memphis for the pro day with James Wiseman and Precious Achiuwa, and he begins the episode by talking about the differences and similarities between the two teams. Next, he breaks down what he saw from Duren and Bates and explains how both can be very high picks in the draft. Babcock currently has Duren as his No. 4 overall prospect for the 2022 NBA Draft, and he said he feels very confident in that ranking. After the discussion on Duren and Bates, Babcock gives his insight and opinion on Lester Quinones, DeAndre Williams, Landers Nolley, Earl Timberlake, Josh Minott, John Camden and Johnathan Lawson. With the season coming soon, Babcock said he will be keeping a very close eye on this Memphis team and its potential NBA prospects. Following his visit to Memphis, Babcock wrote about his time in the Bluff City and the pro day. For all of his thoughts in a very well-written article, you can click here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Manuscript Academy
Agents, Illustrators, and Nurturing Creative Collaboration with Author Janet Costa Bates

The Manuscript Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 24:50


We are so happy to welcome Janet Costa Bates, award-winning author of several titles including, most recently, the picture book Time for Bed, Old House. We talk about Impostor Syndrome, selling books with *and* without an agent, and collaborating with your creative partners (wait until you hear how well her illustrator tapped into her story). And, yes, Julie met Janet at SCBWI Whispering Pines the same year Jessica was there--and this was also the site of Janet's life-changing meeting with editor Christian Trimmer. Janet Costa Bates is the author of picture book TIME FOR BED, OLD HOUSE which received starred reviews from the School Library Journal, Kirkus Reviews, and the Bulletin for the Center of Children's Books. She drew inspiration from her Cape Verdean-American background to write her first picture book, SEASIDE DREAM, winner of a Lee and Low New Voices Honor Award as well her RICA BAPTISTA chapter book series, to be published by Candlewick Press starting in Fall 2022. She lives in Massachusetts with her family. www.janetcostabates.com

Thyroid Warrior Podcast
Social Determinants of Health...an Example 145

Thyroid Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:42


Today's episode is giving you an actual example of how social determinants of health can impact someone's care.   For me, we have to have a more broad conversation about care. It's not solely on race. If we could focus more on how similar we are despite our experiences and differences.   Yes, health disparities exist.    Yes, minority populations are usually impacted by these structural issues.   However,   WE have all struggled with access to care.   WE come from different backgrounds and have had poor experiences in getting to appointments.   WE have all struggled with watching loved ones get sick because they can't afford their medications.   The question is how do WE work TOGETHER to help each other MORE?   Resources Marmot, Michael, and Ruth Bell. “Social Inequalities in Health: a Proper Concern of Epidemiology.” Annals of Epidemiology, Elsevier, 3 Mar. 2016, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1047279716300400.  Healthy People. “Social Determinants of Health.” Social Determinants of Health | Healthy People 2020, www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-of-health.  Eighty-Six Percent of Primary Care Patients Believe Racism Is Impacting Their Health.” Primary Care Collaborative, 22 July 2020, www.pcpcc.org/2020/06/10/eighty-six-percent-primary-care-patients-believe-racism-impacting-their-health.  Evans, Michele K., et al. “Diagnosing and Treating Systemic Racism: NEJM.” New England Journal of Medicine, 17 June 2020, www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2021693.  PatientEngagementHIT. “Patients, Providers Reflect on Racism as Public Health Crisis.” PatientEngagementHIT, 15 June 2020, patientengagementhit.com/news/patients-providers-reflect-on-racism-as-public-health-crisis.  Nolen, LaShyra, et al. “How Medical Education Is Missing the Bull's-Eye: NEJM.” New England Journal of Medicine, 25 June 2020, www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1915891?query=recirc_mostViewed_railB_article.  Wakefield, Emily O, et al. “Describing Perceived Racial Bias Among Youth With Sickle Cell Disease.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 17 Mar. 2018, academic.oup.com/jpepsy/article/43/7/779/4942298.  Betancourt, Joseph R. “Cultural Competence And Health Care Disparities: Key Perspectives And Trends.” Health Affairs, 2005, www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.24.2.499.  Henderson, Saras, et al. “Cultural Competence in Healthcare in the Community: A Concept Analysis.” Wiley Online Library, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 7 Mar. 2018, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/hsc.12556.  Rukhsana Ahmed & Benjamin R. Bates (2017) Patients' fear of physicians and perceptions of physicians' cultural competence in healthcare, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 10:1, 55-60, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2017.1287389  Joseph R. Betancourt, Alexander R. Green. “Defining Cultural Competence: A Practical Framework for Addressing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care - Joseph R. Betancourt, Alexander R. Green, J. Emilio Carrillo, Owusu Ananeh-Firempong, 2003.” SAGE Journals, 1 July 2003, journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1093/phr/118.4.293.  Crawford, Dana E., et al. “‘LET UP': A Systematic Approach to Responding to Cultural Bias in Health Care.” ZERO TO THREE, vol. 40, no. 2, Nov. 2019, pp. 10–17. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip,shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1244159&site=ehost-live&scope=site.  Place, Not Race: Disparities Dissipate In Southwest Baltimore When Blacks And Whites Live Under Similar Conditions 

Insurance Town
Devon Bates - Mergers and Acquisitions

Insurance Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:23


This week the mayor sat down with good buddy Devon Bates of Oak Street Funding and talked M&A's. Devon took a walk down memory lane with me , we then talked about mergers and Acquisitions, she gave great advice , we talked about all things aquisitions on this episode. 

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast
Episode 370: Trick or Treats

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 68:56


Flashback to the early 80s – Halloween is still a growing holiday; slasher films have found their footing and are dominating the horror scene — most of them a copy of the uber-successful slasher prototype, Halloween. But none of them … Continue reading → The post Episode 370: Trick or Treats appeared first on The Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast.

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 239: The Height of Fall Sports

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 65:25


This week we've got a jam packed Bobcast, including interviews with student-athletes and coaches from EIGHT different sports. It's the height of fall sports season and we've got it all covered, on the Bates Bobcast!  Interviews this episode: 1:14 -- Custavious Patterson, Senior Associate Head Coach and Offensive Coordinator, Football. 12:24 -- Curtis Johnson, Head Coach, Men's Cross Country. 20:19 -- Jillian Richardson '23, Women's Cross Country (Female Bobcat of the Week and NESCAC Cross Country Runner of the Week). 26:04 -- Bruce David '25, Men's Soccer Goalkeeper (Male Bobcat of the Week). 32:43 -- Kat Nuckols '22, Women's Soccer Goalkeeper. 38: 10 -- Emma Eide '24, Volleyball Setter. 44:36 -- Alex Voight-Shelley '24, Women's Golf. 49:18 -- Anna Rozin '22, Women's Tennis. 55:52 -- Sean Bryant '23 and Derek Marino '22, Football Wide Receivers.

Enrollment Growth University: Higher Education
How to Scale Supplemental Instruction

Enrollment Growth University: Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 19:35


Nicolò Bates, Founder and CEO at TEDU, and Jessica Brooks, Director at the International Center for Supplemental Instructional, joined the podcast to discuss the student outcomes and technological strategies for launching and scaling supplemental instruction.

POWER Podcasts
Episode 111: Anchors, Maps & Compasses: Fuel for the Higher Self

POWER Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 35:33


Find it on #Spotify #iTunes #applepodcasts #amazonmusic #GooglePlay #SoundCloud #YouTube and #Podomatic  .......Love + Light,Brandi L. Bates http://instagram.com/brandiiswinninghttp://twitter.com/SoledadFrancishttp://youtube.com/BookLoveHer *******To send a donation: http://www.paypal.me/BrandiLBatesFresh new talks uploaded every Thursday Evening after 7:00 PM (EST).A little something for everyone striving to be more, have more, and do more...all podcasts are time-sensitive and remain for a limited time only.Thank you for your time.#powerpodcasts 

Portugalex
Vice-almirante, bates forte cá dentro!

Portugalex

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 3:15


Justiça tem o seu próprio tempo e não segue o calendário gregoriano. E a despedida do vice-Almirante.

True Crime and Coke
THE TORTURE AND MURDER OF KELLY ANNE BATES

True Crime and Coke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:59


THE TORTURE AND MURDER OF KELLY ANNE BATES James Patterson Smith had a violent history. In his 40s, he started dating 14-year-old Kelly Anne Bates. When Kelly was 17, over the period of 4 weeks, Smith gouged her eyes, scalded her skin, partially scalped her, mutilated and killed her. The pathologist in charge of the case described her injuries as the worst he had ever seen. Smith was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment in 1997.   SOURCES USED: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/3dq7ul/what_is_the_most_horrific_crime_scene_in_history/ https://www.documentingreality.com/forum/f249/torture-murder-kelly-anne-bates-155301/ https://medium.com/crimebeat/one-of-the-most-horrific-instances-of-domestic-violence-the-case-of-kelly-ann-bates-b73ccea0f114 https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/wish-id-killed-monster-who-8694736 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kelly_Anne_Bates

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast
Episode 369: Bloodfest

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 86:57


As horror fans we would all love to experience our horror movies in real life. Bloodfest 2018 gives customers that opportunity! Experience Tortureville, The Vamp Camp or Hoddington High. Live through your favorite horror movies! Run if you must, survive … Continue reading → The post Episode 369: Bloodfest appeared first on The Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast.

The Assembly Call IU Basketball Podcast and Postgame Show
The Inside Scoop with Tamar Bates: Episode 1

The Assembly Call IU Basketball Podcast and Postgame Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:51


In the first episode of The Inside Scoop with Tamar Bates presented by Speakeasy Sales Copy, Jerod and Tamar lay out their goals for the show and dig into Tamar's offseason transition to Bloomington. Among the topics discussed:• How the show came about• What they want fans to take away from the series• How Tamar reacts when his coaches and teammates call him "cocky."• His relationship with Rob Phinisee (and how Rob is looking offensively)• The impact of Clif Marshall• His impression of what's different this year compared to before his arrival• The lessons learned and confidence gained from the Bahamas trip• The early leader for his favorite restaurant in Bloomington• What he and his family will be doing before and during Hoosier Hysteria• His goals for his freshman season -- team and personalAnd much more.

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 238: A scrum at Garcelon

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 43:31


This week we introduce you to one of our 13 club sports at Bates: rugby! The rugby squad plays the University of Maine this Friday night at 7pm on Garcelon Field. Plus, our recap of the week that was in varsity athletics, including interviews with standouts from the Bates field hockey, volleyball and men's tennis and golf programs. All that and more, on the Bates Bobcast! Interviews this episode: 0:57 -- Ed Argast, Interim Head Coach, Football. 5:07 -- Alyssa Lowther '25, Volleyball. (Female Bobcat of the Week) 10:09 -- Nick Forester '23, Men's Tennis captain. (Male Bobcat of the Week) 17:23 -- Bridget Thompson '22, Field Hockey. 24:36 -- Jack Howard '22, Men's Golf captain. 33:33 -- George Schouten '22 and Tim Hunter '22, Club Rugby.

SuperFeast Podcast
#135 Restore Your Eyesight and End Myopia with Jake Steiner

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 63:38


Jake Steiner claims he is just another guy from the internet, but for the past 20 years, he's been successfully pioneering natural myopia (nearsightedness) control and built a global community of people seeking to do the same through his website endmyopia.org where he offers a plethora of resources, articles, and courses for free. Prior to his journey of scientific exploration Jake Steiner was very nearsighted with minus 5.00 diopter's of high myopia, on a path of his vision getting progressively worse, with no end of wearing lenses insight. Today Jake no longer wears glasses, has 20/20 eyesight, has corrected his myopia without the use of eye vitamins, eye exercises, or surgery, and is passionate about providing guidance and resources for other myopes to do the same. One thing Jake touches on a lot in this conversation is screentime. Screen time has become so prevalent and woven into our everyday lives that we consciously need to counterbalance and mitigae its effects to prevent strain on our eyesight and Liver Qi. In TCM the Liver meridian is connected to the eyes and supports blood circulation and the flow of Qi through the eyes. It is the main meridian responsible for healthy vision. Mason and Jake discuss the fundamentals of myopia, lifestyle factors that affect our eyesight, the massive wholesale to retail lense markup, herbs to nourish the Liver, and empowering people to take back control of their health, no matter what the diagnosis. Tune in.    "The muscle spasm I talked about, you can measure it. You can measure your eyesight, and you can find out that it's very variable. You can buy or print out an eye chart, hang it up somewhere, measure out the correct distance you need to be from the chart, and see which line you can read? And then have a four-hour Netflix binge and try that same thing again. You're going to be kind of surprised that you probably can't read that same line anymore".   - Jake Steiner     Jake and Mason discuss: Pseudomyopia. Screen addiction How diopters work. Lens-induced myopia. Natural myopia control. Measuring your eyesight. Acupuncture for eyesight. Eyesight muscle spasms. The Liver-Eye connection. Herbs to nourish Liver Qi. Screen addiction and eyesight. Lifestyle habits that affect eyesight.    Who is Jake Steiner? Jake Steiner began his journey to reverse his -5.00 diopter myopia 20 years ago. Through a great deal of experimentation, and trial and error to apply theoretical concepts found in clinical journals and peer-reviewed studies, eventually, he was successful in getting back his natural 20/20 eyesight. Over the years, Jake has cataloged the many tools, resources, and experiences that made his myopia recovery a reality. Much of it exists now as part of the resource that is endmyopia.org. Jake created endmyopia.org to help share and connect with his fellow myopes so that more people could get their natural eyesight back.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shisandra Beauty Blend End Myopia Website Shortsighted Podcast Jakes 7 Day Free Course To Fix Eyesight Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Jake, welcome, man.   Jake Steiner: (00:01) Thanks for having me, Mason. I appreciate it.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, no, absolute pleasure, absolute pleasure. Bangkok treating you well?   Jake Steiner: (00:09) Bangkok is treating me amazing, actually. I can't complain.   Mason: (00:14) We had a little bit of a jam, I'm enjoying lockdown way too much in my quiet little South Golden suburb, but I've got... I know I shouldn't say it too, I've got too many friends in Melbourne and Sydney and other places in the world who are not enjoying it. Let's not go into that. I don't mind if you want to go into how awesome Bangkok is, though. That'd be cool to hear a little bit of... we'll get into that. But I want to hear about just eyesight, glasses. I want the whole shebang. Where did you start out? Digging into this, when was your moment when you realised you'd... or did you feel like at some point, was it the feeling of being hoodwinked by an industry or something that got you spurred on? Or what was your motivation to start restoring your eyesight?   Jake Steiner: (00:59) You're getting me in a totally different angle on this now. So I started wearing glasses when I was maybe 12-ish, somewhere around there. I'm super old, so I lived in a time before screens. So I didn't get into glasses till school, till well into school. And so maybe 12-ish, somewhere around there, my parents took me to an optometrist, optometrist said, "You need glasses," I got classes. And from there every year or two or so, I got stronger glasses. And when I started out, I played water polo, which I've really enjoyed. You're in water that's too deep to stand in, so you're treading water, and you're throwing and you're catching a ball that you're only allowed to touch with one hand. It's somewhat intense and it requires decent eyesight, you got water splashing around, stuff's going on.   Jake Steiner: (01:51) And as my eyes got worse, the ball turned into just more of a yellow outline that just kept getting bigger because it's just a blurry thing. And I was trying to kind of aim at the middle of it, because you got to catch it with one hand. Eventually I couldn't play anymore, because you can't really wear contacts and glasses doesn't work. And I turned into more of a introvert nerd type in retrospective. Because kids wouldn't pick me for sports because once I started getting into glasses... once you wear glasses, you get afraid of balls flying because you don't have peripheral vision. You can't see stuff that comes flying at you from the side nearly as well. And if a ball hits your face and your glasses go flying, you just can't see anything. So it makes you kind of vulnerable and you act more afraid of your moving environment. And that sort of reflect in how you just behave.   Jake Steiner: (02:47) So I went from just being a kid to being more of an outsider because glasses. On hindsight. At the time, I didn't realise. I started reading a tonne, got into a lot more of the "nerdy stuff," computer stuff, that started merging. And then I worked glasses till I got to minus five and I was stock trading and doing just screen stuff a lot. And then one day I found myself in... somewhere in Asia and looking for taxi and I couldn't see, and I went back to the optometrist and they said, "You need stronger glasses," and I said, "Why?" And they said it's genetic. And that was just a moment where I was like, it can't be genetic. Because it's a problem that didn't exist to this extent 50 years ago. My parents don't wear glasses, my grandparents don't wear glasses. The genetic answer doesn't make sense. So I went to library and I started researching and I found out that short-sightedness, nearsightedness, myopia is not at all a genetic condition. It's a 100% environmental and all the glasses thing, all my youth that I spent in glasses was completely pointless and unnecessary.   Mason: (04:00) I mean, a lot of things are jumping out at me, but the one that really annoys me the most is when a professional, a doctor, an optometrist in this setting, that they're so confident in the talking point that they've been given from their professors or their institution and they don't get the severity. And just how irresponsible it is to spout something that they don't actually know for themselves is true. And they just say, "No, it's genetic. Literally, this changes your whole life. You're crazy. You think you can do something about this?" Well, do you know it's genetic? "Yeah, yeah, of course. My institution told me. I paid heaps of money to be there. And they're really smart people. I'm not looking into it myself." That happens so much and so many people's lives goes... it's a curve ball because of it, unnecessarily.   Jake Steiner: (04:52) Yeah. It's amazing. And my parents are both medical doctors, and I'm generally not against modern medicine in a lot of ways. There's amazing stuff that they're figuring out. But when it comes to not acute symptoms, like long-term just stuff, so often there is the profit motive runs away with the story, right? Glasses, the wholesale cost for lenses is like 2 to $5. Hundreds of dollars in a retail store. They make on average about 5000% profit on selling glasses.   Mason: (05:28) Far out.   Jake Steiner: (05:31) It's crazy. It's crazy. It's crazy.   Mason: (05:33) That's insane.   Jake Steiner: (05:33) It's crazy. People pay 200, 300, $400 for glasses. It costs nothing. It costs the optometrist nothing.   Mason: (05:41) Wow. I mean, not to say there's an inherent corruption there in people, like it's a thing that you trust your institution, you trust the entire medical institution's good-willed, et cetera, and probably morally and ethically you probably get in and you go, "Oh, it's just the way it is. And that's just the benefit. This is how I get my payday after putting in so much energy to become a doctor and become an optometrist and pay the service to society." But if you were able to get rid of the survivalist in nature, like, "I need this to pay for all this stuff I've gone and... I need to pay my kids and my family and all these..." If you take all that away and you just look at it objectively, very unethical doing that.   Jake Steiner: (06:30) Yeah. And okay, here's the weird thing, and before we fall too deep into the rabbit hole, I always recommend people go to Google Scholar. If anybody's not familiar, scholar.google.com is the Google search engine that only shows you clinical research studies. If you don't want to look at normal internet where who knows what you're getting for results, it doesn't mean that a scientific study is correct, it just means you're only looking at those. You're looking at peer-reviewed studies. So whenever I hear a podcast with a crazy dude from the internet claiming that a whole entire trusted institution is wrong, I always go there first. Because I'm like, "Is there any basis to this at all?" Super helpful, because there's so much stuff out there that is maybe a little bit kind of crazy, who knows? So Google Scholar, super handy. Just go over there, type in pseudomyopia, P-S-E-U-D-O myopia. That means not real near-sightedness.   Jake Steiner: (07:33) And that tells you, if you just spend five minutes, see there are 20,000 plus search results of all clinical studies that say your near-sightedness starts out as a muscle spasm. And it's kind of mind-blowing and you don't have to, but you can certainly, dig into studies that tell you there's a round, circular muscle around a lens in the front of your eye that shapes the lens. So the closer you look at something the more that muscle tightens up and the more it bulges the lens out that you get clear, close-up vision, focuses the light in the back of your eye on your retina. And the further you look at something, the more that muscle relaxes and what happens, super short version is, if you're a kid studying in front of a book for many, many hours or now people just living in front of screens, that muscle gets stuck. It's just a muscle spasm. It's not designed to be in this super tight mode that it's in when you're looking at a phone for countless hours every day. And it doesn't completely relax.   Jake Steiner: (08:37) So since it controls that lens, it not relaxing means the lens doesn't go back into full distance vision. It's just like if you turn off the autofocus on a camera and leave it in close-up and then you point the camera at a distance and things are blurry. That's exactly what happens in your eye. If the optometrist at that point said, "Go camping for a weekend and then come back," you'd have a better result after the camping. And it's super important because myopia is not genetic. It starts out as pseudomyopia. Google Scholar, easily 20,000 search results explaining this in fish. I don't know how they figured that out fish, in birds, in monkeys, and in humans, anything that has our kind of eye has that same response. I just wanted to put that out upfront. So when people are listening, they're not dragged into this not knowing what's going on.   Mason: (09:34) Yeah. I mean, and before we go into your... I don't even know whether protocols is the right word, but all the insights and the work that you do, which I'm really... it's been a few months or a couple of months since I really dived down through your website and was like, "Oh, holy shit, this is my..." Because I've had a lot of people who have come and have wanted to be on the podcast. I think we reached out to you. I think Alex found you and reached out to you. Didn't want to make everyone think that you were out there reaching out, when I think we did it. A lot of people though, reaching out to be on the podcast with eyesight healing techniques. And I know it's always, it's always pretty stretching and do the eye movements and all that kind of stuff, but yours was... I'm looking forward to getting the refresher, it's going to kind of be new, but I remember looking into it being super impressed and kind of excited. It was just very... I don't know, it had a connectivity to life rather than just being this isolated treatment that was completely packageable and sellable in a course or something like that.   Mason: (10:40) But just put out there again, I realise, we're talking about the optometry industry, and I know that even though we're going to go into some solutions right now, I know there are people who are just kind of happy to have glasses and just grateful for that opportunity when their eyesight goes. Even if it is something that you know is lifestyle based or environmentally based, it's not just an inevitable deterioration of your genetics. So gratitude there for everything that's possible and the support that that can can give. But man, that realisation, do you think is it scary for most people? Do you think realising that it is inevitably your choices and the way that you've just fallen into living that has determined the deterioration of eyesight and that you have... it's fully within your capacity to get it back on track? What do you think is the biggest thing that stops people there just jumping in straight away and doing it? Is it daunting, don't believe it, you know?   Jake Steiner: (11:41) Okay, somebody explained this to me one time that finally made sense, because I don't talk about this even to my friends, because I know people don't care and it makes me frustrated. But this guy said, make a list of the 10 most ongoing important things in your life, pressing, that you're doing, or you have to do, or you really wish you could get done. He's like, 10 things. And he's like, the first three is how far are you going to make it. And maybe that's extreme and maybe that's not right, but it stuck in my head as eyesight is number 15, right? Like you'd love to run a triathlon and you'd love to pick a painting and you'd love to travel to New Zealand. For you I guess that's not that far. And then, yeah, sure [crosstalk 00:12:33]-   Mason: (12:32) I'm pretty far at the moment, man. [crosstalk 00:12:35].   Jake Steiner: (12:36) [crosstalk 00:12:36]. Oh man. Yeah. But so it's like, it would be interesting to do, but you know what? You get up in the morning and it takes you exactly 40 seconds to pop in your contact lenses. And that problem, number 12 on the list, is solved. It'd be nice not to pop them in, but it's not that big of a deal. The alternative I'm suggesting is you learning about biology a little bit and questioning your day-to-day habits a little bit and coming up with better things to do with part of your free time and becoming aware and sort of biohacking a thing that's just always been neglected. And that's kind of a big undertaking for, "I'm saving those 40 seconds in the morning." You know what I mean? I think that's kind of the, "I already fixed that." [crosstalk 00:13:27]-   Mason: (13:27) I think the gravity of it though... I completely get it. I mean, it's something I'm constantly doing. There's things that are obviously massively important to me and to my health and I berate myself that I don't... I'm not creating space for this one little aspect of my health. But got kids, got a kid and another kid on the way, business is going off. But I think the complete sympathy for people, or empathy, if that is the case, but I just think this is a great reminder to be like, "Don't let go. Just hold onto that number 14 and really create a structured... within your life. Make sure you're not just getting stuck, washed away within your life just grinding." If you can get to that point where you can automate particular things, get down that list, and make sure... and have faith that there's going to be a point where you go like, "Ah, okay, I'm ready. I'm really ready. And I've got the space to kind of nail this now."   Mason: (14:27) I mean, just hearing you talk about the difference as a child and just that that's... I'm sure that's altered the way that you operate in the world, the way that you think the way you relate to your body, due to maybe not engaging in sports and being as active for particular reasons. Not for particular reasons, for that reason. I think the gravity and just the opportunity of doing things like this is, it comes down to everything, is like with our herbs that we have at SuperFeast, it's like if you start to engage with the capacity, you actually have control of how the chi in your organs flow, and you can, with your lifestyle and herbs and movement, you can generate your own energy. You do not have to be reliant on external sources of energy. And just that's like too huge for some people to take on and it takes them a long time to come to terms with that. To come to terms with something like the eyesight, being able to turn your eyesight around, I mean, it's exciting, but yeah, I can completely imagine why people don't sink their teeth in immediately.   Jake Steiner: (15:36) Okay, for example, I've poked around your website and I'm like, that made it on my list of, "That would be interesting, but will I ever get there?" You know what I mean? Realistically, I'm like, "Okay, I'm in Thailand, shipping, understanding how much of it makes sense? How will it affect my life?" Who knows, right? It's in the same spot on the list, where I'm like, I'm sure it could make a difference but how big is my motivation? And when it comes to eyesight, I'll throw this in there, one part is it changes who you are. In just simple examples, if you wear glasses, when you're walking outside, you're looking at the ground because you don't have peripheral vision, you can't look straight ahead.   Jake Steiner: (16:22) A person without glasses, or if you have contacts you can, you can see the ground from your periphery. So you're walking in the world, not necessarily staring at the ground. If you wear glasses, you're walking, you're looking at the crowd. Your experience of the things in front of you is the ground. You don't think of it because that's just your life, but it would not be the same if you're not wearing glasses. If you're talking to people, your eyes look through the centre of the lens, because that's the optical centre, that's where your best vision is. So your eyes are trained just to look just through that one point. Versus people who don't want glasses who have a much more fluid eye movement and neck movement. So when you're talking to people, you appear to be kind of stiff and weird, just slightly, just so slightly that nobody's consciously aware of it, but people treat you differently because you are a little bit weird behind the glasses. Potential tendency to make you a little bit more introverted, potential tendency to view yourself differently because you are different because you kind of have a weird... you're not right in how you're interacting.   Jake Steiner: (17:31) Another thing, for example, I spend three months of the year kite surfing. Not now anymore, apparently, but I used to. Since I don't wear glasses. And I still catch myself going, "Unbelievable that my body can do that." Because I was so believing that I'm clumsy and fearful and I don't have the athletic ability because the lenses, no peripheral vision, my eyes are stuck looking through the centre of the lens, that I don't have the confidence to move. The fine motor control, your brain just goes, "Whoa, careful." None of this works very well. Going from there to not wearing glasses, I spent years paragliding. I lived in Nepal, paragliding. Crap I would have never done, never, ever, ever, ever. Because I don't believe that I can. Now I'm fine. But it took a lot of years and habit changes and just exploring how does it make my life different, that made this journey of going from glasses to no glasses, super worth it. Because it's like, I got a second life. I went from this nerdy dude who lived behind screens, trading stocks, to having all sorts of interesting physical, outside experiences that are super amazing, that I would have probably never had.   Mason: (18:53) After you went to the optometrist and they said, "It's genetic, you're getting worse. You need," whatever, thicker glasses, whatever the terminology is, what was the first thing that you went and did when you were doing research and you started putting a technique to action or something like that, or an insight to action? What was the first thing you did that then actually yielded results and started putting real faith in you that you can do this?   Jake Steiner: (19:20) That was a long time. First, I bought everything that was out there. I bought the books, whatever courses. First I found pseudomyopia. So there's two things I found. One, I found pseudomyopia, it's a muscle spasm. The cause of your near-sightedness is a muscle spasm. It's not a question. This is in optometry journals. It's weird that the retail optometrist doesn't know what the academic optometrist writes about. This is-   Mason: (19:54) Just conveniently doesn't know, just be like, "No, no, just don't even let it in. I just want to be happy over here selling my 5000% increased product."   Jake Steiner: (20:07) Not to knock all optometrists. There are awesome optometrists, for sure. There are helpful optometrists, optometrists that know this, there are optometrists that are willing to support you. Some of them are in a tough spot because the regulatory boards don't let them talk about this. That's a whole big topic. They're not bad people. It's just I hold a grudge because that really put me in a direction. so I found pseudomyopia and then I found another terrible thing, terrible, terrible thing, on Google Scholar. You type in lens-induced myopia. And that will piss you off a little bit because as the name suggests, once you start using the treatment they sell you, your eyesight will get worse because of the treatment. Not because of genetics, not because blah, as soon as you start wearing the glasses... and I can explain if you want, but that's kind of a long biology topic, your eyesight will get worse because of the glasses. Again, [crosstalk 00:21:07]-   Mason: (21:07) Because of the spasming? Are we still on spasm? Or does it deteriorate in any way?   Jake Steiner: (21:12) Worse. Much, much worse. The eye is like a fluid-filled ball, right? And it's not solid, it's not like a bone, so it's never perfectly round. And you've got the lens in the front and the retina where the signal is received in the back, and between there's fluid and a skin basically. And it's not a perfect one, it's just held together. It has a mechanism built-in that adjusts its length, like how much distance is between the lens in the front and the retina in the back. And when you're a baby, you start out hyperopic, like the eyeball is too short, you can't see up close clearly. But then that mechanism, that works throughout your whole life, adjusts the eyeball in length that you have perfect vision. And that Megan doesn't always works. And there's a few different things that run it, pretty well understood in science. When you put on glasses, what happens is, glasses moved the light further back in your eye, because you have a muscle spasm, you're stuck in close-up mode, the light focuses just in front of the retina because it wants to be in close-up. And what the lenses do, is they just move the light back a little bit. So it's basically... it's making it so despite the muscle spasm, the light focuses in the right spot for distance.   Jake Steiner: (22:28) Problem with that is it's not perfect. Glasses are not... they're 16th century technology. So some of the light focuses behind the retina and that is the signal that tells the eye that it's too short. It's called hyperopic defocus. You can look it up on Google Scholar. So a little bit of the light focuses behind the retina and then the eyeball, that mechanism in the eyeball, "Well, crap, I'm too short," and the eyeball physically elongates. And that's why a year later you need new, stronger glasses because the eyeball has compensated for the lens.   Mason: (23:06) So [crosstalk 00:23:08]-   Jake Steiner: (23:07) Literally you're selling new glasses. Because of the glasses, you're selling more glasses.   Mason: (23:17) I mean, that makes sense. I'm sure for a lot of people, that's a bit of a shock, but it makes sense. If you don't use it, you lose it. And it's just, I think it's kind of coming out more in... well, consider the alternative, but even in some circles around healing body and trauma to the body, broken bones, [inaudible 00:23:39] like strains, rather than do complete mobilisation, those people that are getting the best results are using... obviously they're putting... they're not just taking the cast off and letting it go wild. They're putting some care into it, as I'm sure we'll hear about your process here, but it's like, no, don't just mobilise the thing that needs healing that needs to move. And then you get the chi moving in there, you get the blood flow going in there, you can eventually heal it. So it sounds like it's a similar connection that you're making there. All right, so you're discovering all these things and I'm sure you're feeling very good about what you've been told so far on your eyesight journey?   Jake Steiner: (24:18) It was unbelievable because I found all this stuff and I printed stuff out and I went back to the optometrist. I'm like, "What is this?" And the second one I went to just kicked me out. Literally, they were just like, "Out of here." I'm like, "This is your journals. Literally this is..." And they were just like, "Out. Out." And from then I just kind of... a lot of Endmyopia is a bit of a grudge I had.   Mason: (24:46) I can imagine.   Jake Steiner: (24:46) I bought all the books. I bought all the books, I bought all the stuff. I was travelling a lot at the time because I was sort of retired. I tried eye acupuncture, I tried eye exercises, I did the Nepalese healers. Tried all this stuff because I assumed, understanding that my eyes are not broken, that somebody figured this stuff out. I don't even have a cool beard, right? On the website a claim I do, but it's a total lie. You have a cool beard.   Mason: (25:15) Yeah. Sorry, I can't be with you on that one.   Jake Steiner: (25:17) Yeah, I know. I'm screwed. So I tried all this stuff and it wasn't working and because of my background, I analysed stuff. From what I do, is the only way you make money is if you really, really, really understand what is going on. And I'm like, "Okay, cause. How do these ideas, how does this book, address the cause? I figured out the cause already. How does it address the muscle spasm? How does it address the lens, the lens-induced myopia part?" And when I started looking at it that way... because first I wasn't. The first year, I was just like, "Yay. Let's try all this stuff." Is how does the acupuncture address muscle spasm and the lens making my eye longer? It doesn't. And then how does the eye exercise, how does this Bates method thing address it? It doesn't.   Mason: (26:09) Bates, I was going to ask you about.   Jake Steiner: (26:11) Yeah, so the problem there for me, as a weird German, analytical, boring guy, I'm really not good at not being able to connect the cause and the treatment. I want to understand. You have to understand it, because how can you treat it without understanding what's wrong in the first place? And I couldn't find a thing that started with, "Here's the cause." I couldn't. And it's weird, and I feel weird, because I have imposter syndrome to some extent. Because it can't possibly be that my dumb ass... I'm not a doctor, I'm just barely... I wasn't even good at stock trading, I was just... whatever, it was a good market. I don't know anything. How can it be that there is no... I'm never going to figure this out. There was a period where I was just like, "Ugh."   Jake Steiner: (26:59) But the logical idea is that the mechanism in the eye is the name of the game. Like, my eye just got worse because I put on the lenses, eye got longer. There are studies that show that the elongation of the eyeball is not a one way thing, the eye just adjusts. It gets shorter, too. So my thought was, if I wear weaker glasses, slightly, slightly weaker glasses, then instead of the light focusing a little bit behind the retina, it focuses just a little bit in front of the retina, and that same mechanism is going to shrink my eyeball back to the correct size. Giant leap, right? But there was plenty of science showing that the elongation is permanent, it's just an adjustment. It's not growing longer, it's just changing like a football shape. But both ways. And that thing works your whole life.   Jake Steiner: (27:49) So I started wearing weaker glasses and I didn't know what I was doing. This was almost 20 years ago. It's like the first guy discovering that lifting weights makes you stronger. It was like that. I just wore a weaker glasses. And they were two weeks in hindsight, like I went from minus five to minus three, couldn't see shit. I remember I went to Laos with those glasses. I threw away the old ones because I'm just like that. Couldn't see anything. It was terrible. It was a stupid idea. But I kept wearing those because I'd thrown away the stronger ones, and eventually I remember I was sitting in a subway somewhere, Hong Kong, I think, one day, and I'm sitting there and I could read the map on the other side. And it was just a sudden realisation that I could do that. I never was able to do that before. And I was like, "Crap, this is working."   Jake Steiner: (28:39) But there was a big period where I just kind of... I don't know why, I just kept weighing those minus threes, life, it sucked. My vision was just... it was not fun, but somehow I couldn't get myself to go back. And there was just that moment that was like, "Well, this crap is really working," and then from there, some friends got involved. And from there, in the intervening 20 years, so many people tried different variations of this, that by now we have a system that one diopter a year. Every three to four months, you can buy a weaker set of glasses and that's all you need. And your vision just improves. Super short, that's the answer to the whole thing. This is why there's not really anything to sell. There's no money to make off of it because the solution... it's a theory, right? It's an unproven theory. Because testing the eyeball length is not cheap, doing it consistently is not cheap. We've done it in the past, but there's not enough evidence for me to go definitively, right?   Jake Steiner: (29:38) I'm saying, you could try this and play with it, I'm not responsible for your result. But tens of thousands of people have done it. We have a huge Facebook group and forum and all kinds of stuff. And I'm super simplifying, there's tonnes more little details, just like lifting weights makes you stronger, there's more details. But it boils down to just small adjustments to the strength of your lenses.   Mason: (30:02) Okay. Because I still have no idea of the structure of what you're offering, but I do remember now that you had a community and that's always... I think that's a good sign. How many people did you say is in the Facebook group?   Jake Steiner: (30:14) 22,000 or so, thereabouts.   Mason: (30:17) Yeah. I mean, Facebook is savage. To have a group with that many people, you've got to like... I like hearing that because having a group like that revolving around distinctions, it might be somewhat of a system, but I like what you're saying. It's kind of the same way we do herbalism, tonic herbalism. I'm like, I don't want to be a clinical herbalist. This is a herbalism style, like a folk style of herbalism for the people that isn't rigid, so rigid instruction that it doesn't fit into the romance of the lifestyle and the kitchen and so on and so forth. And I feel like, that's what I'm hearing there that it's just... take the edge off. It makes it more accessible. But you've got free guides and stuff that people can go get, right? Just to start getting them into biology and see the studies and all that?   Jake Steiner: (31:10) It's free. We have a few courses that nobody needs to buy. If you want to support the resource, I'm trying not to pay all the bills. It's not that cheap actually to run out of pocket. It doesn't make me happy if I have to. That is more structured where I offer support, but they're not necessary. I've written like 1,200 articles on the site. Nobody needs to spend money to do this. And the basis is simple, the practical approach takes a little bit of... Once you dive into it, you're going to end up having a lot of questions, like, "I have astigmatism. I have presbyopia. I have this, I have that." That's why I've written a tonne of stuff. So all the things I've figured out with the help of lots of other people, the last 20 years is on there, it's free. There's no paywall, there's no nothing.   Jake Steiner: (31:56) And then you dig into that a little bit, and then you pop up in the Facebook group, which is super active. We've never manipulated stuff, it's just the people in there are the people that found it. And we have a big forum that's bigger than the Facebook group where people are having discussions, trying other stuff. [inaudible 00:32:16]. And so it's an evolving, ongoing thing.   Jake Steiner: (32:18) For me, the most interesting thing is once you dig into it, you start going, "A big problem is that I'm addicted to my stupid phone." I have replaced all of the fun things I do with playing on my phone. Eventually, and people don't need to, but the fun part of this whole thing is going, "I need distance vision time to improve my site." I pop on slightly weaker glasses or contact lenses, but now I need to go do something. Birdwatching, tennis playing, bike riding, something that is going to be less fascinating than just picking this up and scrolling through it.   Jake Steiner: (32:52) And to me, I think the funnest part, and who cares because addiction is not my topic, but people slowly going, "Well crap, I do spend six hours on my phone, it says. And I don't have any hobbies anymore. And I could..." And for me personally, that's kind of the super fun bit, if you stop in the forum, sometimes people are talking about how they're rediscovering the boring-ness and fascinating-ness of life that starts with not turning on a screen.   Mason: (33:23) I've got a friend, Jake, he's been on the podcast before. He teaches bushcraft and survival skills and he's an activist as well. But he spends a lot of time in town. And then he was just telling me every now and then he goes bush for however many weeks, three weeks. Whenever I'd talk to him after he was doing that, or if he'd be giving a little update every few days, he's just like, he goes, "The first thing I noticed is all my senses come back online." And he goes, "And my eyesight, all of a sudden, starts becoming sharper, I didn't even realise how fuzzy it was spending all that time." And he's not even a big computer or a phone guy, but even just for him, he gets into the bush and... I mean, that's what walkabout is, you go and you look and you just walk for as long as you need to release the tension from your body. Which of course is going to be connected to the eyes as well.   Mason: (34:25) And so they say, they just watch that breeze move the trees up on the mountain, on the ridge line, or we'll just watch the waves and just watch the sand on the horizon, and eventually that... My indigenous mates who talk about that, they talk about that pulling out the trauma as you go along, because you're looking at things that your brain goes, "I don't have to remember this," but so as you start spitting up... in this walkabout state, you start spitting up all the traumatic memories that create the tension for you, that natural vista that's off in the distance plucks off all that trauma. And that can release the tension from your body. And that just ties exactly into what you're talking about here. And what a gift to give people, remembering just the importance to balance out all that close screen time with getting out there into something where you're looking far away.   Jake Steiner: (35:21) I'd love to do that. I'd love to do that. We should do that. My audience is so diverse and from so many different places, there's... I spent a fair amount of time in Hong Kong, or I used to before Hong Kong became a forever locked island. There's nowhere to go. Real estate is so expensive you live with your parents or you live in this tiny hole. And then every time I go there, people are on the phone, on the subway, on the bus, walking to the subway to the bus. They're on the phone in the bar, in the restaurant with friends, they are just glued to those things. And then when I have people that participate from Hong Kong, they go, "Man, I am feeling like an alien. I put my phone down and I'm the only one with their phone down. And I'm just alone in the city, surrounded by people on the phone." And I'm like, that's kind of traumatising. So being in a place where you can have a walkabout, for one, that's a brilliant start.   Mason: (36:24) It's literally going for a walk and looking into the distance, right?   Jake Steiner: (36:28) Yeah. Yeah.   Mason: (36:31) When you boil it down, I'm sure there's many little techniques and things that pop up in the forum or in... I mean, you've got a bunch, I'm looking at the courses now. Child myopia, prevent and reverse, myopia post-LASIK, there's some pretty chunky ones in there, like 14 week programmes-   Jake Steiner: (36:56) Not available for the most part though.   Mason: (36:58) Is that because of availability of spots?   Jake Steiner: (37:01) Because I do support and I've got... especially this year, I'm super busy. In that whole course thing, there's only one or two that are actually available. Again though, you don't need any of them. There's a seven day free email guide that kind of... because it's such a thick topic, like where do I start? And the website has so much stuff on it that it kind of walks you through start with understanding why. And people get mad at me for this because they just want the steps. But I'm like, the reason you wear glasses is because you just trusted a thing. I'm not looking that trustworthy and I don't try to make it about trust, so I'm like, understand the cause first, take 10 minutes, an hour, a week, however much you need to understand what's up with the biology. And then people get pissed because they're like, "Just give me the steps. I believe you."   Jake Steiner: (37:52) But I'm like, get what it is. And so the seven day guide walks you through the here's what's going on and here's how you can question this whole thing in the first place. And then here's the basic stuff. And then I release you into the wild of website and community and stuff. And that's really all you need. So I'm kind of anti-selling the courses, but I really don't think that's where you need to start. It's more of a slightly weaker pair of glasses. And I have a podcast, but I only do improvement stories. Whenever there's somebody who surfs, for example, on there, I'm like, that's going to be good. Because if you surf, you have motivation to rid of those stupid things, because contacts out there, you lose a contact lens, it's a lot less fun experience coming back. And those people improve really quickly and really consistently, because there's no excuse. If you're in the bush, if you're doing that kind of thing, if that guy wore glasses, I promise... well, I shouldn't promise, but he would take to something like that so easily because he needs the eyesight and he uses it.   Mason: (39:05) And I know what you mean by promise. I mean, you're probably just watching that there's a pattern. If people apply themselves, you see the pattern of improvement. Weaker glasses, time off the myopically looking at a screen or books or video games or whatever it is. Are there any other little cool add-ons that you're like, maybe they're not the Big Kahuna in the protocol, but just little things that help improve? I'm thinking as well, there're a lot of people listening, wanting to... like the prevention. This is just something beautiful, even though you're preventing eyesight from deteriorating or becoming myopic, there's a beautiful... these are all just beautiful things to add into a lifestyle anyway, to keep you sharp and loving life.   Jake Steiner: (39:51) True. You can measure your eyesight. The real starting point... and that's the seven day guide thing, too, the difference between hearing this and being like, "Huh, that's an interesting topic," and then forgetting about it a half hour after you listened to it, and having an experience, is you can measure your eyesight. The muscle spasm I talked about, you can measure it. You can measure your eyesight and you can find out that it's very variable. You can buy or print out an eye chart, hang it up somewhere, measure out the distance that you need to be at the right distance from the chart and see how your eyes... Which line can you read? And then have a four hour Netflix binge and try that same shit again. And you're going to be kind of surprised that you probably can't read that same line anymore.   Jake Steiner: (40:40) That experience of going, "Well crap." Or if you eat a big pizza and drink a Coke and get a giant insulin spike, try to read that chart and see what happens. Or be stressed out and angry and read that chart and see what happens. If you do that and if you get really into it and you just keep a little log, because you're going to forget. What line could you read and what was the connecting... where were you at in that moment? You notice that your eyesight is connected to your diet, is connected to your mood, is connected to your interactions, everything. And if you start doing that... and for example, if somebody wears glasses and their glasses are just giving them perfect vision, you can take them off and the way diopters work, so the strength of the glasses is just a distance measurement.   Jake Steiner: (41:30) And I don't want to get too far into that, but it's just, if you take a book or a screen and you just put it... how close do you have to put it for it to be perfectly sharp? And then how far can you get it from your eyes to where it's still perfectly sharp? And then once you start to see the tiniest bit of blur, measure that distance, however many centimetres, 100 divided by the distance equals diopters. So if you can see 50 centimetres, 100 divided by the 50 is two. You need glasses that are two diopters to have perfect distance vision.   Jake Steiner: (42:06) So if you are a two diopter person, you're going to see the 50 centimetres perfectly. But now eat the pizza or now try to do that in a nice, natural, full spectrum light, you're going to see 60 centimetres. Try to do that in a shitty lit fluorescent room, you're going to see 40 centimetres. The numbers are not exact, but it's going to vary that way. And you're going to be like, "Fluorescent light is shit for my eyes." Because you're going to be able to measure the... And once you get into that rabbit hole, then it's tempting. Because then you're like, "Oh crap. I don't have to go to the optometrist. I don't need to get measurements there. This thing is variable. And it's another way for me to quantify how I'm doing with my body."   Mason: (42:52) And it is all connected. Always. I was curious when you brought up acupuncture, whether you've ever had someone dive in with you about that connection between eyes and sight and muscle tension and the liver much. Because it's like, it's been popping up in my mind a little bit.   Jake Steiner: (43:12) My mom loves acupuncture, which is funny because she's a paediatrician, medical doctor, but she's also into that stuff. With eyesight, everything is connected.   Mason: (43:22) Right, right.   Jake Steiner: (43:26) I've been on podcasts where first the host is like, "Your topic has nothing to do with us." And I'm like, "Body, it's all one thing. It's all connected together." The thing that improves eyesight and makes the eyesight worse is close-up and glasses.   Mason: (43:40) Yeah, right.   Jake Steiner: (43:40) It's the main thing. If you want to fix that stuff and you just want to fix it, that will fix it. But there are lots of other things also. Trauma can absolutely affect your eyesight. I do blood tests two, three, four times a year because all this stuff works together. If you have messed up blood values, if you're lacking stuff, it's going to affect your eyesight also, definitely. Everything plays together. I'm just focusing on what's the way that's just going to fix it for most people in most cases.   Mason: (44:13) Yeah, absolutely. And I like it. I get asked about eyesight a lot and I know there is that connection of the liver Meridian ending at the eyes and sight is that sense connected to the liver. But at the same time, sometimes I get people reporting an improvement in vision when they get onto certain liver herbs, but it's not... it's kind of like, "Yeah, but I can't..." What you were saying at the beginning, where's the actual, down to the wire, causality and do I know there's actually going to be enough of a connection there or there's not going to be all these other things in the way for most people that you're really not going to get that much improvement if you just get onto the herbs, but-   Jake Steiner: (44:52) But try it. But try it. You know what I mean? Address the big elephant first. If you have screen addiction, no amount of herbs are going to fix your eyes. But if you're taking care of every else, I'm all for it. You know what I mean? Because especially because you can measure and you can experience and you can go, "Okay, what does this do?" And I'm not saying it doesn't. I'm a big fan because I'm into this topic. If you've got herbs for eye stuff, I'm like, "Send me herbs, I'll try some."   Mason: (45:18) I'll send you the Beauty Blend because that's the only one with schizandra and goji in there that are known to bring brightness to the eyes. They go through and get the chi of the liver flowing. And a lot of the time what creates the tension is an excess of liver yang. And if there's an excess of liver yang, then what is regulated by that, the whole liver [inaudible 00:45:40] system is the peripheral nervous system as well. And so you're going to get a tightening up through the entire nervous system, lose that smooth flow in the muscle and a smooth flow of chi. And I can see you, there's probably a connection there with tension in the eye, but... Yeah?   Jake Steiner: (45:55) That and floaters, people bring up a lot. People get floaters, don't know if [inaudible 00:46:01]... And especially in the forum, because we have such a wide audience I'm boring, because I'm just like, "Just give me the thing that works and how simple can I make it?" But at the same time I'm interested in these things, A, and B, there's a lot of audience that leans into a different direction from here than I do. You know what I mean? You talk to me about chi, I'm like, "I don't know. I don't know."   Mason: (46:28) I don't know either. I think it's just fun thinking about it. [inaudible 00:46:30] with herbs, I don't offer any of these formulas, but just that the [Plerium 00:46:36] blends, like Free and Easy Wanderer, these are the herbs that smooth out the flow within the liver. That's the one I think for people, but like these plerium blends and formulas, I think would be really nice addition for a lot of people, especially to hopefully smooth out some of the excessive emotions that come out of the liver sometimes or with anything. In any process like this, I'm sure you see people go through all manner of emotional processes going through this.   Jake Steiner: (47:04) For sure. And that's why I'm like, especially in the forum, there's a lot of people who are a lot more into this side of the topic who would love that kind of stuff. You know what I mean? And I'm super open-minded about, "I'm not right, I just figured out one little sliver of one little thing. You have a whole other thing." And I'm learning. There's so much interesting stuff that people figured out that isn't mainstream, isn't easily packaged and sold in every grocery store. You know what I mean? I like to make that connection. So if you have stuff like that, I'm always interested.   Mason: (47:40) Definitely send you some Beauty Blend, man, couple of other things. But I mean, as I said, I like having this, a podcast resource like this, because when we get asked, it makes me feel so much more secure and comfortable going, "Yeah, hit this first." And then you start adding in all the other things and it just becomes this massive bonus. But there's an actual technique here that's somewhat proven, anecdotally even, with tens of thousands of people at this point, which is nice to have anecdotal evidence getting to those numbers. And then can't hurt, can't hurt, add the Beauty Blend in there, get the liver chi flowing. The ancient Taoists said that this is how you keep the eyes sparkling. It sounds fun. Other good shit's going to happen when you're doing it anyway, so just go and enjoy yourself.   Jake Steiner: (48:32) And also speaking of herbs, I have a house in Myanmar, which is currently not in a good situation, but they only do herb stuff. They use this stuff on their skin, right? They draw these circles on their skin with bark, it's bark from some kind of tree. You do not get sunburned. Your skin doesn't even get dark. Everybody uses it. It is some magic stuff. And it would put sunscreen companies out of business, because it's a tree bark, you just rub it up, you put it on your skin. It looks cool. It keeps your skin smooth. No sunburns.   Mason: (49:08) Wow.   Jake Steiner: (49:09) It is amazing. Yeah. And all Burmese, that's how you can recognise Burmese people in Thailand because they draw these things on themselves. But that's that tree bark. And they've got this for all kinds of different things there. And because I live there and I have a fully off-grid house, and when I get... something funky happens, they always bring out some herbs and the herbs always work. So I've learned like there's certainly an art there that's getting lost a little bit in our pharmaceutical world.   Mason: (49:39) Yeah. It's called thanaka, T-H-A-N-A-K-A, apparently.   Jake Steiner: (49:45) Yeah, that's right.   Mason: (49:45) Is that it?   Jake Steiner: (49:45) Yeah, yeah, yeah.   Mason: (49:46) Yeah, cool.   Jake Steiner: (49:46) Yep.   Mason: (49:47) Looks amazing. I mean, I'd love a lot of those... Yeah, look at it. Look at the designs that they pop on their checks, everyone going like... Yeah, if you just write, if you write thanaka, or I've just written Myanmar bark sunscreen and then gone to images. Beautiful. It looks great. That's the goal. Because here, that's what we do with... we had an auntie up north who's from [Moranbah 00:50:13], and she's just like, "Yeah, use ochre. That's what you guys should be using. You just put ochre all over you." And so when got it, just pop that on our daughter. It doesn't like... sunscreen, we weren't going to use like a zinc based anyway, but it's so more badass as well.   Jake Steiner: (50:28) That stuff is cool. And people use it. This is not an old ancient thing that is no longer in use. Right now, you go to some island in Thailand, you want to figure out which are Thai people are Burmese, look for the ones that have things drawn on them. It's cute.   Mason: (50:44) Man, this has been so rad. I hope people jump over to your website. Easiest way for them to find you?   Jake Steiner: (50:52) Endmyopia.org.   Mason: (50:56) Endmyopia.org. You do have a crap load of resources on there.   Jake Steiner: (51:03) It's many years of stuff.   Mason: (51:07) I can tell. A lot of resources. There's apps there. Gosh, I mean, Shortsighted Podcast in there. I mean, yeah, I can see you've got a Discord going as well. Is that still happening?   Jake Steiner: (51:23) Yeah. A lot of that stuff is community stuff. I'm not on Discord much, but somebody said we need Discord, and so yeah, they're talking on there.   Mason: (51:33) It's a movement, you can tell. You've started a movement, which is awesome. It must feel good. I hope you feel good.   Jake Steiner: (51:39) Yeah. I feel like an imposter mostly. It's weird for me to be the... You know what I mean? If I had a cool beard for a start, then you know-   Mason: (51:47) Maybe. Maybe that's the first... because it's the same thing. In all only imposter stuff it's the same as the eyesight, it's just environmental. It's just what you're putting around yourself and what you're saying to yourself, it's a process. I kind of still feel it. I recently just figured my way through it and finding my place in the whole herbal world and the health education world. I had to just embrace a little bit more of my full spectrum of self. Like a full spectrum of eyesight. I had to kind of get a little bit more into my comedy career, put less pressure on myself to kind of be a know-it-all in the health and herbal space. And I feel like I'm slowly have an appropriate... All of a sudden that impostor feeling has an evolution to being a much more appropriate emotion or feeling that actually gets some momentum behind me rather than... I definitely know that feeling of being stuck in that... Excessively.   Jake Steiner: (52:41) If you have suggestions, I always welcome them because that's definitely a weird problem I have. Because it feels like I can't possibly be that dude. You know what I mean? There's a lot of jokes on the site. I constantly joke about my imaginary beard and being the last living eye guru. Because I'm like, how is it possible? It continues to be the thing and I like talking about it and I think it's important. But at the same time it should be somebody more wise or with the right titles or something.   Mason: (53:08) Yeah. For me, I was always in the back of my mind... it wasn't an actual threat. I was just like, I was worried, I knew the things, I could call the things out about myself that were gaps in my knowledge and where I knew that potentially someone could... there was a in my armour and someone could call out my lack of experience in this element of what I do or in this element of what I do. And I've had it in the past when I've been a bit more overt and bravado about my expertise, which weren't there and had that person who was a big gift now, but you know, kind of whack me down on social media and be like, "Here, how about some facts? You want to back it up? You want to be able to do this, then let's go at it." And I'd get really angry and, "How dare you pull me down?" And then my housemate at the time was like, I was telling her, I was venting about it. And she was like, "Oh wow, this guy's really helping you sharpen your pencil. You're really reacting to this and showing your hole." And I was like, "Oh, shit. Yeah, they're definitely... Yes."   Jake Steiner: (54:09) I love those. I love those. Especially in the forum. I don't sensor stuff. So when people come and say... There's a thread in there now of some guy who said he got massive amounts of floaters and I didn't say it and it was because of me, and I welcome those because whatever my imposter feeling is, I'm like, please do point it out. Just bring it. You know what I mean? Because it's such a weird topic. Nobody needs these things in front of their eyes and it makes us less... it makes us timid and it makes us hide behind screens and books and it stops us from expressing and experiencing and I am not the dude to tell that story, in a way. Right? Because I'm just a dude.   Mason: (54:51) Well, but you obviously are. I don't know. I reckon you're probably on the path anyway and something will pop eventually. Because you're calling yourself out. As long as you're calling yourself out in a progressive... in a way that it progresses forward. That was my big thing. I started pulling all the herbalists and the acupuncturists onto the podcast and I just-   Jake Steiner: (55:10) Oh, cool.   Mason: (55:11) ... started owning my position. I started owning my shortcomings, all the things I thought if I kind of admitted to and mentioned that everyone would just go, "You're a fraud." And everyone was like, "Yeah, we know mate. We know you're only this." And I'm just like, "Yeah, I'm just the herbal scallywag and I'm making my own formulations. And I work within tonic herbs, which are super easy." Everyone can do it. I have a certain amount of experience, I understand patterns, I understand how to formulate, I understand how to source because that's just my passion. I used to call myself out in a really self-deprecating way and I used to kind of joke about it, I'd be like, "Yeah, I can't do this and I can't do that."   Mason: (55:49) Now, I feel like I'm more in a position where I'm just like, " I need to put boundaries up, need to have good boundaries around my capacity and make sure that I state what my capacity is and my want. I'm not going to go and study more. So don't expect any more from me than this." And then I just kind of went into cultivation and within those boundaries, I just owned it. This is who I am, having so much fun doing this and I'll go to the experts and I just started... like you do as well I guess, just started, "Well, I don't know that bit. I actually don't know how to answer that bit, but I'm going to start pulling in experts and start getting really curious."   Mason: (56:28) I started getting really curious and started becoming a student again. I really owned my expertise and what I do well, and it's like, "Screw it. I'm going to own it." I'm sure I can feel a lot of relatedness with you there. And then going off and going, "I'm going to continue to learn." And yeah, I'm just going to continue to learn. Be a student.   Jake Steiner: (56:45) I like that. And I like that, especially because I think we spend so much time online with these things is trying to figure out where's the scam, where's the catch? That's always my first thing. I'm like, "Ah, what is this crap about now?" I really like when somebody goes, "Let me just tell you." Like, when you said this is my expertise and this is the limit of it, I'm like, I'm already a fan. Because you're not forcing me to go find a whole... because you're not happy until you go, "What's the real..." Everything has a certain amount of bullshit in it. I do that probably too much, because I'm probably... People who randomly show up at the website are like, "What is with this fool?" But I'm like the librarian of this thing. People bring what works and what doesn't work and I just collect it all and I put it all in one place and that's it, right?   Mason: (57:41) I feel you, man. It's a trippy feeling knowing that there's like... when you start getting like website traffic and you start knowing there's heaps more people having that initial reaction, "What the hell is this?" I tripped out about that a lot and wanted to control that a lot. That's kind of shifted. I just started getting into more comedy stuff on my personal Instagram, and that kind of, for some reason that just alleviated the pressure valve for me. And that was where I got to practise going, "All right, they're going to come and they're going to see this, and this is the one thing they're going to see and they might not get the whole backstory and I haven't had time to explain myself and that..." I'm going, "All, I'm going to just accept it. This is me being vulnerable." And so I just started becoming really prolific, for me anyway, prolific in that rather than perfect. And it-   Jake Steiner: (58:32) I want to see that. I got to go check that out. I like it. Yeah.   Mason: (58:38) masonjtaylor.com. No, masonjtaylor, @masonjtaylor. Masonjtaylor.com, don't go there anyone, that website is very out of date.   Jake Steiner: (58:45) That's cool. I like that. Especially when you're like, "I didn't explain it clearly." I think there's something to just letting go of some of the veil of perfection and just being like, "I'm making a thing and it's an ongoing experiment in evolving it, making it better."   Mason: (59:04) I think it'd be really nice for it to happen more and more. Because I mean, you've provided so much, it'd be nice to see... it would have to go. I'm sure every business or offering or charity or whatever it is, it's always going hit a point where it's like, "All right, things need to change. And it needs to take on a new way of being... new way of being structured or professional," or whatever it is. I can imagine yours is with that many people behind it, you could step it up and take it to another level. It's just going, "All right, cool. Do we just sit, let it be here or do we jump into the unknown once again and take it forward?" Either way, I think the resources and the offering is magic. It'd be awesome to see it continue to evolve and grow into the world so people can have that place and make this more of a norm, make the knowledge more of a norm and the insight that you can actually restore your vision, a norm as well.   Jake Steiner: (01:00:02) Yeah. Just be happy, the people that listen to your podcast and enjoy your approach, to maybe look at their eyes and go, "Maybe I'll take care of these things a little bit."   Mason: (01:00:16) We're doing all HR stuff and at the moment, like that's where our structure is coming in, bringing more and more love to everyone working in the business and this is the one of the resources... we have blue blocker glasses and things that people can wear, but just start putting this... because we're growing, put this into the fabric of the... a bit more into the fabric of the workflow. And for everyone, taking pride and this leads a little distinctions of how to ensure that our eyeball doesn't become elongated and we don't start deteriorating the health of the fluid within it, and just these little things you've mentioned, it's just like, bang, I'm on. I'm on. I'm implementing that right now. Some people are wearing glasses, I'm going to send them this just as an option. But for those that don't... I feel it right now, I've been staring at the screen all day. I'm like, "Jeez, the blurriness."   Jake Steiner: (01:01:09) Buy an eye chart. Buy an eye chart. Hang it up somewhere in your house, and just mark a spot that's the right distance from it. And sometimes when you walk past it, just stop there and look at it. And start noticing how that goes up and down. Because that prompts action, then you're like, "Well, maybe I'm going to not do four hours, maybe three hours." Because there's also a time where the muscle starts to lock up, for me that is three hours. I spend more than three hours in front of a screen, I can't see the small line on the eye chart anymore.   Mason: (01:01:38) Wow.   Jake Steiner: (01:01:39) The muscle just locked up. And then if I take an hour walk, I can see that line again. So I know what my screen limit is before that muscle just gets stuck for the rest of the day. An eye chart is super handy just as a quick reference of, can you read the thing still or can't you.   Mason: (01:01:56) I mean that immediate feedback, as well. Where do we get the eye chart? Is that just something we purchase in our local area?   Jake Steiner: (01:02:04) Yeah, or you can print it out. I have some somewhere, but I don't know where. It should be easy to get, just buy it online somewhere.   Mason: (01:02:11) We'll have a look, see if we can find it on your site and put it in the resources for the podcast, otherwise like you said, I'm sure it's just one of those things that's easy to order online. But that's good. I'm definitely doi

Drop Da Mic.
EPISODE 237: FROM THE BATES TO THE BAY (PSYCHO 1960 Film Discussion)

Drop Da Mic.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 76:37


In this very special episode, we invited Bay Area native, Ryan Jiminez onto the show for a review of Director, Alfred Hitchcock's formative classic, ‘PSYCHO.' Tune in for our brand new pop culture news and weekly recommendations for both, TV and film!

First Timers Movie Club
Psycho (1960) with guest Solymar Romero

First Timers Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 139:09


On this episode, Patrick and Lolo kick off the Halloween season with guest Solymar Romero by showing her Alfred Hitchcock's horror classic, PSYCHO for the very first time! A masterful film of terror, this is not one you want to miss. But will Solymar like it? Will it turn out to be everything it's been hyped up to be? And what on earth is so fascinating about this one movie that we talk about it for over two hours, making this our longest podcast to date?! Listen now to find out!Vote First Timers Movie Club the Best Local Podcast here: https://vote.thepitchkc.com/arts-and-entertainment/best-local-podcastNew episodes of First Timers Movie Club come out every other Friday so click SUBSCRIBE and rate us five stars to make sure you don't miss our next episode!Have a favorite (or least favorite) famous movie that you think we should've seen? Reach out to IX Film Productions on Twitter, Instagram or email and we'll add it to our list!Watch Solymar Romero in Under The Sun: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rQ8RxxVmME&tDon't miss our 2021 Oscars series and the upcoming Harry Potter Episode exclusively on our Patreon: www.patreon.com/ixfilmproductionsFollow IX Film Productions for podcast updates, stand up comedy, original web shorts and comedy feature films at:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ixfilmproductionsTwitter: www.twitter.com/ixproductionsInstagram: @IXProductionsYouTube: www.youtube.com/ixfp"First Timers Movie Club" is brought to you by IX Film Productions."Making the World a Funnier Place one Film at a Time"MusicThe Curtain Rises by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5007-the-curtain-risesLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 237: Cross country's big statement

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 51:56


This week on the Bobcast we are celebrating our cross country teams winning the Bates Super Cross Country Shootout, including the women's squad outracing No. 5 Tufts. Plus, the field hockey team earned its first NESCAC win in convincing fashion and football battled Amherst to the wire. All that and more! Interviews this episode: 1:27 -- Ed Argast, Interim Head Coach, Football. 6:32 -- Mohamed Diawara '23, Wide Receiver, Football. (Male Bobcat of the Week) 14:37 -- Riley Burns '22, Field Hockey captain. (Female Bobcat of the Week) 21:15 -- Tara Ellard '22, Women's Cross Country captain. 27:57 -- Jackson Donahue '22, Men's Cross Country. 33:26 -- Simon Redfern '22, Placekicker, Football. (NESCAC Special Teams Player of the Week) 43:05 -- Paul Gastonguay '89, Head Coach, Tennis.

The Nathan Barry Show
048: Ali Abdaal - Building Multiple Income Streams as a Content Creator

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 72:25


Ali Abdaal is a Doctor, writer, podcaster, entrepreneur, and YouTube sensation. Ali has grown his YouTube subscriber base to over 2 million, and writes a weekly newsletter titled Sunday Snippets. Sunday Snippets covers productivity tips, practical life advice, and the best insights from across the web.Ali studied medicine at Cambridge University. He worked as a Doctor in the United Kingdom before taking time off to explore his other interests. His YouTube channel covers medicine, tech, lifestyle, and productivity. Ali also co-hosts a weekly podcast with his brother, called Not Overthinking.After learning to code at age 12, Ali started doing freelance web design and development. He enjoys playing piano, guitar, and singing covers of mainstream pop songs. You can find occasional videos of Ali's music prowess on his Instagram page.In this episode, you'll learn: Ali's savvy insights for growing your YouTube subscriber base A proven formula for writing content titles that get clicks Ali's playbook for taking your podcast to a whole new level Links & Resources The Nathan Barry Show on Apple Podcasts The Nathan Barry Show on Spotify Sean McCabe Pat Flynn ConvertKit Ibz Mo Casey Neistat Sara Dietschy Chris Guillebeau Tim Ferriss Derek Sivers School of Greatness podcast Lewis Howes Dave Ramsey Michael Hyatt Cal Newport Crash Course John Green Hank Green Daily Content Machine Andrew D. Huberman Reboot Dan Putt Tiago Forte David Perell Jim Collins The Flywheel Effect Impact Theory podcast The Tim Ferriss show Seth Godin Scrivener James Clear Ali Abdaal's Links Follow Ali on Twitter Watch Ali on YouTube Check out Ali on Instagram Ali's newsletter Ali's website Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Ali:YouTube can change your life, but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years. If you do that, I guarantee you it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers on it. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have, or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee.You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode, I talk to Ali Abdaal. Over the last four and a half years he's built his YouTube channel from zero to 2 million subscribers.He's who all of my friends who are into YouTube turn to for advice. He's got a paid course. He's got a substantial email newsletter. He started out as a doctor and then has made the switch into a full-time YouTuber. So anyway, I'll get out of the way, but, before we dive into the show, if you could do me a favor after the show: if you could go and subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, wherever you listen.That helps with downloads. If you could also write a review, I really appreciate it.Now it's on to the show, with Ali.Ali, welcome to the show.[00:01:17] Ali:Thanks for having me. This is really cool. I've been following you on the internet in a non-weird way since 2016. I remember once in, I think it was 2018, I discovered your 2015 podcast series all about launching an ebook, and pricing plans, and all this stuff.It was so good. Now we're looking to do eBooks and things like that. Thank you for all the inspiration on that front.[00:01:46] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Well, it's fun to have you on, it's been fun to watch you grow. I was actually on a hike with our mutual friend, Sean McCabe after he moved to Boise, my hometown. He was talking about you, and I hadn't come across your stuff yet. And I was like, oh, I gotta check it out.And now I'm watching a whole bunch of videos. And then of course we've been internet friends for, for awhile now.[00:02:08] Ali:I'm now a customer of ConvertKit as well, for the last few months.[00:02:11] Nathan:Yeah. Let's see. Okay. So I want to dive into your story and get some context because you have an interesting path of finishing school, like a substantial amount of schooling, and then diving into the world of being a doctor, and then transitioning out of it.What was the plan? Let's start.[00:02:36] Ali:Yeah. for a bit of context, I spent six years in medical school, and then two years working full-time as a doctor in the UK national health service before deciding to take a break. In that break I intended to travel the world, but then the pandemic happened and I ended up becoming a full-time creator on the internet by virtue of the fact that I didn't have a job when it was a pandemic.When I first decided to apply to med school, I'd been into the whole entrepreneurship thing since the age of 12. I learned to code. I started doing freelance web design and freelance web developer from age 13 onwards. So, in school, in high school, middle school, like we call it secondary school in the UK, I'd rush back home from school when I finished off my homework in record time, and then just be plugging away at like PHP or some HTML or some like jenky Java script. I used to make $5 here and there, and be like, yes, I'm, I'm making magical internet money. Every year when, when I was in, in high school, my friends and I would come up with a new business idea.So, we started this multi-level marketing thing and some other random pyramid schemes, and random paid surveys, and whatever we could do to make money circa 2006 to 2010. So, I always had this interest in entrepreneurship, but then when it came to figuring out what to do with my life, I was getting decent grades in school and because I'm Asian, and everyone in the UK who is Asian, their parents are doctors. So, it was like a default path for me to just like, oh, you know, why, why don't I become a doctor? And I kind of reasoned at the time that if I could be a doctor, and also be a coder on the side, that's like a more interesting combination than if I were just a coder or just a doctor.Not that there's anything wrong with either, but I felt the combination would be more interesting because of the synergy. And so I ended up going to med school, which is a weird, a weird reason for going to,[00:04:24] Nathan:Interesting to him, interesting to you, or interesting to[00:04:27] Ali:Yeah.[00:04:28] Nathan:Family friends.[00:04:30] Ali:Oh no, not family and friends, interesting to me, because it would make life more fun and interesting to me because it unlocks opportunities for creating a tech startup or whatever, further down the line. I think at the time I was drinking the zero to one Kool-Aid[00:04:45] Nathan:Well, Peter Thiel[00:04:46] Ali:Yeah, like that, where I first came across the idea that like, innovation happens at the intersection of multiple fields.And so, you know, the printing press was invented by the guy who really understood, I dunno, looms and how spinning yarn worked, but also understood like something else about something else, and combined these ideas to create something cool. So, I always found it in my head that, Hey, why don't I get really good at the medical stuff and be a really good doctor?And then on the side, if I know how to code, then I can like combine those to spin off some, fit some something interesting further down the line.[00:05:14] Nathan:I think that resonates with me of like,I think that people, especially like online creators who go and do one thing very specifically, maybe don't have as much of an interesting angle, to put into it. Like I think that some of what made me more interested.This is like, they're just hypothesizing, teaching like online business and, and marketing is having a design background, even though those are much more overlapping than say, like a big a doctor and, and, you know, a web developer, you know, as you were starting into it. But, but I think having those skills in another area makes you more interesting as a person and it gives you better stories to tell, and then it gives you a better perspective.And you're not like just pulling from the same industry over and over again.[00:05:58] Ali:Yeah, no, exactly. I, I often find that the, the YouTubers that I seem to kind of, and the, and the, and the bloggers as well, who I follow more of are the ones who seem to have multiple interests. And it kind of gets to that question of like, you know, the, the thing that holds everyone back around, like, what's my niche, like, oh, but I have to pick one thing and get really good at that.And yes, that does have some merit to it, but I often also think that, yeah, but you know, how, how can you carve out a niche for yourself? That's a combination of the other, other stuff that you're interested in, And so instead of trying to be the best, I don't know, productivity YouTuber, it's like, you're the only productivity YouTuber.Who's also a doctor who also runs a business that that's kind of how I think about it.[00:06:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. Okay. So, when you're in med school, when you started your YouTube channel or you're wrapping up med school, right.[00:06:45] Ali:That's right. Yeah. So, I started the YouTube channel in my penultimate year, so I, I, I, I done five years of med school at this point. I'd set up a few businesses. I had like two SAS products that I was using to side hustle, income, most my, my way through med school. And then in 2017, when I was in my final year, the YouTube channel actually started out as a content marketing strategy for my, my business, that business was helping other people get into med school.It was like that standard thing. Once you do something, you then teach other people how to do the thing. and it was like, you know, the creative economy before it was really called that where[00:07:20] Nathan:Yeah,[00:07:20] Ali:You kind of follow that model. And so the YouTube channel started.[00:07:23] Nathan:Because you were you teaching people like test prep[00:07:25] Ali:Exactly. Yeah. And it's so similar to pet Flynn story as well.You know, he, he started off teaching people how to do some architecture exam. I started up teaching people how to do the med school admissions exams, and that's kind of transitioned into a coaching business, which then transitioned into the YouTube channel.[00:07:40] Nathan:Okay. And so as the YouTube channel started to grow, like, what were some of those first milestones, you know, as you're getting to, how long did it take for you to a thousand subscribers and then maybe, you know, 5,000 or 10,000? Like what milestones stand out.[00:07:52] Ali:Yeah, so I started in the summer of 2017 and it took me six months and 52 videos to get to the first thousand subscribers, six months in 52 videos. I was putting out two videos every week while preparing for med school finals and kind of neglecting my exams for the sake of YouTube, because I could see the YouTube thing was like, oh, I really want to do this.I think the ROI on being a YouTube or is going to be higher than the ROI and getting an extra 2% in my med school finals. that was, that was the theory. Anyway, So, yeah, it took six months of the channel to get a thousand subscribers, another like four or five months for it to get up to 5,000 subscribers.And at the point where I was at around 4,005,000 subscribers, there were two like really good things that happened. Number one was a collab with a much bigger utuber. his name is Ibz Mo. So he and I got to know each other through university and he had 60 K at the time. And so he and I did a collab which took off and helped the channel get exposure.But also there was a video that I made my, my very first video that actually went viral, which was a video about how to study for exams. now this video is a bit weird because like I'd actually planned for it to happen like a whole year before I made it. So when I started YouTube, I, I sort of consumed the hell out of everything on the internet, around how to be a YouTuber and, Sara Dietschy and Casey Neistat had this thing whereby Casey Neistat, enormous YouTuber, Sarah DG would take YouTube who was smaller at the time.She went from 40 cases. Over to like one through over a hundred, a hundred thousand, basically overnight because Casey Neistat shouted her out. and the way that she described that, and I, that I found in some random interview, like on the YouTube grapevine, was that you, you benefit from a collaboration with a bigger utuber, but you only benefit from it.If there is already a backlog of really high quality content on your channel. And so I took that to heart and I knew that, okay, at some point I want to do a collab with a bigger utuber. And at some point I want to try and make specifically a video on how to study for exams, but I knew number one, I needed to have a backlog of hot, cold, high quality content because otherwise no one would care.And secondly, I knew that it would take me about a hundred videos to get good enough at making videos to actually be able to make a decent video about exams. And so that was like my 82nd or something video, which I, I, I I'd had in the back of my mind for so long since, because since getting started button, you know, I need to get my skills up.I need to put in the quantity so that I can actually make videos that are hopefully.[00:10:06] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting. Yeah, because coming, doing a collab and coming to a channel and it's like, okay, they have four videos. And the one that I saw in the collab is actually the best one they've ever done. Like it's sort of, it doesn't have the same ring to it as if you come in and be like, wow, this is incredible.Like, one of my favorite bloggers, you know, it's separate from the YouTube space, but I got him, Chris Guillebeau was an author and blogger and I followed him in the early days. And I had the experience of, he had written a guest post for Tim Ferris and I was reading Tim versus blogging. This was probably 2011, maybe.And I was like, oh, this is really good. I love it. I think it was on actually on travel, hacking, you know, credit card points and all of that. And so I clicked over to his site and I think. Over the next, like two days, I just read the entire website, you know, Nate, it was like years worth of blog posts and all that, but that was the experience.Right. The guest posts is a collab of some kind and then coming over and you're like, you're just deep dive and consume everything rather than the experience of coming over and be like, oh, okay. That's interesting. You know, and like moving along and the back catalog is what, what, drives that?[00:11:09] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I had, I had that exact experience with Derek Sivers who I discovered through the Tim Ferriss show and Mr. Money mustache, but it's coming through a temporary. I was like, all right, I'm spending the next week of my life. Just binge reading all of your blog posts that you've ever written for the last 20 years.And now it's like, I've got this information downloaded into my brain.[00:11:24] Nathan:Yeah. I love it. Okay. So one thing that I wondered about is as you spend all this time, you know, on med school and, and then, you know, becoming a doctor, it's a big investment. then you also have this love for YouTube and the channels growing. Like the channel now has 2 million subscribers and, and, this is wild success.How do you think about. Like when you made that switch to YouTube, as your full-time thing and leaving behind, at least for now your career as a doctor, how did you make that decision? How did sunk cost play into it? You know, all that,[00:11:59] Ali:Yeah. So this is, it's still something I think about to this day. It's like, there's this balance between how much do I want to be a doctor? And how much do I want to be a YouTuber? when I made the decision at the time, it was, so it was about actually this time, last year, where I took a break from medicine intending to travel the world, but then pandemic happened and ended up being a full-time YouTuber.And then like back then, what I was thinking was I'm, I'm only going to do this for a little while. Cause this YouTube thing is going well right now, the problem with YouTube and like the creative stuff in general is that there's not a lot of like longevity to it necessarily. Like there are so few YouTubers who are big today that were also big 10 years ago.And so that's the thing that I constantly keeps me up at night. Like how will I continue to stay relevant? You know, X number of years from now. And to me, the medicine thing always seemed like a great, you know, my main hustle is being a doctor and my side hustle is being a YouTuber so that no matter what happens, you know, at least I'll have a, a full back career to kind of fall back on.[00:12:53] Nathan:Pretty sure doctors have irrelevant 10 years now.[00:12:55] Ali:Yeah, I'm pretty sure doctors will be relevant. So I wouldn't, I wouldn't have to worry in that context. in the UK, the way the medical system works, there's also like, after you're a doctor for two years, at that point, there's a very natural gap and a lot of people will take some time out to, to go traveling or whatever.And just so happened that COVID happened to that exact point just as I just, as I left to take a break. But I was, I was on the, the school of greatness podcast with Louis hose, last, last week. And he, he was calling me out on this. He was saying that basically I was bullshitting myself because I think the reason why I was holding onto the medicine thing was a profound sense of risk aversion.It was number one. The what if I, what if I lose everything at least then I'll still be able to be a doctor. And number two, it was a case of like, oh, but. I, you know, my brand was built up of the back of being a doctor. And if I lose that, then you know, who am I, why does anyone listen to what I have to say?Who will care what I have to think anymore? Because now I'm just a YouTuber rather than a doctor, which has like prestige and it has like clout. And he basically just called me out and dismantled, like all of my BS on all of those funds. And that really, really got me thinking. Cause like, you know, ultimately the thing that I care about is teaching and inspiring people.And if I think about, if I could only do one thing for the rest of my life, it would not be saving lives as a doctor. It would be teaching people. And that's the thing that YouTube lets you do and lets you do it at scale. And that's the thing, the internet that today. And so now right now I'm going through this phase of having to really think about like, am I only holding onto the doctor thing because of because of fear. And am I holding onto fear and sunk costs, which is obviously like a stupid thing. do I really want to go all in, on the YouTube stuff and then the business stuff, because my real passion is teaching. I don't know any, any thoughts on that balancing, like the fear and like the sensible decision would like following your passion.And it sounds so cliche, but yeah.[00:14:48] Nathan:Yeah. No, it all makes sense to me. The place that I would go is, you know, as you, cause there's, there's fear on both sides, right? I've given up the, being a doctor and then there's fear of what does this career as a, as a creator, as a YouTuber look like in five years, in 10 years. And I would lean in on that side and try to figure that out.Like who are the people, questions I would ask, who are the people who. You admire, who have had longevity in their careers. Right. Cause in the, in the blogging world that I've been a part of the last I want to spend, I guess, almost exactly 10 years now. There's a lot of people who are not around anymore, you know, like they're still alive.I'm sure they're living wonderful lives, but they don't live internet, you know, internet visible lives anymore. and then also seeing like what, what does your business look like in that? It's how you do dependent? Is it, what does that look like? So as you look five years ahead, this something I want to ask later, but, but I'm curious for now, like five years, 10 years ahead, like what are you doing?What's the, what does your, your audience look like? And what role does YouTube or other things play in[00:15:50] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I think if, if, if I think about people who have longevity, I think you're one of the examples that comes to mind where you started off as a blogger, and then you did the ebook thing, and then you went into the SAS thing, which is now like, absolutely like, you know, exploded. so that's really cool.The other people who I look to are, you know, people like Tim Ferris, who. Has gotten bigger every year, since before I work, we came out and it wasn't a one hit wonder. We started off with the books and then he did a great job of transitioning into the podcast where now it's less about him and more about kind of spotlighting other people and building this almost the institution of his, his personal brand, which is built off of teaching people.Cool, cool things. yeah, I think about it, like in that context, like the thing that you and Tim have in common is that you've both gone, moved away from being very personal brand heavy and more towards being somewhat institutionalized in your case and convert kit in his case, through his podcast.And that's kind of how I see it for myself in a dream world, whereby let's say five years from now, I'm still like doing YouTube videos and teaching people and I'm learning things. And then teaching people, the things that I've been learning. Cause I, I enjoy that kind of stuff, but it's become, becomes less about me personally and more about kind of showcasing other experts.Building a team and building a brand that can be dissociated from my personal name, if need be.[00:17:09] Nathan:Is there a blueprint that comes to mind? So I think about this, a lot of where, where this goes with the highest leverage point to direct an audience to, I —-wrote an article called the billion Abdaalar creator, that is about like this exactly of, you know, if you have an audience of 10,000 or a hundred thousand or a million people, like, what is the thing that you would point that to long-term.And so I'm always looking for these blueprints that other people have created, right? Like I think, Dave Ramsey would be an example of someone who has taken this.Podcasting a radio show is basically a podcast. you know, and taking it to this extreme of, I don't know what they have, I'm making up numbers, but in the ballpark of like 500 to a thousand employees, they've got like this franchise thing, they've got courses that they're, you know, you can sign up for everywhere.Like it's this massive media empire that I can draw a pretty consistent line from, you know, blogger with 10,000 subscribers or 10,000 podcast downloads consistently to that of like continually working away at it. Not to guarantee you that, that you'll hit that, but you know, there'll be other people on Michael Hyatt or, anything else or there's the software direction that I went.So are there like specific blueprints that you look at and be like, okay, that, but[00:18:30] Ali:Yeah.[00:18:31] Nathan:Of it.[00:18:32] Ali:Yeah. I think for me, the playbook that I'm currently following is trying to be a cross between Tim Ferris and Cal Newport.In that Tim, Tim Ferriss in the context of starting a podcast, interviewing experts on stuff. And I need me to, I probably add someone to that. Tim Ferriss, Cal Newport, and the crash course, the YouTube channel, which is run by Hank and John Green, whereas also taking the Tim Ferriss model of podcast, interviewing other people.And then, then that becomes its own kind of content, which helps people, the Cal Newport model of actually I think he he's done a great job of straddling the two worlds of old world prestige of being a professor at Stanford or wherever he's a professor at a part-time and also being a part-time writer and blogger and internet personality type person.And then like taking elements of those and combining it with like the YouTube airy type thing, whereby I think, I think what's missing from the world of podcasts these days is that there are so many podcasts and there is so much incredible wisdom, which back in the day used to be locked up inside either textbooks or in scientific journals.Now, the people who write those scientific journal review papers are being interviewed on all the podcasts. but they're being interviewed in the context of a three hour long discussion. And yes, you could listen to the three hour long discussion. Yes. You could listen to the podcast clips that they've got, that they've been posting through Daily Content Machine on Twitter or whatever, but it's just not as actionable as someone actually creating a compelling YouTube video.So, you know, you could listen to Andrew Huberman interview, the world's expert on longevity about all the eight different things you should do to increase your life. And very few people would follow that advice because there's no in a digestible format. And so if I'm thinking like what I'm, what I'm thinking is that if we can do the podcast thing, we can do the kind of Cal Newport thing of combining old world prestige with new world, kind of content, and also do it in the format of like YouTube videos that are accessible to the mass market and, you know, a lay person audience that is kind of the combination that I see myself doing over the next like five years.And that feels quite exciting.[00:20:32] Nathan:Yeah. So that target of like the 10 to 15 minute YouTube video, that's really well crafted and architected to have the table of contents and even skip to the sections. And it's like, look, this is what you need. And it's not just what was covered in an hour long interview, but also like, and then we pulled in this and when they referenced this thing, like, this is what they're talking about.We can illustrate it with visuals and everything else.[00:20:55] Ali:Absolutely. Yeah. And that's the thing that I'm hooked. So in the process of building a team around, which is something I wanted to talk to you about because you've built a big team over time, I was speaking to Derek, you're a director of marketing as well about building a team and he had, so he had loads of advice to share.So that's, that's a challenge for me right now. It's like, you know, two years ago, it was just me last year, this time, last year, there were three, three of us full-time well, two full-time. It was me working as a doctor and a part-time assistant, and now there's 12 of us, but now we're hiring another 10 people.So by next month it's going to be maybe like 20, 20 of us a hundred. It's all those problems associated with scaling a team and leadership and management. And that's the kind of stuff that, I've been really as sort of very much on the steep learning curve of, and that I'm very excited about getting better at,[00:21:44] Nathan:Yeah. what's the reason that you're growing the team so quickly.[00:21:48] Ali:Well, let's see, because we just have a lot of money. once, once we launched our, yeah, it's a, it's a, it's a good problem to have. We're just like very cash rich and expertise poor as someone described as, We launched our cohort based course part time, YouTube academy this time, last year, it did phenomenally well, I'd been doing classes on Skillshare, which started off as making like a few hundred to a few thousand a month and is now compounded to the point where we make some way between 60 and $80,000 every month, just passive income of Skillshare classes.That means that every month we're just making more and more money. And I see the, I see the numbers going up and I see them go up and I, I see basically like, well, why, why are, why aren't we doing anything with that money other than just[00:22:30] Nathan:Right.[00:22:31] Ali:every year.[00:22:32] Nathan:Okay. So really quick, since you mentioned, are you okay sharing some of the numbers, like the numbers from part-time YouTube academy?[00:22:38] Ali:Yeah. so we launched the first cohort in November last year. I think this year we're on track to do maybe like $2 million revenue and like 1.1 0.5 million profit, 1.6 million profits, something like that. next year we're hoping to take that up to like 5 million revenue. Which again, all of these feel like, like dumb numbers, I'm just plucking out of thin air.Cause it's like, I I've, I'm, I'm really bad at like projecting, protecting financials. Like it's all, it's all just a guess. Anyway, like if we could do four cohorts and sell 600 places, that would be 5.5 0.1 million revenue. It's like, that's actually, that's actually doable, but it's just such a fricking ridiculous numbers.It's like, how on earth can that be doable? It's just like, how, how does it even work?[00:23:23] Nathan:Yeah. Welcome to the internet. And, when you have substantial leverage, like things that were possible, like seemed insane before you're like, oh yeah, I know that math checks out, you know?[00:23:34] Ali:Yeah, exactly. I suppose if somebody, to you for ConvertKit was I think last I checked, you were on 20 million annual recurring.[00:23:41] Nathan:Yeah. We're at 20, 28 and a half. Now[00:23:44] Ali:Well the hell that's going to quickly compounding.[00:23:48] Nathan:The magic of compounding, This is fascinating to me because a lot of, I feel like a lot of content creators are, you know, get to your stage and they're like, okay, what, you know, what Lamborghini should I buy right now?Have you thought about putting the line beginning in your YouTube videos? I'm kidding, please.Don't[00:24:05] Ali:I mean, I've got a Tesla model three, so that was my, a splurge.[00:24:08] Nathan:That was your splurge. Yeah, exactly. you know, so interesting to me that you're hiring at the rate that you are, which is to be totally clear is the rate that we hired at ConvertKit like slow at first of like two or three, four, and then it started to, like started to really take off. And I think in, let me think how long eight months we went from four people to 21 people.And, and that worked really well for us. And we were growing really, really quickly. And, and, like in that time, I think we 10 X revenue, like going. 30,000 a month in revenue to 300,000 a month and revenue. and so that that's absolutely a wild ride. And then we kind of paused there for a second and we like methodically about, okay, what are the roles that we need?How do we build the team culture within the group that we have? How can we invest in those relationships? We also had our first team, like in-person team retreat at that time. and so I think it's really important as you grow a team that quickly to make sure you're really, really, yeah. Intentional about, the team culture, which like, that's one of the things like, what does that even mean?How do you, how do you do that? And the way that I do it is being clear about the mission of what you're building and why. and then investing deeply in the relationships with each person.[00:25:32] Ali:Okay. And what does, what does that mean?[00:25:34] Nathan:Was, so you're hiring all these people, right? And let's say you're hiring from you're very much the face of the.And so if someone's applying to like, oh, I want to work with Ali, right? Like, let's do that. And so they have this relationship with you and what you don't want is this, you'd end up with this hub and spoke model where you're the hub and everyone has a relationship with you and they don't have it with each other.And that's just the, it's a natural way that things are joining, right. Or the way it comes about. I, the same thing when people wanted to start working at ConvertKit, they wanted to work at convergent, but they a lot wanted to work with me. And so you have to invest deeply in turning that hub and spoke into like a spiderwebs where if you're not at the core of it, they all are riffing on ideas.They, you know, understand each other's, families and like individual values and everything else. and that matters more. And so you have to know that the natural state of things is not ideal and you need to like aggressively work, to change that. So that you're less important than your own.[00:26:39] Ali:Oh, interesting. Yeah. That's exactly the challenge that we're having right now where. Still all of the things kind of flow through me, but it's, I think over the last few months, as I've gotten like business coaches and working with, with our mutual friend, Sean, as a coach, as well, and reading sort of dozens of books about like leadership and management and like org chart structure and all that jazz, we're starting to get to a point where I actually do feel like stuff is happening without me.And it's like the best feeling in the world when they're just doing stuff. And I'm like, whoa, wow. That's actually a great idea. It was so well done. And you've actually done this better, better than I would have done this. Whoa. Okay. This is really cool. so hopefully as the team expands, yeah, the, the, the culture thing is interesting.I think so far, I haven't given any thought to culture in the slightest as just sort of happened organically slash accidentally. but one of the exercises that Sean, Sean took me through was the thing of like, imagine, you know, a year from now or three years from now, what is the sort of business that you want to have?Like you go into work in the morning, like what, what do you want to say. It was only after that. I kind of thought about that, that I realized that for me, what that dream looks like, it's actually having an in-person team having like a studio, maybe, maybe in a place like London that we can invite people over to for podcasts and focus for collabs having an in-person team.Or maybe once a once a week, I have brainstorm meetings with, you know, our writers and researchers and stuff, and we figure out what we're doing. Maybe once a week, I filmed stuff for the YouTube channels. And maybe once a week, I sit down to record a podcast with someone cool. And the rest of the time I spend like chilling, or, you know, writing or reading or doing other, working on the businessy type stuff.And we have like a COO or general manager or whatever you want to call it, who runs the day-to-day operations without needing my input. and it was only really when I kind of said that out loud, I'm just going to ask, so, okay, well when you just make that happen and I was like, oh yeah, you're right.I could just make that happen. And then, because I think before I just, I, I drank the remote work Kool-Aid so, so much that I just sort of assumed that you had to hire remotely. Then I realized, hang on, given that this is the sort of business I want to be in where we're all actually in person, because it's more fun.I can just hire people who are only London. And so when we're not doing that, hiring people who are only in London, which feels weird, but it means we also have, you know, a few dozen applications rather than a few thousand to, to deal with, which is, which is kinda nice.[00:28:59] Nathan:Yeah. And that's something that when you get clear on that, and that's why so many people want, besides journaling or whatever, other journaling coaching, any, any form of getting that clarity, it's you realize that you're like following this meandering path and like, and then we can do this and then that, and then you realize like, oh, I can just draw a straight line from point a to point B and just do that now.And it's, it's so powerful and you'll save yourself a lot of trouble because then you won't be at a point, right. Where you say we've built a 25 person team. That's like, maybe there's six in London. And then, everyone else is spread throughout the world and people are loving aspects of that, but then they're feeling like the people in London are getting more time with you and right.And you go and create this major culture problems because you had an intention like, or an internal desire that you never expressed, explicitly. And then once you express that and then everyone's like, oh, okay. So I know that it's them working for you remotely right now. I know that I either long-term need to switch to being a contractor of like, just providing a service, you know, or I need to move to London or I need to fully transition out.Like, and there's like a beautiful clarity in that, that when you just keep it inside, you like no one will, no one will experience.[00:30:17] Ali:Hmm. Have you, have you got any like prompts that you find helpful in this sort of journaling thing and figuring out what you want from the business and from life?[00:30:25] Nathan:So, you and I both share a passion for coaching and I hire a coach as well as name's Dan, from an organization called reboot. so he asks all kinds of questions. one, I was navigating a scenario recently that was just really frustrating. And, he said, okay, I want you to picture when you're 40.So I'm 31 right now. So nine years from now, how would your 40 year old self looking back, you know, basically 10 years be proud of how the situation was handled. And that was a version. So basically the prompt would be like stepping forward, not just, what do you want 10 years from now, but like stepping forward and trying to really imagine that scenario.You know, what's pushing you to do, and then looking like looking back on it as a memory of how you handle this next period of difficult transition or any of that. So that'd be one version. Another is like really pushing on like the five why's and really digging in of why do you want that thing? What do you, what are you actually trying to accomplish?I'm sure there's more, butYeah. Are there others that you use.[00:31:38] Ali:Yeah, that question of why did I come across this? I can't remember where I was like to cite my sources, but, the thing of when, when making a decision, think about what decision your like 10 year older self would have wanted you to make, to be like the best version of yourself.And I've been thinking about that recently in the context of this thing of do I go all in on the YouTube thing or do I just kind of do Hoff medicine off YouTube? And I do think out of 10 years from now, I would have wanted myself to make the decision of actually just going all in on the passion project and just seeing what happens with that.If it doesn't work, it didn't work, but at least having a go rather than feeling kind of pulled in two directions, which are sort of incompatible because of the amount of time commitment that a physical career like medicine takes.[00:32:25] Nathan:Yeah. And it's hard when you're like, if you have a 10 person team and you're, you're the only one that's part-time right. Like that, that will result in, you wish you could spend more time with the team. You, you know, you being the bottleneck and things, you shouldn't be it made me think of like the, on the team side of things.There's a movie called the intern, Robert DeNiro and Hathaway.[00:32:44] Ali:No, yeah. I really enjoyed that. It[00:32:46] Nathan:It's a fun movie.And there's a scene in it. So Anne Hathaway runs this, like a fashion tech startup, but th but there's a scene early on when she's like rushing from thing to thing and everything is going to her for approval and all of this stuff.Right. And I remember watching the, how she's so important. It'd be nice to be that important. And then the second one, you stepped back and you're like, that is a terribly run business. Like, what is she doing? You know, like the whole thing, if she wasn't there, the whole thing would fall apart. Cause no one would have our approval for like the homepage designs or, or whatever else.And so, going back to the hub and spoke thing, that's the, you know, you'd like watch that little clip of the movie and then go, okay. That, but the opposite, like that's[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah,[00:33:30] Nathan:To go.[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah. There's one. So, often, you know, someone in my team will message me being like, Hey, you know, we, we need to discuss item X. can you, me and Angus hop on a call and discuss item X. And these days are reply with, can you and Angus discuss item X? Like, do I absolutely have to be on this call?And they're often like, oh no, I guess you don't. Yeah. You know, I mean, I'm just gonna take care of it. I'm like great, wonderful. and I'm always surprised when that works. it's like, oh yeah, this doesn't work. I actually don't need to be involved in everything. but I guess it's, it is that balance of, and I think sometimes the team does feel frustrated that I I'm involved in too many things.I've heard and they feel like maybe I don't necessarily trust all of their decisions. it's like, you know, my name that is going on all this stuff and I trust, but I want to, I want to be able to verify, like if I ask why was something done? Like why, why that pricing plan, rather than that pricing plan,[00:34:22] Nathan:Right.[00:34:22] Ali:Like a reason behind it beyond, oh, it's just, we just sort of plucked numbers out of thin air.[00:34:26] Nathan:Yeah. So two things that makes me think of is one, creating a culture where asking questions is encouraged and not just, Like asking questions of like, Hey, could you explain this to me? I truly don't understand it, but, but also like asking for, is there a reason behind this? You know, why did you do that?And then the other side, when people come to you and say like, Hey, what do you think we should do? Then you ask them, what do you think we should do?And then going like, oh, well I think X, Y, and Z. And you're like, okay, why do you think that because of this great, let's do that. You know, you have more and more conversations where like people come to you and then they make the decision and[00:35:05] Ali:Yeah,[00:35:05] Nathan:Place.[00:35:06] Ali:Yeah, yeah. I'd love to get to that point. I think I need to do a better job of, of doing that. the most, the most obvious example is like when we're brainstorming video content ideas and we're coming up with titles. so we had a meeting earlier today and, you know, the team came up with a few concepts and like 20 titles for each one.And then I made the final decision. I was like, oh, I kind of liked the sound of like title number five. but what I probably should do in that context is, okay, Gareth, if you were making this video, what title would you go for? And then kind of seeing what happens. And I guess there is an element of like, you know, I, I trust my gut on what makes a good title more than I trust anyone else's in the team Scott's or what makes a good title.But I'd like to be able to either train someone it's hard to train someone for this, like find someone who's got like trust more. And so who, who I can just fully outsource the responsibility of coming up with a decent title for, because it is such a huge part of what makes a successful YouTube video[00:36:00] Nathan:Yeah. Okay. On those lines. When you make a video, do you know how often do you know when it's going to be like a video that really hits?[00:36:09] Ali:Think about 20% of the time.I can, I have a gut feeling that, okay, this could be a banger. and th the way I think about it in my head is sort of in terms of Banga potential. So a video called I dunno, nine passive income idea is how I make $27,000 a week that has high bang of potential, a video call.The power of positive thinking the potential, like that's not going to be back. It's like, okay, can we increase the bang of potential by making the title more clickbait? and so for example, you know, I've been working with a life coach for the last few months. I want to make a video about it. I've been thinking, you know, how, like really the thing I worked with them on was how to figure out what I want from life.But a video called how I'm, how to figure out what you want from life. You know, maybe two out of five bang of potential, a video called I hired a life coach for $3,000. Here's what I learned. That's got bag of potential. And so often it's just like a tweaking of the title where it's like the more click baity and sensationalized the title that is annoyingly often.The thing that chorus that correlates most strongly with how much of a banger is this city you're going to be. And the formula that I try and use is sensational click baity title combined with like very deep nuanced. So that someone clicks on the video thinking, huh? And then they're very, very impressed by the production value by the structure, by the academic newness of it, by how awful it is.I think it's crossed the Pepsi, at least that's the intention.[00:37:32] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting to me. I have this like running fantasy as I teach. People how to build wealth and make money. Like, those are some of my favorite topics. I can talk about them all day. And so I was joking with someone that I was going to do, like these real estate seminars, you know, that you see advertised where it's really scammy or you're really just paying for that person's private jet.You know, or it's like, it's the, the MLM equivalent, multilevel marketing equivalent of whatever. Like I'm going to use the same tactics, but then like actually deliver real value. And like the ticket that I charged would just be like 50 bucks and it all go to, I don't know, clean water, charity water, or something like that, you know, basically saying like, I'm going to hook people in with the same thing, clickbait and then deliver, like substantial value that will actually be life-changing.Yeah. And so[00:38:23] Ali:Yeah.[00:38:23] Nathan:The same thing. I like it.[00:38:25] Ali:Yeah. I think it's a great idea because you kind of need to use the clickbait. Like there's literally no way someone's going to click on something. there's a channel, V very, to cm, which made an amazing video, like a few days ago, about the difference about the importance of clickbait and how, and how much it works.And his overall point was that like click, click bait is kind of the wrong word. There is sort of, I think, I think the two terms where there's this sort of like intrigue Bates, which is that, you know, oh, this is interesting. I want to, I want to click on this. And then there is, I can't remember what he said, but it's like, sort of trashed bait, which is that I'm going to stick a bikini model on a thumbnail and has nothing to do with that.But, and so there's those two, two different ones where like, in a way, the way that you title something or the title of your book or the cover of some. It's so, so important for getting the message across. And we shouldn't see that as being a bad thing. Whereas the word clickbait, it includes, you know, things like what is what what's a good headline designer.What's good marketing coffee, but it really shouldn't because clickbait has, it is a dirty word, but it, it shouldn't be because the cover of something is so important to how that thing is perceived and whether people are going to see it or not.[00:39:33] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. How do you think about the thumbnails and then like the, say the first 30 seconds of the video, those are two separate questions, but as both of those in, in driving engagement,[00:39:44] Ali:Yeah. So thumbnail is really, really important. I think on our channel, we were bad at thumbnails. I'm not a fan of our thumbnail style. we're trying to evolve and iterate on it over time whereby the, you know, and so w w whenever someone's an early stage, utuber, it's like, you're, you're uploading the video.And then you think about the title. And then you think, okay, let me find a, still from the video that I can use with someone else, and then maybe you downloaded it, ramp up the contrast saturation, blah, blah, blah, sticker, clarity, filter on it, and maybe put some text on it in Canada. That's like the, the new YouTube, YouTube way of doing it.When you become a little bit more pro you start thinking of the title in advance anything, okay, what's the title of this video going to be, and then you make the video and you've got the title already. but the thumbnail is still a bit of an afterthought because it's, it's quite hard to think about something else.And that's the point where we're at. and the gold standard is where you have full about the title. And you have literally made the thumbnail before you even think about writing the script for the video. And that is a place where we would like to get to. so we're looking to hire like a graphic designer and, you know, a YouTube channel producer whose job it's going to be to work with a graphic designer at any time, because we, we we've got hundreds of ideas at the top of our pipeline, but at the moment, our bottleneck is in developing those ideas, crucially with a decent title of decent thumbnail and a rough talk, rough amount of talking points.And so, yeah, we're doing everything we can to make the thumbnail more of a first-class citizen, because it's just so stupidly important on YouTube. And in fact, often, you know, if, when I've heard YouTubers would like 10 million plus subscribers speak about thumbnails, they view the thumbnail as being even more important than the title, because the thumbnail is the first thing that really catches the viewer's eye.And the first thing that they see. so yeah, I think we do vaginal thumbnails. Well, relatively speaking, and we're trying to improve at it. I think equally the first 30 seconds is just ridiculously important where everyone's attention is so like all over the place, but if you don't hook the viewer within the first like five seconds, you see that huge drop off in engagement.And again, other other YouTubers that I look up to really, really obsess over the first 30 seconds to one minute of the video and when we teach our YouTube, of course, and we analyze like, what makes a good, like what do these sort of 5 million plus view videos happen? It's like often there's like a cut every single second in the first 30 seconds, like some new piece of gear or something happening on screen.It's just like so rapid and fast and really holds your attention. Whereas for the rest of the video, you can kind of switch to a car every five seconds or something happening every 10 seconds, the ten second rule. but certainly the first 30 seconds, like Panama, it's gotta be like really, really, really sharp and on points.Otherwise people just don't watch.[00:42:16] Nathan:Yeah, that's fascinating. I'm realizing that it's true for a lot of channels I've seen grow really quickly are employing the same things. that's something that's I wanted to ask you about on the monetization side is you're selling a high value course, to like a big audience, you know, 2 million subscribers on YouTube.You also have a what? Lower a hundred thousand subscribers on, on email.All right.[00:42:38] Ali:Yeah.130 or something.[00:42:41] Nathan:Nice. What's the, like, how does your approach differ when in promoting that, you know, a new course, like the part-time YouTube academy on YouTube versus on email.[00:42:50] Ali:I think I'm still scared of selling. It's really bad. I need to get over it. I was, so I was really, really scared of selling like a year ago. And when I had the idea for the part-time YouTube academy, it was on like the 16th of August, 2020, where I wrote the notion page about it for the first time I was thinking, okay, you know, this, this is either going to be a Skillshare class.I eat free, or it's going to be like maybe a 50 to $200 kind of self-paced course. And you know, I can really, really over-deliver on content. Cause I know what I'm talking about here. And so $200 is an absolute steal for this. No one's ever going to complain that this is not worth it. And then I spoke to, I think people that you probably know Tiago Forte and David Perell who run their own like cohort based courses.And they challenged me. You know, what if you had to do this live? What if you had to charge a thousand Abdaalars for it, how would it change your approach to the course? And starting to think in those terms made me really changed the way that we did a personal course and it became a high, second thing. It made me realize that actually what the world needed was not, or what needed to be grandiose, like what the internet needed.It was not, another YouTube or making a self-paced course on how to be a YouTuber. The thing that's actually holding people back is the accountability and the community. And these are things that you get in a live cohort. but getting back to your point about how, like the difference in, in setting it.So we actually only advertised it on Twitter and on the meeting list. initially I didn't even mention it on YouTube because I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube. And I think the reason I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube is a problem with YouTube that I've spoken to a bunch of other creators about, which is that the people who comment on the videos do not reflect the audience at all.[00:44:29] Nathan:Right.[00:44:30] Ali:Like, if you think about who comments on a YouTube video, it's generally kids, it's generally kids with with enough time on their hands to comment on to comment on videos. And so I was always scared. Like, my audience is not going to appreciate the fact that I'm selling a high ticket course. They're going to think I'm a snake oil salesman or something like that.And my audience mental model was the people who comment on my videos. And it took me a little bit of like an epiphany to realize, hang on, the people who I'm targeting are people with jobs. People would like, you know, six figure incomes, people who want to do the creative side hustle and take it seriously.They are not the 14 to 17 year old kids commenting on my videos. And that was such a major like revelation of like, I can actually completely ignore the comments and I can just go by the analytics that tells me like 40% of my audience is age like 24 to 36 in the U S fantastic. Those are the people I want.Whereas on email, you don't really see that as so, so clearly. And so I think, and especially because I've read your stuff. Read a lot around email marketing, but so little around YouTube marketing. I'm much more comfortable selling on email than I am selling on YouTube, but it's, it's something I'm trying to get better on.So,[00:45:31] Nathan:Are you able to track attribution for signups or that kind of thing of what's coming from YouTube versus email now, right? You're doing at least some promotion of it on YouTube.[00:45:40] Ali:Yeah. we actually, so in the first cohort where we did, we didn't promote on YouTube at all. So it was like 50% Twitter, 50% email, I think for the most recent cohort, even now we don't really promote on YouTube very much. It's less just like a very, very subtle casual plug at the start of a video.I think about 30% came in through YouTube and the rest came in through again, Twitter or email.And so, but you know, one of the things that we're hiring for is a marketing marketing manager to basically just lead marketing for the YouTube academy. And that was some of the stuff that, that your pal Derek was was, was helping us with.[00:46:13] Nathan:Yeah, they're good at all of that kind of stuff of taking, I mean, all the things that I did over the years of like, oh, there's, one-off push here, they're entering into like, okay, that was great. Look at the results we got from it. Also, we're going to do it as a system now, and it's going to work like this and it's going to drive consistent results over time, rather than like these spikes or that sort of thing, which I'm good. okay. Something else like in that journey, we kind of left off as you were, you know, I guess the last we're talking about YouTube numbers was, you know, like five, 10,000 subscribers. I want to hear a little bit more about going from that 10,000 to 100,000 and then like, I think it's a huge jump, but a hundred thousand to 2 million.[00:46:54] Ali:I think it is absolutely fancy. It's just the law of compounding and consistency and, you know, the results happen very, very slowly and then very, very fast. And before you know it, you know, Jim Collins, I thing has that model of the flywheel that it takes. It takes a hell of a lot of energy to get going, but once it starts to go, then it, it becomes unstoppable.I think it's, it's the case for any interesting kind of compounding could growth projectory, you know, YouTube channels, convert kits, any software platform that's growing. and so in year one, I think we hit maybe like 20,000 subscribers by the end of it. Then year two was probably the next few hundred thousand year three was the next like million in year four.It's just wrapped up wait, where we just hit the 2 million mark. And then at the end of year four, so it was just, you know, perfectly matches it maps onto one of those exponential growth curves. The scary thing about that is that like, if you extrapolate it further, that means we're going to be on like 4 million subscribers by next year.And that's just completely unfathomable to me because it's like, okay, that's just never gonna happen. And there is a point at which the, the compounding growth curve stops, That's the thing that I worry about. I don't really worry about it. That's the thing that I'm trying to build more and more like pillars of support around the business, a diversification, more into courses, more into books, more into stuff that is dissociated from my personal brand and also from my personal YouTube channel specifically.Yeah, it's, it's, it's weird. It's one of those things we look back on and you kind of forget like, oh yeah. When, when I started, like, I remember like when I started working as a doctor, I had, I hit 50,000 subscribers like that, that, month. And then a year later when I was having my first like appraisal, where they, your supervisor looks at how good a doctor you were.The first thing he said to me was there were 263,000 people following a YouTube channel. How the hell did that happen? And so I have that number in my head is like, oh yeah. Once I, at the, at the end of 2019, when I, when I finished my first year, I was Dr.. That was what. And then it was like my it's my second year of working as a doctor when the pandemic struck and the pandemic, me and my channel really take off because all of a sudden people were sitting home and watching YouTube videos.I think that was when we had and subscribers. and now a year on from that point, we've just had 2 million and it's just been just insane, insane growth. but obviously consistency compounding the thing I always tell my students is that, you know, YouTube can change your life. but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years.And if you do that, I guarantee it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee. You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or, you know, just opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently on YouTube.And everyone here is that advice. And like, you know, so few people actually follow that,[00:49:43] Nathan:Yeah.[00:49:44] Ali:With me. You know, I've been trying, I've been trying to hit the gym for the last like eight years. Never done it consistently until I got a personal trainer and now I'm actually seeing gains, Yeah, compounding and consistency, which is some of the stuff that you talk about as well.[00:49:55] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Is there a point in there where you saw things plateau at all? Like right. There was the, a flat part and an S-curve where you started to think, okay, I need to change something or push through this or anything like that, or has it always just been consistent?[00:50:10] Ali:Yeah. So I don't really look at the numbers very much. the way that's, you know, my, my theory of numbers has always been that like the, the numbers were, were always outside of my control. And the only thing that I could personally control were the number of videos I was putting out and how, how good I felt about the quality of those videos.That second one I got rid of very quickly, because I realized that what I feel about the quality of my own videos does not match at all what the audience feels about the quality of my videos. And therefore I'm not even gonna think about that. So the only metric I care about is just putting out two videos a week.The thing that I, I think of more. When it comes to, okay, these are, this is a bottleneck. We have to like push through. It is when the channel starts to feel like it's a bit stale. And there's been a few times, boy for four and a bit years now, or I felt like, okay, we've kind of been doing the same thing for awhile and it worked to get us here, but maybe what necessarily got us there.So most, you know, initially it was like medical school stuff or it's that Kevin doing medical school stuff for a whole year. I need to kind of branch out from this. And it was like student stuff in general. And it was like, okay, I, I'm not, I'm not graduated to the student. There's only so long. I can keep on just peddling the same stuff around how to be an effective student.It's all kind of, of it. I mean, it's, it's obvious, but it's, you know, there are a finite number of things. There's like a few techniques that work really well and you make videos about them over and over again. So it, it feel stale now more, more recently, the productivity hustle lead type stuff has started to feel a bit stuck.And so now we're now thinking, okay, what's the next level? And that was what prompted the idea to start any podcasts that we're what doing, trying to mimic basically the Tim Ferriss show or impact theory or school of greatness, or these other sorts of broadly in-person interview podcasts interviewing like entrepreneurs, CEOs, creators, and other inspiring people about how they find fulfillment in work and in life that's like the spiel for it.And I, I, I hope that will be like the next level, and be able to expand our content beyond just me talking about productivity or me talking about tech.[00:52:06] Nathan:Right.[00:52:07] Ali:Mostly based on that gut feeling of stillness that I feel okay. The writing on the wall is that this is going to decline unless we change something rather than about the numbers.[00:52:15] Nathan:Yeah. That makes sense of figuring out. I mean, it's in the quality of the product that you're delivering, you know, and making sure that you're continuing to innovate their innovative buzzword, but you know what I mean? so one other thing that I see you doing throughout all of this is making sure that it's fun.And so I'm curious for your[00:52:33] Ali:Yep.[00:52:33] Nathan:On like, what's your philosophy around making this fund? why is that important instead of just like, or in addition to the like rigorous discipline?[00:52:43] Ali:This is literally the thing that I'm writing a book about right now, which is that, you know, people have been asking me for it for years, how you said productive. Even when I was in like high school and university people would be like, oh my God, you do so much stuff. Like how, how are you so productive?How do you, how do you will have it? And it always felt a bit like, you know, people, people had this weird image of me that I was some kind of productivity guru. And now the comments on my videos, like, oh my God, he must be some sort of absolute machine. But you know, I, I, I, I line until like 11 o'clock in the morning this morning, the only thing that got me out of bed was a zoom meeting with the team.And I scroll Twitter for a solid, like 45 minutes today. And I wasted, you know, I, I finished up with a call about half an hour before we were meant to start recording. And I was like, ah, How much work are you ready to get done in half an hour at school, Twitter, often Ariba. So I'm just like genuinely really lazy.And all of the people who actually know me know that I'm really lazy and are completely baffled that the internet thinks I'm a productivity group. I think the, if there is one secret that secret is that I just make everything that I do really fun. and so I think that's got kind of two components.The first component is finding things that you already find fun and then doing them. and that's fine. it's, it's, it's quite hard to do that because often the things we find fun are the things that are not really suitable for a career. Like, you know, I enjoy playing the guitar and do I ha I enjoy playing board games.I enjoy watching Netflix. Like it's very hot. It's hard to make a kind of sustainable career out of that probabilistically. Yes, I could become the next ninja, but it's pretty unlikely I could become the next John Mayer was pretty fricking unlikely. and so the, the lever that I try and pull is figuring out ways to make the thing that I'm already doing, figuring out ways to make that more fun. And I think I've just sort of been subconsciously doing this for my whole life, because I don't like doing stuff that's boring. I only like doing stuff that's fun. And I figured out like a few different, different things I can do that. Basically it tricks my brain into having more fun, which makes me more productive, but it also makes my life more happy.And it also means I don't really need discipline because it's like fun. Like, you know, when

90 Second Narratives
Otto von Bismarck's Four-Legged Friends

90 Second Narratives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 8:15


“Historians like to say, everything has a history. Recently, the history of animals, has seen some development. The history of dogs, living closely beside humans for millennia as guards, workers, hunting aids and companions, illustrates a relationship with nature over time and sheds light on how our species has understood our role on our planet as owners, custodians, or exploiters of the natural world, and it includes ambiguous friendships…” So begins today's story from Dr. Claudia Kreklau.For further reading:Parry, Tyler D., and Charlton W. Yingling. “Slave Hounds and Abolition in the Americas.” Past & Present 246 (2020): 69–108.A.W.H. Bates, (ed.), Anti-Vivisection and the Profession of Medicine in Britain: A Social History, The Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2017. 

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast
Episode 368: Rob Zombie's 31

Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 78:11


The leaves are starting the turn. The nights are getting colder. Halloween is just around the corner and it’s the time of year where The Resurrection of Zombie 7 starts looking towards ghosts, pumpkins and candy corn. Seven weeks of … Continue reading → The post Episode 368: Rob Zombie’s 31 appeared first on The Resurrection of Zombie 7 Podcast.

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf
Jacqueline Bates - Episode 30

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 56:36


In this episode of PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf, Sasha and Photo Director Jackie Bates discuss her work with The California Sunday Magazine and Pop Up Magazine, a live magazine meant for a live audience. Sasha and Jackie also talk about some strategies for photographers to use when approaching an editor for assignment work. https://www.californiasunday.com https://www.instagram.com/popupmagazine/ New York City-based photographer Jacqueline Bates was born in Mount Kisco, New York, in 1981 and raised in Connecticut. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2004 and Master of Fine Arts in 2009, both in photography, from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. In addition to taking pictures, Bates also works in magazine publishing as a photography editor. Find out more at https://photowork.pinecast.co

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 236: Fall sports in the fast Lane

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 31:07


This week we get you ready for the football team's home opener Saturday against Amherst, as we chat with fifth-year seniors Brendan and Anthony Costa. Plus, the men's soccer team is off to a great start and a pair of Bobcats earned NESCAC honors last week! Interviews this episode: 1:21 -- Rex Lane '25, Men's Soccer. (NESCAC Player of the Week and Male Bobcat of the Week) 8:26 -- Jill Richardson '23, Women's Cross Country. (NESCAC Performer of the Week) 12:35 -- Maddy Kwei '25, Women's Golf. (Female Bobcat of the Week) 17:02 -- Brendan Costa '22 and Anthony Costa '22, Football season preview.

Jason & John
Jason & John Show, Tues., Sept. 14, 2021, Hour 3 (w/NFL player Darren Bates in Seg 2)

Jason & John

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 38:56


Jason & John Show, Tues., Sept. 14, 2021, Hour 3 (w/NFL player Darren Bates in Seg 2) ....John Wall/NBA vax info Seg 1:  New Stadium idea/Liberty Bowl Seg 2:  Darren Bates with J&J Seg 3:  Vaccination and See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hear That Podcast Growlin': A show about the Cincinnati Bengals
Bates' contract saga continues; week 1 takeaways & probably informative w/ Mo Egger

Hear That Podcast Growlin': A show about the Cincinnati Bengals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 62:16


Following a propitious season open for Cincinnati, Paul and Jay reflect on Sunday's victory and what lies ahead. But, before then, the guys discuss Jessie Bates' ongoing contract situation. Will he sign elsewhere this offseason? The guys also examine Zac Taylor's aggressive play-calling, the offensive and defensive lines performances, and Mo Egger joins us for a new weekly segment, one whose name stands to be workshopped. Rundown: (8:30) Jessie Bates' contract saga (15:00) Aggressive play-calling (21:30) D-line wows (30:00) Probably Informative w/ Mo Egger: JaMarr Chase (45:30) Jays got stats Follow Paul on Twitter: @pauldehnerjr Follow Jay on Twitter: @JayMorrisonATH Follow Mo on Twitter: @MoEgger Save 50% on a subscription to The Athletic by visiting: theathletic.com/hearthatpodcastgrowlin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Roofing Success
66: Best Practices to Recruit Sales Reps for Your Roofing Company with Kris Bates

Roofing Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 52:34


Kris Bates, CEO and President of OnPoint Premier is from West Texas. He first got into adjusting for an insurance company. He maintained this position for over 13 years giving him invaluable insight into insurance companies and how best to work with them. Having an understanding of the insurance business, it was not hard for him to make the jump in starting his own company in partnership with Robert McDonald. OnPoint Premier, established in 2016, was founded by Robert McDonald and Kris Bates with the desire to change the roofing industry through superior customer service and quality craftsmanship. OnPoint Premier is known for being the local roofing company that crafts gorgeous roofs for homeowners and businesses across the state of Texas. The company helps homeowners through the claim process. OnPoint Premier has an in house supplementor that helps maximize the homeowners claim. Employees are educated in code compliance and keep up to date with what the city requires to make sure every homeowner is brought up to code. On this episode, we talk about how to recruit and train sales reps along with implementing processes in your roofing company. Links: https://www.onpointpremier.com/ https://www.facebook.com/onpointpremier https://www.instagram.com/onpointpremier/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/onpointpremier/ For Tips, Strategies, and Free Downloads visit our website and join the Roofing Success Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/1940365569408073/ www.roofermarketers.com The Roofing Success Podcast Text Jim @ (612) 512-1812 – Say Hi! I would love to hear your feedback, pros & cons! Please leave us a review!

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast
TMB30: Chelsea 0-1 Leeds United | 14th Sep 1991

The Square Ball: Leeds United Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 17:03


The scoreboard looked beautiful at Bates's Bridge on this day in 1991. Carl Shutt, back from his injury sustained at a wedding, scored the winner and vaulted the advertising hoardings to celebrate at the non-electrified fence in front of the Leeds fans. With wearecallidus.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Digging Deep with Cody Janssen
Wienen Matches Denton's 8 Titles: Briarcliff Review & 2021 Season Wrap-Up Show (ft. Chad Wienen, Andrea Berger, Jeremy Osborn, Casey Greek, & Aaron Bates)

Digging Deep with Cody Janssen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 210:22


WE'RE BACK! And with a big-time episode to do justice to this legendary 2021 season! Chad Wienen joins the show to discuss his latest championship-winning season and ending it by joining the great Gary Denton's 8 titles club. The fastest woman on four wheels, Andrea Berger, joins us to talk about all the buzz at Briarcliff surrounding the women of ATV motocross. We also chat with our first-ever Digging Deep ATVMX Fantasy season champ, Aaron Bates. And throughout this episode you'll hear Casey Greek and Jeremy Osborn assist in going over everything that happened at Briarcliff, breaking down all the points battles we've been following, and complete our coverage of what was a truly historic season. You can't call yourself an avid ATV motocross fan if you're not listen to Digging Deep! Thanks for DIGGING DEEP with us, enjoy! Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/diggingdeep)

Wanda's Picks
Wanda's Picks Radio Show ft.: Jerome Preston Bates re: Jimi Hendrix Experiment

Wanda's Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 159:00


This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!  We are joined by Jerome Preston Bates, an American theater, film and television actor, director and playwright and Rome Neal, director, to talk about "The Jimi Hendrix Experiment."  This free virtual production, produced by Black Repertory Group in Berkeley (57th season) is followed by a conversation with the playwright and artists who knew Hendrix, Sat., Sept. 18, 8 p.m. (ET), 5 p.m. (PT). The play streams live and free on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PV2g19bOQ1Y

POWER Podcasts
Episode 36: Winning Season

POWER Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 31:53


Find it on #Spotify #iTunes #applepodcasts #GooglePlay #SoundCloud #YouTube and BrandiBates.Podomatic.comLove + Light,Brandi L. Bates**http://instagram.com/brandiiswinninghttp://twitter.com/SoledadFrancishttp://youtube.com/BookLoveHerTo send a donation: http://www.paypal.me/BrandiLBatesFresh new talks uploaded every Thursday Evening after 7:00 PM (EST). A little something for everyone striving to be more, have more, and do more...all podcasts are time-sensitive and remain for a limited time only. Thank you for your time. Visit http://www.brandibates.com/ for more details and more talks.#PowerPodcast 

Locked On Spurs - Daily Podcast On The San Antonio Spurs
Fan Episode - Fan react to Spurs signing Bates-Diop and are fans expecting the team to receive an early knockout punch

Locked On Spurs - Daily Podcast On The San Antonio Spurs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 45:22


On this episode of Locked On Spurs, host Jeff Garcia welcomes back Spurs fan Danny Sanders for another fan episode. What are Spurs fans thinking about the team signing Kieta Bates-Diop? Also, with the Spurs opening the season with a brutal schedule are fans resigned to seeing the team take losses early? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. StatHero StatHero, the FIRST Ever Daily Fantasy Sportsbook that gives the PLAYER the ADVANTAGE. Go to StatHero.com/LockedOn for 300% back on your first play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1206: Honda Look To GM For Help Building EVs | 09 Sep 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 23:27


Show #1206. If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Thursday 9th September. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too.  HONDA, GM TO SHARE EV PARTS - The Japanese automaker Honda is strengthening ties with General Motors to share components for electric vehicles. They aim to shorten the time needed to develop new models, and keep up with the wave of electrification taking place around the world.  Honda will develop platforms for small and medium-sized cars. GM will make them for larger models. Original Source : https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20210907_13/ TESLA FINISHES CONSTRUCTION OF SHANGHAI-BASED SUPERCHARGER PRODUCTION PLANT - Tesla completed the construction of its Supercharger production plant in Shanghai in late August and is going through debugging of the equipment that will run from August 21 to September 25, according to a local media outlet. - The building works officially commenced on January 20 this year, according to an environment impact assessment report. The plant consists of 5 semi-automatic assembly lines, which are capable of producing 10,000 Superchargers per year.  The site will produce the V3 Superchargers. Original Source : https://autonews.gasgoo.com/china_news/70018666.html BOSSES FROM ELECTRIC CARMAKER RIVIAN TO VISIT UK SITE BEING CONSIDERED FOR GIANT FACTORY - Bosses from Amazon-backed US carmaker Rivian are flying into the UK next week to visit a potential site for a giant electric car factory, sources have told the West of England mayor's office.  California-based Rivian is said to be eyeing an area between Bristol and Bridgwater, in Somerset, for a UK plant. - Rivian executives will be involved in a series of meetings with government and business officials, and will visit Somerset's 616-acre Gravity smart campus - off junction 23 of the M5. - Rivian bosses will also visit Bristol to find out about the city's innovation expertise, concluding with a dinner aboard the SS Great Britain. They will then fly on to Germany to visit a rival site before making a final decision, it is understood. Original Source : https://www.business-live.co.uk/manufacturing/bosses-electric-carmaker-rivian-visit-21501260 FORD POACHES TOP TECH EXECUTIVE DOUG FIELD WHO HELPED LEAD APPLE'S TOP-SECRET CAR PROJECT - Ford has hired former Tesla and Apple executive Doug Field to lead its emerging technology efforts, a key focus for the automaker under its new Ford+ turnaround plan.The hire is a major new addition for Ford, while a big hit to Apple and its secret car project, which the company has yet to confirm exists. Apple, in an emailed statement, said: “We're grateful for the contributions Doug has made to Apple and we wish him all the best in this next chapter.” - The hire is a major addition for Ford and a big hit to Apple and its secret car project, which the company has yet to confirm exists. - Field — who led development of Tesla's Model 3 —most recently served as vice president of special projects at Apple, which reportedly included the tech giant's Titan car project. Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/07/ford-hires-ex-tesla-apple-executive-doug-field-to-lead-advanced-tech.html VOLKSWAGEN SAYS IT WILL LEASE USED EVS TO MAINTAIN CONTROL OVER ITS BATTERIES - At the Munich auto show this week, Volkswagen Group CEO Herbert Diess told the press his company plans to offer leases on its used EVs as a way to maintain control over the batteries that power them. - Automotive News Europe reports Diess told the audience that Volkswagen will offer used-vehicle leases on its ID family of electric vehicles, including those in North America, as a strategy to keep control over their valuable batteries. Diess said the secondary leases would allow the company to recycle the valuable battery packs into new uses, including home power centers and fast chargers. - “In Europe, we are trying to get a second lease and even a third lease, and keep the car in our hands,” Diess said. “Battery life we think today is about 1,000 charging cycles and around 350,000 kilometers [about 215,000 miles], something like that. So, the battery would probably live longer than the car, and we want to get hold of the battery. We don't want to give the battery away.” Original Source : https://cleantechnica.com/2021/09/08/volkswagen-says-it-will-lease-used-evs-to-maintain-control-over-its-batteries/ NEW BRITISHVOLT BATTERY CELL FACTORY UNDER CONSTRUCTION - Works have begun at Britishvolt's new battery cell factory in Blyth, Northumberland. Planning permission for the cell factory was granted unanimously by Northumberland County Council in July and construction of the facility is scheduled to begin in autumn or winter this year. - The production facility will be built on the 95-hectare former site of the town's power station. Once up and running, the company is planning to start production in 2023, according to the latest Britishvolt announcement. In total, the plant is expected to create around 3,000 direct jobs and a further 5,000 in associated supply chains. - The project is to be built in three phases of ten GWh each, reaching a full capacity of 30 GWh by the end of 2027. To get things underway, Britishvolt has commissioned construction partner ISG with the preliminary work. ISG will clear the site and take preparatory steps for the utilities and infrastructure of the construction site. Original Source : https://www.nextgreencar.com/news/9221/new-britishvolt-battery-cell-factory-under-construction PORSCHE TAYCAN'S STRONG DEMAND OUTPACES AUTOMAKER'S PRODUCTION CAPACITY - The Porsche Taycan is experiencing massive demand with delivery estimates stretching up to six months, said CEO Oliver Blume. The demand for Porsche's all-electric four-door sedan outpaced the company's production capacity for 2021 in the first quarter alone.  “Our original production capacity for the Taycan was 20,000 units this year – we've sold that many in the first half of the year,” Blume said during a panel discussion at the IAA Mobility show in Munich. The Porsche CEO noted that “incoming orders are huge,” including in China. - The Taycan's popularity continued to accelerate in Q2 2021, with Porsche exceeding all the deliveries in 2020 in just the first half of the quarter. The accelerated popularity of the Taycan was partly due to the new variants released of the all-electric four-door. Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/porsche-taycan-demand-beats-production-capacity MOTORTREND:  WE DRIVE THE 2022 RIVIAN R1T OFF-ROAD ACROSS THE TRANS-AMERICA TRAIL, PART 1 - This route winds around the Appalachians, across the mighty Mississippi, through the Great Plains, and over the Rockies, before threading through the west's high-desert slick rock and redwoods to the coast. Some paved roads dot the trail, but they're few and far between. Because of the endeavor's sheer scale and distance, MotorTrend together with Rivian dedicated 43 days to the adventure, split into five legs. We divided into five crews of staffers as we navigated our convoy of two near-production-spec 2022 Rivian R1Ts and our support vehicle, a Ram 1500 TRX, across the Trans-America Trail. Original Source : https://www.motortrend.com/features/2022-rivian-r1t-exclusive-drive-review-trans-america-trail-off-road TESLA SOLD 44,264 CHINA-MADE VEHICLES IN AUGUST, LOCAL DELIVERIES UP - U.S. electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc in August sold 44,264 China-made vehicles, including 31,379 for export, the China Passenger Car Association (CPCA) said on Wednesday. Local sales of China-made vehicles jumped to 12,885 cars last month from 8,621 cars in July. Tesla's sales in the first month of each quarter are usually lower than the following two months. - China's BYD sold 60,858 electric vehicles last month, while General Motors Co's China joint venture with SAIC Motor delivered 43,783 units. Original Source : https://finance.yahoo.com/news/tesla-sold-44-264-china-080815117.html TESTED: 2021 TESLA MODEL S PLAID TRAVELS 345 MILES - Tesla's tri-motor 1,020-hp flagship sedan covered 345 miles on Edmunds' real-world EV range loop, falling just shy of its EPA-estimated range by 3 miles.It ties the 2021 Tesla Model 3 Long Range for first place on our EV range leaderboard among both luxury and non-luxury EVs.  The Plaid proved to be pretty efficient when driven with restraint, consuming slightly less energy than a Porsche Taycan 4S tested in similar conditions Original Source : https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/2021-tesla-model-s-plaid-travels-345-miles-tying-edmunds-real-world-range-leader-the-tesla-model-3-long-range.html A TESLA RECORED A MAN FAKING BEING BACKED INTO AT A GAS STATION - Arthur Bates Jr., the 47-year-old man in question, was in the gas station's parking lot where the “incident” occurred. In video footage from the Tesla released by local authorities, Bates can be seen behind the vehicle. - In the video, Bates can be seen behind the Tesla as it slowly reverses. As the vehicle comes to a stop, Bates literally walks into the bumper of the car and collapses on the ground pretending he's in pain and placing his foot on the back of the car. - Bates then had the nerve to go and call for emergency services, with an ambulance and firefighters coming to check him for injuries. Police managed to find the driver of the car who explained that they witnessed Bates intentionally getting behind the vehicle Original Source : https://jalopnik.com/a-guy-tried-to-pull-a-fast-one-by-claiming-a-tesla-back-1847631428 QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM IAA mobility show is this week. The most headline grabbing cars from the big names will get the headlines, but do YOU think needs electrifying to fill a gap in the market? Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/ 

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 235: Remembering Peter Goodrich '89, fall sports preview part II

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 40:21


This week we remember All-American thrower Peter Goodrich '89, who died in the attacks of September 11, 20 years ago. Teammate Matthew Schecter '89 shares his memories of Peter and tells us more about the Peter Goodrich Memorial Scholarship. Plus, we continue our fall sports previews with volleyball, field hockey and football. Interviews this episode: 0:46 -- Matthew Schecter '89. Remembering Peter Goodrich '89, Men's Track and Field. 11:33 -- Emily Hayes, Head Coach, Volleyball. Season preview. 19:17 -- Dani Kogut, Head Coach, Field Hockey. Season preview. 27:10 -- Ed Argast (Interim Head Coach), Custavious Patterson (Offensive Coordinator), Keith Davis (Defensive Coordinator), Football season preview.

Own It! from Women Lead Change
Owning it with Michelle Bates: Leading with Empathy

Own It! from Women Lead Change

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 28:04


Tiffany O'Donnell talks to Michelle Bates, Founder and CEO of SkyPrairie Inc. She is a transformational business and technology executive with more than 25 years of experience across multiple industries and market segments. Michelle has a strong commitment to her community and is engaged in philanthropic work. She supports the LGBTQ+ Clinic at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, One Iowa, Shelter House and the Englert Theatre. In addition she coaches and mentors students at the University of Iowa's John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center and regularly mentors women in technology and business.On today's episode, Michelle discusses her leadership journey, what it's like being a woman in tech, and how tech has and will impact our world. Follow Women Lead Change on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn and visit wlcglobal.org for more information. Own It! from Women Lead Change is sponsored by Iowa State University's Ivy College of Business.Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=7V9VAGJQC2YLA&source=url)

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Memphis Adds Sheed, Duren and Bates, Wazzu Moneyball and Akinjo At Baylor With Stats By Will. Plus, MLB With Fangraphs' Jon Tayler and Boston College Eagles With Rivals' Andy Backstrom

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 115:57


Blue Wire's Chase Thomas is joined by Fangraphs' Jon Tayler to talk about the Orioles moving up to No. 1 in the MLB pipeline rankings, Bregman returning for Houston, the fall of the Red Sox, a November World Series, and much more (1:00). Then, Stats By Will on Memphis adding Sheed to the coaching staff, Duren and Bates to the team, how Kyle Smith has rebuilt Washington State basketball, Akinjo at Baylor, and the impact of the mid-range shot in college basketball (45:00). Lastly, Rivals' Andy Backstrom on Boston College football, Jurkovec's rise, the absence of a running game, questions in the secondary, and what Jeff Hafley has gotten right so far at BC (90:00). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast
Aaron Torres Media launches, Emoni Bates commits to Memphis, CFB Alliance + Week 0 Preview!!!

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 53:12


It's Thursday and we have a LOADED Aaron Torres Podcast. Aaron discusses the launch of "Aaron Torres Media" and what it means for the show, and then transitions to the mega-news that Emoni Bates has committed to Memphis. Then he discusses the ACC/Big Ten/Pac-12 alliance and previews Week 0 in college football!. Here is a full rundown.The launch of Aaron Torres Media (3:00): Aaron opens the show by discussing the official announcement of the next chapter of his career: The launch of Aaron Torres Media. He explains how this ties into his decision to leave KSR a few weeks ago and what it means for the future of his show. Also, what can fans expect when they visit his new website Aaron Torres Online. Emoni Bates commits to Memphis (14:00): From there, Aaron transitions to the mega-news in college hoops as high school hoops star Emoni Bates has committed to Memphis. Aaron breaks down why this is good for Memphis and good for college basketball, but also puts the pressure squarely on Penny Hardaway's shoulders. Also, what are realistic expectations for Bates and Memphis this season?ACC/Big Ten/Pac-12 Alliance + Week 0 Preview (28:00): Finally, Aaron wraps by discussing the news of an ACC/Big Ten/Pac-12 schedule alliance and why this is actually a good thing for college football as a whole. Finally he wraps by discussing Week 0, why Scott Frost is essentially in must-win territory heading into Saturday and the rest of this weekend's games (43:00)

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

Gary Parrish is joined by Kyle Boone to offer their immediate reactions to Emoni Bates committing to Penny Hardaway and the Memphis Tigers. The guys break down why Bates chose Memphis over other options and what the next few years hold for the Tigers.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices