Podcasts about Mississippi River

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Major river in the United States

  • 1,111PODCASTS
  • 1,835EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 26, 2022LATEST
Mississippi River

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Best podcasts about Mississippi River

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Latest podcast episodes about Mississippi River

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast
Mississippi River Bass Fishing with Cade Laufenberg

The SmallmouthCrush Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:32


If you are a hard-core angler, you have come to the right place. This is a weekly podcast that will interview some of the top local and regional anglers in North America. Anglers who consistency finish near the top in both Largemouth and Smallmouth bass fishing tournaments. Travis and his guest will discuss techniques and strategies used to help these anglers stay so consistent and help you become a better angler and gain an edge on your body of water. This interview I chat with Cade Laufenberg.  Cade pretty much dominates the Mississippi River and has a great resume when it comes to tournament fishing.  He discusses some of his favorite techniques river fishing and lets us know what to look for.  He gives up some great information in this episode!Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/cade.laufenbergInstagram https://www.instagram.com/cadelaufenbergfishing/YouTube Cade LaufenbergThe Reel Shot is where I recommend you purchase your tackle! Use my Code SmallmouthCrush15 and get 15% your first order today!https://bit.ly/2YtVLRLSMALLMOUTHCRUSHNEW VIDEOS UPLOADED WEEKLY and the WORLD FAMOUS LIVE STREAM with Co Host Epic Eric---------------------------------------Sunday – 2:00 PM Est The SmallmouthCrush PodcastMonday - 8:00 PM Est LIVESTREAMFishing Videos throughout the week---------------------------------------Follow on Instagram @SmallmouthCrush https://www.instagram.com/smallmouthcrush/

JustGoBike
PreRide RAGBRAI Route Inspection Ride 2022 Day 7

JustGoBike

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 16:56


Day 7! Here is a delayed recap of Day 7 on the 2022 RAGBRAI Route Inspection Ride. The last day we rode 65.4 miles with 2,966 feet of climb from West Union, through Elgin, Gunder, Postville, Waukon and finally to Lansing and the mighty Mississippi River to dip our tire. www.RAGBRAI.com www. murphologypodcast.com

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies
Wicked Problems - Changing Weather and How It's Affecting Our Lives with Tony Pratte

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:53


  Global challenges are abounding, and working in the world of sustainability, health, and wellness has brought many wicked problems to light.  We can describe some of the most challenging social issues we face today as wicked problems. With those problems, we have to re-frame our notion of success. Although they will never get entirely solved, success with wicked problems is about impacting or improving outcomes and mitigating risks.  I am Marla, the Green Home Coach! I am excited to be back in the studio today with my co-host, Tony Pratte, who is joining me to talk about the wicked problem of changing weather.  Stay tuned for more! Crazy weather There has been some crazy weather in St. Louis for the last couple of months! It has been raining a lot, and the driving downpours have caused many problems for land developers.  Lots of rain  Over the last decade or so, we have seen an increase in rainfall in the Oklahoma area. There has been unusual rainfall between March and November- and sometimes even December!  Changing weather patterns Weather patterns appear to be changing everywhere. Even though some of it could be cycles, the changing weather over the last few years has been partially due to the increasing drought in the western part of the United States.  What is rain? When the moisture in the air reacts with water in the ground, it rains. Currently, the ground out west lacks water, so rain is not getting triggered in that area. The moisture that should be causing rain in the west (in California, Arizona, and Nevada) is moving eastwards. Extreme weather patterns Lately, the extreme global weather patterns have become more extreme! You cannot compare Oklahoma with St. Louis You cannot compare Oklahoma with St. Louis because St. Louis is a meteorological anomaly. Most cities have two weather patterns. They are either affected by the Arctic or the Gulf of Mexico. St. Louis gets affected by both, so it has three weather patterns. For weather forecasting, two mathematical equations get combined. In St. Louis, there is a third equation that throws everything off. A river effect St. Louis is at the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, the second-largest freshwater flow in North America. So the state is surrounded by water. That causes a river effect, much like the lake effect at the Great Lakes, which amplifies many weather patterns. That matters because it helps us gauge the changes we see in the weather patterns. Climate shift Things that do not usually occur in certain parts of the country are happening a lot more, and strong weather patterns have been reported in the news. Scientific data shows that the weather is changing, and people are starting to accept it.  Water usage Many large cities are in the desert. Air conditioning makes the heat bearable, but where does the water come from? A limited amount of fresh water exists on the planet that constantly gets recycled through the water cycle. A billion people have problems accessing clean water every day. Yet we keep building big cities in areas with no water (like Las Vegas), and more and more people keep moving to those locations.  Subsidized water The water pumped to the desert cities gets subsidized, so people aren't aware of the real cost. If it was not subsidized, fewer people and businesses might move to those cities. That could relieve some of the strain on the natural resources of those locations and help stabilize the weather patterns. Water rights In the west and in California Central Valley, where a lot of food is grown, water prices are soaring. As the drought in that area worsens, people are buying up water rights. That has created a challenge for small farmers who are unable to compete with the huge conglomerates that own the water rights. Is water an inalienable right? The corporations that own the big farms can use their resources, create hedging strategies, and buy options on commodities like water. So people are talking about whether water is an inalienable right, and if it should be commoditized and purchased.  A perpetual cycle Changing weather affects water patterns, and water patterns affect the weather. It is a perpetual cycle, so it is hard to know where to start if we want to change things. Natural patterns The natural patterns that exist will continue. If there is mismanagement, however, things get thrown out of whack, and problems tend to get amplified.  A wicked problem The water issue is a wicked problem because it requires many different solutions. If we want to continue as a society, we need to figure out how to deal with the effects of the weather changes. Change Change is here, and it is unavoidable. No matter what, we will have to adapt, mitigate, and suffer.  The real cost of water Mitigating and adapting will not solve this problem. If people were charged the actual cost of water in desert cities rather than subsidizing, it could prevent some future suffering.  Thinking differently We have to start thinking differently about water and the changing weather patterns. Some people recognize that, so they use water wisely and consider ways to conserve it when building. Figuring out how to obtain water  Although the agricultural community has probably adapted better than most by coming up with more efficient irrigation systems and using technology tools, we still have to figure out how to capture water and recharge the aquifers. Because thousands of acres of farmland and millions of people are affected by the weather changes.  Wasted water The water from the heavy rains in Oklahoma City over the past weeks has been running through the storm-water systems and into the Gulf of Mexico. That water gets wasted because it mixes with salt water. It would be a much better idea to figure out a way to keep that water fresh and re-introduce it to the water cycle.  Using strategies to overcome the feast or famine effect We can all do something for ourselves to overcome the feast or famine effect resulting from changing weather patterns. Small steps add up.  Gutters in Oklahoma Gutters are not automatically fitted on houses in Oklahoma City because there is usually not enough rain to make them worthwhile. With the climate becoming wetter, more people are putting gutters onto their houses and installing rain barrels and rain gardens to capture the water. No simple answers There is no simple answer to the wicked problem of obtaining enough water for everyone with changing weather patterns. We need to have open and realistic discussions about what is changing weather and the water patterns. It does not matter who caused the problem. What does matter is that we have to fix it. Some simple tips for becoming part of the solution: Use rain barrels (if they are legal in your state) Install a rain garden Buy local produce  Use native plants for landscaping Stand up and speak out about the need for change Have a great green day!   Links and resources: What Makes a Green Home Green Audio Program:  Green Home Coach Study.com video: wicked problems definitions EPA.gov climate indicators Scienceline on how weather affects the way we live EPA.gov Weather.com - weather changes National Geographic - climate change CDC Climate Effects on Health Psychiatry.org

Weather With Enthusiasm
Record Heat For Lower to Middle Mississippi river valley For Saturday 6-25-22. Especially Memphis

Weather With Enthusiasm

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 17:26


Record Heat For Lower to Middle Mississippi river valley For Saturday 6-25-22. Especially Memphis--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/weather-with-enthusiasm/support

New Books Network
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Chinese Studies
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in Sociology
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Education
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

New Books in Economics
Eli Friedman, "The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:29


Amid a vast influx of rural migrants into urban areas, China has allowed cities wide latitude in providing education and other social services. While millions of people have been welcomed into the megacities as a source of cheap labor, local governments have used various tools to limit their access to full citizenship. The Urbanization of People: The Politics of Development, Labor Markets, and Schooling in the Chinese City (Columbia University Press, 2022) by Eli D. Friedman reveals how cities in China have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility, and degraded educational opportunities. Using the school as a lens on urban life, Eli Friedman investigates how the state manages flows of people into the city. He demonstrates that urban governments are providing quality public education to those who need it least: school admissions for nonlocals heavily favor families with high levels of economic and cultural capital. Those deemed not useful are left to enroll their children in precarious resource-starved private schools that sometimes are subjected to forced demolition. Over time, these populations are shunted away to smaller locales with inferior public services. Based on extensive ethnographic research and hundreds of in-depth interviews, this interdisciplinary book details the policy framework that produces unequal outcomes as well as providing a fine-grained account of the life experiences of people drawn into the cities as workers but excluded as full citizens. Michael O. Johnston, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Sociology at William Penn University. His most recent research, “The Queen and Her Royal Court: A Content Analysis of Doing Gender at a Tulip Queen Pageant,” was published in Gender Issues Journal. He researches culture, social identity, placemaking, and media representations of social life at festivals and celebrations. He is currently working on a book titled Community Media Representations of Place and Identity at Tug Fest: Reconstructing the Mississippi River. You can learn more about Dr. Johnston on his website, Google Scholar, on Twitter @ProfessorJohnst, or by email at johnstonmo@wmpenn.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

American Shoreline Podcast Network
Paddling the Mighty Mississippi with John Ruskey | Delta Dispatches

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 46:47


This week, Jacques spoke with John Ruskey, one of the most knowledgeable river guides and paddlers of the Mississippi River. John shares his life experiences gathered from over 40 years paddling the Mighty Mississippi. Tune in to learn about John's work and how you too can experience the Mississippi firsthand!

The Great Deception Podcast
New Madrid Earthquake/Tecumseh's Comet of 1811 & The War of 1812

The Great Deception Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 120:14


Welcome to episode 39 of The Great Deception Podcast where tonight we will continue down the road of government violence against the population. There were broken treaties, deceptions, lies, etc by the US Government and its forces. In response the Natives formed the Pan-Tribal Union and the Creek Confederacy. This episode includes two future Presidents who commit atrocities against the Natives. In 1811 Tecumseh's Comet was visible for 260 days peaking in September and visible until March 1812. Then in December of 1812 the New Madrid Earthquake takes place, the largest earthquake in the contiguous US, causing the Mississippi River to flow backwards for 3 days. Following the earthquake the War of 1812 ensues and the Natives are dealt a severe blow. Please share, like & review. If you want to support the show, links are below: Mat from The Great Deception Podcast Linktree: https://linktr.ee/thegreatdeceptionpodcast IG: https://www.instagram.com/thegreatdeceptionpodcast/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/user/Barons44 Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/hPdLAyfQQ2DP/ Telegram:https://t.me/thegdpod Email: thegreatdeceptionpodcast@gmail.com To Make Contributions: Venmo: https://account.venmo.com/u/Matthew-Terrillion Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thegreatdeceptionpodcast Merch Store: https://my-store-cb4b4e.creator-spring.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-great-deception-podcast/support

Delta Dispatches
Paddling the Mighty Mississippi with John Ruskey

Delta Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 46:47


This week, Jacques spoke with John Ruskey, one of the most knowledgeable river guides and paddlers of the Mississippi River. John shares his life experiences gathered from over 40 years paddling the Mighty Mississippi. Tune in to learn about John's work and how you too can experience the Mississippi firsthand!

Burning Man LIVE
Sweaty Dynamite: The Dave X Story

Burning Man LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 58:58


When dynamite is aged the wrong way it gets sweaty with little crystals that can cause spontaneous explosions.Dave X. Man of fire, bacon, and “the ponytail of approachability.” An enigmatic shaman of fireworks, flame effects, and deep thoughts, his stripper name is Sweaty Dynamite. His spiritual calling is to bring joyful, fiery experiences to the masses. His secret weapon: a thick binder. Huh? More on that later. Could one man be a hippie and a redneck, and in charge of Fire Art Safety in Black Rock City, and also fill the role of Cake Marshal for Burning Man Project? Yes, yes he could. A pyrotechnician, a peaceful perturber, and a Burner from days of yore, he bestows his teachings upon Stuart Mangrum. Pro tip: Each of our episodes ends with a bang, especially this one. Burning Man Staff: Dave XBurning Man Journal: Dave XShitDaveXSays.com

BHA Podcast & Blast with Hal Herring
BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning

BHA Podcast & Blast with Hal Herring

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 55:48


BHA Podcast & Blast, Ep. 133: BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning For Americans who live or venture west of the Mississippi River or north to Alaska, no public lands are more important, more abundant or more accessible than those managed by the Bureau of Land Management. We are talking about 247.3 million acres of public land (70 million of them in Alaska). In the Lower 48, this means elk hunting in the Missouri Breaks of Montana, Wyoming's best pronghorn and mule deer country, quail hunting in the borderlands of New Mexico, and black bear or even bison hunting in the high desert mountains of Utah. The BLM manages the National Conservation Lands system, which includes millions of acres of America's finest hiking, camping, wandering, canyoneering, rafting and access to rivers. The agency administers 18,000 grazing permits and is responsible for 700 million subsurface acres of publicly owned minerals. If it seems like an impossible task…well, sometimes it is. Today on the podcast we talk with BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning about the present and future of these lands – and how we can create a future in which politics is no longer the major obstacle to keeping these irreplaceable lands in public hands.    

BASS TALK LIVE
Episode 727: ELITE SERIES PRO, BOB DOWNEY

BASS TALK LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 76:10


Minnesota's Bob Downey joins BTL for the first time to talk about hockey, his path to the Elite Series, and fishing the Mississippi River.  

Patrick Miner's Podcast
Sex, mollusks and buttons galore

Patrick Miner's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 28:20


In three successive years this small town produced more than a billion buttons annually. This episode is a remarkable story told by an equally remarkable Guest.  Dustin Joy has the  great responsibility to reveal the circumstances along the Mississippi River which was the  Gold Rush of the Midwest! Muscatine Iowa was the PEARL BUTTON CAPITAL OF THE WOLD.https://muscatinehistory.org/about/CLUSTERS OF CLAM SHELLS LIE on the banks of the Mississippi River in Muscatine, Iowa. Look closely and you'll see each shell is dotted with perfectly neat holes. Many decades ago, these shells were plucked from the bottom of the river by the ton, soaked, steamed, and swept of their meat and pearls. Circular saws cut multiple discs out of each shell. These were called “blanks.” Each blank was sanded down into a perfect pearl button, ready to be sewn onto a dress, jacket, or glove.Muscatine's pearl button industry hit its peak between 1908 and the '20s, when factories in the Iowa town produced 1.5 billion buttons, or one-third of the world's pearl button supply. These buttons were worth $3.3 million, according to the 1910 edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica. But few of us who grew up along the Mississippi, who've held those milkweed-grey shells with holes in them, have actually held pearl buttons or heard a cohesive origin story about the industry. To get the definitive history I went to Terry Eagle, the Director of The National Pearl Button Museum at The History and Industry Center, in Muscatine. “The story of the pearl button is a national growth story, a national treasure story, and an environmental lesson,” Eagle says. “And if you don't believe me now, I'll prove it to you.”https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/pearl-buttons-muscatine-iowaSupport the show

It's New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

New Orleans is well known for its legacy restaurant families. And now, just across the Mississippi River in Gretna, the Mandina clan is poised to claim its own place in our culinary pantheon. On this week's show, we meet three generations of family who have made Tony Mandina's a Westbank culinary institution. We begin with the restaurant's namesake founder and his wife Grace Blanchard Mandina. Having no prior experience in the business, the couple ran the restaurant with help from members of their extended family. Grace shares stories of some pitfalls and laughs in those early days, when the ragtag team found themselves having to make it up as they went along. The Mandinas' Sicilian roots make their story a particularly rich and delicious one. We learn about the family's history, which can be traced back to Salaparuta, a town in southwest Sicily. Tony recounts the first time he met his aunts in the Old Country in 1960. Ever since then, the family has maintained a connection to their family across the Atlantic, even forging new relationships with distant cousins, resulting in an import/export business. Tony and Grace's three daughters began working in their parents' restaurant as children. In 2020, middle daughter Kolette Mandina-Ditta took over the reins of Tony Mandina's, along with her daughter Lindsey Marcel. Both of them join us in the studio to discuss growing up in the restaurant, and Kolette describes what motivated her to write "Tony Mandina's Kitchen," a new book featuring a collection of family history and recipes.

Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

New Orleans is well known for its legacy restaurant families. And now, just across the Mississippi River in Gretna, the Mandina clan is poised to claim its own place in our culinary pantheon. On this week's show, we meet three generations of family who have made Tony Mandina's a Westbank culinary institution. We begin with the restaurant's namesake founder and his wife Grace Blanchard Mandina. Having no prior experience in the business, the couple ran the restaurant with help from members of their extended family. Grace shares stories of some pitfalls and laughs in those early days, when the ragtag team found themselves having to make it up as they went along. The Mandinas' Sicilian roots make their story a particularly rich and delicious one. We learn about the family's history, which can be traced back to Salaparuta, a town in southwest Sicily. Tony recounts the first time he met his aunts in the Old Country in 1960. Ever since then, the family has maintained a connection to their family across the Atlantic, even forging new relationships with distant cousins, resulting in an import/export business. Tony and Grace's three daughters began working in their parents' restaurant as children. In 2020, middle daughter Kolette Mandina-Ditta took over the reins of Tony Mandina's, along with her daughter Lindsey Marcel. Both of them join us in the studio to discuss growing up in the restaurant, and Kolette describes what motivated her to write "Tony Mandina's Kitchen," a new book featuring a collection of family history and recipes.

Curious Minnesota
How did Nicollet Island transform from an industrial hub to a public park?

Curious Minnesota

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 16:55


Nicollet Island is arguably the most unusual park in a city known for its parks. Located beside downtown Minneapolis, it is an oasis of green space in the heart of the urban core. It was once home to some of the city's most prominent industrialists, as well as factories powered by the Mississippi River. But it has undergone a major transformation in roughly the last half century. Chris and Rushika Hage, authors of a book about Nicollet Island, join host Eric Roper to discuss the island's history and how it came to look the way it does today. LINKS: How did Nicollet Island become parkland with private housing on it? (May 2019 Curious Minnesota story) A before and after aerial view of the island showing how it has changed

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Sequoia Hauck's Gift for Decolonizing the Process of Art-Making

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 28:27


Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine – Weekly Radio ShowNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.Native Lights –Sequoia Hauck's Gift for Decolonizing the Process of Art-MakingOn today's show, we talk with Sequoia Hauck (they/them), a Native (Anishinaabe/Hupa) queer multidisciplinary artist based in the Twin Cities. Sequoia's art-making includes theater, filmmaking, poetry, and performance art, with all of it centered on a decolonized creative process.Sequoia shares details of their upcoming art installation, which is happening as the closing event of Northern Spark. Their project is a large-scale installation of two cloth rivers that span what is now Raspberry Island in Imnížaska Othúŋwe/Ashkibagi-ziibiing (St. Paul). The cloth rivers are replicas of Ȟaȟáwakpa/Gichi-ziibi (Mississippi River) and Mnísota Wakpá/Ashkibagi-ziibi (Minnesota River).Miigwech, Sequoia! We loved hearing about your passion for connecting to ancestors, building community through performance art, and finding healing and resiliency through our relationship to water and its movement and stillness.Northern Spark is happening on Saturday, June 11th from 9p through 5:30a.http://northern.lights.mn/platform/northern-spark-2022/https://2022.northernspark.org/art-and-events/Sequoia Hauck's website is here: https://www.sequoiahauck.com/Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - CHAD LEWIS - Pepie - The Lake Monster of the Mississippi River

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 49:32


Pepie - The Lake Monster of the Mississippi River - For over two decades Chad Lewis has traveled the back roads of the world in search of the strange and unusual. From tracking vampires in Transylvania and searching for the elusive monster of Loch Ness to trailing the dangerous Tata Duende through remote villages of Belize and searching for ghosts in Ireland's haunted castles, Chad has scoured the earth in search of the paranormal. Chad has been featured on the Discovery Channel's A Haunting, William Shatner's Weird or What, ABC's Scariest Places on Earth, and Monsters and Mysteries in America --along with being a frequent contributor on Ripley's Believe it or Not Radio. With a Masters Degree in Psychology, Chad has authored over 17 books on the supernatural, and extensively lectures on his fascinating findings. The more bizarre the legend, the more likely it is that you will find Chad there. - www.chadlewisresearch.comFor Your Listening Pleasure for these Lockdown / Stay-At-Home COVID and Variants Times - For all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv.Our radio shows archives and programming include: A Different Perspective with Kevin Randle; Alien Cosmic Expo Lecture Series; Alien Worlds Radio Show; America's Soul Doctor with Ken Unger; Back in Control Radio Show with Dr. David Hanscom, MD; Connecting with Coincidence with Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD; Dick Tracy; Dimension X; Exploring Tomorrow Radio Show; Flash Gordon; Imagine More Success Radio Show with Syndee Hendricks and Thomas Hydes; Jet Jungle Radio Show; Journey Into Space; Know the Name with Sharon Lynn Wyeth; Lux Radio Theatre - Classic Old Time Radio; Mission Evolution with Gwilda Wiyaka; Paranormal StakeOut with Larry Lawson; Ray Bradbury - Tales Of The Bizarre; Sci Fi Radio Show; Seek Reality with Roberta Grimes; Space Patrol; Stairway to Heaven with Gwilda Wiyaka; The 'X' Zone Radio Show with Rob McConnell; Two Good To Be True with Justina Marsh and Peter Marsh; and many other!That's The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv

American History Tellers
The Great Mississippi Flood | Media Storm | 4

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 41:59


In 1927, a slow-moving catastrophe like the Great Mississippi Flood was perfect material for a relatively new medium: radio. Over the airwaves, the flood became the first natural disaster that Americans could follow almost in real time, day by day, as the rising river waters swept away one town after another.In this episode, Lindsay talks with Susan Scott Parrish, author of The Flood Year 1927: A Cultural History, about the ways Americans far from the Mississippi River experienced the disaster in newspapers, on the radio, and in popular culture. They'll also discuss how entertainers of the time rallied the public to raise funds for recovery, while federal relief efforts only enforced existing socioeconomic and racial divides in the South.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/historytellersPlease support us by supporting our sponsors!Sleep Number- Special offers for a Limited Time are available at sleepnumber.com/tellers!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
EWN Practice Leads Sharing Expertise through the EWN Cadre

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 34:09


In Episode 2 we had a high energy roundtable with the EWN Practice Leads who play a critical role in broadening and expanding the application of Engineering With Nature practices and nature-based solutions within the US Army Corps of Engineers. In Episode 3, the EWN Practice Leads return to talk about how they're solving challenges, advancing EWN implementation through the EWN Implementation Cadre, and sharing what they are learning with other practitioners.   Host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are joined again by a roundtable of the EWN Practice Leads. Elizabeth Godsey is the Technical Lead for Coastal Engineering and Regional Sediment Management with Mobile District; Danielle Szimanski is a Project Manager and Ecologist with Baltimore District; Eddie Brauer is a Senior Hydraulic Engineer with St. Louis District; and Dave Crane is an Environmental Resource Specialist with Omaha District. We asked each to talk about their current projects.   Danielle, a Coastal Practice Lead, describes her work in the Chesapeake Bay where rising sea level is already occurring and is expected to increase. She and her team are restoring barrier islands and marshes to combat the loss of habitat and for flood risk management of inland areas. “Being able to restore these marshes, especially if they're degraded and fragmented, and being able to stave off that future loss and stop them from turning into open water is critical for the Chesapeake Bay.” Danielle also discusses work underway at Deal Island: “The Deal Island project is a maintenance dredging project on the Wicomico River. We're going to use the dredge material to restore approximately 70 acres of degraded and fragmented marsh. This will restore that wetland for migratory birds, and provide nesting habitat specifically for the Saltmarsh Sparrow, which is a threatened species.” She adds, “there's been a lot of work with other federal, state and non-government agencies to create this design and complete pre- and post-monitoring to assess how these wetlands are actually going to provide habitat once they are created.”   Elizabeth, also a Coastal Practice Lead, has worked on a number of coastal restoration projects in the Gulf to restore habitats for threatened and endangered species including sea turtles and piping plovers: “In Mississippi alone we've restored over 2,500 acres across the coastal zone habitats, including beach, dune, wetlands, and island restoration. That's about 2000 football fields of restoration work in that state alone.” She's taking that first-hand knowledge and experience and, as a Practice Lead, sharing leading practices and key learnings with others: “The biggest thing that we're doing is our monitoring and adaptive management. It's a long-term look at the project performance and the ecological benefits that come from the projects. We give that back to scientists, to universities, to people at the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), and the US Geological Survey (USGS) so they can improve their modeling tools and reduce uncertainty in their predictions.” She also stresses the importance of combining multiple benefits to help achieve whatever the mission goal is, whether it is storm risk management, navigation and economic benefit, or ecosystem protection and restoration: “We're able to integrate each of those benefits and provide that value-add to the nation. We're getting that message out and showing people how to do that, and how you communicate the benefits of this approach to decision-makers.”   Turning to the Riverine Practice Leads, Eddie describes the importance of taking a holistic perspective of riverine systems. “There are so many people that have a day-to-day connection to the river beyond just the projects that the Corps is doing. It's our responsibility to ensure that we account for everyone's needs on all the projects that we construct. To do that, it's critical to understand that each project is part of a broader system.” He goes on to describe a project that the Corps participated in on the Madeira River in Brazil, the largest tributary of the Amazon River and a critical navigation corridor for transporting goods and people. “It was extra critical for us to be to take a watershed approach, to understand the system before doing anything. We spent four years studying the system prior to making a single recommendation. Through this analysis, we understood that because of the geology of the river, we were able to manage it in smaller reaches instead of very large engineering projects, similar to what you'd see on the Missouri or the Mississippi Rivers. We were able to nudge the river through potentially temporary river training structures and spark natural geomorphic processes to accomplish our goals, as opposed to using a brute force engineering approach.”   Dave is working on a project on a 12-mile stretch of the Platte River that runs through the city and county of Denver where the Corps had built dams in the past. By rethinking the approach and applying EWN principles, he and his team are achieving multiple benefits: “We're doing things like completely removing or modifying drop structures in the river that allow for better fish passage and better in-channel habitat, while also helping to reduce sedimentation the channel. In some areas we're able to pull back the riverbanks to allow more flood water conveyance capacity. Working within an urban area, that has a very direct and large connection to a much larger landscape, laterally and upstream and downstream.”   Working together, the four Practice Leads have learned from each other and developed shared priorities. As Elizabeth notes: “Connecting practitioners of different backgrounds like us with this overarching vision of Engineering With Nature was the thing that really made it easy for us to figure out our group's strengths and differences; how we could come together and work, and also what those priorities needed to be, because we could find those common grounds across the landscape.”   One of their top priorities was expand the practice of EWN across the Corps. In 2021 the Practice Leads established the EWN Implementation Cadre. As Dave explains, “It's an informal internal network of EWN and natural and nature-based features practitioners. We have a space where we connect and share experiences, knowledge, ideas, upload documents to a shared drive and have discussions online.” Danielle describes the process of sharing that goes on across the Cadre: “The key word that we were looking for, for the Cadre hub was ‘crowdsourcing'. Project managers from anywhere in the country that have become a member of this hub can pose a question to the entire group, the multiple hundreds of Cadre members.” As Eddie notes, in addition to leveraging resources and connections, the Cadre provides an opportunity to bring new ideas into the Corps.   According to Jeff, the Cadre as an unqualified success: “When the Cadre was launched, the Leads invited anyone within the Corps who was interested in learning more about the EWN Cadre to attend their opening webinar – 800 Corps employees participated in that first meeting! And the interest has continued. It's just been incredible to see the number of people coming to this space, wanting to learn more about Engineering With Nature, offering their thoughts, and their questions. Creating this repository of information has become so valuable. It's a special place and just a real testimony to the hard work that the Practice Leads are doing.”   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN   Elizabeth Godsey at LinkedIn Elizabeth Godsey at EWN Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program Gulf Islands National Seashore – Ship Island Gulf Islands National Seashore – Cat Island Deer Island Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project Monitoring and Adaptive Management Alabama Island Restoration-Dauphin Island   Danielle Szimanski at LinkedIn Danielle Szimanski at EWN Wicomico River - Deal Island Project Raising the Bar for Salt Marshes on Deal Island – Audubon   Edward Brauer at EWN USACE St. Louis District: An Inland Proving Ground Madeira River Navigation Improvement Planning Study PIANC – Working with Nature for Climate-Resilient Ports and Waterways   David Crane at EWN USACE Omaha district to partner with city of Denver on $350M waterway restoration, flood mitigation project South Platte River – Final Integrated Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement   EWN Implementation Cadre Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series   EWN Podcast S4E2: High Energy Roundtable with the EWN Practice Leads  

Stories from the Floodplain
Rivers at a Crossroads

Stories from the Floodplain

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 50:05


The Mississippi River–America's most iconic and storied river, and the lifeblood of human civilizations and cultures dating back centuries–has again been named to a list of the nation's Most Endangered Rivers. In this episode, we speak with Olivia Dorothy, American Rivers' Director of River Restoration in the Midwest about why the Mississippi is endangered and how a new proposal in Congress could unite Mississippi River states and kickstart much-needed environmental restoration across the region. Links: Prairie Rivers Network (http://www.prairierivers.org/) American Rivers (https://www.americanrivers.org/) Take Action: Use the Action Alert here! Tell your Congressperson that you support the Mississippi River Restoration and Resilience Initiative and urge them to pass this landmark piece of legislation. Become a member of Prairie Rivers Network and connect with a community dedicated to protecting water. And sign up for our emails so you don't miss new podcast episodes. Music: https://www.purple-planet.com/

Good Morning from WVIK news
Good Morning from WVIK News for Friday, May 27, 2022

Good Morning from WVIK news

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 5:11


It's Zip Code Day in Bettendorf "52722"!The Mississippi River is about to crest within 1-1/2 feet of flood stage...The Unemployment Rate continues to decline in the QCA...The QCA is designated StormReady...BEAUTIFUL weather for Memorial Day Weekend!

Here First
Friday, May 27th, 2022

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022


As we head into the holiday weekend, Iowa boaters are being cautioned to watch for too much water on the Mississippi River, and too little in western Iowa. The IDOT is urging drivers to slow down and pay attention, and Des Moines hosts the state's largest celebration of Asian heritage this weekend.

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

No Weapon Formed Against Us Shall Prosper (2)  (Audio) David Eells - 5/25/22 Excerpt from: Vision of the End of the World Given to Sarah Hoffman After her suicide in 1979, the Lord sent Sarah back to Earth to repent and share a warning of the end of the world... This panoramic view of Earth came into view and then came closer and closer like I had been out into space and was flying toward it…. As the world zoomed up to me I saw the whole world and then the various countries. I don't know the countries of the world very well, but as I looked at these lands I instinctively knew what countries they were. I was looking at the Middle East and watched as a missile flew from Libya and hit Israel with a big mushroom cloud. I knew that the missile was actually from Iran but people from Iran had been hiding it in Libya and fired it.  I knew that it was a nuclear bomb. Almost immediately missiles started flying from one country to another, quickly spreading to all over the world. (The Alliance has said there would be a fake WW3 and we can see the stage being set. I have said for months that this could end up being a real World War and that the DS is professional at getting in the middle and shooting both ways to start wars. Indeed, in Rev. chapter 6 we see the second seal brings a world war. A covenant is being put together as NESARA/GESARA.) Rev. 6:1-8, And I saw when the Lamb opened one of the seven seals, and I heard one of the four living creatures saying as with a voice of thunder, Come. 2 And I saw, and behold, a white horse, and he that sat thereon had a bow; and there was given unto him a crown: and he came forth conquering, and to conquer. (Jesus in the Man-child ministries, like Moses judged Egypt)   3 And when he opened the second seal, I heard the second living creature saying, Come. 4 And another horse came forth, a red horse: and to him that sat thereon it was given to take peace from the earth, and that they should slay one another: and there was given unto him a great sword. (World War) 5 And when he opened the third seal, I heard the third living creature saying, Come. And I saw, and behold, a black horse; and he that sat thereon had a balance in his hand. 6 And I heard as it were a voice in the midst of the four living creatures saying, A measure of wheat for a shilling, and three measures of barley for a shilling; and the oil and the wine hurt thou not. (Food scarce, famine) 7 And when he opened the fourth seal, I heard the voice of the fourth living creature saying, Come. 8 And I saw, and behold, a pale horse: and he that sat upon him, his name was Death; and Hades followed with him. And there was given unto them authority over the fourth part of the earth (It is clear that the depopulationists got their way. Mike Adams and Steve Quayle interview warn about the planned and orchestrated extermination of the human race.),the fourth part of the earth to kill with sword, and with famine, and with death, (Footnote for “death" in the Numeric says "or pestilence") and by the wild beasts of the earth. (The "sword, famine, and pestilence" were used several times when the scriptures speak of Babylon taking down the apostates and their system.) I also saw that many nuclear explosions did not come from missiles but from ground bombs of some kind. I knew that in the future there would be a nuclear war throughout the world and this is how it would start. Then, my focus changed from the Middle East to America. I understood that I was about to see some of the things that would lead up to the nuclear holocaust I had just witnessed. As I looked upon the continent of North America, I zeroed in on the East Coast and then to New York. I saw New York with all of its buildings and people. Then I saw some tall buildings crashing to the earth with tremendous smoke, debris and dust everywhere (World Trade Towers?). The next thing that I felt more than I saw was that shortly after this there was no commerce, no shopping, buying, and was I impressed that there was no economy. The economy had almost failed completely and no one had any money. (This is happening now and it is to bring down the DS fiat dollar for the purpose of bringing online the new financial system. It is possible that they will not be able to bring it back. A guess is because of plagues. We don't know how much of this revelation can be avoided through repentance and spiritual warfare.) The next thing I saw was people being sick and dying. I saw this particularly in four cities: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Salt Lake. The disease started by having white blisters, some the size of dimes appear on their hands, arms and face. (Monkeypox is spreading now? Back in Nov. of 2021 Bill Gates warned of a smallpox outbreak. Bill Gates' Germ-Game Warning. Smallpox is a much worse version of Monkeypox but the vaccine is the same for both. In March 2021, NTI partnered with the Munich Security Conference to conduct a tabletop exercise simulating a global pandemic involving an unusual strain of monkeypox caused by a terrorist attack using a pathogen engineered in a laboratory… SIGA Technologies & Bavarian Nordic have official contracts with first world nations like the US and undisclosed Europeans for Monkey Pox vaccine production as of May 12th, just days before outbreak began… This quickly developed into white puffy sores and blisters. People would stumble about and fall and then many died within a short time, maybe 24 hours.  I also saw other people with blood coming from their nose, mouth, eyes and ears. (Ebola or Marburg) It started like a flu virus and it spread very quickly, faster than the other white blister disease. The people who had this disease died even faster. This was more wide spread across the entire United States. There were hundreds of thousands of people stricken with these two diseases. (This is the DS revenge and this could be their method to cheat on or derail the mid term 2022 elections and NESARA/GESARA.) I knew that there were several different kinds of diseases, but at first primarily these two. They came from small containers that had been brought into the United States. These containers were like quart jars and I was impressed that the people carrying them would just drop them on the ground in large crowds of people and the people would become infected without realizing it. (We have dreams of them dropping them in airports so that they would spread everywhere quickly) In these cities as the disease spread, the people tried to flee from the cities out to the countryside. (Do it now) There was complete chaos in these cities and a breakdown of normal society. There was no electricity in them either, but I don't know why or how that came to be. (They are bringing the nuclear and hydro generators down to replace them with Tesla Free Energy now, but because of the plagues they may not finish the project.).  There were cars piled up everywhere, blocking roadways and most people then had to walk out with nothing. (They have warned of CME's from the Sun bringing the grid's down as an excuse but, more likely, they have EMP's that will take down the vehicles.)  The disease started to spread beyond these initial cities. As these people were fleeing the cities, there were gangs attacking them and killing them. (Because they are afraid of the pandemic)  In the cities that were struck with the disease, there was complete chaos, looting, rioting, murdering, a complete breakdown. Many people seemed to go absolutely crazy. I sensed that the electricity had failed everywhere now and that nothing was running. (According to our dreams, some places will have electricity and many will not because the pandemic will hinder the switchover. Some will attempt to deceive those with electricity out of their houses.)  There was no communication or anything anywhere in the country. (They are bringing the internet down to switch over to the new internet connected through Starlink satellites, but the switchover could be interrupted by the pandemic.)  Nothing worked, no radios or TVs. (Because the electricity didn't come up.) I watched people throw rocks and break windows to steal TVs, which I thought was really crazy because they wouldn't work. Immediately, as I watched this happen in the United States, I jumped back to the Middle East and saw the same thing in Israel, the same sores, and I realized that it was the same types of disease or sickness happening there. I knew somehow that whatever diseases had been used in the United States were also being used in Israel. This lasted for only an instant and I was back in the United States. There was a tremendously long winter that lasted into summer. (We just had a long winter that and it is still getting cold as of the end of May.) It caught everyone by surprise and started the full famine. Actually, I realized that the long winter actually just increased the famine greatly to its full measure, because the famine had already been in progress because of the storms, droughts, floods and other plagues that had been happening over the few years leading up to the long winter. It seemed then that the year following the long winter was when everything started to go down hill very quickly or things piled up one on top of the other without any breaks. The sense of time was not very clear because I was seeing several things that seemed to happen all at the same time or very close together. (This sounds like our current media news cycles. Note, the book of Revelation is not a series of consecutive happening from beginning to end. In several places the same time periods are being spoken of. This revelation is likely the same.) During and after the long winter, the disease spread everywhere and increased in severity. The economy was completely gone and the electricity was also gone. There was complete chaos and anarchy all over the United States. There was no government, just a total breakdown. There was no food at all. I saw people trying to get food and were completely panicked because there was no food. I saw people digging in the ground for worms and eating them because they were so hungry. (At this point at the end of May 2022, the plan is; crash the economy, the electricity, the internet, and the food supply. So this vision has been extremely accurate. We must ask God for mercy for those He has chosen.) Also, during this time I became aware that there was very little water and that almost all of the water had become poisoned so that if a person drank the water they would get the disease and die. Many did drink the water, knowing that they would die, because they were so thirsty. Some of the people seemed to go crazy(ier) and went around in gangs killing people just for the sake of killing. Others killed for food or for things but the people who killed just to kill were absolutely terrible. They seemed like beasts; animals completely out of control as they raped, looted, burned and butchered people. I saw them go into people's homes and drag families out who were hiding there and rape them and butcher them. There was such a fear and hatred that came upon the people -- families, wives, husbands -- loving ties no longer mattered; it became survival only. Husbands would kill their wives and children for food or water. Mothers would kill their children. It was absolutely horrible beyond description. (It's here that the New Age people will discover that man is not inherently good, but is capable of the worst. Ecc 3:19  ... yea, they have all one breath; and man hath no preeminence above the beasts: for all is vanity. Not to mention, that the tribulation came and not their 1000 years of peace because “there is no peace to the wicked, saith the Lord.") The air seemed to be filled with smoke as many buildings and cities burned and no one put them out. As I looked upon the scene of chaos, destruction and smoke, I noticed that there were these little pockets of light scattered all over the United States. There were, I would guess, about twenty or thirty of them. I noticed that most of these places of light were in the western part of the United States, with only three or four in the East. These places of light seemed to shine through the darkness and caught my attention and so I concentrated on them, asking, "What are these things?" I could then see that they were people who had gathered together and they were on their knees and they were praying. The light was coming from them and I understood that it represented their goodness and love. I understood that they had gathered together for safety and that they cared more for each other than for themselves. Some of the groups were small, with only a hundred people or so, but in other groups there were what seemed several thousand. I realized that somehow many, if not most of these cities of light had been established just before the disease attack and that they were very organized. It was like they had known what was coming and had prepared for it. I didn't see who or what had organized them, but I saw many people struggling to get to them with nothing but what they could carry. These cities of light had food and were sharing their food with those who joined them in their groups. There was peace and safety in the groups. They were living in tents, all kinds of tents, many of which were just blankets covering poles. I noticed that the gangs left these groups alone, choosing to pick on easier targets and unprotected people. They also preyed on the people who were trying to get to the cities of light. Many people in these cities of light had guns to defend themselves and so the gangs left them alone but it seemed that the gangs just didn't want to come against them. (We are warned that "They that take the sword will die by the sword" and "If any man shall kill with the sword, with the sword must he be killed.” Some coming to these cities of light will not have this conviction yet. I would suggest that guns could also have a spiritual meaning. The power to kill will be in the saint's words as if they were a gun. The two witnesses kill with their words in Rev.11, indicating the time of grace is up for the wicked.) I realized that these cities of light, which is what I began to think of them, were only for a short time and then the people in them would go somewhere else; however, I don't know where they went but I seem to think that they gathered to the mountains; to the high places. (They are there to be prepared to spread the Gospel, for we have a short time left.) (Then the nuclear war which had started when in this dream the Iranian missile was fired at Israel from Libya and then the invasion of the US by Russia and China and other nations towards the end of the tribulation began.) As I was looking at the cities of light, I then saw missiles coming and hitting some cities and mushroom clouds started happening all over the United States. Some were from missiles that I knew came from Russia and others were not from missiles, but were from bombs that were already in the United States. They were hidden in trucks and in cars and were exploded. I specifically saw Los Angeles, Las Vegas and New York hit with bombs. New York was hit with a missile, but I think that Los Angeles was hit by a truck bomb or actually several, because I didn't see any missile. I also saw north of Salt Lake City have a mushroom cloud, a small one, but no missile. In the darkness I also saw little fireballs. I don't know if this happened just before or during the mushroom clouds, but there were millions falling everywhere. They were very hot, of different sizes with most about the size of golf balls. As they fell from the sky they left a streak of flame and smoke behind them. Whatever they touched they started on fire: people, buildings, trees, grass, it didn't matter. I didn't ask what they were or where they came from, because by this time I was getting sick of the whole scene and so I just observed and didn't ask many questions. (We've had many dreams of fireballs hitting the earth.) Almost right on top of these mushroom clouds I saw Russian troops invading the United States. I saw them parachuting into a lot of places, primarily from the East Coast. I saw them parachute into Salt Lake City. I also saw Chinese troops invade from the West Coast, near Los Angeles. (This is what we've known by many revelations.) The people who were still alive started fighting them with their own guns. I didn't see any military. This was the nuclear war that I had seen earlier and I knew that it was also happening all over the world like I had seen previously. I did not see much of this war, but I was impressed that it was not very long and the Russians and Chinese lose, but I don't know how exactly. (This reminds me of George Washington's vision when the angels came to help.) Now the smoke turned to a very thick, heavy dark smoke. Just as things appeared to be as bad as it could get, then the earthquakes happened. This happened during a winter. It seemed that this was the winter following the very long one and so the chaos had been almost for a full year. The earthquakes seemed to start in the West, around Idaho and Wyoming, and then quickly spread everywhere. I saw a huge earthquake strike Utah and then California. There were earthquakes all over California, but were especially devastating in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. (Could this be the approach of Planet X? It is possible what happened in History could happen again when the planet did not escape the sun's gravity and went around again or even again.) These earthquakes triggered volcanoes all over the West. They started spewing a tremendous amount of ash and smoke into the air and the air became very dark and dirty. The sun was darkened even more because of the smoke and the ash that started raining down everywhere. I also saw huge waves of water sweep over the West Coast and then I realized that it was happening all over the coastal cities of the entire world. Los Angeles was almost swept completely away. The waves were huge. (The tipping and slowing down of the earth because of the Planet X flyby.) I saw a big wall of water, taller than many of the buildings, perhaps as high as 20 feet, sweep over Salt Lake City. I thought this was strange because it was so far from the ocean and I wondered how a wave from the ocean could travel all the way to Salt Lake City. I was impressed that it was not from the ocean but from the ground. I quickly saw great cracks in the earth around Salt Lake City open up and water just shoot out of the ground. I felt that under the ground, very deep, there was a tremendous amount of water and the earthquakes forced it up to the surface. (The fountains of the deep broken up again as in the days of Noah.)  When the water swept over the city, there weren't very many buildings left, in fact there was a tremendous destruction with hardly anything left at all, just a few buildings. The water went from Idaho down to near Cedar City and was very bad. In the cities there was great destruction, and most of the buildings had been destroyed and there was a lot of rubble. Through the earthquakes, disease, floods, volcanoes and tidal waves killed a lot of people, most people died because of the gangs and everyone killing each other, not from the terrible devastations. As I thought a moment about it, it seemed that the earth itself had become sickened at the terrible things that were happening upon it and was finally reacting. I was impressed that the earth wanted to cleanse itself of the terrible chaos and evil that had engulfed the people. (This is the wrath of God not earth.) Because of the volcanoes erupting everywhere, there was now ash mixed with the heavy smoke. Ash was falling and it was almost complete darkness everywhere. The diseases had become very bad. I saw people literally die on their feet. There was another disease I saw. People had these red blotches on them and then they quickly started bleeding everywhere, from every opening. Then, they literally disintegrated or melted into unrecognizable masses of flesh and bone. I cannot even begin to describe what I saw. The dead were everywhere After this terrible winter, I saw the survivors pile up the dead into huge piles and burn them. The smell was absolutely terrible. I could smell it just a little and the smell itself would make you sick. This burning of bodies had happened a little during the chaos, but not much because people were so worried about surviving that they just ignored the dead. I then saw four more things.  I saw a huge earthquake in the middle of the United States. It was tremendous and seemed to split the United States in half about where the Mississippi River is. The crack in the earth that resulted was huge and that area totally sank. It was miles wide and it opened up and the earth fell down. It seemed to swallow everything. Then water flowed in from the Gulf of Mexico all the way up to the Great Lakes, only they weren't lakes anymore, they became all part of a big inland sea. I then saw a series of tremendous earthquakes all over the world. But it wasn't lots of separate earthquakes, it was all part of one huge, gigantic earthquake that shook the entire earth. (The earth's mantle slipping on the core from an earth tide from Planet X.) Because of this earthquake, water came upon the land all over the world. Huge walls of water along all of the coasts. This earthquake and the walls of water made the earlier ones seem small by comparison. I don't know if the earthquake that split the United States into two parts was part of this worldwide quake or not. I then saw a tremendous wind come upon the earth. As the wind hit I saw people go into caves and into the cracks of rocks to escape it. It was tremendous and it blew trees and everything away. It appeared to be stronger than any hurricane or tornado. It seemed like everything was blown away. I understood, without asking, that the great worldwide earthquake and the wind were somehow caused by a huge object, like a planet or something, that had come very close by the earth and disrupted everything and that it was near the end that this happened. (Planet X was not known by the public at this time.) I then was back into space viewing the entire earth from a distance. I saw this huge fireball, two or three times bigger than the earth, approach the earth. It was extremely bright red and gold in color and then engulfed the entire earth. When I saw this, because it was so different than everything else, I asked what it was. I was impressed that it was the burning of the earth that is described in the scriptures. I understood that just before it came, Jesus had appeared to the earth and the good people that I had seen earlier had left the earth with Him and were no longer on the earth. (Timing? Planet X may go around the Sun more than once. Some ancient historians reported that it hit planet Tiamat which then became the asteroid belt. This slowed P-X so that it could not escape the gravity of the Sun till it went around again and maybe again. The last time could be the rapture and the great and terrible day of the Lord)  The only people left were the few wicked who had survived the devastations earlier, but there were not many.   Economic Devastation and the Monkeypox Plague Garrett Crawford - 3/26/08 (David's notes in red) This dream has stayed true to how I saw it in 2008. I havent changed a word. I think the first crash was the economic crash of 2008. The 2nd crash is what is happening now in the economy. I found it strange the survivor of the crash put on a monkey suit. (Could this represent the Market crashing at same time as monkey pox arrives?) I dreamed I was given a Word from the Lord that another 9/11 attack would occur, It was profound enough that I told the members of my family. A long time passed in the dream and I had forgotten about it, because it didn't come to pass. (Many times we forget the things the Lord reveals to us and begin to doubt Him because the things spoken do not come to pass according to our timing.) After an extended period of time, I saw myself and a few other men castrating ourselves and we had performed another surgery on ourselves as well. In this surgery we had removed some organs from our abdomens. We thought that we were doing a good thing, but there were complications with the surgery. (Castration represents cutting off the flesh of man's ability to sow his own seed and the surgery represents cutting out the flesh and organs that feed the old man and cause him to live independently from faith in God. The complications represent the trials and testing that the God sends our way to prove our faith and our commitment to walk in agreement with our promises in His Word.) After many weeks I realized that I was not healing properly and that I may have taken out too many organs that I had really needed.(This represents walking by sight and looking at the problems and also regrets for having chosen to follow the Lord and give up everything of our carnal life for Him and His Kingdom. )  We all walked around after the surgery carrying a plastic bag full of our organs because we thought we should keep them. (Don't try this at home kids! :o) The devil will try to convince us through fear, doubt, and unbelief that we need to hang on to our flesh and that it was a mistake to give up our fleshly lives. We prayed for God to help us reconnect them ourselves, but we tried to no avail to reconnect them. (This represents shrinking back and desiring to reconnect the our old lives and the people we've left behind for the sake of discipleship.  Heb. 10:35-39 Cast not away therefore your boldness, which hath great recompense of reward. 36 For ye have need of patience, that, having done the will of God, ye may receive the promise. 37 For yet a very little while, He that cometh shall come, and shall not tarry. 38 But my righteous one shall live by faith: And if he shrink back, my soul hath no pleasure in him. 39 But we are not of them that shrink back unto perdition; but of them that have faith unto the saving of the soul.) I finally told the group of men that I was very troubled and wanted to go to the hospital to have the doctors reconnect my organs. I had lost faith in a supernatural healing. At that moment I ran outside, determined to get to the hospital as fast as I could, carrying my bag of organs.  As I ran through the door I found myself outside, on top of an apartment building. (The top of the apartment building represents heavenly places in Christ, those who are sanctified through separation from the Babylonish world and its systems. They are hidden in Christ in their Psalm 91 protection.) I could see that I was in a big city, (Ninevah/America) and as I looked ahead I could see the twin towers (also mentioned in the previous revelation.) standing in front of me. There was panic on the face of all on top of the building with me and on the street below. A plane had just been ripped out of the air and literally thrown to the ground in front of the towers a few seconds before I walked out.  I looked down and I could see the mangled wreckage of what used to be a commercial airline fuselage. The Towers were not damaged but the plane crashed right at the base of them. (Could these towers be symbolic of the American economy and empire. The 1st crash of 2008 did not destroy America.) As I looked in the sky another plane flew by the towers and caught fire and suddenly crashed into the top of the second tower. (This could represent this current economic crash. It is the second crash and it hit the second tower. This one will bring destruction to America.) At this moment I looked at my mother and I realized that the thing the Lord spoke to me about came to pass, a second 9/11 style attack. At that moment I changed, I was so full of faith and peace. I said, “If God is with me so much that he showed me the future, then he is with me enough to also heal me."  At that moment I took the bag of organs (Representing fear, doubt and unbelief) and threw them so hard they flew over to one of the twin towers and landed next to the wreckage on top of the tower. The top of the tower was filled with water like a huge pool. (The tower is a Babel. The American Babylon which is under the curses pronounced against it by God. I saw America as a huge fish pool in a dream years ago. The Hebrew name "Nineveh" is written ideographically with the cuneiform sign of a fish within an enclosure and I saw the U.S. in a vision as a fish enclosure.)  The bag just floated around until one of the survivors of the crash swam over to it and grabbed it. I told her not to touch it but she took the remains in the bag and put them on like clothing. When she put them on, it looked like a monkey suit. (All those who cling to fear, doubt and unbelief will become victims of the vaccines of the DS plagues represented by the “Monkey suit or Monkey Pox.”) Then my mom, sister, and I ran inside our apartment. I said, “We need to leave the city right now before mayhem ensues. Grab what you can carry and let's go." I filled a couple of garbage bags full of food that was in the pantry and we ran to the SUV. (We have warned people to leave the big sin cities. Spiritually, this represents fleeing into the wilderness. Rev. 12:14 And there were given to the woman the two wings of the great eagle, that she might fly into the wilderness unto her place, where she is nourished for a time, and times, and half a time, from the face of the serpent.) Then I woke up. (Just a thought, This shows that when these bad times come many lost and unsaved will be terrified and scared. (Which will drive many to God.) But the believers who are knowledgeable about the things to come will rejoice, because they know what is happening. The tribulation will have the complete opposite effects on the two groups. The believer will know that God is doing these things and that they are in his hand, where as the unsaved will not see any sovereign control and just see chaos, causing them to panic. I think the start of these things will kickstart a revival among God's people.)   Select LanguageAfrikaansAlbanianAmharicArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChichewaChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CorsicanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchFrisianGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHawaiianHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKazakhKhmerKinyarwandaKoreanKurdish (Kurmanji)KyrgyzLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianLuxembourgishMacedonianMalagasyMalayMalayalamMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianMyanmar (Burmese)NepaliNorwegianOdia (Oriya)PashtoPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSamoanScots GaelicSerbianSesothoShonaSindhiSinhalaSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSundaneseSwahiliSwedishTajikTamilTatarTeluguThaiTurkishTurkmenUkrainianUrduUyghurUzbekVietnameseWelshXhosaYiddishYorubaZulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version  

QC, THAT'S WHERE!
'QC, That's Where' We're Not Flashy, We're Just Really Good at Stuff: A running tradition

QC, THAT'S WHERE!

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 45:24


The Quad Cities community has become a rich destination for runners and continues to foster a running community within, given its growing access points to cross Iowa/Illinois state lines across the Mississippi River!There are endless opportunities to run with peers or compete against worldwide elites. The Quad Cities has numerous running groups, clubs, and road races every week. Some of the most well known are the Bix 7 in Davenport, Iowa and the TBK Bank Quad Cities Marathon, which travels from Illinois into Iowa and back, touching four cities along the way. Guests Joe Moreno and Phil Young are influential names in the Quad Cities running community. Phil is the owner of Fleet Feet Davenport. Joe is the former Mayor of East Moline and race director for multiple area events including the TBK Bank QC Marathon, Firecracker Run, and Freedom Run.  From directing their own events to becoming known as the mayor who will high five you as you cross the finish line, hear their perspectives from participating, to volunteering to being race leads and all the ups and downs in between. 

Tacos and TeKILLya
Mathias Ham House

Tacos and TeKILLya

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 45:26


The Mathias Ham House sits in Dubuque, Iowa. This is located right on the border of the Mississippi River. In fact, that is how Mathias Ham made his fortune to in turn build a house in the 1800s. However, the home only held the family for his next generation before being sold to the state in order to eventually become a museum. It was only once it became a museum did all the spooky happenings become known to the public. Join us as we discuss the haunting in the Mathias Ham House! Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathias_Ham_House http://hauntedhouses.com/iowa/the-ham-house/ https://www.encyclopediadubuque.org/index.php?title=HAM,_Mathias https://www.rivermuseum.com/ham-chronicles/posts/behind-the-hams https://www.dreadcentral.com/cold-spots/5080/the-mathias-ham-house/ https://www.telegraphherald.com/news/tri-state/article_ca311b9d-6614-55fc-8fd2-2bc691c23be8.html https://k923.fm/5-haunted-iowa-destinations-3-mathias-ham-house/ https://www.iowahauntedhouses.com/real-haunt/mathias-ham-house.html https://www.rivermuseum.com/hamsite https://www.cityofdubuque.org/708/Mathias-Ham-House https://www.hauntedplaces.org/item/matthias-ham-house/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tacosandtekillyapodcast/support

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Pennsylvania Woodsman - A Kentucky Boy's Pennsylvania Elk Hunting Experience

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 77:46


Hunting elk east of the Mississippi River is arguably one of the greatest conservation success stories in North America. While the herds seen today in Pennsylvania are actually Rocky Mountain Elk transferred from western states, it's still a thrill to see and hear this species roam the state. On this week's episode of the Pennsylvania Woodsman, Mitch and Robby chat with Jacob Coons about his recent elk hunting trip to the Keystone State. Jacob is driven to the challenge of hard-earned DIY hunting for western game but is also allured by the unique hunting opportunity for elk in eastern states. He drew a late season bull tag for the 2021-2022 season and was fortunate to connect with the trophy of a lifetime. Jacob shares with us all of his homework to prepare for this tag and what he learned throughout the entire experience. You will likely learn something about elk hunting PA you never knew, as Jacob's attention to detail is superb!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 4040: Dark Enigma - Demons, Voodoo and a Grisly Murder in Nola

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:44


Please be aware the stories, theories, re-enactments and language in this podcast are of an adult nature and can be considered disturbing, frightening and in some cases even offensive.  Listener Discretion is therefore advised.  Welcome heathens welcome to the world of the weird and unexplained.  I'm your host, Nicole Delacroix and together, we will be investigating stories about the things that go bump in the night, frighteningly imagined creatures, supernatural beings and even some unsolved mysteries and all sorts of weirdness.  So, sit back, grab your favorite drink, and prepare to be transported to today's dark Enigma....  And on today's Dark enigma well, we have another wonderful listener suggestion!  So, with that said, we will still be playing our drinking game and as you know, the drinking game is only for those of us that are at home and have nowhere else to go tonight.  The choice of libation, as always my darlings, is yours, so choose your poison accordingly… Alright, now for the game part how about every time I say    that will be a single shot and every time I say    , that will be a double shot.  Now that the business end is out of the way we can jump headfirst into today's dark enigma… so don your best beads, grab your most elaborate mask and we're heading down to my neck of the woods, Bayou Country with today's topic of Demons, Voodoo and a Grisly Murder in Nola! You can wear your hunger and your haunts on your sleeve in New Orleans and no one will judge you for it. You can take a leisurely stroll down the street of sin and if you walk far enough, you'll find profound peace and quiet. You can grab a go-cup filled with strawberry daiquiri and a fried shrimp po' boy at the same joint, and sit on an iron bench overlooking the Mississippi River thinking about what you'll have for your next meal. And perhaps most of all, New Orleans mourns their dead with such passion and pride that strangers can join in on the funeral dirge; umbrellas in hand, swaying hips down cobblestone streets, singing along to St. James Infirmary. It's quite a scene to behold in the Big Easy, with lazy summer days and cool moonlit nights, a great place for artists, lovers, and anyone else who needs a little inspiration. 

waterloop
waterloop #144: Modeling the Mississippi River Delta

waterloop

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


It took thousands of years for the Mississippi River to build the coastline of southern Louisiana and its vast network of wetlands and bayous. It only took several generations of people to disrupt the natural, land-building flow by controlling the river with concrete and levees. Now a state-of-the-art, 10,000 square foot physical model is used to plan restoration projects for the area, as discussed in this episode with Clint Willson, the Director of the Center for River Studies at Louisiana State University. Clint explains how the Mississippi River Delta model operates and the unique learning opportunities it provides to students, scientists, and resource managers.waterloop is a nonprofit media outlet. Visit waterloop.org

Ray Appleton
Hour 2 -Friends remember Woman Dragged For 8 Miles. Mass shooting At Supermarket Hate Crime. Alleged Corruption By Fresno City Attorney. City Propose Veterans Memorial District

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:25


Monique Contreraz, 29, was killed in a hit-and-run incident early Friday morning. According to Fresno police, she was stuck under a pick-up truck and dragged for 8 miles. The 18-year-old suspected of opening fire at a Buffalo supermarket Saturday told authorities he was targeting the Black community, according to an official familiar with the investigation. Fresno City Attorney Doug Sloan shared details of a conversation he had with Fresno City Council President Nelson Esparza — what Councilmember Garry Bredefeld described as extortion of the attorney. Our city is not only home to the California Veterans Home, a senior care facility for those who bravely defended our nation, but also hosts the largest Veterans Day Parade west of the Mississippi River. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BirdNote
Morning on the Bayou

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 1:46


Cypress trees draped with Spanish moss rise from still, dark water. A Barred Owl hoots mightily as an alligator slithers by. It's morning on the bayou. Bayous are found in much of the Southeast from Arkansas to Alabama, across flat land that drains into the Mississippi River. A bayou's luxuriant wetness supports lush growth of trees and shrubs. These in turn offer secluded nesting for a broad range of birds, including the Anhinga, the Yellow-throated Warbler, and this Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. Learn more at BirdNote.org.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 49:51


Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our third episode discussing Kate Chopin's controversial novella, The Awakening.  Week 1 we introduced Chopin, her life and the book itself.  We talked about what a stir it made during her lifetime ultimately resulting in it being forgotten and then rediscovered midway through the 20th century.  Last week, we spent all of our time on the vacation resort island of Grand Isle.  We met Mr. ad Mrs. Pontellier, as well as the two women who represent got Edna, our protagonist, two alternating lifestyles.  Edna Pontellier, we were quick to learn, is not a happily married woman.  Her husband is outwardly kind to her, but readers are told outright that love and mutual respect was never part of the arrangement between these two.  Edna is indulged by Mr. Pontellier, for sure.  He gives her anything she wants in terms of money or material, but in exchange, she is his ornament, an expensive hobby, a pet even- something to be prized- or as Ibsen would describe it- a beautiful doll for his doll house.      The story starts in the summer at the vacation resort town of Grand Isle, Louisiana.  While vacationing on the island, Edna Pontellier experiences what Chopin terms “the awakening”.  She awakens to the understanding that she is not a pet or a doll in the doll house, and just like Nora in the The Doll's House, she decides she really doesn't want to be one anymore.     No, I guess if that were the only thing to this story, we'd have to say, Sorry Kate, Ibsen beat you by about 20 years.  In Ibsen's story, Nora awakens when her husband, Torvald, turns on her over money.      That's a good point, what awakens Edna in this book is not a marital crisis over money.  It is a crisis that awakens her, and it totally informs how she views her marriage, but it is a crisis concerning her husband at all that is the catalyst.   She is awakened to her own humanity by discovering her own sensuality.  I want to highlight that this awakening isn't overtly sexually provoked.  No man comes in and seduces Edna; she does not go off with a wild vacation crew.  She is left vulnerable, if you want to think about it that way, because of loveless marriage, but she is sensually and emotionally provoked through three  very different relationships- all of which affect her physically as well as emotionally.  The first is with a Creole woman, Adele Ratigntole, one with a younger Creole man, Robert LeBrun, and the third with the provocative music of Madame Reisz.  Experiences with these three awaken something in Edna that encourages maybe even forces her to rebel- rebel against her husband, against the culture, against the person she has always been, against the roles she has played, against everything that she has ever known.      The problem is- rebellion only takes you so far.  You may know what you DON'T want, but does that help you understand what you DO?  And this is Edna's problem.  Where do we go from here?     And so, in chapter 17, we return with the Pontellier's to their home in New Orleans.  And, as we have suggested before, New Orleans is not like any other city in America, and it is in these cultural distinctives of Creole life at the turn of the century that Chopin situates our protagonist.  But before we can understand some of the universal and psychological struggles Chopin so carefully sketches for us, we need to understand a little of the culture of this time period and this unusual place.  Garry, tell us a little about this world.  What is so special about Esplanade Street?    Well, one need only Google tourism New Orleans and a description of Esplanade street will be in the first lists of articles you run into.  Let me read the opening sentence from the travel website Neworleans.com    One of the quietest, most scenic and historic streets in New Orleans, Esplanade Avenue is a hidden treasure running through the heart of the city. From its beginning at the foot of the Mississippi River levee to its terminus at the entrance of City Park, Esplanade is a slow pace thoroughfare with quiet ambiance and local charm.  According to this same website, Esplanade Street, during the days of Chopin, functioned as “millionaire row”- which, of course is why the Pontelliers live there.    It actually forms the border between the French Quarter and the less exclusive Faubourg Marigny.  At the turn of the last century it was grand and it was populated by wealthy creoles who were building enormous mansions meant to compete with the mansions of the “Americans” on St. Charles Avenue.    “The Americans”?    Yes, that was the term for the non-Creole white people.  The ones that descended from the British or came into New Orleans from other parts of the US.     Esplanade Street was life at its most grand- there is no suffering like you might find in other parts of New Orleans.  The Pontelliers were wealthy; they were glamorous; these two were living competitively.      The first paragraph of chapter 17 calls the Pontellier mansion dazzling white. And the inside is just as dazzling as the outside. Mrs. Pontellier's silver and crystal were the envy of many women of less generous husbands.  Mr. Pontellier was very proud of this and according to our sassy narrator loved to walk around his house to examine everything.  He “greatly valued his possessions.  They were his and I quote “household gods.”    The Pontelliers had been married for six years, and Edna over this time had adjusted to the culture and obligations of being a woman of the competitive high society of Creole New Orleans.  One such obligation apparently centered around the very serious etiquette of calling cards and house calls.  This is something we're familiar with, btw, since we watch Bridgerton.  It was something we saw in Emma, too.  Garry, talk to us about the very serious social business of calling cards.     Well, this is first and foremost a European custom during this time period. It started with simple cards designed to announce a person's arrival, but as in all things human, it grew and grew into something much larger and subtextual- and of course, with rules.  During the Victorian era, the designs on the cards as well as the etiquette surrounding were elaborate.  A person would leave one's calling card at a friend's house, and by friend meaning a person in your community- you may or may not actually be friends. Dropping off a card was a way to express appreciation, offer condolences or just say hello.  If someone moved into the neighborhood, you were expected to reach out with a card, and a new arrival was expected to do the same to everyone else.      The process would involve putting the card on an elaborate silver tray in the entrance hall.  A tray full of calling cards was like social media for Victorians- you were demonstrating your popularity.    For example, if we were doing this today, we would have a place in the entrance of our home, and we'd make sure the cards of the richest or most popular people we knew were on to.  We would want people who dropped off cards to be impressed by how many other callers we had AND how impressive our friends were. The entire process was dictated by complicated social rules, and as Leonce explains to Edna, to go against these rules could mean social suicide.     It could also mean financial suicide because business always has a human component.  The function of an upper class woman would be to fulfil a very specific social obligation and this involved delivering and accepting these calling cards.  Every woman would have a specific day where she would make it known she was receiving cards, and the other ladies would go around town to pay house calls.  In some cases, a woman might remain in her carriage while her groom would take the card to the door.  During the Regency era like in Jane Austen's day, there was a system of bending down the corner of the card if you were there in person, and not if you were sending it, but by Chopin's day, I'm not sure if that was still a thing.     The main thing was that the card would be dropped off on this special silver tray. If it were a first call, the caller might only leave a card.  But, if you were calling on the prescribed day, the groom would further inquire if the lady of the house were home.  A visit would consist of about twenty minutes of polite conversation.  It was important that if someone called on you, you must reciprocate and call on then on their visiting day.      Well, the Tuesday they get back, Edna leaves the house on her reception day and does not receive any callers- a social no-no.  In fact, as we go through the rest of the book, she never receives callers again. This is an affront to the entire society, and an embarrassment to her husband; it's also just bad for business, as Mr. Pontellier tries to explain to his wayward wife, let's read this exchange.    “Why, my dear, I should think you'd understand by this time that people don't do such things; we've got to observe “les convenances” if we ever expect to get on and keep up with the procession.  If you felt that you had to leave this afternoon, you should have left some suitable explanation for your absences.      One thing I find interesting.  Mr. Pontellier assumes that Mrs. Pontellier is on the same page on wanting the same things as he wants, and what he wants is to keep up with the procession.  They'd been doing this for the last six years, and doing it well.    Another thing I notice is that he doesn't rail at her for skipping out. Mr. Pontellier, unlike her father, even as we progress through the rest of the book, is not hard on her at all.  In fact, he's indulgent.  The problem in the entire book is not that he's been overtly abusive or cruel.  Read the part where he tries to kind of help her fix what he considers to be a serious social blunder.    Page 60    Well, if taken in isolation, this exchange doesn't seem offensive, and I might even have taken sides with Mr. Pontellier if it weren't back to back with this horrid scene of him complaining about his dinner then walking out to spend the rest of the evening at the club where he clearly spends the majority of his time.  You have to wonder what is going on at that club, but beyond that.  Edna is again left in sadness.  “She went and stood at an open window and looked out upon the deep tangle of tea garden below”.  (On an aside, if you've read Chopin's story, the story of an hour, you should recognize the language here and the image of this open window).  Anyway,, Here again we have another image of a caged bird, or a person who is looking out in the world but not feeling a part of it.  “She was seeing herself and finding herself in just sweet half-darkness which met her moods. But the voices were not soothing that came to her from the darkness and the sky above and the stars.  They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of home.  She turned back into the room and began to walk to and from down its whole length, without stopping, without resting.  She carried in her hands a thin handkerchief, which she tore into ribbons, rolled into a ball, and flung from her.  Once she stopped, and taking off her wedding ring, flung it upon the carpet.  When she saw it there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it.  But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.  In a sweeping passion she seized a glass vase from the table and flung it upon the tiles of the hearth.  She wanted to destroy something.  The crash and the clatter were what she wanted to hear.”    She's clearly angry…and not just because Mr. Pontellier complained about the food and walked out of the house.  She's angry about everything.     Never mind the fact that we are never told what goes on at this club, but there are several indications in different parts of the book that Mr. Pontellier may be doing other things besides smoking cigars in crowded rooms.  Adele even tells Edna that she disapproves of Mr. Pontellier's club.  She goes on to say, “It's a pity Mr. Pontellier doesn't stay home more in the evenings.  I think you would be more- well, if you don't me my saying it- more united.”      Although I will add, Edna quickly replies, “'Oh dear no!' What should I do if he stayed home? We wouldn't have anything to say to each other.”  - the fact remains that MR. Pontelier does not see any need to nurture any sort of human or intimate relationship with Edna- theirs comes across as a cordial business arrangement, at best, with Edna in the position of employee.      True, and although I don't know if this is the right place to point this out, but in terms of the sexual indiscretions that may or may not be going on when Mr. Pontellier is at the club, there is likely a lot in the culture at large going on under the surface that a person from the outside wouldn't immediately be aware of.   Edna is naïve at first to all that goes on in her Victorian-Creole world.  There just is no such thing as “lofty chastity”  amongst the Creole people, or any people I might add, although Edna initially seems to believe that in spite of all the sexual innuendo in the language, nothing sexual was ever going on.  There are just too many indications otherwise in the story that that is not the case.  The reader can see it, even though Edna cannot.     True, and if you didn't catch it on Grand Isle, in the city, it is more obvious, and the farther along we go in the story, it gets more obvious as well.  Mrs. James Highcamp is one example.  She has married an “American” but uses her daughter as a pretext for cultivating relationships with younger men.  This is so well-known that Mr. Pontellier tells Edna, after seeing her calling card, that the less you have to do with Mrs. Highcamp the better.  But she's not the only example.  Victor basically details an encounter with Edna of being with a prostitute he calls “a beauty” when she comes to visit his mother..ending with the phrase that she wouldn't comprehend such things.  And of course, most obviously there is the character Arobin with whom Edna eventually does get sexually involved, but his reputation has clearly preceded him.       Well, Edna's awakening to all of this would explain part of her anger, but  there is more to Edna's awakening then just Leonce, or the new culture she's a part of, or really any outside factor.     Yes, and it is in the universality of whatever is going on inside of Edna that we find ourselves.  That's what's so great about great literature- the setting can be 120 years ago, but our humanity is still our humanity.       I agree and love that, but let's get back to her setting for a moment. I think it's worth mentioning that the 19th century culture of the Creole people in New Orleans is messy and complicated in its own unique way.  It's fascinating, but for those who are not of the privileged class, life was often a harsh reality.  The world, especially in the South, was problematic for people of mixed race heritage.  So, and this is more true the closer we get to the Civil War and the Jim Crow era, but those who called themselves “white creoles” had a problem because of the large existence of the free people of mixed race ancestry in New Orleans.  There was a strong outside pressure to maintain this illusion of racial purity, but the evidence suggests this simply wasn't reality.  Let me throw out a few numbers to tell you what I'm talking about.  From 1782-1791, the St. Louis Catholic Church in New Orleans recorded 2688 births of mixed race children.  Now that doesn't seem like a large number, but let me throw this number out- that same congregation at that time same only records 40 marriages of black or mixed race people.  Now, I know Catholics are known for having large families, but I'm not sure 20 women can account for 2688 births.      No, something feels a little wrong.  That number suggests another explanation may be in order.      Exactly, and by 1840 that number grows from 2688 to over 20,000 with mixed raced Creoles representing 18% of the total population of residents of New Orleans.  And if that doesn't convince you, here's another indicator, during this same period many many free women of color were acquiring prime real estate in New Orleans under their own names.  These women had houses built and passed estates on to their children, but notice this detail, the children of these mixed-raced women had different last names then their mothers.  We're not talking about small amounts of property here.  By 1860 $15 million dollars worth of property was in the name of children with last names that were not the same as that of their mothers, oh and by the way, a lot of that property was in the neighborhood where Edna rents her pidgeon house just around the corner from Esplanade street- in other words around the corner and walking distance from millionaire row.      Well, that's really interesting, and I guess, does add a new dimension to the subtext in the language for sure.    Well, it does, and it is likely something readers of the day would have certainly understood, more than we do 100 years later when the stakes of identifying as being of mixed raced heritage are not the difference between freedom and slavery.  But beyond just that, it's an example of cultures clashing.  Edna represents an outwardly prudish Puritan culture coming into a society that is French, Spanish and Caribbean- very different thinking.  This is a de-facto multi-cultural world; it's Catholic; it's French-speaking; it's international.  She doesn't understand what she's seeing.  And in that regard, her own situational reality is something she's realizing she is only beginning to understand, and she comes into it all very gradually. She is not, in Adele's words, “One of them.”  In fact, there may have been irony in the narrator in Grand Isle suggesting that Robert LeBrun's relationships every summer were platonic.  His relationship with the girl in Mexico we will see most certainly is not, but nor was his relationship with Mariequeita on Grand Isle, the girl they meet on the day they spent together.      Indeed.  You may be right- perhaps there is a real sense that Edna has been blind, and perhaps not just to her husband but by an entire society that presents itself one way but in reality is something entirely different altogether.  When she visits Adele and her husband at their home, everything seems perfect- of course.  Adele is the perfect woman with this perfect life.  Adele is beautiful.  Her husband adores her.  The Ratignolle's marriage is blissful, in fact to use the narrator's words, “The Ratignolles' understood each other perfectly.  If ever the fusion of two human beings into one has been accomplished on this sphere it was surely in their union.”      Do you think it's sarcasm again?  Was it truly perfect, or just presenting itself to be perfect?     It's really hard to tell.  Maybe they have worked out a great life together.  I think there is a lot in this passage to suggest they are truly happy together.  Edna even expresses that their home is much happier than hers.  She quotes that famous Chinese proverb “Better a dinner of herbs”.  The entire quote is “Better a dinner of herbs than a stalled ox where hate is.”- meaning her house has better food but she thinks of it as a hateful place- whereas this place is the opposite.   Poor thing- she sees her reality for what it is.  I still see a little sarcasm in the narrator's language, but even if Adele is every bit as perfect as she seems, and even if her home is every bit as perfect as it seems, and even if her husband is every bit as perfect as he seems, in the most real of ways, that could all be true and it wouldn't matter.  E    Precisely, The Ratignole's life can be every bit as perfect as it appears. and it wouldn't make Edna want it any more.  Edna leaves Adele's happy home, realizing that even if she could have it it's not the life she wants.  She wouldn't want that world even if Leonce loved her.  It's just not for her.  The problem is, that's as far as she's gotten with her problem solving.  All she knows is what she DOESN'T want.  Her new world is a world of negation.  She wants to quit, and so she does.  She absolutely disregards all her duties to the point that it finally angers Leonce enough to confront her.    “It seems to me the utmost folly for a woman at the head of a household, and the mother of children, to spend in an atelier days which would be better employed contriving for the comfort of her family.”    An atelier is an artist studio.  It' seems Edna has left all the responsibilities she had as a housewife as well as a mother.  And let me add, Edna was never dusting, cooking, or bathing her children.  She has several house keepers and nannies.  But now, she's not even overseeing what others are doing.  Instead, she's devoting herself entirely to painting.  And surprisingly, Leonce doesn't even have a problem with that in and of itself.  Edna tells her husband, “I feel like painting.”  To which he responds, “Then in God's name paint!  But don't let the family go to the devil.  There's Madame Ratignolle, because she keeps up her music, she doesn't let everything else go to chaos.   And she's more of a musician than you are a painter.”  Yikes, that may be honest, but it does come across as a little harsh.  I know.  I think it's kind of a funny line.  To which, Edna has an interesting comeback- it's like she knows it's not about the painting. She says, “It isn't on account of the painting that I let things go.”  He asks her then why she's let everything go, but she has no answer.  She says she just doesn't know.  Garry, do you want to take a stab at what's going on with Edna?   Well, I do want to tread carefully.  What is fascinating about this book is not so much that Chopin is arguing for any specific course of action, or warning against any specific set of behaviors.  She doesn't condemn Edna for anything, not even the affair she will have with Arobin.  Instead of judging, Chopin, to me, seems to be raising questions.  And it is the questions that she raises that are so interesting.  Edna is desperately trying to rewrite the narrative of her life.  There is no question about that.  But that is an artistic endeavor, in some ways like painting or singing.   I guess we can say Chopin is blending her metaphors here.  Edna doesn't want to be a parrot and copy, but she's living her life exactly the way she is painting- it's uncontrolled; it's undisciplined; it's impulsive.  I'd also say, it's rather unoriginal.  There is no doubt that the social roles offered to her are restrictive.  There's no doubt her marriage is a problem, but as we get farther into the story, it's hard to believe that even if all of these problems could be rectified that Edna would be able define a life for herself.  We, as humans, are always more than a reaction to the social and cultural forces in our world- I hate to get back to the word we used last week, but I can't get away from it.  Even under strict social norms, which I might add, Edna is NOT under for her time period- she is after all one of the most privileged humans on planet Earth at that particular time in human history, but even if she were under severe restrictions, she, as a human, still has agency- we all do.  Yes- and to use Chopin's words from chapter 6, Mrs Pontellier was beginning to realize her position as an individual as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world WITHIN and about her.  I think that Edna is like the rest of us in that it's easier to understand and manage the world about us as opposed to the world within.  At least I can SEE the world about me- how can I see within?  How can I understand myself?  And so Edna goes to the world of Madame Reisz having discarded the world of Adele Ratignolle- the world of art, the world of the artist- which is where Edna goes in chapter 21.  I would argue that she sees it as the polar opposite of Adele's reality.  There is the Adele version of being a woman- a totally objectified, sexualized but mothering type of woman= versus this version of womanhood who is basically asexually.  Perhaps Madame Reisz isn't a woman at all- she's an artist.    Except that world, the world of the artist, comes with its own share of difficulties nevermind that it is simply more uncomfortable.  Reisz' house is described as “dingy”.  There's a good deal of smoke and soot.  It's a small apartment.  There's a magnificent piano, but no elegant food or servants or silver trays for calling cards.  She cooks her meals on a gasoline stove herself.  Let me quote here, “it was there also that she ate, keeping her belongings in a rare old buffet, dingy and battered from a hundred years use.”  True, but there is also  the music and when the music filled the room it floated out upon the night, over the housetops, the crescent of the river, losing itself in the silence of the air and made Edna sob. The art is otherworldly, and there is something to that.  Something attractive maybe even metaphysical.  I want to talk about Kate Chopin's choice of music.  I don't think we noted this in episode one, but Chopin was an accomplished pianist.  She played by ear and read music.  She held parties, almost identical to the ones she described Madame Ratignole throwing in the book with dancing and card playing.  Music was a very big deal to Kate Chopin, so when she includes specific music in her writing, she's not just dropping in commonly used songs, she uses artists she likes for specific reasons, and in this novel, the pianist Frederic Chopin is selected intentionally- and not because he has the same last name, although I did check that out- they are not related.  Garry, as a musician yourself, what can you tell us about Frederic Chopin, the Polish composer and pianist?  Well, let me make this comparison, Frederic Chopin's music in his day was the pelvis gyrating Elvis' Rock in Roll of his day.  It was provocative.  19th century attitudes towards this type of harmony driven romantic music would seem hysterical to us.  They were seen as sensual and a destructive force, especially for women.  This may even be Chopin's sassy narrator playing with us again- Frederic Chopin's music is definitely driving sensuality in Edna. To say Kate Chopin is using it ironically is likely taking it too far, but I don't know, maybe not.  This narrator has been ironic before. The main undeniable connection is that Madame Reisz plays Impromptus.  Impromptus are improvisational music.  Frederic Chopin wrote only four of them in his career.  The one Kate selects here is called Fantasie-Impromptu in C minor- it's the only one in a minor key that he ever wrote.  You can pull it up on Spotify and hear it for yourself.   It is full of rhythmical difficulties.  It's very difficult to play. It's quick and full of emotion.  There is banging on low notes at times, thrills and rolling notes going faster and slower at others points.  Frederic Chopin, by the way, was a very temperamental person and in some ways shares a lot of the personality quirks of Madame Reisz. But he did have an interesting philosophy about music that I really like and does connect to our book.  He is recorded to have said this, “words were born of sounds; sounds existed before words…Sounds are used to make music just as words are used to form language.  Thought is expressed through sounds.  And undefined human utterance is mere sound; the art of manipulating sounds is music.”  Interesting, music is thoughts as sounds.  I like the expression “undefined human utterance” especially in regard to Edna because she absolutely cannot get her thoughts out nor is she willing to share then with anyone.  She expresses more than once that her inner world was hers and hers alone. She can't get her thoughts out when she talks to Adele; she can't get them out when she talks to her husband, and she can't get them out even with Madame Reisz which would have been a very safe space for her to express herself.  At the end of chapter 21, she's sobbing at the music and holding in her hands a letter from Robert LeBrun crumpled and damp with tears.   It would have helped her to have found someone to talk to, maybe the Dr. Mandelet that Leonce goes to in chapter 22 for advice about how to help his wife.    What we find out from Leonce's conversation is that Edna has withdrawn from every single person in her world.  She won't even go to her sister's wedding.  What the doctor sees when he goes to dinner at their house is a very outwardly engaging woman but an inwardly withdrawn one.  The Doctor wonders if she's having an affair, but she isn't.    She is, to use the title of the book, One Solitary Soul.  As a human being, there are only so many types of relationships we find meaning in: we have our parents and birth family, we have our intimate relationship, we have our children (if we have any), we have our professional relationships, and we have our social friends- at least one of these has to be working for us.  Edna finds no satisfaction in any of them.  She doesn't have a trusting relationship anywhere.    Yes, every single relationship in her life is basically a burden.  Edna is trying to relieve herself of every single responsibility in the world hoping that getting out of relationships will help her expand her identity.  The problem is getting RID of responsibilities is not really the answer.  To find meaning in this world you must DO something worth doing.  Something that takes strength and energy.  Something you can be proud of.  Of course as a classroom teacher, that is what we do everyday.  It's not helpful to give students high grades or marks for nothing.  It weakens them.  When you give them a difficult task and then they are able to do that task, they grow, they get strong, they learn they are capable of even great responsibilities.  If you want to get strong, you have to take ON responsibilities- you have to practice strength training, Edna goes the opposite way here.      Edna does look for models, and if she wanted a career path, or a professional life like we think of in  our era, Chopin threw in a character that could have served that function.  It's what I see going on in  the chapters about the races.  Edna is actually really good at horse gambling.  She knows horses.  She knows the horse-racing business and knows it well.  The text actually says that she knows more about horse-racing than anyone in New Orleans.  In fact, it's her knowledge about horses that puts her on the radar of the man she eventually has the sexual relationship with, Alcee Arobin.    Let's read the section where we see this relationship, if we want to call it that, take shape.  Arobin had first seen her perform well at the tracks and to use the narrator's words, he admired Edna extravagantly after meeting her at the races with her father.  Mrs. Highcamp is also a completely different version of a feminine ideal, although neither Edna nor the narrator seem to think enough of to give her a first name.  This confused me some when I read this because in my mind, Mrs. James Highcamp would have been this type of a liberated woman that Chopin might want to have Edna admire.  She's clearly sexualy liberated, but beyond that she's worldly, intelligent, slim, tall.  Her daughter is educated, participates in political societies, book clubs, that sort of thing.  But nothing about Mrs. James Highcamp is alluring to Edna at all.  She suffers Mrs. James Highcamp because of her interest in Arobin.   Let's read about these encounters between Arobin and Edna.   Here's the first one  Page 86     So, Arobin becomes fascinated with Edna, in part because she is so smart and different from other women.  At the end of that evening, they dined with the Highcamps. And afterwards Arobin takes Edna home.  The text says this “She wanted something to happen- something, anything, she did not know what.  She regretted that she had not made Arobin stay a half hour to talk over the horses.  She counted the money she had won.  There was nothing else to do, so she went to bed, and tossed there for hours in a sort of monotonous agitation.  And so the relationship with Arobin is born out of boredom.    Yes, the dominant movement in Edna's life is always drifting towards boredom.  Edna wants to rewrite her social script, but she can't seem to define what she wants.  She has trouble speaking, so she has no words to write her own story.  She doesn't want to be a mother; she doesn't want to work except in sunny weather; she has an opportunity with Mrs. Highcamp to get involved with political or literary women; but that doesn't spark her interest.  She could make a name for herself at the races, but the money doesn't motivate her- she's always had it and in some ways doesn't seem to know a world without money.  So, she's going to default into this relationship with Arobin.  I'm going to suggest that she is again playing the part of the parrot.  Messing around with Arobin is just the kind of thing she sees men doing.  It's what Victor does; it may be what her husband does; it is likely what Robert is doing down in Mexico, so she's going to try to mimic male behavior since she hasn't really found a female model she's interested in emulating, and Arobin is an opportunitiy for this.    And yet, she's self-aware enough to not be seduced by Arobin.  The first time he really tries to make a move on her by kissing her hand, this is what she says which I find insightful,  “When she was alone she looked mechanically at the back of her hand which he had kissed so warmly.  Then she leaned her head down on the mantlepiece.  She felt something like a woman who in a moment of passion is betrayed into an act of infidelity, and realizes the significance of the act without being wholly awakened from its glamour.  The thought was passing vaguely through her mind, “what would he think?”  She did not mean her husband; she was thinking of Robert LeBrun.  Her husband seemed to her now like a person whom she had married without love as an excuse.  She lit a candle and went up to her room.  Alcee Arobin was absolutely nothing to her.  Yet his presence, his manners, the warmth of his glances, and above all the touch of his lips upon her hand had acted like a narcotic upon her.  She slept a languorous sleep, interwoven with vanishing dreams.”  Garry, is there a connection between Edna's boredom with her new life and her desire to pursue this relationship with Arobin.   Well, again, Dr. Kate Chopin is playing the psychologist.  Science has absolutely confirmed there is a relationship with boredom and risk-taking behaviors.  In other words, the more bored you find yourself, the more likely you are to do something risky.  It's one reason teenagers are so prone to dangerous behaviors like drugs.  They don't know yet how to cope with personal down time.  They can't manage their own boredom.  Bored people don't know what they want to do.  They also score low on scares that measure self-awareness.  Bored people can't monitor their own moods or understand what they truly want.  And here's another characteristic that should sound familiar in the life of Mrs. Edna Pontellier, notice that last line “vanishing dreams”, Edna is not dreaming.  She's not working at writing a script for her life..structuring a story for herself.  Her dreams and not building anything, they are vanishing.  That's not good.  And it's not that doesn't have illusions, she does, but a dream is not an illusion.  Dreams are what inspire us to do something different. Both a dream and an illusion are unreal, but an illusion will always be an illusion- it has no chance of becoming real; out of dreams new realities are born.  We are not seeing Edna dream.  Her dreams are vanishing.    Which brings us to the place where I want to end with this episode- chapter 26 and Edna's decision to move out of her husband's house.  I mentioned that this book is constructed with the archetypal 3 in mind at every point.  Edna has been living on Esplanade street- the wealthy gilded cage life, and she doesn't want that.  She has visited Madame Reisz's apartment, but she doesn't seem to want that- it's, and I quote, “cheerless and dingy to Edna”.  So what does she do? She moves two steps away from Esplanade Street, to a house Ellen calls, “the pigeon house.”  Pigeons are the oldest domesticated bird in the world.  They never fly far from home- homing pigeons is actually a term. She's building an illusion. Edna is going out of her husband's house to a place around the corner, but is she really building a new life of any kind?  What is this about?   Edna describes it to Madame Reisz, this way,  “I know I shall like it, like the feeling of freedom and independence.”    But is the feeling of freedom and independence the same as actually having freedom and independence?  Well, obviously not.  They are worlds apart.  But Edna lives in feelings.  She works when she feels like it.  She plays with her children when she feels like it, and now she admits to Madame Reisz that she's in love with Robert LeBrun, who by the way is coming back.  And when she finds that out she feels, and I quote “glad and happy to be alive.”  And what does she do after that, she stops at a candy store, buys a box to send to her children who are with their grandparents in the country and she writes a charming letter to her husband.  Her letter was brilliant and brimming with cheerfulness.  I'm sorry, but Edna frustrates the feminist in me.    Well, Edna is struggling for sure.  She can't connect with people.  She can't identify a dream worth pursuing.  She can't write her own story.  There is no doubt that a lot of this has to so with cultural and social forces at work in her world.   These are powerful forces.  However,  it is not the outside forces of her world that will do her in.  Edna is smart.  She's beautiful.  She's charming.  She actually has a lot going for her, especially for a woman during this time period.  If Chopin had wanted to write a story where a woman breaks free and soars, she has a protagonist who is positioned to do that very thing.    But she's in a mess.  And maybe that's why she's so relatable.  Many of us have made messes of our lives.  We have an incredible ability to screw up, but  humans are also incredibly resilient.  Look at Chopin's own life as an example.  In some ways, she's both Adele Ragntingole and Madame Reiz, at different points in her life she'd been both.  She may even have been Mrs. James Highcamp to a lesser degree. Why is Edna struggling here?  Well, humans are incredibly resilient, but you know what else we are- we are social beings.  Let's revisit that original book title, “One Solitary Soul”- it's my experience that no one gets out alone- not even the rich, the beautiful or the smart.  No one gets out alone.    Ah, Edna is strong enough to confront the forces without, but who will help her confront the forces within?  And so next episode, we will see her confront those internal forces.  There are no more female characters to meet; no more male characters either for that matter.  We will see Edna confront Edna alone, and we will see what happens.  Thank you for listening.  If you enjoy our podcast, please share it with a friend, a relative, your classmates, your students.  We only grow when you share.  Also, come visit with us via our social media how to love lit podcast- on Instagram, facebook and our website.  Feel free to ask questions, give us your thoughts, recommend books.  These are all things we love.  Thanks for being with us today.  Peace out.         

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
469. Sybil Gage, Part 2

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


469. Part 2 of our interview with Sybil Gage. Born and raised in New Orleans Sybil Gage had front row schooling in what makes that city great. Now living in Florida, Sybil is spreading New Orleans music to the rest of the world. The “Little Dynamo” is slinky in sequins, and funky in fishnets and has become the darling of the East Coast from New Orleans (Old U.S. Mint Theater) to New York City (Triad Theater W. 72nd St. Broadway). Witness “Sybil Gage and Her Mighty Catahoulas” and a typical evening will include the legendary music of Professor Longhair and James Booker, fun tunes from Smiley Lewis and Jesse Hill and Eddie Bo, blues from Elmore James, Little Willie John, Mississippi John Hurt, Robert Johnson, Etta James, Gus Cannon, as well as many of her own award winning original contributions. On intimate evenings, with only piano to accompany, she sings Pre War Blues, Hokum, Traditional New Orleans inspired Jazz and original tunes that fit seamlessly into her vast repertoire. This week in Louisiana history. May 14, 1845. First free public school opened in LA. This week in New Orleans history. On May 14, 2011, the Morganza Spillway on the Mississippi River was opened for the second time in its history, deliberately flooding 3,000 square miles of rural Louisiana and placing three nuclear power plants at risk to avert possible flooding in Baton Rouge and New Orleans. This week in Louisiana. Bogalusa Balloon Fest May 20-22, 2022 10:00 am - 10:00 pm 401 Walker St. Bogalusa LA 70427 We are a hot air balloon festival which includes hot air balloons, a carnival, vendors and live entertainment. May 20-22, 2022 10:00 am - 10:00 pm Amenities: Senior Citizen Discount, Student Discount, Family Friendly, Free Parking. View Website Phone: 985-750-3905 Email: bprcc.70427@gmail.com Postcards from Louisiana. Guitarist on Royal St.Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play.Listen on Google Podcasts.Listen on Spotify.Listen on Stitcher.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.  

American History Tellers
The Great Mississippi Flood | When the Levee Breaks | 1

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:33


In the winter and spring of 1927, record-setting rain fell across the central United States. The Mississippi River swelled to capacity, and by April, the water breached major levees. It was the start of the most catastrophic river flood in American history.When the flood threatened the town of Greenville in the Mississippi Delta, white plantation owners pulled tens of thousands of Black workers from the cotton fields and sent them to the river. An army of hundreds of men worked day and night, piling sandbags to battle the raging waters. But soon, despite their efforts, the Great Mississippi Flood would unleash destruction on the Delta.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/historytellersPlease support us by supporting our sponsors!Trade Coffee- New subscribers get $30 OFF your first order and FREE shipping at drinktrade.com/TELLERS!Peloton- Visit onepeloton.com to learn more about a fun, motivating variety of workouts!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MPR News Update
Woman charged in death of newborn found in Mississippi River in 2003

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 5:18


Goodhue County authorities announced Monday they have filed second-degree murder charges against a woman they say is the mother of two newborn babies found dead in the Mississippi River in 1999 and 2003. This is an MPR News evening update for May 9, 2022. Hosted by Hannah Yang. Our theme music is by Gary Meister. 

The Gateway
Friday, May 6, 2022 - Preventing an ancient Mississippi River giant's extinction

The Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 10:17


Missouri scientists are tracking lake sturgeon populations in the Mississippi River, as part of an ongoing effort to prevent the extinction of the endangered fish species. The team implanted radio transmitters into wild sturgeon this spring, so they could track movement in the river ecosystem.

Bird Banter
The Bird Banter Podcast: Ed From The Great River Road Part 2

Bird Banter

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 27:56


On this episode I report on birding the Great River Road, and various places nearby, from Memphis to Davenport, Iowa and then on to Omaha.  Overall a great experience, seeing new states, new roads, and getting an appreciation for the great river.  Highlights were great looks at Sedge Wren, some fabulous National Wildlife Refuges, and of course the Mississippi River and all it entails.  For more details, photos and related i