Podcasts about Decoder

  • 211PODCASTS
  • 406EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Feb 8, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Decoder

Latest podcast episodes about Decoder

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Microsoft thinks AI can beat Google at search — CEO Satya Nadella explains why

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2023 24:12


I'm coming to you from Microsoft's campus in Redmond, where just a few hours ago, Microsoft announced that the next version of the Bing search engine would be powered by OpenAI, the company that makes ChatGPT. There's also a new version of the Edge web browser with OpenAI chat tech in a window that can help you browse and understand web pages.  The in-depth presentation showed how OpenAI running in Bing and Edge could radically increase your productivity. They demo'd it making a travel itinerary, posting to LinkedIn, and rewriting code to work in a different programming language. After the presentation, I was able to get some time with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Nadella has been very bullish on AI. He's previously talked about AI as the next major computing platform. I wanted to talk about this next step in AI, the partnership with OpenAI, and why he thought now was the best time to go after Google search. This is a short interview, but it's a good one. Okay, Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft. Here we go. Watch this interview as a video Microsoft announces new Bing and Edge browser powered by upgraded ChatGPT AI All the news from Microsoft's February AI event Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23354035 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone, Jackie McDermott, Vjeran Pavic and Becca Farsace and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How HBO's creatives survived corporate chaos

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 68:23


HBO started as an experiment. It was a way to get people to switch from getting TV over broadcast antennas to cable by offering events you'd otherwise need tickets to see: boxing, plays, movies. That's where the name Home Box Office comes from. But it grew from there in surprising ways: HBO was a major innovator in satellite distribution, in working with cable operators around the country, and of course in programming. The company's taste and style has influenced and shaped culture for a generation now. And importantly, HBO did it without any real data: the cable companies owned all the subscribers, so HBO made decisions through instinct and experience. The amazing thing about HBO is that it has stayed true to itself through an absolutely tumultuous set of ownership changes and strategy shifts. If you're a Decoder listener you know about the chaos of AT&T and HBO Max and the sale to Discovery to create Warner Brothers Discovery, but it's so much twistier than that. I talked through all of those twists with Felix Gillette and John Koblin, authors of the terrific book It's Not TV: The Spectacular Rise, Revolution, and Future of HBO. Felix and John also peeled back the curtain on your favorite HBO shows from Sex and the City to Game of Thrones. Before we get into the episode, I have to do our usual set of disclosures: I'm a Netflix executive producer. We made a Netflix show called The Future Of. You should watch it. I'm hopelessly biased in favor of the show we made. Also, Vox Media has a minority investment from Comcast. They don't like me very much. And I worked at AOL Time Warner. I quit to start The Verge.  Ok that's that. Let's get into the interview—it's a good one. Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23352141 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.  The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Inside the global battle over chip manufacturing

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 53:06


A few weeks ago, President Biden was in the Netherlands, where he asked the Dutch government to restrict export from a company called ASML to China. ASML is the only company in the world that makes a specific machine needed to make the most advanced chips. Apple couldn't make iPhone chips without this one machine from the Netherlands' biggest company. ASML doesn't just shape the Dutch economy—it shapes the entire world economy. How did that happen? Chris Miller, Tufts professor and author of Chip War: The Fight For The World's Most Critical Technology walked me through a lot of this, along with some deep dives into geopolitics and the absolutely fascinating chip manufacturing process. This one has everything: foreign policy, high powered lasers, hotshot executives, monopolies, the fundamental limits of physics, and, of course, Texas. Here we go. Links: US issues sweeping restrictions on chip sales to China Japan and the Netherlands join US with tough chip controls on China Pat Gelsinger came back to turn Intel around — here's how it's going Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23342471 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.  The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Switched on Pop
Taylor Swift and the music industry's next $20

Switched on Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 82:24


Streaming feels like it's both at its height and on a precipice. Musicians are fed up at getting paid fractions of a penny, and the whole business model seems precarious. Switched On Pop co-host Charlie Harding was talking about the challenges for streaming future with my friend Nilay Pattel, editor in chief of The Verge and host the podcast Decoder - a show about big ideas. And they taped a conversation about what's next for streaming through the case study of Taylor Swift who has deftly navigated the transition from CDs to streaming, and whose era tour may mark the end of an era in music.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Taylor Swift and the music industry's next $20

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 83:33


I have this theory that music is usually about five years ahead of the rest of media in terms of its relationship to tech—whether that's new formats based on new tech, like vinyl to CDs; new business models like streaming; or simply being disrupted by new kinds of artists who use new forms of promotion like TikTok in unexpected ways. I've always thought that if you can wrap your head around what's happening to the music industry, you can pretty much see the future of TV or movies or the news or whatever it is, because the music industry just moves that fast. I was talking about this with my friend Charlie Harding, the co-host of Switched on Pop, and he said that he thinks the upcoming Taylor Swift Eras Tour is itself the end of an era in music — that the age of cheap streaming services is coming to an inevitable conclusion, and that something has to change in order for industry to sustain itself in the future.  So, in this episode, Charlie and I walk through a brief history of the music business—which, despite its ever-changing business models, is permanently trying to find something to sell you for $20 whether that's the music itself, all-access streaming, merch, and even NFTs—using Taylor Swift as a case study. We map her big moves against the business of music over time to try to see if this really is the end of an era. And maybe more importantly, to try and figure out if the music industry can sustain and support artists who are not Taylor Swift, because streaming, all by itself, definitely cannot. Links: Switched on Pop Charlie's first appearance on Decoder: Good 4 who? How music copyright has gone too far - The Verge  Why Amazon VP Steve Boom just made the entire music catalog free with Prime - The Verge  Spotify launching in the US at 8AM tomorrow, open to all pre-registered users - The Verge Metallica sued Napster 15 years ago today - The Verge Taylor Swift calls Apple Music free trial 'shocking, disappointing' in open letter - The Verge Taylor Swift versus Ticketmaster: the latest on the tour that may break up a giant - The Verge The DOJ has reportedly opened an antitrust investigation into Ticketmaster's owner      How fandom built the internet as we know it, with Kaitlyn Tiffany - The Verge Steve Aoki on the blockchain, the metaverse, and the business of music - The Verge Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23322720 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Hadley Robinson, Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. Our Sr. Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Lock Sportscast
132: Locky Awards Nominations are Open

The Lock Sportscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 36:38


Your weekly source for locksport news and sometimes interviews. Full show notes, including links, can be found at http://www.thelocksportscast.com  In this week’s episode: America needs more skilled trade workers First public open of a Dex magnetic padlock without tools First public single pin pick of Maglok Lockpick Championship by A.Wendt GmbH New Products Videos Blog Posts Criminals Events Meetups Sales Giveaways and more Announcements: The Locky Awards  Corrections: News: America needs carpenters and plumbers. Gen Z doesn't seem interested Automate Safe Cracking with an ESP8266 and a Stepper Motor - Hackster.io Super-long Eurocylinders! Super-long Eurocylinders! 2  Community News: Dex magnetic lock picked [104] [Public First] Maglok - Picked Lockpicking Competition 2023 in Germany

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Breaking free from big tech and big content with authors Cory Doctorow and Rebecca Giblin

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 90:20 Very Popular


Last year I spoke with Cory Doctorow and Rebecca Giblin about their new book, Chokepoint Capitalism. It's a book about artists and technology and platforms, and how different kinds of distribution and creations tools create chokepoints for different companies to capture value that might otherwise go to artists and creators.. In other words, it's a lot of Decoder stuff. As we were prepping this episode, the Decoder team realized it previews a lot of things we're going to talk about in 2023: antitrust law. Ticketmaster. Spotify and the future of the music industry. Amazon and the book industry. And, of course, being a creator trying to make a living on all these platforms. This episode is longer than normal, but it was a really great conversation and I'm glad we are sharing it with you. Links: What is Mixer, Ninja's new exclusive streaming home? Ninja returns to Twitch This was Sony Music's contract with Spotify Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23311918 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.  The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
‘We might be wrong, but we're not confused': how Tomer Cohen, chief product officer at LinkedIn, figures out what works best

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 78:24 Very Popular


Tomer Cohen is the chief product officer at LinkedIn, and actually, I talked to Tomer twice. Here's a little secret about Decoder: we do the interviews, and then often, the guest and I just keep chatting for a while. So after my first interview with Tomer, we were hanging out, talking about the perpetual battles between engineers, product managers, and designers. And he said something that completely jumped out at me: “We might be wrong, but we're not fucking confused.”  This isn't a totally new line — it's been floating around for a while, you can Google it — but you know I love an f-bomb, and honestly, it's one of the most simple and clarifying things a manager can say, especially when managing across large teams. So I asked Tomer to come back and really dig in on that idea. On top of that, we've been talking a lot about running social networks lately, and LinkedIn is a fascinating social network because it doesn't have the same engagement-based success metrics as other social platforms like Twitter and Instagram. Tomer doesn't care about time spent on LinkedIn; the platform is designed to be successful when people get new jobs. That means his ideas for features and user experiences are just really different. Links: Employment Situation Summary (Jobs Report) December Workforce Report 2022 (LinkedIn) Vision to values flowchart ChatGPT proves AI is finally mainstream — and things are only going to get weirder LinkedIn buys California-based SaaS learning platform How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell RAPID decision making Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23281360  Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.  The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The WP Minute
What's a web hosting provider's role in content moderation?

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 5:01


What's a web hosting provider's role in content moderation? WordPress co-founder and Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg recently weighed in. Mullenweg was a guest on The Verge's Decoder podcast and discussed the issue as it relates to WordPress VIP hosting. Specifically, he commented on a controversial story that was published in 2020 on the New York Post website. The Post is a WordPress VIP client. The story covered material allegedly recovered from a laptop owned by Hunter Biden, the son of U.S. President Joe Biden. Debate over the origins of the material saw both Facebook and Twitter temporarily restrict links to the story. Mullenweg says Automattic reviewed the matter but ultimately decided not to take action. Automattic has policies in place for content moderation, and Mullenweg referred to them as a “starting point” for looking deeper into a specific case. Links You Shouldn't Miss Theme developer ILOVEWP published a report on the most popular WordPress plugins released in 2022. The report uses publicly available data for plugins in the official WordPress.org repository. In all, nearly 4,200 plugins have been added so far this year. Out of that, only 7 have achieved at least 50,000 active installations. Did publishing platform Substack use unattributed code from open source competitor Ghost? Ghost's founder and CEO John O'Nolan makes a case in a recent Twitter thread. In a response thread, Substack co-founder and CEO Chris Best says the whole thing is a misunderstanding. Rather, Substack's custom theming API is merely compatible with Ghost. There's a lot here to digest. Therefore, reading the threads from both parties is recommended to see where each side is coming from. What will WordPress freelancers face in 2023? The WP Minute's Eric Karkovack offered some predictions. Upgrading to PHP 8 and navigating an uncertain economic environment are among them. Development firm Awesome Motive has introduced SendLayer, an email delivery service aimed at WordPress website owners. It requires a free API key and works in conjunction with the WP Mail SMTP plugin. Paid plans are being offered. Classifieds listings buy yours TweetGrab crawls your site and turns any embedded Tweets into screenshots with the click of a button. ZipMessage Record and swap messages asynchronously with clients and others using video, screen, audio or text + Embed video intake forms in WordPress. MainWP 4.3 includes Client Management, a new default theme, and an easy way to organize clients & sites from a single dashboard. From the Grab Bag Now it's time to take a look at some other interesting topics shared by our contributors. The Block Editor is coming to the WordPress.org support forums. According to Sarah Gooding at WP Tavern, the WordPress.org Meta Team is

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Disney's CEO drama explained, with Julia Alexander

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 62:15


Today, we need to talk about Bob. Two Bobs, actually: Bob Iger, the former and now current CEO of Disney, and Bob Chapek, the man Iger handpicked as his replacement, who flamed out and was fired by the board, and then, on November 20th, was replaced by Bob Iger. Bobs, man. The heart of this whole thing is total Decoder bait. It's a story about how to structure a company like Disney. Then you add in the complexity of the shift to streaming, the future of TV and movies generally, and the gigantic reputation of a character like Bob Iger, who many people think could plausibly run for president. There's just a lot going on here. Whenever I need to talk Disney, media, and Bobs, I call one person: Julia Alexander, director of strategy at Parrot Analytics and a former reporter at The Verge. Julia pays a lot of attention to the streaming giants, she's sourced inside all the companies battling for our attention, and she has a lot to say about the Bobs. Links: Bob Iger steps back in as Disney CEO, replacing Bob Chapek  Reed Hastings on Twitter Disney+ launch lineup: Every movie and TV show available to stream on day one - The Verge Bob Iger steps down as Disney CEO, replaced by Bob Chapek - The Verge Disney streaming chief Kevin Mayer resigns to become TikTok CEO - The Verge Disney Plus surpasses 100 million subscribers - The Verge Meta announces huge job cuts affecting 11,000 employees - The Verge Netflix's $6.99 per month ad tier is now live Stranger Things - The Verge Disney's major reorganization is good news for anyone who loves Disney Plus - The Verge Functional Structure: Advantages and Disadvantages | Indeed.com Pros and Cons of Implementing a Divisional Structure | Indeed.com Disney Proposal to Restructure, on McKinsey's Advice, Triggered Uproar From Creative Executives - WSJ Disney Shows the Limits of Streaming - WSJ Disney Erases Almost All Its Pandemic Gains After Earnings Miss ‘Strange World': Beautiful to look at, but not much below the surface - The Washington Post Watch The Future Of | Netflix Official Site Kevin Mayer quits as TikTok CEO due to ongoing political turmoil - The Verge Kevin Mayer Says His Firm Is In Deal Mode After Buying Reese Witherspoon's Hello Sunshine WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar announces exit as Discovery deal nears close - The Verge  Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23259187 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How Bose compete with AirPods — and why it's in more cars than ever, with CEO Lila Snyder

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 78:52


Bose is one of the most recognizable audio brands in the world: it was famous for the Wave radio in the 80s, it invented noise cancellation, you can see its logo on NFL sidelines every Sunday, and of course there are the popular consumer products like the QuietComfort headphones that reviewers like Chris Welch here at The Verge rate as some of the best in the game. Bose is in tons of cars as well: audio systems in GM, Honda, Hyundai, Porsche, and more are developed and tuned by Bose. Bose was founded in 1964 by Dr. Amar Bose, who donated a majority of the shares of the company to MIT, where he was a professor. That means to this day, Bose is a private company with no pressure to go public. However, Bose still has to compete against big tech in talent, products, and compatibility. So today I'm talking to Bose CEO Lila Snyder about Bose's dependence on platform vendors like Apple and Google, how she thinks about standards like Bluetooth, and where she thinks she can compete and win against AirPods and other products that get preferential treatment on phones. Links: Bose QuietComfort Earbuds II review: noise cancellation domination How Amar Bose used research to build better speakers List of Bose shelf stereos Hearing Aids | FDA Digital signal processor Functional organization Bose names its first female CEO as wait continues for new products Amar Bose '51 makes stock donation to MIT Meta announces huge job cuts affecting 11,000 employees Amazon mass layoffs will reportedly ax 10,000 people this week Elon Musk demands Twitter employees commit to ‘extremely hardcore' culture or leave The iPhone 7 has no headphone jack Bluetooth Special Interest Group Qualcomm Partners with Meta and Bose Bose gets into hearing aid business with new FDA-cleared SoundControl hearing aids Over-the-counter hearing aids could blur the line with headphones New Bose-Lexie Hearing Aid to Enter the Over-the-Counter Market Lexie Partners with Bose to Offer Lexie B1 Powered by Bose Hearing Aids Bose Frames Tempo review: the specs to beat Bose discontinues its niche Sport Open Earbuds BMW starts selling heated seat subscriptions for $18 a month Seven CEOs and one secretary of transportation on the future of cars Why Amazon VP Steve Boom just made the entire music catalog free with Prime                  Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23246668  Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.  The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Vast and Curious, cu Andreea Roșca
De ce orașele trăiesc veșnic, dar companiile mor tot mai rapid? Decoder.

Vast and Curious, cu Andreea Roșca

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 69:11


Astăzi, am pentru voi un episod special despre un fenomen interesant: de ce orașele tind să trăiască veșnic, dar companiile mor din ce în ce mai repede?   Explicația, precum veți auzi, e bazată pe felul în interacționează oamenii și circulă resursele. Matematica orașelor e o zonă fascinantă și utilă pentru oricine își pune întrebări despre creșterea și descreșterea unei organizații.  Acest episod este parte a podcastului Decoder, un nou podcast realizat de Adrian Stanciu și de mine, în care despicăm teme legate de cultură în business, de cum lucrăm împreună, de etică, morală, performanță și chiar filozofie.  Sper să vă placă și așteptăm, ca întotdeauna, feedback, idei și întrebări pe decoder.ro.  

Multiform: An Xbox Podcast
Pentiment Is Here - Multiform Ep. 223

Multiform: An Xbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 79:55


This week in the news we discuss comments Phil Spencer made on a recent Decoder podcast interview, updates from Embracer Group's earnings call, Xbox Black Friday and Holiday sales, November Xbox Game Pass additions and subtractions, the November Xbox system update, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt current-gen update release date, Xbox Cloud expanding to 2021 Samsung TV's and Company of Heroes 3 potentially coming to console.  We also discuss games we've been playing including Pentiment, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 & Warzone 2.0, Flight Simulator 40th Anniversary Update, and SMITE Runescape crossover. You can email the show at questions@multiformpodcast.com or reach us on Twitter @multiformpod

Project XTalk: An Xbox Podcast
ABK Deal About Mobile | Bethesda's Response to Mick Gordon | Project XTalk: An Xbox Podcast #110

Project XTalk: An Xbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 64:41


What is up everyone and welcome to Project XTalk: An Xbox Podcast! Your weekly podcast all about Xbox and gaming from Save The Game Media. Join us LIVE every Thursday and listen while Kevin and Ethan break down the biggest gaming news of the week. Who knows what special guest may stop by. If you like that make sure to like, share and subscribe! If you want to support us further, check out our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SaveTheGameMedia This week Phil Spencer has given an interview to the Decoder podcast and we are breaking down all the headlines like: Phil ONCE AGAIN confirming that Call of Duty will stay on PlayStation, the Activision Blizzard deal is about Mobile NOT Call of Duty and more. Then we have an acquisition to discuss, the latest Xbox Game Pass drop and Bethesda responds to Mick Gordon. Follow Us: https://twitter.com/SaveGameMedia https://twitter.com/TheMuff1nMon Audio: https://anchor.fm/project-xtalk Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/89rMmfzmqw Our Website: https://savethegamemedia.weebly.com/ Support our Extra Life Goal: https://www.extra-life.org/participant/SaveTheCarpoolTrophy #Xbox #CallofDuty #XboxGamePass #philspencer #candycrush

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Phil Spencer really wants you to know that native Call of Duty will stay on PlayStation

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 65:19


Phil Spencer, CEO of Microsoft Gaming, is in charge of Xbox and all the game studios that Microsoft has acquired over the years. Phil came to talk to us hours before the European Commission announced an in-depth investigation into Microsoft's proposed 68.7 billion dollar acquisition of Activision Blizzard, which makes the enormous Call of Duty series, as well as Candy Crush on phones.  So I had the chance to ask Phil: Will he make the concessions that regulators want in order to close this deal? And is the deal really just about Call of Duty, or something else? Is Microsoft committed to keep Call of Duty available on Playstation? Phil's a candid guy. He's been on Decoder before. I always enjoy talking to him, and this was a fun one. Links: Microsoft's Phil Spencer on the new Xbox launch - The Verge Microsoft to acquire Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion - The Verge Why Microsoft bought Bethesda for $7.5 billion Microsoft announces big, multistudio push to create more Xbox exclusives Bethesda's Starfield and Redfall have been delayed to 2023 Tech antitrust pioneer Lina Khan will officially lead the FTC Sony says Microsoft's Call of Duty offer was ‘inadequate on many levels' Microsoft: Xbox game streaming console is ‘years away' This is Microsoft's Xbox game streaming device Google is shutting down Stadia in January 2023 - The Verge Razer's Edge is one sharp-looking cloud gaming Android handheld Logitech G Cloud Gaming Handheld review: terminally online Steam Deck review: it's not ready Steam Deck, one month later Tech Leaders Discuss the Metaverse's Future | WSJ Tech Live 2022 Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on the business of Windows Microsoft partners with Meta to bring Teams, Office, Windows, and Xbox to VR EU opens ‘in-depth investigation' into Microsoft's Activision Blizzard acquisition Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23223230 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Double Barrel Gaming
BREAKING: Phil Spencer Interview On The Decoder Podcast, CONFIRMS Call Of Duty On PlayStation AGAIN!

Double Barrel Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 129:45


01:00 Guest & Panel Intros 06:00 BREAKING: NEW Phil Spencer Interview with the Verge's Decoder Podcast Re: Call Of Duty STAYING on PlayStation! 40:00 Xbox Game Pass for Mobile, could this be a thing in 2023? 1:00:00 NEW Xbox Game Pass bundle slated for THIS holiday season with HUGE "Free To Play IP's" that include #Fortnite, #FallGuys & #RocketLeague! How BIG could this be for Xbox? 1:16:00 NEW info on the size of the planets in Bethesda's NEW IP, Starfield. Just how BIG will it be, FRIKKIN HUGE and according to to some, as BIG a Skyrim......WOW! 1:36:00 Xbox Shares Community Safety Approach in Transparency Report Re: "Cyber Bulling" over Xbox Live & THIS IS an important conversation! 1:56:00 Panel Outros and Special Message to the Community! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-ravitch/support

The Brian Lehrer Show
Twitter's Free Speech Dilemma

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 29:16


Elon Musk considers himself to be a 'free speech absolutist,' but what happens when his ideals conflict with the business model of his latest acquisition, Twitter? Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge and host of the podcast "Decoder," and Suzanne Nossel, PEN America chief executive officer, discuss Musk's troubles at Twitter and why free speech absolutism may cause the ship to sink.

Hughesy & Kate Catchup - Hit Network - Dave Hughes and Kate Langbroek
CATCH UP - Another first name decoder and training an old dog!

Hughesy & Kate Catchup - Hit Network - Dave Hughes and Kate Langbroek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:14


On today's catch up, Hughesy's brother got himself an old dog, another round of ridiculous first name spelling and one of the women on Eliza's rampage CALLS IN! Subscribe on LiSTNR: https://play.listnr.com/podcast/hughesy-ed-and-erinSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Woo Woo School
S3E11 - Dream Decoder

Woo Woo School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 44:30


In this episode, we explore our subconscious landscape through dreams. Which, hellllllo, Scorpio szn has us straight up RIPE with them.  Accompanied by a dream card deck, we discuss common themes coming up in our (and yall's!) snooze cruises.  One part debunking the seemingly random imagery, one part astrology, one part laughing our ass off at personal asides: you've got a show that is equally educational as it is farting around. Our personal podcast dish of choice.  IDK about y'all, but we're feeling pumped to be on mic lately, so we hope you enjoy this audio party as much as we did in making it.  DECK LINK FOR DEBUNKING UR OWN ZZZS!  https://amzn.to/3fNrWYZ Other dream resources! A Practical Guide to Decoding Your Dreams and Visions: Unlocking What God is Saying While You Sleep https://amzn.to/3Tmk7qL The Dream Interpretation Handbook: A Guide and Dictionary to Unlock the Meanings of Your Dreams https://amzn.to/3DVj0bM 12,000 Dreams Interpreted: A New Edition for the 21st Century https://amzn.to/3hsvakS

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Why Figma is selling to Adobe for 20 Billion Dollars

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 69:15


Dylan Field is the co-founder and CEO of Figma, which makes a very popular design tool that allows designers and their collaborators to all work together right in a web browser. You know how multiple people can edit together in Google Docs? Figma is that for design work. We just redesigned The Verge; we used Figma extensively throughout that process. So for years, people have been waiting on the inevitable Figma vs. Adobe standoff since Figma was such a clear upstart competitor to Photoshop and Illustrator and the rest. Well, buckle up because in September, Adobe announced that it was buying Figma for $20 billion. Figma is going to remain independent inside Adobe, but you know, it's a little weird. So I wanted to talk to Dylan about the deal, why he's doing it, how he made the decision to sell, and what things he can do as part of Adobe that he couldn't do as an independent company. Dylan's also a pretty expansive thinker, so after we talked about his company getting the “fuck you” money from Adobe, we talked about making VR Figma for the metaverse and AGI, which is artificial general intelligence, or the kind of AI that can fully think for itself. This episode takes a turn. I think you're going to like it. Okay, Dylan Field, CEO of Figma. Here we go. Links: Welcome to the new Verge Adobe to acquire Figma in a deal worth $20 billion A New Collaboration with Adobe Designers worry Adobe won't let Figma flourish WebGL - Wikipedia How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell - Decoder Dylan Field on Twitter: "Our goal is to be Figma not Adobe" College Dropout Turns Thiel Fellowship Into a $2 Billion Figma Fortune Generative adversarial network (GAN) - Wikipedia       GPT-3 - Wikipedia Is VR the next frontier in fitness? - Decoder Artificial general intelligence - Wikipedia   Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23209862 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Jackson Bierfeldt. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Offline with Jon Favreau
Elon's Twitter is in the Sh*tter with Nilay Patel

Offline with Jon Favreau

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 49:06 Very Popular


Nilay Patel, Editor-in-Chief of The Verge and host of the Decoder podcast, talks with Jon about Elon Musk's newest and thorniest business venture: purchasing Twitter. In a recent article, “Welcome to Hell, Elon,” Patel describes the quandary that awaits the Tesla founder and argues that Musk has made a historic mistake. He joins Offline to talk Musks' misguided free speech promises, the limits of technical solutions to political problems, and the hubris of an internet troll-turned-King Twit. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, click here. For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast.

曼報 Manny's Newsletter
EP27|串流王者 Spotify

曼報 Manny's Newsletter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 81:56


2023 年必備的財經知識桌上聖品:〖 招財曆 2023 〗現正募資中,由我的超級好友 IEObserve 國際經濟觀察 X 財女Jenny 共同撰寫,七萬字頁頁含金,絕對值得珍藏。手刀搶購最後 9 天的早鳥優惠:https://r.zecz.ec/ndVC 【本集大綱】 00:00 - 13:19 要怎麼對人生充滿期待? 13:19 - 25:04 《串流王者》的觀看須知 25:04 - 39:06 開除自己 39:06 - 51:18 Fuck-off vs. Trade-off 51:18 - 63:33 Spotify 的生意本質 63:33 - 70:14 音樂串流的下一步 70:14 - 75:29 什麼是夠好的創辦人? 75:29 - 81:57 信任感的重要性 【推薦閱讀】 1. 《聲入 Spotify》 2. Amazon Music VP interview (Decoder) 【推薦訂閱】 訂閱《曼報》電子報: https://manny-li.com/ 追蹤《曼報》IG:@manny_li | https://www.instagram.com/manny_li/ Powered by Firstory Hosting

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
The mystery of Biden's deadlocked FCC

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 41:14 Very Popular


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is currently short a commissioner, and the Biden Administration and Senate Democrats just can't seem to get that seat filled despite having nominated an amazingly qualified person. Her name is Gigi Sohn. The inability to get Gigi confirmed at the FCC has left the commission deadlocked with two Democrats and two Republicans. That means the commission in charge of regulating all telecom in the United States, including how you get your internet service, is unable to get much done. The Biden administration can't accomplish some of its biggest policy priorities like rural broadband and restoring net neutrality. President Biden first nominated Gigi Sohn to the FCC over a year ago, but the full Senate vote to confirm her just hasn't happened. We've been digging into the story for a few months now, trying to figure out what's going on here, and we found a simple but really frustrating answer… Links: Gigi Sohn Author Profile - The Verge  Comcast trying to “torpedo” Biden FCC pick Gigi Sohn, advocacy group says The Slime Machine Targeting Dozens of Biden Nominees Attempted acquisition of Tribune Media by Sinclair Broadcast Group The Vergecast: Net neutrality was repealed a year ago. Gigi Sohn explains what's happened since  Confirmation Hearing for FCC and Commerce Department Nominees Biden signs $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act  Biden Signs Bill to Help Veterans Exposed to Toxic Burn Pits With the Inflation Reduction Act, the US brings climate goals within reach  Federal Communications Commission v. Pacifica Foundation  Federal Communications Commission v. Pacifica Foundation  A Media Censor for the FCC?  Hyperpartisan Gigi Sohn Doesn't Belong at the FCC Gigi Sohn and the Police Gigi Sohn Facebook Tweet Tech antitrust pioneer Lina Khan will officially lead the FTC Confirmation Hearing For FCC Nominee FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel on staying connected during a pandemic Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23201559 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was written and reported by Jackie McDermott. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. Additional mixing by Andrew Marino. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Vergecast
Why Signal won't compromise on encryption, with president Meredith Whittaker

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 75:01 Very Popular


Today we're sharing an episode of Decoder with Nilay Patel featuring an interview with Meredith Whittaker, president of Signal. Signal is the popular messaging app that offers encrypted communication. You might recognize Meredith's name from 2018 when she was an AI researcher at Google and one of the organizers of the Google walkout. Now she's at Signal, which is a little different than the usual tech company: it's operated by a nonprofit foundation and prides itself on collecting as little data as possible. Listen to more of Decoder with Nilay Patel anywhere you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Why Amazon VP Steve Boom just made the entire music catalog free with Prime

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 69:22


I love covering the music industry, but over the past 10 years I've found that it's one of the most challenging things to make accessible to a wide audience. See, my theory is that the music industry is like five years ahead of everything else when it comes to being disrupted by tech: whatever happens to the music industry because of technology eventually happens to everything else. Today I'm talking to Steve Boom, the VP of Amazon Music. Amazon just announced that they are upgrading the music service that Prime members get as part of their subscription. Starting today, one of the benefits for Amazon Prime members is that you now get access to the entire Amazon Music catalog, about 100 million songs, to play in shuffle mode. That service used to only contain 2 million songs. And they are removing ads from a large selection of podcasts including the entire Wondery catalog. I wanted to ask Steve: what's it like to negotiate with the record labels for a service like this? What can streaming services do to make artists more money? And where do podcasts fit into the overall strategy? Amazon and Spotify both spend a lot of money buying podcast studios. Is it paying off? Links: Amazon buys Wondery, setting itself up to compete against Spotify for podcast domination Apple's Anti-Competitive Behavior Hurts Everyone—Including Audiobook Listeners, Publishers, and Authors Why Rdio died Why it makes sense for Amazon to buy Twitch Amazon Launches Audio App Amp Combining Music and Live Conversation  The days of cheap music streaming may be numbered Why did Jack Dorsey's Square buy Tidal, Jay-Z's failed music service? Amazon Music rolls out a lossless streaming tier that Spotify and Apple can't match How Amazon runs Alexa, with Dave Limp Apple's new podcast charts show Amazon at the top Spotify gets serious about podcasts with two acquisitions  Vox Media acquires Cafe Studios, Preet Bharara's podcast-first company Vox Media Acquires Criminal Productions, Leading Narrative Podcast Studio Time to Play Fair - Spotify Apple's New App Store Rules a Big Boon for Netflix, Hulu & Co. MusiCares Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23197384 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Never pay the ransom — a cybersecurity CEO explains why

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 66:11 Very Popular


Steve Cagle is the CEO of Clearwater Compliance, which is a cybersecurity firm focused on the healthcare industry. Basically, they lock down hospital computer systems, which contain a huge amount of personal data, and are so mission critical that ransomware attackers know that hospitals are more likely to just pay up. If the cryptocurrency explosion has accomplished anything, it's making ransomware attacks easier and more lucrative for bad guys. Steve told me there's so much personal information in a hospital system that a single patient's record can sell for a huge premium over somthing like a credit card number. And we talked about amount of regulation needed to secure that data and that some insurance providers require hospitals to have a minimum level of security, or they won't be covered. It's a fascinating one. Links: Cyber Security Week 2022 Penetration test Cyberattack delays patient care at major US hospital chain Average Healthcare Data Breach Costs Surpass $10M, IBM Finds Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23175031 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott. Research by Liz Lian and it was edited by Jackson Bierfeldt. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

What Are You Wearing?
We Asked A 'Fashion Decoder' What Our Clothes Are Really Saying

What Are You Wearing?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 24:50 Very Popular


What do your clothes say about you? According to 'fashion decoder' Kathryn Eisman, a lot more than you may think. She's the host of the new Paramount+ show 'Undressed', which promises to be a transformation show with a difference. She joins us on this episode to speak about the importance of the clothes on a person's confidence, plus decodes Deni and Tam's outfits. And on Boujie and Budget, Tam has some affordable and colourful rain protection, and Deni brings the dress of our dreams. THE END BITS Subscribe to Mamamia BOUJIE Deni: Aje Amour Ruffle Midi Dress Tam: Kellective by Nikki BUDGET Deni: Wittner Zaidee Siren Pink Patent Leather Platform Heel Pump Tam: Gorman Raincoats FOLLOW US Check out everything we talked about today on the Mamamia Style Instagram We have a Facebook group! Check out What Are You Wearing GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CREDITS: Hosts: Tamara Davis and Deni Todorovič Producer: Emmeline Peterson Audio Producer: Thom Lion Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.auBecome a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
The people who make your apps go to Stack Overflow for answers – here's how it works

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 68:15 Very Popular


Today I'm talking to Prashanth Chandrasekar the CEO of Stack Overflow – a highly specialized kind of social network, with a really unique business model. If you don't know Stack Overflow is a major part of the modern software development landscape: it's where developers come together, ask questions, and get answers about how to build software, including actual code they can use in their own projects. It's basically a huge question and answer forum. More than 100 million people visit Stack Overflow every single month. The company also sells Stack Overflow as an internal forum tool that big companies can use for their own teams: Microsoft, Google, Logitech—you name it, they're using Stack Overflow to coordinate conversations between their engineers. The platform has a long reputation of elitism; Prasanth himself is a developer and he told me his own first experience on Stack Overflow was a negative one. In fact, he took over as CEO about three years ago, after a pretty serious moderation controversy that saw several longtime Stack Overflow moderators quit. I wanted to talk to Prasanth about how it works, how the company makes money, and how to grow such a specialized user base while still being welcoming to new people. Links: Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Stack Overflow Sold to Tech Giant Prosus for $1.8 Billion Stack Overflow helps millions of developers do their jobs every single day. Its new CEO says the next stage of its growth is selling to businesses. Big Tech's hiring freeze unlocks rich talent pool for U.S. startups Stack Overflow raises $85M in Series E funding to further accelerate SaaS business Chris Dixon thinks web3 is the future of the internet — is it? Stack Overflow Has a New Code of Conduct: You Must 'Be Nice' Code of Conduct - Stack Overflow Eight great sites that offer online classes The other side of Stack Overflow content moderation Everything you need to know about Section 230 Transcript:  https://www.theverge.com/e/23185361 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Earthquake Science Center Seminars
WaveDecompNet: a multi-task encoder-decoder network to separate earthquake and ambient noise signals in seismograms

Earthquake Science Center Seminars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 60:00


Jiuxun Yin, Caltech Seismological Laboratory Seismograms contain multiple sources of seismic waves, from distinct transient signals such as earthquakes to continuous ambient seismic vibrations such as microseism. Ambient vibrations contaminate the earthquake signals, while the earthquake signals pollute the ambient noise's statistical properties necessary for ambient-noise seismology analysis. Separating ambient noise from earthquake signals would thus benefit multiple seismological analyses. This work develops a multi-task encoder-decoder network named WaveDecompNet to separate transient signals from ambient signals directly in the time domain for 3-component seismograms. We choose the active-volcanic Big Island in Hawai'i as a natural laboratory given its richness in transients (tectonic and volcanic earthquakes) and diffuse ambient noise (strong microseism). The approach takes a noisy 3-component seismogram as input and independently predicts the 3-component earthquake and noise waveforms. The model is trained on earthquake and noise waveforms from the STandford EArthquake Dataset (STEAD) and on the local noise of seismic station IU.POHA. We estimate the network's performance by using the Explained Variance (EV) metric on both earthquake and noise waveforms. We explore different neural network designs for WaveDecompNet and find that the model with Long-Short-Term-Memory (LSTM) performs best over other structures. Overall, we find that WaveDecompNet provides satisfactory performance down to a Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of 0.1. The potential of the method is 1) to improve broadband SNR of transient (earthquake) waveforms and 2) to improve local ambient noise to monitor the Earth's structure using ambient noise signals. To test this, we apply a Short-Time-Average to a Long-Time-Average (STA/LTA) filter and improve the number of detected events. We also measure single-station cross-correlation functions of the recovered ambient noise and establish their improved coherence through time and over different frequency bands. We conclude that WaveDecompNet is a promising tool for a broad range of seismological research.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Why Signal won't compromise on encryption, with president Meredith Whittaker

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 74:31 Very Popular


Meredith Whittaker is the president of Signal, the popular messaging app that offers encrypted communication. You might recognize Meredith's name from 2018 when she was an AI researcher at Google and one of the organizers of the Google walkout. Now she's at Signal, which is a little different than the usual tech company: it's operated by a nonprofit foundation and prides itself on collecting as little data as possible. But messaging apps are a complicated business. Governments around the world really dislike encrypted messaging and often push companies to put in backdoors for surveillance and law enforcement because criminals use encrypted messaging for all sorts of deeply evil things. But there's no half step to breaking encryption, so companies like Signal often find themselves in the difficult position of refusing to help governments. You might recall that Apple has often refused to help the government break into iPhones, for example. I wanted to know how that tradeoff plays out at Signal's much smaller and more idealistic scale. This is a good one, with lots of Decoder themes in the mix. We have to start doing checklists or something. Okay, Meredith Whittaker, president of Signal. Here we go. Links: The battle inside Signal Yes, even Signal is doing stories now Here's why Apple's new child safety features are so controversial Signal is ‘starting to phase out SMS support' from its Android app A very brief history of every Google messaging app RCS: What it is and why you might want it Let's chat about RCS WhatsApp is now entirely end-to-end encrypted Moxie Marlinspike has stepped down as CEO of Signal Meredith Whittaker Tweet Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23173757 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Jackson Bierfeldt. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Vergecast
Zuckerberg on the Quest Pro, our impressions, and the state of VR games

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 74:22 Very Popular


Today on the flagship podcast of low-latency head tracking: 02:35 - Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg chats with deputy editor Alex Heath about Meta's new headset, the Quest Pro. 22:00 - Alex Heath and senior reporter Adi Robertson chat with David Pierce about their first impressions using the Quest Pro. 47:45 - Group Publisher for The Verge Chris Grant chats with David about what's happening in VR for video games. You can listen to the rest of the chat with Mark Zuckerberg on Decoder with Nilay Patel, watch it on The Verge's YouTube channel for the video version, or read it on our site. Email us at vergecast@theverge.com or call us at 866-VERGE11, we'd love to hear from you. We are conducting a short audience survey to help plan for our future and hear from you. To participate, head to vox.com/podsurvey, and thank you! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Mark Zuckerberg on the Quest Pro, future of the metaverse, and more

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 62:50 Very Popular


Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg joined The Verge's deputy editor Alex Heath for an in-depth conversation about the company's new high-end, mixed reality headset, the $1,499 Quest Pro, and why he isn't backing down from building the metaverse. Zuckerberg and Heath also talked about the future of social media, why he enjoys “being doubted,” and the growing concerns about TikTok's Chinese ownership. Links: The Meta Quest Pro is a cutting-edge headset looking for an audience Xbox Cloud Gaming is coming to the Meta Quest ​​Apple's mixed reality headset will reportedly come with an M2 chip We finally got our hands and eyes on the PlayStation VR2 Apple's app tracking policy reportedly cost social media platforms nearly $10 billion  Mark Zuckerberg took on China in a speech defending free expression Why BeReal is breaking out Elon Musk is buying Twitter, probably? Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23161228 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone, Vjeran Pavic, and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Pat Gelsinger came back to turn Intel around. Here's how it's going.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 70:33


Today I'm talking to Pat Gelsinger, the CEO of Intel. I've been excited to have this conversation for a very long time – ever since Pat took over as CEO a little over a year and a half ago. After all. Intel is a very important company with a huge series of challenges in front of it. It's still the largest chip manufacturer by revenue, and makes more chips than any other company in the United States. In fact there are basically only three major chip manufacturers: Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, or TSMC, which is in Taiwan, Samsung, based in South Korea. And Intel, here in the United States. The Intel Pat took over was struggling, and was losing ground to in a variety of markets. But in the past year and a half, Pat's restructured the company, turned over almost all of its leadership positions, opened a new line of business that would compete with TSMC and make chips for other companies including Intel's competitors, and generally tried to reset Intel's famous engineering culture around engineering. Glossary: IFS - Intel Foundry Service. Raptor Lake - codename for intel's Gen 13 processors that were just the day before we had our conversation. Sapphire Rapids - the codename for Intel's 4th generation Xeon server processors. 20A and 18A - 20A is a rebranding of what was intel's 5nm process scheduled to debut in 2024 and 18A is a rebranding of Intels 5nm+ node due out in 2025. Packaging - integrated circuit packaging is the last step of semiconductor fabrication. It's where a block of semiconductor material is put into a case. The case, is known as a "package" and that is what allows you put a circuit on a board. Wafers - When a processor is made they make processors you make hundreds of them at once on a giant wafer.  EUV - is Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. It's the most advanced way to make chips.  ASML - Is the company that makes the machines that lets you make chips. They are the only company that makes EUV machines. RibbonFET - A new transistor technology that Intel developed. ISV - Independent Software Vendors. PDK - Process Design Kit is a set of files that have data and algorithms that explain the manufacturing parameters for a given silicon process. EDA tools - stands for Electronic Design Automation tools. Basically software tools that are used to design and validate the semiconductor manufacturing process. Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore - the founders of Intel. Andy Grove - employee #3 who went on to become one of their most successful CEOs. Links: Moore's Law Intel is replacing its CEO in February Intel has to be better than ‘lifestyle company' Apple at making CPUs, says new CEO Apple is switching Macs to its own processors starting later this year Apple MacBook Air with M1 review: new chip, no problem  What we know about Intel's $20 billion bet on Ohio Intel is building a new €17 billion semiconductor manufacturing hub in Germany Intel delays ceremony for Ohio factory over lack of government funding Intel needs 7,000 workers to build its $20 billion chip plant in Ohio Biden signs $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act President Joe Biden speaks after groundbreaking for Intel's $20 billion semiconductor plant Intel's top Arc A770 GPU is priced at $329, available October 12th Intel's 13th Gen processors arrive October 20th with $589 flagship Core i9-13900K Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23149693 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How Arm conquered the chip market without making a single chip, with CEO Rene Haas

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 64:44 Very Popular


One of the more interesting quirks of the modern tech world is that there's a really important company at the center of it all that doesn't make anything. But its work is in your phone, in your TV, your car and maybe even your laptop. I'm talking about ARM, a chip design company that's been through quite a lot these past few years, and I'm talking to Arm CEO Rene Haas. Arm designs the instruction sets for modern chips: Qualcomm's chips are Arm chips. Apple's chips are Arm chips. Samsung's chips are Arm chips. It's the heart of modern computing. Arm licenses the instruction set to those companies, who then go off and actually make chips with all sorts of customizations. Basically every smartphone runs an Arm processor, Apple's Macs now run arm processors, and everything from cars to coffee machines are showing up with more and more arm processors in them. We want to know what you think about Decoder. Take our listener survey! Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23137412 Links: The Vergecast: The HDMI Holiday Spec-tacular on Apple Podcasts  Biden signs $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act Intel needs 7,000 workers to build its $20 billion chip plant in Ohio - The Verge What comes after the smartphone, with Qualcomm CEO Cristiano Amon - The Verge Why the global chip shortage is making it so hard to buy a PS5 Nvidia's huge Arm deal has just been scrapped What is a SoC? What is an ECU? Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Can software simplify the supply chain? Ryan Petersen thinks so

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 64:52 Very Popular


Ryan Petersen, is the CEO of Flexport, ac ompany that builds software that integrates all the different shipping vendor systems you might run into as you try to get a product from a factory in China to a consumer in Idaho: rail, sea, truck. We've talked about the supply chain and inventory management on Decoder with a lot of our guests — the chip shortage seems to affect every company, and sorting out how to get products made and delivered on time is a pretty universal problem. But we haven't really talked about how products get from one place to another around the world. So I wanted to talk to Ryan, figure out what Flexport's role in all this is, what his bigger supply chain solutions would be, and why he's leaving his job as CEO to be executive chairman and handing the reins to Dave Clark, who used to work at Amazon. Links: Dave Clark to Join Flexport As Our New CEO Flexport Wants to Be Uber of the Oceans At Google, Eric Schmidt Wrote the Book on Adult Supervision The real story behind a tech founder's ‘tweetstorm that saves Christmas' Ryan's twitter thread Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23126062 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Everyone knows what YouTube is. Few know how it really works.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 66:20 Very Popular


Today, I'm talking to Mark Bergen, a reporter at Bloomberg and the author of a new book about YouTube called. Like, Comment, Subscribe: Inside YouTube's Chaotic Rise to World Domination. YouTube has always been fascinating to me because it's such a black box: everyone feels like they know how the platform works, but very few people have a real understanding of the internal politics and tradeoffs that actually drive YouTube's decision. Mark's book is one of the best of its kind I've read: not only does he take you inside the company, but he connects the decisions made inside YouTube to the creators who use the platform and the effects it has on them. This was a fun one – keep in mind that for as little as we might know about YouTube, we might know even less about TikTok, which is driving all sorts of platforms, even YouTube, into competing with it. Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23113078  Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Dictionary
#D43 (decoder to decompress)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 21:27


I read from decoder to decompress.     The word of the episode is "decompose". The Monty Python song "Decomposing Composers" is excellent: https://youtu.be/yLPQRTdkzrU     Theme music from Jonah Kraut https://jonahkraut.bandcamp.com/     Merchandising! https://www.teepublic.com/user/spejampar     "The Dictionary - Letter A" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter B" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter C" on YouTube   "The Dictionary - Letter D" on YouTube     Featured in a Top 10 Dictionary Podcasts list! https://blog.feedspot.com/dictionary_podcasts/     Backwards Talking on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIujMwEDbgZUexyR90jaTEEVmAYcCzuq     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar https://www.tiktok.com/@spejampar 917-727-5757

SLEAZOIDS podcast
241 - NEW ROSE HOTEL (1998) + DECODER (1984) ft. Kurt Schiller & Chris Woodward

SLEAZOIDS podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 157:50


Hosts Josh and Jamie and special guests Kurt Schiller & Chris Woodward (of the Podside Picnic podcast) discuss provocative, lo-fi cyberpunk with a double feature of Abel Ferrara's transactional, alienating approach in NEW ROSE HOTEL (1998) and Muscha's more apocalyptic, atmospheric DECODER (1984). Next week's bonus episode is a patron-exclusive bonus episode on EBIRAH, HORROR OF THE DEEP (1966) and GODZILLA VS. HEDORAH (1971), you can get access to that episode (and all past + future bonus episodes) by subscribing to our $5 tier on patreon: www.patreon.com/sleazoidspodcast Intro // 00:00-10:55 NEW ROSE HOTEL // 10:55-1:24:30 DECODER // 1:24:30-2:31:38 Outro // 2:31:38-2:37:50 MERCH: www.teepublic.com/stores/sleazoids?ref_id=17667 WEBSITE: www.sleazoidspodcast.com/ Pod Twitter: twitter.com/sleazoidspod Pod Letterboxd: letterboxd.com/SLEAZOIDS/ Josh's Twitter: twitter.com/thejoshl Josh's Letterboxd: letterboxd.com/thejoshl/ Jamie's Twitter: twitter.com/jamiemilleracas Jamie's Letterboxd: letterboxd.com/jamiemiller/

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Rewind: How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 78:29


This episode was originally published on May 3rd, 2022. Tony Fadell was instrumental in the development of the iPod and iPhone at Apple and then co-founded Nest Labs, which kicked off the consumer smart home market with its smart thermostat in 2011. Tony sold Nest to Google for $3.2 billion in 2014 and eventually left Google. He now runs an investment company called Future Shape.  Links: Inside the Nest: iPod creator Tony Fadell wants to reinvent the thermostat General Magic - Trailer Inside Facebook's metaverse for work Silicon Graphics Google is reorganizing and Sundar Pichai will become new CEO Fire drill: can Tony Fadell and Nest build a better smoke detector? Google purchases Nest for $3.2 billion Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company Nest is rejoining Google to better compete with Amazon and Apple Apple Music Event 2005 - Motorola Rokr E1 / iTunes Phone Activision Blizzard hit with another sexual harassment lawsuit Nest buying video-monitoring startup Dropcam for $555 million What matters about Matter, the new smart home standard ZIGBEE ON MARS! Directory: Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Andy Grove, former CEO of Intel Pat Gelsinger, current CEO of Intel Sundar Pichai, current CEO of Alphabet Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and The Boring Company Jeff Williams, COO of Apple Matt Rogers, Nest co-founder Jeff Robbin, VP of consumer applications at Apple Steve Hoteling, former CEO gesture recognition company Finger Works Jon Rubinstein, senior VP of the iPod division at Apple Steve Sakomen, hardware engineer and executive at Apple  Avie Tavanian, chief software technology officer at Apple Scott Forstall, senior VP of iOS software, Apple Jony Ive, chief design officer, Apple Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22817673 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How the head of Facebook plans to compete with TikTok and win back Gen Z

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 65:06 Very Popular


We've got a special episode of Decoder today – an interview between Verge deputy editor Alex Heath and Meta's Tom Alison, the head of Facebook. Alex is the co-host of the newest season of Vox Media's podcast Land of the Giants. This season is about Facebook and Meta. The season finale comes out tomorrow. Alex has been reporting for Land of the Giants for many months, and along the way he interviewed Tom. Facebook has a lot of challenges, but it seems like the biggest problem is TikTok: Facebook's problem is that it spent years – you spent years – building out a social graph that, it turns out, is less interesting than just being shown content that the company thinks you might like. Alison has been at Facebook for more than a decade and previously ran engineering for the News Feed, so he knows more than almost anyone about the history of feeds and where they are going. Links: Land of the Giants Facebook is changing its algorithm to take on TikTok, leaked memo reveals Facebook is revamping its home feed to feel more like TikTok Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23092319 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Advertising is everywhere. Wieden+Kennedy CEO Neal Arthur explains how it works

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 63:22 Very Popular


One thing that strikes me, in all these episodes of Decoder, is how little any of us really pay attention to the advertising industry, and how deeply connected it is to almost other every modern business. After all you can start a company and invent a great product, but you still need to market it: you need to tell people about it, and eventually convince them to buy it. And so you take out an add on a platform and, well, the platform companies we all depend on mostly run on ads. Google's entire consumer business is ads. Meta's entire business is ads. And when we talk to creators, they're even more tied to ads: their distribution platforms like TikTok and YouTube are all ad-supported, and a huge portion of their revenue is ads.  This week I'm talking to Neal Arthur, the CEO of Weiden and Kennedy, one of the few independent major ad agencies in the world, and maybe the coolest one? It's got a rep. Weiden is the agency that came up with Just Do It for Nike and Bud Light Legends for Bud Light. They've done campaigns for Coke, Miller, Microsoft, ESPN – you name it. Coming off our conversation last week with Katie Welch about building a brand from the ground up using influencer marketing and potentially never hiring an ad agency, I wanted to get a view from the other side: how does a big ad agency work? Where does their money come from? So many of the big agencies are merging into what are called holding companies – why is Wieden still independent? Links: Bud Light puts creative account up for review after years with Wieden+Kennedy Mover Over Millennials -- Here Comes Gen Z How Selena Gomez's Rare Beauty Goes Viral, With CMO Katie Welch Mad Men (TV Series 2007-2015) Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23081723 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott. It was edited by Callie Wright. And researched by Liz Lian. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Financial Decoder
How Can You Get Started with an IRA?

Financial Decoder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 36:35


Instinctively, most people know that it's a good idea to save money for the future. But when it comes to saving for retirement, there are complex decisions each person must face—and typically when they are just starting out in the workforce. Is it better to contribute to a 401(k) or a Roth IRA? When can a traditional IRA make sense? How can you convert a traditional account to a Roth account? In this episode, Mark Riepe speaks with Hayden Adams. Hayden is director of tax and wealth management at the Schwab Center for Financial Research. He's also a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional and certified public accountant, and he provides analysis and insights on topics like income tax planning, tax-efficient investing, asset allocation, and retirement withdrawal strategies. Hayden and Mark discuss the history of IRAs, the various types of accounts, how to invest once the account is open, and many of the pressing decisions facing younger investors when they are deciding how best to save for their future. Taxes play a key role in many of the decisions, and Hayden walks listeners through the potential pitfalls—and benefits—of each savings-related decision.Follow Financial Decoder for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen.Financial Decoder is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit Schwab.com/FinancialDecoder. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a rating or review on Apple Podcasts. Important DisclosuresThe information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision.All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager.Investing involves risk including loss of principal.Roth IRA conversions require a 5-year holding period before earnings can be withdrawn tax free and subsequent conversions will require their own 5-year holding period. In addition, earnings distributions prior to age 59 1/2 are subject to an early withdrawal penalty.Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve.Any corporate name mentioned is for illustrative purposes only and is not a recommendation, endorsement, offer to sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security.(0822-2J82)

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How Selena Gomez's Rare Beauty goes viral, with CMO Katie Welch

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 63:05


Katie Welch is the Chief Marketing Officer of Rare Beauty — the beauty products company founded by superstar musician and actress Selena Gomez. Rare Beauty sells its products online and in Sephora retail stores, and importantly, Katie does almost no traditional marketing: Rare is a true internet brand, that depends on social media strategy, influencer marketing, and community to drive sales. Specifically, the enormous community around Selena Gomez, who, again, is an international superstar with a fandom of her own. This kind of marketing is essentially new. Famous people making their own products and companies and using their online reach to launch and grow those businesses is a combination of art and commerce that is 10 – 15 years old at most, Rihanna's Fenty Beauty is only five years old, but it's redefined the industry and helped make her a billionaire. Some of the first big successes came from the Kardashian-Jenners including Kylie Cosmetics, founded in 2015, as well as Kim Kardashian's Skims, founded in 2019. I've been really curious about how these businesses work, how they reach their audiences and customers, how CMOs like Katie measure success, whether being the marketing executive for an super online celebrity-driven business feels different than being a traditional marketing person, and whether the ever-present risk of weird things happening online make her plan differently. Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23071490 Links: Why BeReal is breaking out Why Hank Green can't quit YouTube for TikTok Apple's app tracking transparency feature isn't an instant privacy button Apple's app tracking policy reportedly cost social media platforms nearly $10 billion Updating The Verge's background policy Marketing Funnels Katie's TikTok Instagram walks back TikTok-style changes — Adam Mosseri explains why Makeup company Glossier to sell its products at Sephora as new CEO pushes to expand reach Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
The risky new way of building mobile broadband networks

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 82:04 Very Popular


In 2019, the Trump administration brokered a deal allowing TMobile to buy Sprint as long as it helped Dish Network stand up a new 5G network to keep the number of national wireless carriers at 4 and preserve competition in the mobile market. Now, in 2022, Dish's network is slowly getting off the ground. And it's built on a new kind of wireless technology called Open Radio Access Network, or O-RAN. Dish's network is only the third O-RAN network in the entire world, and if O-RAN works, it will radically change how the entire wireless industry operates. I have wanted to know more about O-RAN for a long time. So today, I'm talking to Tareq Amin, CEO of Rakuten Mobile. Rakuten Mobile is a new wireless carrier in Japan, it just launched in 2020 – it's also the world's first Open RAN network, and Tareq basically pushed this whole concept into existence. I really wanted to know if ORAN is going to work, and how Tareq managed to make it happen in such a traditional industry. So we got into it – like, really into it. Links: Rakuten Rakuten Edge Cloud "Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM" Rakuten Group to Acquire Mobile Industry Innovator Altiostar Gadgets 360 Massive MIMO Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23061797 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Why Hank Green can't quit YouTube for TikTok

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 75:28 Very Popular


Today I'm talking to Hank Green. Hank doesn't need much introduction. In fact, he invited himself on Decoder to talk about YouTube's partner program, which shares ad revenue between YouTube and the people making videos. The split is 55/45 in favor of creators. But other platforms don't have this. There is no revenue share on Instagram. There is no revenue share on Twitter. There's no revenue on Twitter at all, really. And importantly there is no revenue share on TikTok: instead there's something called a creator fund, which shares fixed pool of money, about a billion dollars, among all the creators on the platform. That means as more and more creators join TikTok, everyone gets paid. You might understand this concept as: basic division. This episode is long, and it's weedsy. Honestly, it's pretty deep in our feelings about participating in the internet culture economy, and the relationship between huge platform companies and the communities that build on them. But it's a good one, and it's not really something any of us talk about enough. Links: Vlogbrothers Decoder interview with YouTube Chief Product Officer Neal Mohan Viacom Has Officially Acquired VidCon, A Global Online Video Convention Series Patreon Acquires Subbable, Aligning the YouTube Stars The Verge EMAILS t-shirt Crash Course SciShow Eons The medium is the message The Kardashians hate the new Instagram Hank Green: So… TikTok Sucks Waveform: The MKBHD Podcast, “TikTok vs YouTube with Hank Green” Decoder: The videos that don't work on YouTube and the future of the creator business with Nebula CEO Dave Wiskus  Awesome Socks Club Awesome Coffee Club Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23051537 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman thinks clothing rental is inflation-proof

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 69:21 Very Popular


Today we're talking to Jennifer Hyman, co-founder and CEO of Rent the Runway. Rent the Runway is a a pretty simple idea: it's a clothing rental and subscription business for women which launched in 2008. The basic idea is pretty simple: you can rent clothes one by one, and Subscribers pay a certain monthly amount for a certain number of pieces that they can swap out anywhere from 1 to 4 times a month depending on the tier of their membership. Rent the Runway also lets customers buy secondhand clothing either after they rent it or just outright.  But Rent the Runway has had a pretty intense path from its founding in 2008 to going public in 2021: the onset of the pandemic in 2020 cratered the business as 60 percent of customers canceled or paused their subscriptions, and Jennifer was forced to make drastic cuts to survive. But she says that now things are swinging back, as more and more people are spending their dollars going out, traveling, and generally shifting their spending from things to experiences. There's a post Covid wedding boom going on: Rent the Runway is right there for people. Jen and I talked about that swing in the business, but we spent most of this conversation talking about running a company that basically does really high-risk logistics: sourcing clothes, sending them to people, getting them back, cleaning them, and sending them out again. Spotify and Netflix run subscription businesses where the products never wear out or get dirty; Jen has to deal with red win stains at scale. In fact, Rent the Runway runs one of the country's biggest dry cleaning operations, which I find to be completely fascinating: what does dry cleaning innovation actually look like, and how does it hit the bottom line? My favorite episodes of Decoder are the ones where simple ideas – renting clothes – turn out to be incredible complicated to execute. This is one of those. Links: Apple defends upcoming privacy changes as ‘standing up for our users' Rent the Runway, a secondhand fashion site, makes its trading debut. Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23041884 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Is the metaverse going to suck? A conversation with Matthew Ball

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 80:41 Very Popular


All right, let's talk about the metaverse.  You probably can't stop hearing about it. It's in startup pitches, in earnings reports, some companies are creating metaverse divisions, and Mark Zuckerberg changed Facebook's name to Meta to signal that he's shifting the entire company to focus on the metaverse. The problem, very simply, is that no one knows what the metaverse is, what it's supposed to do, or why anyone should care about it. Luckily, we have some help. Today, I'm talking to Matthew Ball, who is the author of the new book called The Metaverse: And How It Will Revolutionize Everything. Matthew was the global head of strategy at Amazon Studios. In 2018, he left Amazon to become an analyst and started writing about the metaverse on his blog. He's been writing about this since way before the hype exploded, and his book aims to be the best resource for understanding the metaverse, which he sees as the next phase of the internet. It's not just something that you access through a VR headset, though that's part of it. It's how you'll interact with everything. That sort of change is where new companies have opportunities to unseat the old guard. This episode gets very in the weeds, but it really helped me understand the decisions some companies have made around building digital worlds and the technical challenges and business challenges that are slowing it down — or might even stop it. And, of course, I asked whether any of this is a good idea in the first place because, well, I'm not so sure. But there's a lot here, so listen, and then you tell me. Links: Matthew Ball on Twitter  Mark Zuckerberg on why Facebook is rebranding to Meta  Microsoft, Meta, and others are founding a metaverse open standards group Android emoji will actually look human this year Apple's app tracking policy reportedly cost social media platforms nearly $10 billion Microsoft and Activision Blizzard: the latest news on the acquisition Microsoft HoloLens boss Alex Kipman is out after misconduct allegations European Parliament Think Tank memorandum—Metaverse: Opportunities, risks and policy implications Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23033211 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How arson led to a culture reboot at Traeger, with CEO Jeremy Andrus

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 77:21 Very Popular


Happy Fourth of July to our listeners in the States. Decoder is only a year old, but we've decided a Decoder tradition is that every summer, we're going to do an episode about the outdoor grill industry, which is gigantic and growing. Last year, I talked to Roger Dahle, the CEO of Blackstone Products, a griddle company that blew up on TikTok and actually went public a few months after we talked. This year, I'm talking to Jeremy Andrus, the CEO of Traeger, which makes beloved wood pellet smokers with all sorts of features — the high-end models even have cloud connectivity so you can control them from your phone. Traeger also recently went public; the company says it will book between $800–850 million in revenue this year. The Traeger story is fascinating: the company was around for 27 years and not growing very much when Jeremy bought it with the help of a private equity firm and became the CEO. He had no background in cooking; he had previously been CEO of Skullcandy, the headphone brand. His early run as CEO of Traeger was a bit of a nightmare, culminating in an arson of a truck at one of Traeger's warehouses. Jeremy responded by cleaning house, replacing most of the team, and moving the company from Oregon to Utah. Since then, Traeger has grown its revenue by 10 times and hopes to close in on a billion dollars in revenue soon. But, it has all the challenges that come along with shipping big, heavy hardware products through the supply chain crisis, looming recession, and changing consumer behavior as one version of the pandemic seems to be ending and people are spending their money on travel instead of home goods. Jeremy was game to talk about all of that; we really got into it. Links: ​​How Traeger's CEO Cleaned Up a Toxic Culture Jeremy Andrus Found Success With Skullcandy. Now He Hopes To Do It Again With Traeger Grills. Traeger buys wireless thermometer company Meater  Jeremy Andrus Found Success With Skullcandy. Now He Hopes To Do It Again With Traeger Grills.  Traeger's stock opens 22% above IPO price, to value the grill market at $2.6 billion Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22953717 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
TSA's chief innovation officer on surveillance, security lines, and surrendering to PreCheck

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 72:36 Very Popular


I'm old enough to remember what it was like to fly before 9/11 — there were no TSA lines, there was no PreCheck, and there certainly wasn't any requirement to take off your shoes. In fact, there wasn't any TSA at all. But 9/11 radically changed the way we move through an airport. The formation of the new Department of Homeland Security and the new Transportation Security Administration led to much more rigorous and invasive security measures for travelers trying to catch their flight. This year is the 20th anniversary of the Department of Homeland Security and the TSA, and I think it's safe to say that nobody enjoys waiting in the airport security line. And in the post-9/11 world, things like PreCheck are the great innovation of the department. At least according to Dan McCoy, who is the TSA's chief innovation officer, who told me that PreCheck is “a hallmark government innovation program.” But what do programs like PreCheck and the larger surveillance apparatus that theoretically keep us safe mean for the choices we make? What do we give up to get into the shorter security line, and how comfortable should we be about that? This week, The Verge launches Homeland, our special series about the enormous influence of the Department of Homeland Security and how it has dramatically changed our country's relationship with technology, surveillance, and immigration. So we have a special episode of Decoder with Dan McCoy to see where the TSA fits into that picture. Links: Read more stories from the Homeland series Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22945989 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices