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Western Civ
Episode 232: The Maya

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 48:06


Today we really switch gears. Before we explore the Spanish conquest of the Aztec and Inca civilizations, we have to set the stage. Long before those conquests, the Maya dominated the jungles and mountains of the Yucatan. Today we introduce them.Website: www.westerncivpodcast.comAd-Free Version: www.patreon.com/westerncivpodcastWestern Civ 2.0 Seven-Day Free Trial: www.glow.fm/westernciv

Environmental Professionals Radio (EPR)
The Green Obsidian, the Creative Process, and Birds with Sierra Taliaferro

Environmental Professionals Radio (EPR)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 37:59 Transcription Available


Welcome back to Environmental Professionals Radio, Connecting the Environmental Professionals Community Through Conversation, with your hosts Laura Thorne and Nic Frederick! On today's episode, we talk with Sierra Taliaferro, outdoor educator and bird enthusiast about The Green Obsidian, the Creative Process, and Birds.   Read her full bio below.Help us continue to create great content! If you'd like to sponsor a future episode hit the support podcast button or visit www.environmentalprofessionalsradio.com/sponsor-form Showtimes: 3:24  Nic & Laura try to talk about birds8:28  Interview with Sierra Taliaferro starts9:30  The Green Obsidian16:45  The creative process27:35  Field NotesPlease be sure to ✔️subscribe, ⭐rate and ✍review. This podcast is produced by the National Association of Environmental Professions (NAEP). Check out all the NAEP has to offer at NAEP.org.Connect with Sierra Taliaferro at www.linkedin.com/in/sierratFollow Green Obsidian on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/TheGreenObsidian/Guest Bio:Sierra Taliaferro is a motivated outdoor educator and bird enthusiast with intentions to promote diversity in urban conservation, social justice and community advocacy. Her previous work experience consists of community engagement, urban agriculture, water conservation awareness, and land management practices. Her aim as a millennial in urban environmental conservation is to involve the public in decisions concerning natural landscapes through citizen stewardship and help bridge a lost connection between people and nature in an urban setting. She hopes to continue to make herself an advocate for diversity in conservation and to emphasize the importance of our natural resources surrounding our urban environments.Music CreditsIntro: Givin Me Eyes by Grace MesaOutro: Never Ending Soul Groove by Mattijs MullerSupport the show

Relay FM Master Feed
Thoroughly Considered 93: The Last Detail with Stephan Ango

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 76:17


On The Last Detail, Tom and Dan invite a guest on to chat about an object that is meaningful to them. They dive deep into that object, discussing the design, the manufacturing process, the good, and bad, and everything in-between. Today's guest is Stephan Ango, the cofounder of Lumi, and now at Obsidian, software for note taking and thought processing. His object is the Hario V60.

The Bike Shed
368: Sustainable Web Development

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 36:03


Stephanie talks about hosting a "Soup Group"! Joël got nerd-sniped during the last episode and dove deeper into Maggie Appleton's "Tools for Thought." Stephanie has been thinking a lot about Sustainable Web Development. What is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Maggie Appleton's Tools for Thought (https://maggieappleton.com/tools-for-thought) Tangrams (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tangram) Tessellation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellation) Hexagons are the Bestagons (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thOifuHs6eY) Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails (https://sustainable-rails.com/) Transcript: AD: thoughtbot is thrilled to announce our own incubator launching this year. If you are a non-technical founding team with a business idea that involves a web or mobile app, we encourage you to apply for our eight-week program. We'll help you move forward with confidence in your team, your product vision, and a roadmap for getting you there. Learn more and apply at tbot.io/incubator. JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. STEPHANIE: And I'm Stephanie Minn. And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. JOËL: So, Stephanie, what's new in your world? STEPHANIE: I'm excited to share a winter survival idea for folks out there who are, like me, in a very cold place where all your friends don't want to hang out [laughs] and bear the cold temperatures of deep winter in January. Because tonight, I'm hosting my first soup group where I'm basically just going to make a really big batch of soup and have my friends come over with bread, and we're going to eat soup and bread and be cozy. And I'm really excited because I was trying to figure out a way to combat the winter blues a little bit. And, yeah, I think this time of year can be really tough after the holidays to get people together again. At least for me, I was feeling like I haven't seen my friends in so long. And I was like, well, I could just be the person to take the initiative [laughs] and be like, "Come over to our place." And the goal is to eventually do this regularly and just have this low-stakes open invitation for anyone to come and show up however they want to. It doesn't have to be, like, big pressure or anything. And if they can't make it at any one time, then there will hopefully be one in the future where they can make it, so I'm excited. After this, I am going to make soup for ten people, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: I love this idea. Soup on a cold day is just the coziest thing. STEPHANIE: Yeah, exactly. I definitely wanted to just make people feel warm and cozy. And that's what I want, so I'm really doing this for myself. [laughs] JOËL: And you know the advantage of hosting is you don't have to go outside. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's the real thing is I'm probably going to kick everyone out at like 11:00 p.m. and then go straight to bed, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: Have you been experimenting with a particular kind of soup recently? Are you going to bring out an old favorite? STEPHANIE: Yeah, I'm excited to make ribollita today, so kind of like a Tuscan style of veggie hearty soup. And I've just been bookmarking soup recipes left and right. [laughs] And I've outsourced the bread situation. So I'm excited to see what kind of bread people bring. And yeah, it'll be very fun and kind of surprising in a comforting way. JOËL: I'm not familiar with this soup. It's ribollita you said? STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's it. JOËL: You said it's a vegetable soup. STEPHANIE: Yeah, mostly veggies and beans. So I have this giant cabbage, a lot of kale, multiple cans of Great Northern white beans, and they're all going to get mixed together. And we'll see how it turns out. I'll update the podcast on how the soup group goes. It is the inaugural one. So I can't think of a time that I made that much soup before. So, hopefully, it goes well. We'll find out. So, Joël, what about you? What's new in your world? JOËL: So, in the previous episode, we talked a little bit about some of the things you had learned about note-taking. And you'd mentioned an article by, I think, Maggie Applebon -- STEPHANIE: Maggie Appleton. JOËL: Appleton...on tools for thought. It was linked in the show notes of that episode. And I went back and read that article, and it was so good, particularly the section, I think, on historical tools for thought and how they, over time, were sort of groundbreaking in helping us to either remember things or to think about problems or ideas in a different way, or to sort of interrogate those ideas and see if we think they're true or helpful. And these were things like writing or the number system but even some more fancy things like the scientific method for the Cartesian coordinate system. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I was really excited to share this with you because I think it was the intersection of a lot of your different interests, including note-taking, diagrams, history, and human cognition, so I'm glad that you found it interesting. JOËL: I definitely got nerd-sniped there. STEPHANIE: [laughs] JOËL: I think one thing that really struck me was the power of having multiple different representations for ideas. And one that jumped out at me was the Cartesian coordinate system, which, among other things, a really powerful tool that gave people...when this was invented, it allowed you to convert algebra problems into geometry problems. And so now, something that used to be an equation you can draw as a triangle or something. And we know how to find the area of a triangle. That's been known since the ancient Greeks and even earlier. And so now a problem that sounded hard is now easy, or at least we have a different way to think about that problem. Because if this equation is equivalent to a triangle, what does that mean? And vice versa, you can use this to convert geometry problems into algebra problems. And so sometimes the power of a new tool for thought might be in that it allows you to sort of convert between two other existing ways of representing things. And making those connections, all of a sudden gives you a whole new way of thinking about things. That blew my mind. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think the other really cool thing is that a lot of these ideas that humans are discovering also already existed in the natural world. So when you are talking about math, you can see representations of math in plants and nature, and I was reminded of how honeycomb from bees is one of the strongest shapes. And yeah, it's really neat to draw inspiration from a lot of places and learn from things that, like, figured it out before we did. JOËL: Have you seen the video on YouTube called "Hexagons are the Bestagons?" STEPHANIE: No, I have not. Tell me more. JOËL: It's a video on YouTube. We can link it in the show notes. Basically, the hexagon shows up everywhere in nature in part because it has a lot of really fun mathematical properties. It's one of the few shapes that you can use to completely cover a surface. So if you want to subdivide a two-dimensional surface into smaller shapes without leaving any empty spaces between them, you really don't have that many options. I want to say it's like squares and triangles and hexagons are the only shapes that can do that. And hexagons have these really fun properties around strength. They also are one of the best balances between volume versus the amount of material that it takes to give you that volume and for strength and things like that. So it's good for honeycombs because you can store a lot of honey for very little amount of wax. But it's also good for all sorts of structural engineering because you can build things that are very strong yet light because they require very little metal or other material to create them. STEPHANIE: When you're saying hexagons filling a lot of space, I also thought about how they've become kind of popular in tiles or interior design in kitchens, and bathrooms, and stuff. [laughs] I've definitely seen that trend a bit. [laughs] So that's really cool just to see, like, yeah, this thing in the natural world that we have adopted for other uses. It's really fun. JOËL: I want to say this idea of taking a 2D space and being able to completely cover it without spaces with a shape is called tessellating a plane. It's a fancy term for it. And if you want to do it with just a single shape, I think there are only like three or four shapes that can do it. STEPHANIE: That's really interesting because it reminds me of those tessellation puzzles that I used to play with as a kid. Do you know what I'm talking about? JOËL: You're thinking like a tangram or something different. STEPHANIE: Yeah, yeah, tangram, that was...oh my gosh, those were fun. Wow, I was learning math as a young child, [laughs] just didn't even know it. JOËL: Another random fun fact: the logo for the Elm programming language is a tangram. STEPHANIE: [Gasps] JOËL: And the community is sort of encouraged to then remix it because the tangram is just a square tessellated out of a bunch of these shapes. But then, if you're building a library or you've got an event or something, the community will take those shapes and remix them into some other shapes that might fit your event. STEPHANIE: That's really cool. Is it a metaphor for how Elm can be used in different ways? [laughs] JOËL: I'm not sure about the story behind the logo. We'd have to look that up. STEPHANIE: That'll be a good adventure for later. [laughs] JOËL: In...I want to say Moroccan art, but I think it might be broader than just Moroccan. It might be more broadly North African or Moorish or whatever you want to call that. There's a long history of building these tessellations, I think, out of tiles, but maybe other things as well where you're doing it with a variety of shapes. So you might start...a classic one, I think is an eight-pointed...is it eight, or? I think it's an eight-pointed star, and then you sort of add other shapes around it. And those can create patterns that take a long time to repeat. And there are these beautiful geometric patterns that just keep on going and expanding without necessarily repeating over a lot of space. STEPHANIE: Whoa. That kind of blows my mind a little bit. It seems so counterintuitive, but then I feel like there are a lot of things in math that are like that as well. JOËL: So, yeah, I think a classic pattern you might start with something like an eight-pointed star. And then maybe to fill in the spaces around that central star, you might put some squares, and then maybe you put some triangles around that, and you sort of keep trying to fill in. And maybe eventually you get to another eight-pointed star, but it's not always perfectly symmetric. STEPHANIE: Someone should make a board game or something out of this idea. [laughs] JOËL: Oooh. STEPHANIE: I bet there's one that exists. But I'm just thinking about people who like jigsaw puzzles and that being the next level challenge of, like, can you figure out how things fit together without the confines of a little jigsaw shape? [laughs] JOËL: Right, right. You have a rectangle shape that you have to perfectly fill in with all of these other smaller shapes, and there is a single solution that will work. You have to figure it out. STEPHANIE: I personally would be very overwhelmed, [laughs] but it sounds fun at the same time. JOËL: So those are a lot of thoughts that I've been having inspiration reading that article that you shared on a previous episode. Have you been reading anything interesting recently? STEPHANIE: I have. I'm really excited to talk about this topic because during my investment time this past week, I've been thinking a lot about it, taking a lot of notes in Obsidian, which is a callback to the last episode, and yeah, I'm excited to kind of get into it. So what I've been reading is Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails by ‎David Bryant Copeland. And I think a lot of fellow thoughtboters have referenced this book or talked a little bit about ideas from this book; at least, I've seen discussion about it in Slack, so that's kind of why I wanted to pick it up. But what really blew my mind was honestly the first chapter where he talks about why he wrote this book and basically what sustainable web development is because it is a little bit, maybe, like a buzzy word. It's like, what is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? And he basically gets down to it by saying that the software that we write is sustainable if it continues to meet our needs years into the future or has longevity and continues to be something we can iterate and work on and not feel that pain or friction, and we feel like we want to, and we feel joyful working on this codebase. So that was kind of my interpretation of his definition about sustainability. JOËL: I love that definition of sustainability about code that can grow and live for a long time. And I feel like that's not a universal value in the tech industry. And on the extreme end of that, you'll have teams that promote the idea that maybe every few years, you should throw out your old codebase and rewrite. I want to say some teams at Google may have done that as a practice for a while, and, of course, then people quote that as a best practice. To a certain extent, I want to say that's kind of what happens with Basecamp in that there are multiple versions of Basecamp. And I want to say each of those is a fresh Rails app. So there's a sense in which those or that style of development is not sustainable in the definition that you were just giving there. How do you feel about that? STEPHANIE: I definitely think the industry has a bias towards newness and change. And a lot of people want to pick up the hot, new technology and, like you said, rewrite code, especially when it's become hard to work with. And honestly, I think that could be its whole own episode, rewrites because I think you and I have pretty strong opinions about it. But I genuinely think that most of our work is, at least, you and I on the Boost team, in particular here at thoughtbot, where we embed on existing client teams, and usually, that means legacy code as well, but I think that the work of development is mostly extending existing code and trying to sustain applications that have users and are working for users. And I think that that's certainly a value that I wish were highlighted more or were invested in more because sometimes that change or wanting to hop on to do something different or do something new has a lot of consequences that I'm not sure we talk about enough as an industry. 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Finally, Airbrake Deploy Tracking helps developers track trends, fix bad deploys, and improve code quality. Since 2008, Airbrake has been a staple in the Ruby community and has grown to cover all major programming languages. Airbrake seamlessly integrates with your favorite apps to include modern features like single sign-on and SDK-based installation. From testing to production, Airbrake notifiers have your back. Your time is valuable, so why waste it combing through logs, waiting for user reports, or retrofitting other tools to monitor your application? You literally have nothing to lose. Head on over to airbrake.io/try/bikeshed to create your FREE developer account today! JOËL: It's interesting you mentioned the types of projects that we tend to be on. I feel like there are a lot of projects that I've been brought on where my goal, specifically coming onto this project, was to make the software more sustainable for the team. It's very easy to sort of start moving very fast in the beginning with a greenfield app, and then eventually, a lot of your choices catch up to you. And then, as your team grows and your product grows, it becomes less and less sustainable. And that's often the point in the lifecycle of the product where I might join the team and try to help make things better for them. I love the keyword sustainable. I don't think that's one that I've used a lot, but it's a great label to put on that kind of work. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think what you mentioned earlier, too, about values that, really stuck out to me in this book because it basically says, "This book is for you if you value these three things: sustainability, consistency, and quality." And all of the recommendations and techniques that he then presents in the rest of the book, using Rails, those decisions are recommended with those three values in mind. And I think, one, those values are personally important to me as a developer. But it also helped me develop some guiding principles around decision-making and provided a lot of clarity around times that I've been on teams where we were doing things that didn't quite align with my values, and I didn't enjoy it. And I couldn't really figure out why. But now I'm able to see that, oh, perhaps this team or organization was valuing something like speed, or profit, or change, or something like that that I just fundamentally value differently. And that was kind of where my internal friction or contentment or discontentment was coming from when working on these teams. So, yeah, that was really clarifying for me. JOËL: Would you say, for you, when you talk about these values, that these are fundamental or ultimate values for you when you write code? Or are they values that are a good way to sort of be a means to some other end? You know, for example, sustainability, do you care about sustainability just for its own sake? Or do you care about it because you want a product to be able to live for a long time? You're building for ten years or 20 years or however long you want this project to last. STEPHANIE: I think the thing with values is that they are really fundamental to a person's identity or belief system. In fact, the definition that I'm kind of working off of here is that values are those fundamental beliefs that drive our actions. And so when you say, like, are values driving how you write code? I think they drive everything. [laughs] But the point that he makes in this book is like, here's how they drive code and technical decisions. So the book is actually quite specific about technical recommendations that he has in the context of Rails. And it's funny because we're talking pretty abstractly and big picture about values and things like that. But then I think it's because he sets the stage to be like, everything I recommend here is what I believe to be sustainable, and good quality, and consistent. And just for an example, one of the recommendations he makes is to, when you're kind of setting up a greenfield application, is to use a SQL schema instead of the default ActiveRecord DSL, so using a structure .SQL file. Because, in his eyes, having the flexibility to write SQL and use the most you can with those tools when it comes to database work is more sustainable in the long term than using the DSL that might not have all the tools available to you that SQL does. And so he kind of gives his reasoning about, like, this is what I recommend, and here's why it contributes to sustainability, in my opinion. And so I have found myself, while I'm reading along, either agreeing, like, oh yeah, I can see his reasoning here, or maybe even disagreeing because I might think about things differently or have other considerations in mind that are more important to me and what sustainability means to me. But what I hopefully want to take away from the framework or understanding of values is evaluating technical decisions that I make based on my values as an individual but, more importantly, the values of the team or organization. JOËL: I love mental frameworks like that that give you clarity into your own thought processes or how you make decisions moving forward. Sometimes you can look at something that's very concrete. Somebody gives you some advice on maybe structuring your database schema, and that might be helpful in and of itself. But if you came away with a larger thought process, I think that's doubly valuable. As an aside here, I love this approach to writing where he sort of lays down almost like preconditions for this book. If you don't agree on these values, this book is not going to be very helpful for you. And then also, here are situations where this advice is not going to apply. Now that I've put down all these edge cases for the rest of this book, I'm going to be speaking very decisively; these are the things I recommend and not have to caveat myself all the time. It's like, yes, I know there are some edge cases where you might not want to do this if it's a one-off script or whatever it is. We've already dealt with all of those upfront. And now, I can be very confident and very direct for the whole rest of the book. And I feel like that's something I struggle with in some of my work sometimes is. I care a lot about nuance, and my audience probably cares about edge cases even more than I do. They probably care too much. Because I say something that's generally true most of the time, and I know somebody's already thinking about the one edge case where that's not true. And that doesn't matter for the main point I'm trying to make. So it's always a struggle to know when to caveat a statement that I'm making. But if you caveat too much, then you undermine your whole point. And so I like this idea of putting some caveats up front and then just saying, like, now we're in the 80% case. Within the 80% case, these are things I think are true. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's a really good point. I agree he is very clear about the intended audience. And so when you read this book, you are either on board because you value the same things he does, or you're not because you are focused and your goals are things that are different from him. So I think it was really helpful to get on the same page, even in a piece of content or in a piece of writing. Because I want to use my time well as a reader, so I want to make sure that what I am consuming makes sense for me, and I will find it worthwhile. David takes a really strong stance on what quality means. And even though that is a pretty subjective value, he describes it as doing things right the first time and acknowledging the reality that we likely won't have the time to go back and clean things up after they've been shipped. So, on this client project, I found myself wanting to refactor things as part of my process, suggesting different implementations to do things the quote, unquote, "right way," or the best way we could, and not everyone shared that sentiment. I sometimes got pushback, and that was challenging for me to figure out how I wanted to navigate that situation and what I was willing to let go and what I wasn't. And so I'm curious if you've ever been in a consulting position like that where maybe the team and organization's values were a little bit different from your understanding, or if they just weren't clear at all, and you were driving towards something that seemed very nebulous. JOËL: I think I've been on both sides of that, both sometimes saying, "Look, we need to maybe slow down," or "Here's a thing that we need to do otherwise that's going to cost us on the longer term. Here's an area where we need to invest in quality today." And sort of on the other side where I'll feel like someone is really pushing an overengineered solution claiming it's going to make life a whole lot better, "If we invest three months upfront today, and maybe in three or four years, it'll pay off if certain things happen," that don't really necessarily line up with the immediate goals. A lot of this, I think, comes down to understanding the client, and their business, and their goals. Sometimes there is a really important deadline for something that has to happen based on an event in the real world. If you were building software for something that had to do with, let's say, the World Cup, you don't want it shipping in January 2023. That's just pointless. And so you've got to prioritize shipping things. And sometimes you say, "Okay, well, do we ship a few broken things? Or do we prefer to ship something that's a little bit smaller, more tightly scoped, but that holds well together?" That again, you have to really understand the client, their business, their needs. So I think for me those values of sustainability, quality...I forget what the third one was that you'd mentioned. STEPHANIE: Consistency. JOËL: Consistency, yes. They all sort of inform how it's going to mesh with the product I'm working on, the goals of that product. Where's it going in the next three months, six months, 12 months? Where's it coming from? Who's the team that I'm working with? Am I with a team of 300 people that are just committing to the main branch all the time with no tests, and we're constantly fighting regressions? Then sustainability looks very different there than a one other-person team, and we're trying to ship something for the World Cup. STEPHANIE: Oh yeah, I have a lot of thoughts there too. Because I do agree that it can look different and sometimes shift a little bit depending on the situation. What you were just describing about team makeup that is really interesting to me because, yeah, sustainability can look different for different teams. If you have, let's say, a lot of earlier career developers on your team, maybe you really want to focus on readability and making sure that they're able to navigate the codebase and figure things out over something like more advanced patterns and skills that will just cause them friction. But maybe you have a team where you all agree that that's what sustainability means to you is choosing those more advanced technical patterns and committing to them and figuring out how to maintain that because it's important to you. And the other thing that you brought up that is also mentioned in this book is that the more information developers have about the future and direction of the business, the better code we can write. For some reason, I've found myself in situations where I don't know all too much about what we are working towards or what the goals of the business are both in the short term and the long term. And I try to make the best guess I can. But I think in those scenarios, at least moving forward, I would really like to be better about pushing product folks or leadership to explain to me why we're doing what we're doing, kind of share the information that they have so that we can build the best product that we can. I think sometimes that information doesn't get shared for some reason. They kind of think that engineers are going to go do their engineer thing, and we'll focus on long-term strategy over here. But yeah, I truly believe that the more information we have, the better quality work we can produce. JOËL: I 100% agree. And I think that's what we see in a lot of classic agile literature talking about things like cross-functional teams or even the client or the product team should be integrated with the development team. You're all one team working together rather than someone has an idea, and then the technical team executes on it. We see that also in some of the domain-driven design literature as well, where oftentimes projects start, and you sit down with a subject matter expert, and they just walk you through all of the business aspects. And particularly for the purpose of domain-driven design, you talk about a lot of the terms that make sense for the business. You build up a glossary of terms. I think they call it a ubiquitous language of things that are specific to your business and how does that work on a day-to-day basis. STEPHANIE: Do you have any strategies for getting more clarity around the work and why you're building it if it's not yet available to you? JOËL: I think there are sort of two scenarios where you have to do that; one of them that comes up maybe more often for us as consultants is onboarding onto a new client. There's a whole new business that we may know nothing about, and we have to learn a lot of that. And so, as part of the onboarding process, I think it's really valuable to have conversations with people who are not part of the dev team to learn about the business side of things. On a per-feature basis, if you've already been onboarded on a project, you've been there for a while, it's often good to go back to the person who maybe created a ticket, a product person who's asking for a feature, and ask, "Why? Why do you want this?" Ideally, maybe that's even part of the ticket-creating process because the two teams are more integrated, and product team is like, here's a problem we're trying to solve. Here's what we think would be a solution. Or maybe even just "Here's a business problem. We need a technical solution. Can you do that for us?" But I've often followed up with people outside of the engineering team to ask follow-up questions. And why are we doing this? And sometimes it's even you have to do like five Whys where it's like, "Oh, we're doing this because we need to do this thing for this customer. They asked for it." And it's like, "Okay, well, why are they asking for that?" "Oh, it's because they have this problem." And why are they having this problem?" And eventually, like, "Oh, I see. Okay." The real solution has nothing to do with what was asked, and you come up with something that's maybe much tighter scoped or will better solve, and everybody's a winner in that case. But it does require following up. So I guess the short and boring answer is talk to people outside the engineering team. STEPHANIE: That's a great point. I think the questions that we as engineers ask can drive more clarity to product people as well if we continue to ask those five levels of why in ways that they maybe didn't think about either. We have the opportunity to do that if we want to do our work well, too. That's kind of exciting to me that it isn't just okay, we're handed some work to do, and they've done all of that strategic thinking separately. And having to implement those details, we can kind of start to chip away at what are we really doing here? And you mentioned talking to people outside of the engineering team. I just was thinking that pairing with non-developers would also be a really great task to do, especially when you get a ticket that's a bit ambiguous and you have questions. And you can always comment on the ticket or whatever and ask your questions. But perhaps there's also a good opportunity to work things through synchronously. In some ways, I think that is a more natural opportunity for that conversation to evolve rather than it being like, okay, I answered these questions, and now I'm going to move on to whatever else I have to do. JOËL: So you mentioned pairing. It's often good to have someone maybe outside the development team pair with you on a technical thing, but sometimes it's good to flip the script. If you're building especially software for an internal team, it can be really valuable to just shadow one of them for a couple of hours or a day. I did a project where we were building a tool for an internal sales team. And I had the privilege to shadow a couple of the sales members for a few hours as they're just doing their job. And I'm just asking all the questions like, "Oh, why do you do it that way? And what is the purpose behind this?" And I learned so much about the business by doing that. STEPHANIE: I love that we took this idea of sustainable development and went beyond just technical design decisions or aspects of how we do our jobs. Because there is so much more that we can do to foster the value of sustainability or whatever other values that you might have, and yeah, I feel really excited to try both these technical strategies from the book and also the collaborative aspects as well. JOËL: I'm really excited about some of these ideas that are coming up from the book. I think today we basically just talked about the introduction, the idea of sustainability. But I think as maybe you read more in the book, maybe we can do another episode later on talking about some of the more specific technical recommendations, how they relate to sustainability and maybe share some of our thoughts on that. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I definitely am excited to keep y'all updated on this journey. [laughs] JOËL: On that note, shall we wrap up? STEPHANIE: Let's wrap up. JOËL: Show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show has been produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter. Or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot, your expert strategy, design, development, and product management partner. We bring digital products from idea to success and teach you how because we care. Learn more at thoughtbot.com.

XNC - Xbox News Cast Podcast
Xbox Biggest Exclusives Release Window Revealed Xbox Developer Direct Event Xbox News Cast 86

XNC - Xbox News Cast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 117:46


Join XNC Podcast with Hosts @colteastwood & @gazondaily https://www.youtube.com/c/Gameondaily with Special Guest: @kingdavidotw to discuss Xbox Biggest Exclusives Release Window Revealed | Xbox Developer Direct Event Xbox News Cast 86 Join the channel to early access: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyGYHo1qVIeGq3ZLnSDaEcg/joinMerchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/colteastwood-merchFollow: https://twitter.com/ColteastwoodAdd me on Xbox Live: Colteastwood Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/colteastwood 00:00:00 Intro 00:03:13 Iron Lords King David 00:04:00 Forspoken Review 00:15:00 Todd Howard & Phil Spencer 00:24:00 Square Enix 00:32:00 Xbox Leadership Changes 00:36:00 Hellblade in 2023? 00:43:00 Redfall Update 00:48:22 Starfield Release Moved UP? 00:58:00 Developer Direct Show 1:08:00 Forza Motorsport 1:20:00 Fallout from Obsidian 1:27:00 Phil loses his way with Halo 1:52:00 New Coverage Topics Covered on the Colteastwood Channel: Microsoft Sony Xbox One Xbox One X Xbox Two Xbox Scarlett Xbox Project Scarlett Xbox 2 Next Generation Consoles Playstation PS4 PS5 Playstation 5 Exclusive Games Console Exclusives xCloud Project xCloud Xbox Game Pass Xbox Game Pass Ultimate Xbox games Playstation Games Xbox Lockhart Xbox Anaconda Danta Xbox Consoles Game Streaming Cloud Streaming Zen 2 Zen 2+ Navi GPU SSD Next Gen Consoles Xbox One S Xbox Live Xbox Live Gold Xbox Rewards Microsoft Rewards E3 E3 2019 E3 2020 X019 Xbox Leaks Rumor News Gears Halo Fable IV Forza Horizon Motorsports Halo Infinite Playstation Now PSNow Phil Spencer Xbox Game Studios Exclusives PS Now PSNow Xbox Series X Xbox Series S Playstation 5 PS5 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/colteastwood/support

Radio Skydive UK
93 Arthur Amarra and the World's First Heads Up Display for Skydiving

Radio Skydive UK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 95:23


Arthur Amara talks about Obsidian, the Heads Up Display Visual Altimeter Is the Obsidian expensive, or cheap? Bruno Brokken Front Cover Photo of Brian and friends over the pyramids Ryan Garner Back Cover Photo of Lee Robinson exiting on his 1st wingsuit jump The UK has had a surprisingly sunny January Laura discusses wearing sunglasses for AFF instructing. Heated gloves… Laura should have asked for commission. Always check your kit before jumping, no matter what the change. 7 jumps in 7 days on 7 continents. Two rival groups? 777 and 7x? More story needed. Skydive the Expo preview Brian wrote an article for the mag. Brian learns how to stop himself better Laura's team Chimera calls it after 7yrs Skydive Langar had their first A licence qualify in 2023. Groundschool to ‘A', all in January. Is there a best time to learn? HELP US SPREAD THE WORD We'd love it if you could please share #RadioSkydiveUK with your social media followers. Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. If this episode rocked your boat, head on over to wherever you get your podcasts from and kindly subscribe. Especially if it's Apple Podcasts. FEEDBACK Audience feedback drives the show. We'd love for you to email us and keep the conversation going. Record an audio message on your smart phone and send it, or a regular email, to studio@radioskydive.uk or put something on social using #RadioSkydiveUK We hope you enjoy.

Glass Ceiling Girls
"I quote the Bible more as a candle lighting tarot reader than I did when I was forced to go to church” A mystical moment with Bianca, The Obsidian Corona

Glass Ceiling Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 82:59


On today's show we host Bianca aka The Obsidian Corona (who came after the beer but before the virus- her words) who brilliantly shows us the crossover between faith and the realm of tarot and psychics. ⠀ ⠀ Bianca discusses the spiritual skills shes developed, what tools are innate to her, and how she uses her abilities in a groundbreaking business model. ⠀ ⠀ Her candor, comedic timing, and her faithfulness to her mystic leanings are inspiring.    Find her online on instagram  @theobsidiancorona Or https://www.theobsidiancorona.com/

The Obsidian Table
GrizzlyFi - Crypto Project Analysis

The Obsidian Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 78:48


A live conversation with a DeFi project, where Matthew & the Obsidian community members ask questions and pick the brains of the founders behind the company. GrizzlyFi joined us for a conversation a few months ago when they first launched, and they're back for a more in depth deep dive. They launched with one idea at the core: being sustainable in a bear market. They're also the largest recorded launch on BSC without a launch pad (over 20 million raised). Now let's dig in, and see if they are succeeding at that goal! Listen and let us know what you think! As always, we want to stress that nothing in this is financial investment advice. Our goal with these conversations is to give everyone listening one more tool in their belt to utilize while they do their own research about DeFi projects & the space in general.House Of Obsidian Discord: https://discord.gg/obsidiansObsidian Twitter: https://twitter.com/ObsidianCouncilObsidian Website: https://www.obsidianfi.com/Weekly Crypto News: https://medium.com/@obsidiancouncilocFind our speakers this week:Guest: GrizzlyFi - https://twitter.com/GrizzlyFi --- https://twitter.com/andres_grizzlyHost: Matthew Walker, https://www.instagram.com/hawaiianmint/ --- https://twitter.com/hawaiianmintShoutout to our editor Ghost for the excellent work!

Obsidian Mindset Podcast
What the Health? - Overnight Oats

Obsidian Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 33:43


Obsidian Mindset presents a new segment called "What the Health?" where Joe and Evan discuss different food and wellness trends. They will go behind the scenes of new fads to discover the science and/ or truth behind the trends. They will even try to recreate and experience them firsthand. In this episode, they talk about overnight oats!If you would like to support Obsidian Mindset, please go to theobsidianmindset.com

Sub FM Archives
Bobby Lasers In The Void Obsidian Wave Guest Mix - 12 Jan 2023

Sub FM Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 123:24


Bobby Lasers In The Void Obsidian Wave Guest Mix - 12 Jan 2023 by Sub FM

The Bike Shed
367: Value Objects

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 34:00


Joël's been traveling. Stephanie's working on professional development. She's also keeping up a little bit more with Ruby news and community news in general and saw that Ruby 3.2 introduced a new class called data to its core library for the use case of creating simple value objects. This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Maggie Appleton's Tools for Thought (https://maggieappleton.com/tools-for-thought) Episode on note-taking with Amanda Beiner (https://www.bikeshed.fm/357) Obsidian (https://obsidian.md/) Zettelkasten (https://zettelkasten.de/posts/overview/) Evergreen notes (https://notes.andymatuschak.org/Evergreen_notes) New Data class (https://ruby-doc.org/3.2.0/Data.html) Joël's article on value objects (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/value-object-semantics-in-ruby) Episode on specialized vocabulary (https://www.bikeshed.fm/356) Primitive Obsession (https://wiki.c2.com/?PrimitiveObsession) Transcript: AD: thoughtbot is thrilled to announce our own incubator launching this year. If you are a non-technical founding team with a business idea that involves a web or mobile app, we encourage you to apply for our eight-week program. We'll help you move forward with confidence in your team, your product vision, and a roadmap for getting you there. Learn more and apply at tbot.io/incubator. STEPHANIE: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Stephanie Minn. JOËL: And I'm Joël Quenneville. And together, we're here to share a little bit of what we've learned along the way. STEPHANIE: So, Joël, what's new in your world? JOËL: I've been traveling for the past few weeks in Europe. I just recently got back to the U.S. and have just gotten used to drinking American-style drip coffee again after having espresso every day for a few weeks. And it's been an adjustment. STEPHANIE: I bet. I think that it's such a downgrade compared to European espresso. I remember when I was in Italy, I also would really enjoy espresso every day at a local cafe and just be like sitting outside drinking it. And it was very delightful. JOËL: They're very different experiences. I have to say I do enjoy just holding a hot mug and sort of sipping on it for a long time. It's also a lot weaker. You wouldn't want to do a full hot mug of espresso. That would just be way too intense. But yeah, I think both experiences are enjoyable. They're just different. STEPHANIE: Yeah. So, that first day with your measly drip coffee and your jet lag, how are you doing on your first day back at work? JOËL: I did pretty good. I think part of the fun of coming back to the U.S. from Europe is that the jet lag makes me a very productive morning person for a week. Normally, I'm a little bit more of an evening person. So I get to get a bit of an alter ego for a week, and that helps me to transition back into work. STEPHANIE: Nice. JOËL: So you've also been on break and have started work again. How are you feeling productivity-wise, kicking off the New Year? STEPHANIE: I'm actually unbooked this week and the last week too. So I'm not working on client projects, but I am having a lot of time to work on just professional development. And usually, during this downtime, I also like to reassess just how I'm working, and lately, what that has meant for me is changing my note-taking process. And I'm really excited to share this with you because I know that you have talked about this on the show before, I think in a previous episode with a guest, Amanda Beiner. And I listened to that episode, and I was really inspired because I was feeling like I didn't have a note-taking system that worked super well for me. But you all talked about some tools you used and some, I guess, philosophies around note-taking that like I said, I was really inspired by. And so I hopped on board the Obsidian train. And I'm really excited to share with you my experience with it. So I really like it because I previously was taking notes in my editor under the impression that, oh, like, everything is in one place. It'll be like a seamless transition from code to note-taking. And I was already writing in Markdown. But I actually didn't like it that much because I found it kind of distracting to have code things kind of around. And if I was navigating files or something, something work or code-related might come up, and that ended up being a bit distracting for me. But I know that that works really well for some people; a coworker of ours, Aji, I know that he takes his notes in Vim and has a really fancy setup for that. And so I thought maybe that's what I wanted, but it turns out that what I wanted was actually more of a boundary between code and notes. And so, I was assessing different note-taking and knowledge management software. And I have been really enjoying Obsidian because it also has quite a bit of community support. So I've installed a few plugins for just quality-of-life features like snippets which I had in my editor, and now I get to have in Obsidian. I also installed things like Natural Language Dates. So for my running to-do list, I can just do a shortcut for today, and it'll autofill today's date, which, I don't know, because for me, [laughs] that is just a little bit less mental work that I have to do to remember the date. And yeah, I've been really liking it. I haven't even fully explored backlinking, and that connectivity aspect, which I know is a core feature, but it's been working well for me so far. JOËL: That's really exciting. I love notes and note-taking and the ways that we can use those to make our lives better as developers and as human beings. Do you have a particular system or way you've approached that? Because I know for me, I probably looked at Obsidian for six months before I kind of had the courage to download it because I didn't want to go into it and not have a way to organize things. I was like; I don't want to just throw random notes in here. I want to have a system. That might just be me. But did you just kind of jump into it and see, like, oh, a system will emerge? Did you have a particular philosophy going in? How are you approaching taking notes there? STEPHANIE: That's definitely a you thing because I've definitely had the opposite experience [laughs] where I'm just like, oh, I've downloaded this thing. I'm going to start typing notes and see what happens. I have never really had a good organizational system, which I think is fine for me. I was really leaning on pen and paper notes for a while, and I still have a certain use case for them. Because I find that when I'm in meetings or one-on-ones and taking notes, I don't actually like to have my hands on the keyboard because of distractions. Like I mentioned earlier, it's really easy for me to, like, oh, accidentally Command-Tab and open Slack and be like, oh, someone posted something new in Slack; let me go read this. And I'm not giving the meeting or the person I'm talking to my full attention, and I really didn't like that. So I still do pen and paper for things where I want to make sure that I'm not getting distracted. And then, I will transfer any gems from those notes to Obsidian if I find that they are worth putting in a place where I do have a little bit more discoverability and eventually maybe kind of adding on to my process of using those backlinks and connecting thoughts like that. So, so far, it's truly just a list of separate little pages of notes, and yeah, we'll see how it goes. I'm curious what your system for organizing is or if you have kind of figured out something that works well for you. JOËL: So my approach focuses very heavily on the backlinks. It's loosely inspired by two similar systems of organization called Zettelkasten and evergreen notes. The idea is that you create notes that are ideas. Typically, the title is like a thesis statement, and you keep them very short, focused on a single thing. And if you have a more complex idea, it probably breaks down into two or three, and then you link them to each other as makes sense. So you create a web of these atomic ideas that are highly interconnected with each other. And then later on, because I use this a lot for either creating content in the future or to help refine my thinking on various software topics, so later on, I can go through and maybe connect three or four things I didn't realize connected together. Or if I'm writing an article or a talk, maybe find three or four of these ideas that I generated at very different moments, but now they're connected. And I can make an article or a talk out of them. So that's sort of the purpose that I use them for and how I've organized things for myself. STEPHANIE: I think that's a really interesting topic because while I was assessing different software for note-taking and, like I said, knowledge management, I discovered this blog post by Maggie Appleton that was super interesting because she is talking about the term tools of thought which a lot of these different software kind of leveraged in their marketing copy as like, oh, this software will be like the key to evolving your thinking and help you expand making connections, like you mentioned, in ways that you weren't able to before. And was very obviously trying to upsell you on this product, and she -- JOËL: It's over the top. STEPHANIE: A little bit, a little bit. So in this article, I liked that she took a critical lens to that idea and rooted her article in history and gave examples of a bunch of different things in human history that also evolved the ways humans were able to express their thoughts and solve problems. And so some of the ones that she listed were like storytelling and oral tradition. Literally, the written language obviously [laughs] empowered humans to be able to communicate and think in ways that we never were before but also drawings, and maps, and spreadsheets. So I thought that was really cool because she was basically saying that tools of thought don't need to be digital, and people claiming that these software, you know, are the new way to think or whatever, it's like, the way we're thinking now, but we also have this long history of using and developing different things that helped us communicate with each other and think about stuff. JOËL: I think that's something that appealed to me when I was looking at some of these note-taking systems. Zettelkasten, in particular, predates digital technology. The original system was built on note cards, and the digital stuff just made it a little bit easier. But I think also when I was reading about these ideas of keeping ideas small and linking them together, I realized that's already kind of how I tend to organize information when I just hold it in my brain or even when I try to do something like a tweet thread on Twitter where I'll try to break it up. It might be a larger, more complex idea, but each tweet, I try to get it to kind of stand on its own to make it easier to retweet and all that. And so it becomes a chain of related ideas that maybe build up to something, but each idea stands on its own. And that's kind of how in these systems notes end up working. And they're in a way that you can kind of remix them with each other. So it's not just a linear chain like you would have on Twitter. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I remember you all in that episode about note-taking with Amanda talked about the value of having an atomic piece of information in every note that you write. And since then, I've been trying to do that more because, especially when I was doing pen and paper, I would just write very loose, messy thoughts down. And I would just think that maybe I would come back to them one day and try to figure out, like, oh, what did I say here, and can I apply it to something? But it's kind of like doing any kind of refactoring or whatever. It's like, in that moment, you have the most context about what you just wrote down or created. And so I've been a little more intentional about trying to take that thought to its logical end, and then hopefully, it will provide value later. What you were saying about the connectivity I also wanted to kind of touch on a little bit further because I've realized that for me, a lot of the connection-making happens during times where I'm not very actively trying to think, or reflect, or do a lot of deep work, if you will. Because lately, I've been having a lot of revelations in the shower, or while I'm trying to fall asleep, or just other kinds of meditative activity. And I'm just coming to terms with that's just how my brain works. And doing those kinds of activities has value for me because it's like something is clearly going on in my brain. And I definitely want to just honor that's how it works for me. JOËL: I had a great conversation recently with another colleague about the gift of boredom and how that can impact our work and what we think about, and our creativity. That was really great. Sometimes it's important to give ourselves a little bit more blank space in our lives. And counter-intuitively, it can make us more productive, even though we're not scheduling ourselves to be productive. STEPHANIE: Yes, I wholeheartedly agree with that. I think a lot about the feeling of boredom, and for me, that is like the middle of summer break when you're still in school and you just had no obligations whatsoever. And you could just do whatever you wanted and could just laze around and be bored. But letting your mind wander during those times is something I really miss. And sometimes, when I do experience that feeling, I get a little bit anxious. I'm like, oh, I could be doing something else. There's whatever endless list of chores or things that are, quote, unquote, "productive." But yeah, I really like how you mentioned that there is value in that experience, and it can feel really indulgent, but that can be good too. MID-ROLL AD: Debugging errors can be a developer's worst nightmare...but it doesn't have to be. Airbrake is an award-winning error monitoring, performance, and deployment tracking tool created by developers for developers that can actually help cut your debugging time in half. So why do developers love Airbrake? It has all of the information that web developers need to monitor their application - including error management, performance insights, and deploy tracking! Airbrake's debugging tool catches all of your project errors, intelligently groups them, and points you to the issue in the code so you can quickly fix the bug before customers are impacted. In addition to stellar error monitoring, Airbrake's lightweight APM helps developers to track the performance and availability of their application through metrics like HTTP requests, response times, error occurrences, and user satisfaction. Finally, Airbrake Deploy Tracking helps developers track trends, fix bad deploys, and improve code quality. Since 2008, Airbrake has been a staple in the Ruby community and has grown to cover all major programming languages. Airbrake seamlessly integrates with your favorite apps to include modern features like single sign-on and SDK-based installation. From testing to production, Airbrake notifiers have your back. Your time is valuable, so why waste it combing through logs, waiting for user reports, or retrofitting other tools to monitor your application? You literally have nothing to lose. Head on over to airbrake.io/try/bikeshed to create your FREE developer account today! JOËL: So you mentioned recently that you've had a lot of revelations or new ideas that have come upon you or that you've been able to dig into a little bit more. Is there one you'd like to share with the audience? STEPHANIE: Yeah. So during this downtime that I've had not working on client work, I have been able to keep up a little bit more with Ruby news or just community news in general. And in, I think, an edition of Ruby Weekly, I saw that Ruby 3.2 introduced this new class called data to its core library for the use case of creating simple value objects. And I was really excited about this new feature because I remembered that you had written a thoughtbot blog post about value objects back in the summer that I had reviewed. That was an opportunity that I could make a connection between something happening in recent news with some thoughts that I had about this topic a few months ago. But basically, this new class can be used over something like a struct to create objects that are immutable in their values, which is a big improvement if you are trying to follow value objects semantics. JOËL: So, I have not played around with the new data class. How is it different from the existing struct that we have in Ruby? STEPHANIE: So I think I might actually answer that first by saying how they're similar, which is that they are both vehicles for holding pieces of data. So we've, in the past, been able to use a struct to very cheaply and easily create a new class that has attributes. But one pitfall of using a struct when you're trying to implement something like a value object is that structs also came with writer methods for all of its members. And so you could change the value of a member, and that it kind of inherently goes against the semantics of a value object because, ideally, they're immutable. And so, with the data class, it doesn't offer writer methods essentially. And I think that it freezes the instance as well in the constructor. And so even if you tried to add writer methods, you would eventually get an error. JOËL: That's really convenient. I think that may be an area where I've been a little bit frustrated with structs in the past, which is that they can be modified. They basically get treated as if they're hashes with a slightly nicer syntax to interact with them. And I want slightly harder boundaries around the data. Particularly when I'm using them as value objects, I generally don't want people to modify them because that might lead to some weird bugs in the code where you've got a, I don't know, something represents a time value or a date value or something, and you're trying to do math on it. And instead of giving you a new time or date, value just modifies the first one. And so now your start date is in the past or something because you happen to subtract a time from it to do a calculation. And you can't assign it to a variable anywhere. STEPHANIE: Yeah, for sure. Another kind of pitfall I remember noticing about structs were that the struct class includes the enumerable module, which makes a struct kind of like a collection. Whereas if you are using it for a value object, that's maybe not what you want. So there was a bit of discourse about whether or not the data class should inherit from struct. And I think they landed on it not inheriting because then you can draw a line in the sand and have that stricter enforcement of saying like, this is what a data as value object should be, and this is what it should not be. So I found that pretty valuable too. JOËL: I think I've heard people talk about sort of two classes of problems that are typically solved with a struct; one is something like a value object where you probably don't want it to be writable. You probably don't want it to be enumerable. And it sounds like data now takes on that role very nicely. The other category of problem is that you have just a hash, and you're trying to incrementally migrate it over to some nicer objects in some kind of domain. And struct actually gives you this really nice intermediate phase where it still mostly behaves like a hash if you needed to, but it also behaves like an object. And it can help you incrementally transition away from just a giant hash into something that's a little bit more programmatic. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's a really good point. I think struct will still be a very viable option for that second category that you described. But having this new data class could be a good middle ground before you extract something into its own class because it better encapsulates the idea of a value object. And one thing that I remember was really interesting about the article that you wrote was that sometimes people forget to implement certain methods when they're writing their own custom value objects. And these come a bit more out of the box with data and just provide a bit more like...what's the word I'm looking for? I'm looking for...you know when you're bowling, and you have those bumpers, I guess? [laughs] JOËL: Uh-huh. STEPHANIE: They provide just like safeguards, I guess, for following semantics around value objects that I thought was really important because it's creating an artifact for this concept that didn't exist. JOËL: And to recap for the audience here, the difference is in how objects are compared for equality. So value objects, if they have the same internal value, even if they're separate objects in memory, should be considered equal. That's how numbers work. That's how hashes work. Generally, primitives in Ruby behave this way. And structs behave that way, and the new data class, it sounds, also behaves that way. Whereas regular objects that you would make they compare based off of the identity of the object, not its value. So if you create two user instances, not ActiveRecord, but you could create a user class, you create two instances in memory. They both have the same attributes. They will be considered not equal to each other because they're not the same instance in memory, and that's fine for something more complex. But when you're dealing with value objects, it's important that two objects that represent the same thing, like a particular time for a unit of measure or something like that, if they have the same internal value, they must be the same. STEPHANIE: Right. So prior to the introduction of this class, that wasn't really enforced or codified anywhere. It was something that if you knew what a value object was, you could apply that concept to your code and make sure that the code you wrote was semantically aligned with this concept. And what was kind of exciting to me about the addition of this to the core class library in Ruby is that someone could discover this without having to know what a value object is like more formally. They might be able to see the use of a data class and be like, oh, let me look this up in the official Ruby docs. And then they could learn like, okay, here's what that means, and here's some rules for this concept in a way that, like I mentioned earlier, felt very implicit to me prior. So that, I don't know, was a really exciting new development in my eyes. JOËL: One of the first episodes that you and I recorded together was about the value of specific vocabulary. And I think part of what the Ruby team has done here is they've taken an implicit concept and given it a name. It's extracted, and it has a name now. And if you use it now, it's because you're doing this data thing, this value object thing. And now there's a documentation page. You can Google it. You can find it rather than just be wondering like, oh, why did someone use a struct in this way and not realize there are some implicit semantics that are different? Or wondering why did the override double equals on this custom class? STEPHANIE: Yeah, exactly. I think that the introduction of this class also provides a solution for something that you mentioned in that blog post, which was the idea of testing value objects. Because previously, when you did have to make sure that you implemented methods, those comparison methods to align with the concept of a value object, it was very easy to forget or just not know. And so you provided a potential solution of testing value objects via an RSpec shared example. And I remember thinking like, ooh, that was a really hot topic because we had also been debating about shared examples in general. But yeah, I was just thinking that now that it's part of the core library, I think, in some ways, that eliminates the need to test something that is using a data class anyway because we can rely a little bit more on that dependency. JOËL: Right? It's the built-in behavior now. Do you have any fun uses for value objects recently? STEPHANIE: I have not necessarily had to implement my own recently. But I do think that the next time I work with one or the next time I think that I might want to have something like a value object it will be a lot easier. And I'm just excited to play around with this and see how it will help solve any problem that might come up. So, Joël, do you have any ideas about when you might reach for a data object? JOËL: A lot of situations, I think, when you see the primitive obsession smell are a great use case for value objects, or maybe we should call them data objects now, now that this is part of Ruby's vocabulary. I think I often tend to; preemptively sounds bad, but a lot of times, I will try to be careful. Anytime I'm doing anything with raw numbers, magic strings, things like that, I'll try to encapsulate them into some sort of struct. Or even if it's like a pair of numbers, it always goes together, maybe a latitude and longitude. Now, those are a pair. Do I want to just be passing around a two-element array all the time or a hash that would probably make a very nice data object? If I have a unit of measure, some number that represents not just the abstract concept of three but specifically three miles or three minutes, then I might reach for something like a data class. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I think that's also true if you're doing any kind of arithmetic or, in general, trying to compare anything about two of the same things. That might be a good indicator as well that you could use something richer, like a value object, to make some of that code more readable, and you get some of those convenient methods for doing those comparisons. JOËL: Have you ever written code where you just have like some number in the code, and there's a comment afterwards that's like minutes or miles or something like that, just giving you the unit as a comment afterwards? STEPHANIE: Oh yeah. I've definitely seen some of that code. And yeah, I mean, now that you mentioned it, that's a great use case for what we're talking about, and it's definitely a code smell. JOËL: It can often be nice as you make these more domain concepts; maybe they start as a data object, but then they might grow with their own custom methods. And maybe you extend data the same way you could extend a struct, or maybe you create a custom class to the point where the user...whoever calls that object, doesn't really need to know or care about the particular unit, just like when you have duration value. If you have a duration object, you can do the math you want. You can do all the operations and don't have to know whether it is in milliseconds, or seconds, or minutes because it knows that internally and keeps all of the math straight as opposed to just holding on to what I've done before, which is you have some really big number somewhere. You have start is, or length is equal to some big number and then comment milliseconds. And then, hopefully, whoever does math on that number later remembers to do the division by 1,000 or whatever they need. STEPHANIE: I've certainly worked on code where we've tolerated those magic numbers for probably longer than we should have because maybe we did have the shared understanding that that value represents minutes or milliseconds or whatever, and that was just part of the domain knowledge. But you're right, like when you see them, and without a very clear label, all of that stuff is implied and is really not very friendly for someone coming along in the future. As well as, like you mentioned earlier, if you have to do math on it later to convert it to something else, that is also a red flag that you could use some kind of abstraction or something to represent this concept at a higher level but also be extensible to different forms, so a duration to represent different amounts of time or money to represent different values and different currencies, stuff like that. JOËL: Do you have a guideline that you follow as to when something starts being worth extracting into some kind of data object? STEPHANIE: I don't know if I have particularly clear guidelines, but I do remember feeling frustrated when I've had to test really complicated hashes or just primitives that are holding a lot of different pieces of information in a way that just is very unwieldy when you do have to write a test for it. And if those things were encapsulated in methods, that would have been a lot easier. And so I think that is a bit of a signal for me. Do you have any other guidelines or gut instincts around that? JOËL: We mentioned the comment that is the unit. That's probably a...I wasn't sure if I would have to call it a code smell, but I'm going to call it a code smell that tells you maybe you should...that value wants to be something a little bit more than just a number. I've gotten suspicious of just raw integers in general, not enough to say that I'm going to make all integers data objects now, but enough to make me pause and think a lot of times. What does this number represent? Should it be a data object? I think I also tend to default to try to do something like a data object when I'm dealing with API responses. You were talking about hashes and how they can be annoying to test. But also, when you're dealing with data coming back from a third-party API, a giant nested hash is not the most convenient thing to work with, both for the implementation but then also just for the readability of your code. I often try to have almost like a translation layer where very quickly I take the payload from a third-party service and turn it into some kind of object. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I think the data class docs itself has an example of using it for HTTP responses because I think the particular implementation doesn't even require it to have attributes. And so you can use it to just label something rather than requiring a value for it. JOËL: And that is one thing that is nice about something like a data object versus a hash is that a hash could have literally anything in it. And to a certain extent, a data object is self-documenting. So if I want to know I've gotten to a shopping cart object from a third-party API, what can I get out of the shopping cart? I can look at the data object. I can open the class and see here are the methods I can call. If it's just a hash, well, I guess I can try to either find the documentation for the API or try to make a real request and then inspect the hash at runtime. But there's not really any way to find out without actually executing the code. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's totally fair. And what you said about self-documenting makes a lot of sense. And it's always preferable than that stray comment in the code. [laughs] JOËL: I'm really excited to use the data class in future Ruby 3.2 projects. So I'm really glad that you brought it up. I've not tried it myself, but I'm excited to use it in future projects. STEPHANIE: On that note, shall we wrap up? JOËL: Let's wrap up. STEPHANIE: Show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. JOËL: This show has been produced and edited by Mandy Moore. STEPHANIE: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. JOËL: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us @_bikeshed, or you can reach me @joelquen on Twitter. STEPHANIE: Or reach both of us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. JOËL: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot, your expert strategy, design, development, and product management partner. We bring digital products from idea to success and teach you how because we care. Learn more at thoughtbot.com.

Double Barrel Gaming
Obsidian's Avowed Playable In Coop Say Insider, Google/Nvidia Have Concerns Regarding The ABK Merger + IS CDPR's Cyberpunk 2077 Coming To Xbox Game Pass At The End Of January?

Double Barrel Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 133:10


TIME STAMP INFO: 01:00 Intros 05:00 NEW Report suggests that CDPR's Cyberpunk 2077 IS coming to Xbox Game Pass, maybe its the 1st BIG 3rd Party Game in January? 40:00 Google/Nvidia Have Concerns Regarding The ABK Merger. They basically "Pulled A Playstation"! Market Leaders in their respected fields have an "Issue" with competition.....WOW! 1:15:00 Jeremy Penter of ACG fame claims that Obsidian's NEW IP Avowed will have some sort of "Co-op" play though the entire game, THAT'S AWESOME and discuss how this will make for one of THE BEST New RPG's for Xbox Series X/S! 2:05:00 Panel Outros and Special Message to the community! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-ravitch/support

The Obsidian Table
EMP - Crypto Project Analysis

The Obsidian Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 73:04


A live conversation with a DeFi project, where Matthew & the Obsidian community members ask questions and pick the brains of the founders behind the company. We sit down with AJ Brockman, core team member at EMP! EMP is a seigniorage protocol that is algorithmically pegged to the price of Ethereum. Listen and let us know what you think! As always, we want to stress that nothing in this is financial investment advice. Our goal with these conversations is to give everyone listening one more tool in their belt to utilize while they do their own research about DeFi projects & the space in general.House Of Obsidian Discord: https://discord.gg/obsidiansObsidian Twitter: https://twitter.com/ObsidianCouncilObsidian Website: https://www.obsidianfi.com/Weekly Crypto News: https://medium.com/@obsidiancouncilocFind our speakers this week:Guest: EMP - https://twitter.com/EmpMoneyBSCHost: Matthew Walker, https://www.instagram.com/hawaiianmint/ --- https://twitter.com/hawaiianmintShoutout to our editor, Hansalord for the excellent work!

What Do I Do Now?
SISTAS ft. KJ Smith, Mignon, Ebony Obsidian, Novi Brown, & Crystal Renee' Hayslett

What Do I Do Now?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 31:14


This past year, Tyler Perry's "Sistas" crossed the landmark 100th episode. And, in a time where so many shows don't make it past the first season, being in the middle of a 5th season with so much success is not an easy feat or one that should go without recognition. But, the principle characters (KJ Smith, Mignon, Ebony Obsidian, Novi Brown, & Crystal Renee' Hayslett) have let viewers know week in and week out, this is a show that isn't going anywhere. Make sure you tune in every Wednesday, 9 PM on BET & BET Her! Being discussed in this interview: Does 6 months really equate to a marriage proposal? Each character's relationship status What men can take away from watching "Sistas" What does five seasons mean to each of them What their long lasting impression after finishing their career in acting The series is MUST SEE TV! Follow the show on social media: @SISTASOnBET and use the hashtag #SistasOnBET to stay engaged with the ladies of the show! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/therealsix5/message

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Conversational canyons by Henrik Karlsson

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 10:54


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Conversational canyons, published by Henrik Karlsson on January 4, 2023 on LessWrong. Conversations are streams: they pass by without leaving much behind. But if you add a notebook—if you write down short summaries of what you talk about so you can return to it in later conversations and expand—then you have a landscape for the conversation to flow through, and this changes it in interesting ways. When I started writing summaries, I thought it would be a small change. I already kept a detailed journal—I could just as well keep one for conversations, too. I could jot down a few notes about the key ideas, turning a two-hour conversation into 400 words or so. After a few months, however, it became clear that these notes were in fact not a small change. The notebook had entirely altered the shape of my conversations. Because I had the notes, I would review them if I was to speak with the same person again, adding comments about thoughts I'd had in the interim, rank ordering which topics I wanted to revisit, and so on. This way good ideas and topics would not be dropped but revisited and expanded. They would be connected to new insights, merged, and refined. Through this, the conversations became richer. They became more useful and interesting. The conversational stream was flowing through a landscape. On its banks ideas would wash up. Gradually, the banks would move, too—the landscape is shaped by the flow of words into a canyon. A canyon that shapes the stream of words in turn. I don't write down the conversations I have with most people. But there are a few who I keep coming back to—friends with minds that are forever churning, minds like mysterious machines I can never fully grasp but am continually delighted by. When we talk they all take me to different places; when I add a notebook they all go deep. The first conversation I wrote down was with Torbjörn, a software engineer who has an uncanny ability to guess my thoughts. When he gets excited he SPEAKS IN ALL CAPS, and he gets excited about everything. At the time, we talked on the phone once a week for about two hours. I would set off from my house toward the ocean and cross into the nature reserve. Walking along the ravine and the cliffs for a few hours, I would talk to Torbjörn about open research questions and software projects we were involved with. He would ask me for strategic advice about his consultancy. We also talked about our relationships, aliens, the ravings of the world around us, mopeds. While talking, we would take turns jotting down keywords to aid our memory, and then, when I got home, I would add what we had said to my note-taking system. I revised old notes in light of how our thinking had evolved, adding new links between different ideas, and so on. (For this particular conversation, I used Obsidian. But the tools are not important. And I roughly follow the note-taking strategy that Andy Matuschak outlines here. But that is not important either.) If Torbjörn wanted some of the notes, I would email edited excerpts to him, so I didn't have to format my notebook in a way that makes sense for him to read. First, I mixed the conversational notes in with my other thoughts. But I've since found that keeping the conversational notes separate from other notes is better—it creates a stronger sense of place. Now, I enter the Torbjörn notes, and all past conversations flow up. Mixed in with the other notes, they were diluted. (I do interlink it heavily with other notes, though.) During the week or so until we talked again, I would occasionally revisit the notes and add a thought or two. It kept the conversation alive in my mind. I'd update a list of topics I wanted to cover next time, shuffling their relative importance. This priority list, which was added to deal with the mess the notes became after a few...

Digital Euphoria
Live @ HyPeR - November 26th, 2022

Digital Euphoria

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 212:19


•SET INFO• Location: Ultros // Empyreum // Ward 2 // Plot 22 When: Every Saturday @ 10 PM EST Catch me on twitch.tv/type_live and follow for updates and live notifications! Follow me on Twitter @type_live for updates and notifications! •Track List• 1. Spy, Yelow - The Force (Extended Mix) [Subculture] 2. Sean Tyas, Bjorn Akesson - Zahi (Sean Tyas Extended Remix) [Regenerate Records] 3. Illitheas - Untold Stories (Extended Mix) [Abora Recordings] 4. Paul Denton - Recoil (Extended Mix) [FSOE] 5. Allen Watts - Dynamo (Extended Mix) [Who's Afraid Of 138?!] 6. Ehren Stowers - After Life (Extended Mix) [FSOE] 7. Jaren, Saad Ayub - Hurt (RYDEX Extended Mix) [Amsterdam Trance Records (RazNitzanMusic)] 8. Exolight - Maybe In Another Life (Extended Mix) [Always Alive Recordings] 9. Obsidian, Asteroid - Arrival (Extended Mix) [Nocturnal Knights Music] 10. Maarten De Jong - Lancelot (Original Mix) [VANDIT Records] 11. Mark Sherry - Gravitational Waves (Systembreaker Extended Remix) [Outburst Records] 12. Metta & Glyde - Primal Fear (Extended Mix) [Outburst Twilight] 13. Dash Berlin, Roxanne Emery - Shelter feat. Roxanne Emery (Photographer Remix) [Armind (Armada)] 14. Somna, HALIENE - Secret (ReOrder Extended Remix) [Magik Muzik] 15. BiXX - Connect The Dots (Extended) [High Voltage Recordings] 16. Metta & Glyde - 11:11 (Extended Mix) [FSOE] 17. BiXX - Face Your Fears (Extended Mix) [Nocturnal Knights Music] 18. BiXX - Marvellous Universe (Extended Mix) [Find Your Harmony] 19. Greg Downey, Bo Bruce - Another Sun (Extended Mix) [Black Hole Recordings] 20. ReOrder, Katty Heath - Meteorite (Extended Mix) [Amsterdam Trance Records (RazNitzanMusic)] 21. Paul Skelton - Farewell For Now (Extended Mix) [Kinected Recordings] 22. Tenishia, Sue McLaren - Strong (Dan Cooper Extended Mix) [Amsterdam Trance Records (RazNitzanMusic)] 23. BiXX - Now or Never (Extended Mix) [FSOE] 24. Metta & Glyde - Anywhere with You (Original Mix) [One Forty Music] 25. Ram, Roxanne Emery - Echo (Extended Mix) [Black Hole Recordings] 26. Ben Gold - Rest Of Our Lives (Extended Mix) [Armada Captivating] 27. Metta & Glyde - Cynosure (Extended Mix) [Regenerate Records] 28. Yoshi & Razner, BiXX - Victoria (Extended Mix) [Nocturnal Knights Music] 29. Susana - Dark Side of The Moon (Stoneface & Terminal Dark Extended Mix) [Amsterdam Trance Records (RazNitzanMusic)] 30. Roxanne Emery, BiXX - Unbroken (Extended Mix) [Nocturnal Knights Music] 31. Christina Novelli, BiXX - Putting Out Fires (Extended Mix) [Muse Music Records ] 32. Talla 2xlc - Carpe Diem (Extended Mix) [That's Trance] 33. Arctic Moon, Linkin Park - Castle Of Glass (Arctic Moon Remix) 34. RAM & Jorn van Deynhoven vs. The Doppler Effect feat. Carol Lee - Beauty Hides In RAMsterdam (Chaim Mankoff Mash-up) 35. Giuseppe Ottaviani, Tricia McTeague - Loneliest Night feat. Tricia McTeague (OnAir Mix) [Black Hole Recordings] 36. Craig Connelly, Christina Novelli - Black Hole (Jorn van Deynhoven Remix) [Garuda] 37. Dash Berlin, Bo Bruce - Coming Home feat. Bo Bruce (STANDERWICK Extended Remix) [A State Of Trance] 38. Susana, Armin van Buuren - Shivers feat. Susana (Original Mix) [Armada Music Albums] 39. OceanLab, Above & Beyond - On A Good Day - Daniel Kandi Mix [Ultra]

Double Barrel Gaming
S.T.A.L.K.E.R 2 Confirmed By GSC Game World To Be An Xbox Exclusive With No PS5 Version Planned! Xbox 1st Party In 2023 Is BONKERS Good!

Double Barrel Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 99:32


TIME STAMP INFO: 01:00 Intros 08:00 Xbox Game Studios release schedule in 2023's 1st Six Months is STACKED, when you consider ALL of the 2nd, 3rd Party & Indies.....WOW! 33:00 NEW "Hot Take Rumor" from known Xbox Insider says Ninja Theory's Hellblade 2 releasing in November of 2023 and Obsidian's Avowed opening 2024 in a BIG way! Could it be true? 1:00:00 CSG Game World has CONFIRMED that there are NO PLANS for a PS5 version of #stalker2 and there are MANY reasons why. Should Xbox "Drop the Bag" and "Lock Up" the UE5 behemoth as an Xbox Exclusive permanently? 1:35:00 Panel Outros and Special Message to the community! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/craig-ravitch/support

NEW Realm of the Mist Entertainment
Breaking the 4th Wall Podcast #178: what could we do while we wait for FALLOUT 5

NEW Realm of the Mist Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 24:22


With Rumors flying from Bethesda, Obsidian and Xbox Studios Chris speculates and gives his thoughts on what could be to fill the possible 10 year wait for the next main line Fallout game. Contact us: Email: realmofthemistentertainment@gmail.com YouTube Edits: Chris Stolle using Hitfilm Software All content copyrighted under Realm of the Mist Entertainment, All Rights Reserved. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Please Support Us: https://anchor.fm/rotm-ent/support And on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Realmofthemist ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Find all the links to all Breaking the 4th Wall Shows here: https://linktr.ee/Realmofthemist --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rotm-ent/support

Living 4D with Paul Chek
EP 221 — Dr. Robert Gilbert: Sacred Geometry

Living 4D with Paul Chek

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 193:49 Very Popular


How does spirit and science connect? Why are patterns a part of everything we see and do? Where is our world heading?Paul talks sacred geometry, paradigm shifts, thought forms and subtle bodies with Dr. Robert Gilbert, director of the Vesica Institute and the first non-Egyptian certified to teach BioGeometry in this very metaphysical Living 4D conversation.Learn more about Robert's work with sacred geometry at vesica.org.For Living 4D listeners: Save $75 off two of the Vesica Institute's most popular courses — Essential Teachings and Practices of Spiritual Science and The Personal Wavelength (good for one year of unlimited access — by using the promo code PAUL75 at checkout.Show NotesScience made more complicated than it needs to be. (6:43)The mythology we're taught in modern education. (15:59)How paradigm shifts happen. (22:14)One of the great secrets of sacred geometry. (38:36)There's a pattern behind everything. (45:36)Metaphysics 101. (54:03)Discovering the two spectrums. (1:05:38)The hidden side of sacred geometry. (1:15:06)How spirit and science connect. (1:26:07)Don't teach the Americans! (1:34:11)Thought forms and information fields. (1:39:49)Elemental beings. (1:53:17)Obsidian absorbs toxic energies. (2:05:50)Sonic geometry. (2:12:45)A great and lost secret of spiritual and personal development: Structuring the subtle bodies. (2:18:32)The 12 lotus pedals of the human heart. (2:25:17)The regent of cosmic intelligence. (2:35:40)Why are we here? (2:55:12)Free agents in the universe. (3:00:44)ResourcesSacred Geometry: Spiritual Science featuring Robert Gilbert on GaiaRosicrucianismThe Kingdom of the Gods by Geoffrey HodsonBlack-body radiationRadiesthesia and radionicsPaul's Living 4D conversations with Dr. Ibrahim Karim and John Stuart ReidMore resources for this episode are available on our website.We may earn commissions from qualifying purchases using affiliate links.Thanks to our awesome sponsors: CHEK Institute/PT3.0 Paleovalley chek15 BiOptimizers PAUL10 Cymbiotika L4D15 Organifi CHEK20

Circle Back Podcast
130: Murder in 16th Century Bavaria

Circle Back Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 97:20


Ep. 130 of The Circle Back Podcast. The gang is all together and talking about some great new games. Dan and Dan beat God of War Ragnarok and Shelby is pretty deep in. Big surprise, they all love it! Dan and Dan are in love with the Night in The Woods-like Pentiment from Obsidian. Also Marvel's Midnight Suns is a surprisingly fun story in addition to a fantastic tactics game and Dan's been loving it. We end it by recapping The Game Awards. Stay safe, and we hope you enjoy! Games Discussed: -God of War Ragnarok -Somerville -Pentiment -Pokémon Scarlet/Violet -Marvel's Midnight Suns

The Obsidian Table
BioFi - Conversations w/ Crypto Projects

The Obsidian Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 87:05


A live conversation with a DeFi project, where Matthew & the Obsidian community members ask questions and pick the brains of the founders behind the company. BioFi  is building a huge ecosystem centered around security  on the blockchain: biometric technology, a wallet, password managers, a secure phone, metaverse infrastructure, and it keeps going. Listen and let us know what you think! As always, we want to stress that nothing in this is financial investment advice. Our goal with these conversations is to give everyone listening one more tool in their belt to utilize while they do their own research about DeFi projects & the space in general.House Of Obsidian Discord: https://discord.gg/obsidiansObsidian Twitter: https://twitter.com/ObsidianCouncilObsidian Website: https://www.obsidianfi.com/Weekly Crypto News: https://medium.com/@obsidiancouncilocFind our speakers this week:Guest: BioFi - https://twitter.com/FinnovantHost: Matthew Walker, https://www.instagram.com/hawaiianmint/ --- https://twitter.com/hawaiianmintShoutout to our editor, Hansalord for the excellent work!

The World of Eora: an Avowed & Pillars of Eternity Lore Podcast

MERRY CHRISTMAS! The World of Eora is a news/lore podcast about the Obsidian-made fantasy world used in Pillars of Eternity and Avowed. In today's not-so-very Christmas episode, we discuss Chanters...a class within character creation from Pillars games, but also a group of people tied to the lore and history of their culture. Join with me in the last episode of 2022 as we discuss these interesting lore keepers and storytellers.

The Catch Bit Show
Episode 20 | Of Long Pulls and Obsidian

The Catch Bit Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 49:10


We get into long pulls and our methods in the early part of the show and Mike spills the beans on how much time he has into perfecting long pulls and nail nicks. The boys see out the new year with a little review of the podcast and talk of where it's heading. Neal tries to ruin the steel industry with talk of obsidian and Jason learns what censorship in 2022 feels like.Thanks everyone for listening!If you enjoyed the episode, be sure to give us some of those stars in your podcast app! Jason Ritchie: @ritchie_handmade_knivesMike Moran: @mikemoranknives and on the web: mikemoranknives.comCheck out Neal's latest latest book on J.A. Henckels Knives

The Obsidian Table
WaifuTV - Conversations w/ Crypto Projects

The Obsidian Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 92:29


A live conversation with a DeFi project, where Matthew & the Obsidian community members ask questions and pick the brains of the founders behind the company. WaifuTV is the brainchild of Gosu (from Gosu Tools), where live streaming and anime merge  to meet on blockchain tech. Gaming, live streaming, and anime where both the creator and the viewer have unique ways to earn  that we haven't seen with the current options. Listen and let us know what you think! As always, we want to stress that nothing in this is financial investment advice. Our goal with these conversations is to give everyone listening one more tool in their belt to utilize while they do their own research about DeFi projects & the space in general.House Of Obsidian Discord: https://discord.gg/obsidiansObsidian Twitter: https://twitter.com/ObsidianCouncilObsidian Website: https://www.obsidianfi.com/Weekly Crypto News: https://medium.com/@obsidiancouncilocFind our speakers this week:Guest: WaifuTV - https://twitter.com/Waifu_TV - https://twitter.com/GosuCodesHost: Matthew Walker, https://www.instagram.com/hawaiianmint/ --- https://twitter.com/hawaiianmintShoutout to our editor, Hansalord for the excellent work!

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
A federal court decides when a contractor size rule actually takes effect

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 16:32


A few years back, Congress changed how the Small Business Administration would calculate whether a business qualified as small. It had been the average of three years of revenue. The new rule was five years. The question arose … when did the new calculus kick in. The question had real consequences for a company called Obsidian. To get the details, Federal Drive host Tom Temin talked with Smith Pachter McWhorter procurement attorney Zach Prince.

Marketing Brief - Et podcast om Online Marketing
EP #597: Virker webinars stadig? (Og en case, hvor det gjorde!)

Marketing Brief - Et podcast om Online Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 12:53


Hvis man kigger på grafen over søgninger på “webinar software” kan man se, hvordan corona tvangs-digitaliserede B2B over hele verden. Der opstod en vis “webinar fatigue”. Laver du også et webinar? Flot - det gør alle andre også. Men hvad med lige nu post-corona? Er webinars stadig en del af værktøjskassen? Hvad separerer de gode fra de dårlige? Hvordan bruger Obsidian det? Halfdan er træt af: 4 deltagere der sidder hver for sig Monologer Generiske webinars Dårlige mikrofoner!!!

Game Pass Grab Bag
Grounded 1.0

Game Pass Grab Bag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 58:14


This week Andrew and Liz went back to check out Grounded by; Obsidian studios. Grounded just recently released there 1.0 patch which means it is a completed game. There is now a flushed out story and the backyard is fully developed. We check out to see if the 1.0 patch really made much of a difference or is this game just the same old same old.

Engineering IRL
Rev. 49 - The Metaverse, Blockchain Games, The Sandbox and what we're building. A look at Obsidian Breakers

Engineering IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 24:42


Is the Metaverse legit? Why are we building games on The Sandbox and not somewhere else? I breakdown the difference between normal gaming and blockchain gaming, Why the Sandbox over some other platforms, The good/bad of developing on The Sandbox, Obsidian Breakers and what I'm developing there, what's next and... should you invest in $SAND? Ask your questions on Obsidian Breakers Discord Must-Watch Trailers for Obsidian Breakers: Trailer 2 Gameplay: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq7j2QrXw20&list=PLQdwCecMFVkscBQgPxFbxskcekA5tsvz5&ab_channel=EngineeringIRL Learn more about Obsidian Breakers on The Sandbox https://www.engineeringinreallife.com/obsidian-breakers Get your hands on our popular Engineering Notebooks! https://www.engineeringinreallife.com/engineering-notebooks Get free online access to the engineering book 10+1 Steps to Problem Solving - An Engineers Guide from a Career in Operational Technology and Control Systems at our website here: https://www.engineeringinreallife.com/book Don't forget to subscribe for more and share the engineering podcast. Head to https://www.engineeringinreallife.com and become a member of the Engineering IRL Community. Engineering IRL Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/@engineering_irl/ And to support us consider purchasing an Engineering Notebook covered with inspirational quotes for engineers. It could be a great gift for an Engineer. The other way to support the Engineering IRL podcast is to subscribe and share the show with your friends! I want this to be a top engineering podcast and will be working hard to make that happen. Facebook: www.Facebook.com/engineerIRL Twitter: www.twitter.com/engineering_irl TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@engineering_irl Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/engineeringinreallife To know more about our partnerships and how to get in touch with the show visit the top engineering podcast. #Engineering #Blockchain #TheSandbox #metaverse

Self-Hosted
86: Disqus-ting Tracking

Self-Hosted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 48:49


What disgusted Alex about Disqus, and how he replaced it with a Self-Hosted solution, a hot HDHomeRun tip, and an update on Chris' hunt for the perfect notes app.

Eggplant: The Secret Lives of Games
105: Making History with Josh Sawyer (Pentiment)

Eggplant: The Secret Lives of Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 70:54


Josh Sawyer (Fallout: New Vegas, Pillars of Eternity) joins us to discuss Obsidian's historical, narrative-driven adventure game Pentiment. We chat about text boxes as game feel, creating hard player choices that don't feel bad, and putting yourself in your art. Show Notes: Josh Sawyer Pentiment The Name of the Rose Pitching a 16th Century Murder Mystery - AIAS Game Maker's Notebook Juice It or Lose It talk Lettermatic Night in the Woods So where *is* Tassing, actually? (Tumblr post) Darklands Guillermo Del Toro's Pinocchio Andrei Rublev

iPad Pros
Ferrite Recording Studio 3 with Canis (iPad Pros - 0160)

iPad Pros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 87:33


Ferrite Recording Studio is the app this podcast is edited with. It is an audio editing app available exclusively for iPad and iPhone and focuses on spoken word audio. Canis is the developer behind Ferrite and is back on the podcast to discuss version 3 of the app. Canis was last on for episode 34 in September 2018. Bonus content and early episodes with chapter markers are available by supporting the podcast at www.patreon.com/ipadpros. Bonus content and early episodes are also now available in Apple Podcasts!Show notes are available at www.iPadPros.net. Feedback is welcomed at iPadProsPodcast@gmail.com.Chapter Markers00:00:00: Opening00:01:38: Canis00:04:28: Stage Manager00:06:32: Any new apps that you use?00:06:59: Obsidian 00:07:07: Things00:07:25: Documents00:07:58: The iPad's Future00:10:27: Ferrite 300:12:37: Double Speed Editing00:16:59: The new audio engine00:21:26: Audio Plugins00:24:52: Other Big Ferrite 3 Features?00:28:03: Search00:30:43: Faster Speeds?00:31:24: Smart Folders00:33:44: Future Smart Things?00:34:59: Other Library Features?00:35:05: Template Folders00:37:57: Context Menus00:41:30: Strip Silence UI00:45:23: Popup Menu00:48:37: UI Redesigns00:55:30: Export01:01:08: Final Mix01:04:50: Equalizer01:07:54: Recording01:12:18: The big recording problem on iOS01:17:02: Hover01:19:32: Keyboard Shortcuts01:20:55: Settings01:23:52: Pricing01:26:17: Wooji-Juice.com01:26:56: Closing Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Risky Business
Risky Business #689 -- FBI baulks at Apple's iCloud encryption push

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: Apple to introduce user-encrypted backups, FBI is sad Twitter ices e2ee plans for DMs RackSpace is getting sued over its hosted Exchange ransomware incident Dodgy driving: Microsoft signs some shady stuff Japan to change laws, release the Shibas A look at the US NDAA Much, much more This week's show is sponsored by Obsidian Security. Obsidian co-founder Ben Johnson joins the show this week to talk through SaaS configuration security and visibility/monitoring. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Mastodon if that's your thing. Show notes Apple Expands End-to-End Encryption to iCloud Backups | WIRED FBI Calls End-to-End Encryption 'Deeply Concerning' as Privacy Groups Hail Apple's Advanced Data Protection as a Victory for Users - MacRumors Apple Kills Its Plan to Scan Your Photos for CSAM. Here's What's Next | WIRED Elon Musk Wanted Twitter To Encrypt Messages. His New Safety Chief Says It's On Hold I Solemnly Swear My Driver Is Up to No Good: Hunting for Attestation Signed Malware | Mandiant Japan to amend laws to allow for offensive cyber operations against foreign hackers - The Record by Recorded Future Amid Outrage, Rackspace Sends Users Email Touting Its Incident Response New Ransom Payment Schemes Target Executives, Telemedicine – Krebs on Security Hackers Planted Files to Frame Indian Priest Who Died in Custody | WIRED Scammers Are Scamming Other Scammers Out of Millions of Dollars | WIRED Risky Biz News: Disgruntled member doxes and extorts URSNIF gang U.S. agency warns that hackers are going after Citrix networking gear | Reuters Police raid offices of Predator spyware seller Intellexa | eKathimerini.com $858 billion defense bill focuses heavily on cyber. These are some highlights. Australia and Vanuatu sign defense and cybersecurity pact - The Record by Recorded Future Fantasy – a new Agrius wiper deployed through a supply‑chain attack | WeLiveSecurity Ukrainian railway, state agencies allegedly targeted by DolphinCape malware - The Record by Recorded Future US Dept of Health warns of ‘increased' Royal ransomware attacks on hospitals - The Record by Recorded Future ‘Crisis situation' declared as two Swedish municipalities hit by cyberattack - The Record by Recorded Future Metropolitan Opera dealing with cyberattack that shut down website, box office - The Record by Recorded Future LockBit ransomware crew claims attack on California Department of Finance PLAY ransomware group claims responsibility for Antwerp attack as second Belgian city confirms new incident - The Record by Recorded Future Popular HR and Payroll Company Sequoia Discloses a Data Breach | WIRED Internet Explorer 0-day exploited by North Korean actor APT37 Four accused in business email compromise scheme which reaped millions from victims - The Record by Recorded Future JSON syntax hack allowed SQL injection payloads to be smuggled past WAFs | The Daily Swig Log4j's Log4Shell Vulnerability: One Year Later, It's Still Lurking | WIRED

Saturday Night Gaming's Podcast
V1E382 Project Paradox - The Bridge

Saturday Night Gaming's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 45:20


Battling their way to the Nexus Bridge, the team attempt to recover from their losses. Bones unearths a secret of the Obsidian gauntlet.   Featuring: Zix Kennfang plyed by Dan Stephens Birgitta played by Jessica Stephens Bones played by Ronnie Shenks with Special Guest Magni played by Ryan Ladner Tony Stephens as the GM   Art Credit: Tony Stephens   Music: Sovereign by Alexander Nakarada (www.serpentsoundstudios.com) Licensed under Creative Commons BY Attribution 4.0 License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Starting Zone: The World of Warcraft Podcast!
Episode #555: Dragonflight Season One!

The Starting Zone: The World of Warcraft Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 125:00 Very Popular


Welcome to The Starting Zone Podcast, The World of Warcraft Podcast for New and Experienced Players! This week Spencer Downey, Jason Lucas discuss Dragonflight Season One, Mythic BoE's, 50% more Classic Experience, The Trading Post and everything going on around Azeroth and The Dragon Isles! Episode #555: Dragonflight Season One! is ready for Download! What's New this Week in World of Warcraft! Weekly Event - World Quest Bonus Event World Boss - Basrikron, the Shale Wing, Proto-Dragon in Ohn'ahran Plains 389 ilvl Loot Plate Chest Mail Wrists Leather Feet Cloth Waist Mastery/Crit Neck Mythic + Affixes (We will see after servers come up!) Thundering Brawl - Arathi Blizzard PvP Quest - Arena Skirmishes PvP Brawl - Deep Six PvP Quest - Arena Skirmishes Darkmoon Faire - December 4th to 10th Don't Miss it Checklist Aiding the Accord - The Hunt Siege on Dragonbane Keep Community Feast Shikaar Grand Hunts Cobalt Assembly rep Obsidian rep Super Rares Trials Trial of Flood at Ohn'iri Springs in Ohn'aran Plains Trial of Elements at Temporal Conflux in Thaldraszus Upcoming: Feast of Winter Veil - December 16th to January 2nd Dragonflight: Season 1 Content Update Notes Introducing the Trading Post! Recruit A Friend Update Bind-on-Equip Items from Mythic Raid in Early Season 1 WoW Classic: The Joyous Journeys 50% Experience Buff Returns Hotfixes The FTC is suing Microsoft ABetterABK Strike Fund and much more! You can find us on Discord at The Starting Zone or email us at TheStartingZone@Gmail.com Have you heard about our Patreon? It's a great way to support the show and goes towards making more content for you! Check it out here: https://www.patreon.com/thestartingzone Looking for to grab some great TSZ merch? Look no further than here! We've got the shirts, hoodies, mugs, pillows even stickers you want!

The World of Eora: an Avowed & Pillars of Eternity Lore Podcast
Ep. #44: Galawain, Lord of the Hunt (in all of its forms)

The World of Eora: an Avowed & Pillars of Eternity Lore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 47:00


"The World of Eora" is a news/lore podcast about Obsidian Entertainment's Pillars of Eternity games, as well as their upcoming release: AVOWED. Today's episode discusses GALAWAIN, one of the eleven deities in the fantasy world of these games, Eora. Galawain is the deity of pursuit, discovery, and hunting (etc.). There's *a lot* that Obsidian could put into Avowed from Galawain-ian (?) lore. Join me today in discussing this! worldofeora@gmail.com @worldofeora

The AIAS Game Maker's Notebook
Pitching a 16th-Century Murder Mystery Game with Obsidian's Josh Sawyer

The AIAS Game Maker's Notebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 113:43


Trent Kusters chats with Josh Sawyer, the Game Director behind Obsidian Entertainment's Pentiment. Together they discuss his long career in game development from his start at legendary studio Black Isle to his current work on projects like Fallout: New Vegas and the Pillars of Eternity series; how he successfully pitched a narrative-focused 16th-century murder mystery; how a small team created an experience full of historical detail and references; and how to have fun with fonts. Watch this episode on our Youtube channel.

The Working With... Podcast
The End Of Year Clean Up

The Working With... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 13:06


This week, what could you change about your system to get it ready for 2023?   You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN   Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin Email Mastery Course The Time Blocking Course The Working With… Weekly Newsletter The Time And Life Mastery Course The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl's YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page Episode 257 | Script Hello and welcome to episode 257 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. There's something about an end of year that turns our minds towards cleaning things up, making changes and planning. Yet when you think about it, these things can be done at any time in the year. Cleaning your task manager of tasks that have been sitting around for over a year, reviewing how we manage our tasks and making plans can all be done anytime. All we need to do is make that decision. That said, the end of year often does give us some extra time to do these things. Emails reduce a little, and most people's attention turn towards the upcoming year. And certainly if you live in the west, Christmas week does take us away from our work and spending time with family and friends.  I find this presents opportunities to clean up my notes for the year, delete tasks I've added, not done and are just sitting around in my task manager cluttering things up.  This week's question is on this very subject. What can we do to change things, reenergise tired processes and fix things that haven't worked well throughout the year.  So, without further discourse, let me hand you over to the Mystery Podcast Voice for this week's question. This week's question comes from Jan. Jan asks: Hi Carl, I've seen you mention your end of year clean up in your blog posts in the past but I've never seen or heard you describe what you do. Could you explain your process for cleaning things up? Hi Jan, thank you for your question. My end of year clean up has become a bit of a ritual for me now. It's something I enjoy doing because I am not working in the sense of creating content, instead I am doing a lot of sitting around and TV watching, not something I do at anything other time of the year. It's relaxing and my mind isn't “on” in the sense of thinking what to create next. So, where do I start?  The first step for me is to do a review of all the apps I am using. The goal here is to eliminate apps I am not using. That means evaluating the usefulness of the apps I have on my computer, phone and iPad.  Through the year I will test a few apps to see what everyone is talking about. In the past, I've had apps like Notion, Obsidian, Things 3 and OneNote on my computer and as they didn't make the cut, so to speak, I deleted them.  This year, I will be happily removing all the COVID apps I installed, I noticed these were still hanging around on a “just in case” basis. But as Korea is no longer doing test and trace and we can travel without the need for a PCR test, I can remove these.  I should point out if you do this exercise, once you've cleared all these apps, your computer, phone and tablets feel faster. I'm sure there's no difference, but it does feel faster.  Next is to go into my workhorse apps and clean them up. I usually start with Todoist because this is the easiest one to clean up. With the Time Sector System, the folder you want to be paying attention to is your Long-term and on-hold folder. This folder can easily become a dumping ground and the end of the year is a good time to go in there and delete tasks you know you're not going to be doing.  For tasks that have been sitting in there for a while but you feel you will still likely want to do them, you can move them out of your task manager and create a project note or add them to a list of tasks you want to do in the future but require further planning out, again in your notes.  Then it's time to go into my notes. Now for me, this year is going to be a difficult one. This is the year I will be making a decision on whether to relegate Evernote to being a storage app and go all in on Apple Notes. Now, the reason for this change of approach with Evernote is because Evernote is going in a direction that will not support how I use notes. That's not a criticism of Evernote, I feel Evernote is doing brilliantly. However for me, I want my notes app to be simple with as few features as possible. When an app has too many features, the temptation to play around with formatting, colours and setups is too much for me. I spend more time playing than doing and that does nothing for my productivity.  Apple Notes, on the other hand, is simple, has great search features and works across all my devices. The test size is readable (while Evernote on my phone and iPad is too small for me to read comfortably), and it does the job I want a notes app to do with little fuss.  Throughout the year, if you are using a notes app properly, you will have collected a lot of notes that you no longer need. These need to be deleted (or archived). I love this purge. It almost acts as a review of my year. I go through my folders, clearing our old notes and making sure the titles and any tags I am using for the notes I keep are relevant and searchable.  This step is important. The search features on our computers are very powerful these days, and saves us a lot of time when looking for a note. If you haven't learned how to use the system search on your devices, that's something I highly recommend you do. It will save to a lot of time.  It during this clean up process when you will also see ways where you can improve your structure. If you've read Tiago Forte's Building A Second Brain book this year, a book I would highly recommend, you may want to implement some of the principles in that book at this stage.  Now while you cleaning up your task manager and notes app, you want to be asking yourself: “how can I do it better?”. We want to be building seamless and effective systems, and there's always room for improvement. If you remember the principles of COD—Collect, Organise, Do—you want to be asking yourself how you can improve your collecting process and how you can reduce the time it takes you to organise what you collect so you can spend more time doing the work.  The more time you spend in your task managers and notes apps, the less time you spend doing the work. So ask yourself, where can you speed up the process?  The final step to the end-of-year clean up is to go into the folders where you store your documents. Now, this is often the hardest part of the process because, over the year, we will have accumulated a lot of documents that either we no longer need or can be archived.  I use an external hard drive to move files and documents I no longer need. This helps to keep my computer's drive clean and also reduces the need for more space in my cloud storage services.  I would also recommend you go into your Documents folder on your computer. We often download PDFs and other documents here and then forget about them. Clean that out.  Once you've cleared everything up, now it's time for the fun part. Asking yourself how you can improve your system. Again, what we are looking for here is speed. How can we get faster at finding our stuff? Researching your device's search tips and tricks is a great way to do this. I've learned so much by watching YouTube videos on learning how to get the most out of Apple's Spotlight (and optimising it to work better for me).  The point of this exercise is to get your systems ready for the new year. You don't want to be going into the new year with slow, unwieldy systems. Starting the new year with a clean set-up not only speeds everything up, but it also sets you up for a fantastic year.  The final part of this process is to look for bumps in the road where your system isn't working too well. I find these bumps are usually in your task managers. Your task manager needs to tell you what you should be working on today. Everything else in there is simply holding pens for tasks you don't need to do today, or you have not yet decided when you will do them.  How can you best set this up so when you go into your task manager to see what needs to happen today, you can see instantly what your objective tasks are—the tasks that must be done today?  And now for the bonus. In recent years, I have taken to using the end-of-year break to go through my calendar to see how I can better optimise my week, so I get to spend more time doing the things I love doing. From spending more quality time with my family to being more consistent with exercise.  For 2023, the area I want to improve is my sleep. I am a terrible sleeper, and I need to be more consistent with this. So, one of my objectives is to redesign my week, so I have a cut-off time each day—a time I need to switch off my computer and a time I need to be in bed.  If you have followed my tip to design your perfect week, you can turn on this calendar and see how you can merge this with your actual week. To give you an example, I want to better use the mornings for creative work. I am at my most creative in the morning and a lot less so in the afternoons. I can block time out on my calendar for writing and recording and push off all my meetings to the afternoon or later in the morning. I understand not all of you have complete control over your calendar. But you likely have more control than you think. Blocking time out now means other people cannot schedule meetings when you could be getting on with your focused work. Try it. It might just work. If it doesn't, then you can go back to the drawing board and rethink your strategy here.  So, there you go, Jan. I hope that has helped and I also hope you get some time over the Christmas break to play with this. The key is to not put pressure on yourself to do this. It needs to be fun. I like to sit with my parents in the evenings and while they watch their favourite TV shows, I can be getting on and cleaning things up.  As this exercise is fun, I can be present when we are talking and while they are consumed in the TV show. I can be cleaning up.  Thank you for your question, and thank you for listening. It just remains for me now to wish you all a very very productive week.   

Relay FM Master Feed
Connected 427: Therapy for an Apple Blogger

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 61:37


Myke has returned and has feelings about recent developments on the show. After Myke tries to punish Stephen with a set of quiz questions, Federico explores Obsidian's new Canvas feature.

Daily
Craft vs Obsidian

Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 9:44


Capítulo 2252 en el que pongo frente a frente a dos de las apps más relevantes del momento: Obsidian y Craft.Espero tus comentarios en Twitter @emilcar o en los canales privados de Weekly en Discord. ¿Que no estás en Weekly? Apúntate ya en https://emilcar.fm/weekly

Ruminate Podcast
156 - For Listeners Only

Ruminate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 22:49


Baguettes and Obsidian.Robb's BaguetteGetting Started with Obsidian (plugins, templates, folders, and more) - YouTubeObsidianIntroduction - The IntersectApple Announces Upcoming Apple Music Sing Feature - MacStoriesCARROT Weather 5.9: A Robot Relationship and Layouts - MacStoriesPixelmator Pro 3.2 Moves into Video Editing - MacStoriesInternet Radio App Broadcasts Has a Fresh New Look, Improved Search, Shazam Integration, and More - MacStories

Connected
427: Therapy for an Apple Blogger

Connected

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 61:37


Myke has returned and has feelings about recent developments on the show. After Myke tries to punish Stephen with a set of quiz questions, Federico explores Obsidian's new Canvas feature.

Parts Department
34 - Note Taking Nirvana

Parts Department

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 43:34


The guys talk get into note-taking, Zettelkasten, Obsidian. Normal stuff too like Fusion 360, 3D Printing and CNC's.Watch on YoutubeDISCUSSED:✍️ Send Comments on this EpisodeDiscuss on Show SubredditPlease note: Show notes contains affiliate links.World CupFusion 360 Apocalyptic Prepping - Project ArchiverBenchmarking Fusion 360Journaling ExperienceZettelkasten.de / Obsidian.mdPrusa Layer Shifts are Back ☹️Just Make PartsFB Ad SuccessSUPPORT THE SHOWBecome a Patreon - Get the Secret ShowReview on Apple Podcast Share with a FriendShow InfoShow WebsiteContact Jem & JustinTiktok | YoutubeHOSTSJem FreemanCastlemaine, Victoria, AustraliaLike ButterMore LinksJustin BrouillettePortland, Oregon, USAPDX CNCNackMore Links

This Week In Video Games
114: Pokemon Scarlet, Pentiment and Somerville

This Week In Video Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 51:02


This week I've been playing Pokemon Scarlet, a technical mess of a game, that still manages to bring the Pokemon magic. I've also been playing Pentiment from Obsidian, in this 16th-century narrative adventure. Season of Plunder is finishing in Destiny 2, so I'll bring you my thoughts on the current state of the game, plus I've been playing Somerville too. 00:00 Introduction 04:06 Pokemon Scarlet review 15:23 Pnetiment review 21:07 Somerville review 25:03 Charts 26:09 Latest Video Game News 34:19 Season of Plunder review (Destiny 2) 46:44 Coming soon RELATED LINKS Support This Week In Video Games through Patreon by becoming a member https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinvideogames Check out the MERCH store https://this-week-in-video-games-store.creator-spring.com/ Subscribe to This Week In Video Games YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyIiL5xk1ut5HY6pPnBUXlQ Rate & Review the podcast https://ratethispodcast.com/thisweekinvideogames More ways to listen https://anchor.fm/this-week-in-video-games https://gopod.me/thisweekinvideogames Music by Christian Hounslow and Jaya McQuaid.

History N' Games
History N' Games Episode 28 (Pentiment Review)

History N' Games

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 10:09


Obsidian's Pentiment is a game full of amazing historical facts, but is it a good game to PLAY? Let's discuss! Support the show

Waypoint Radio
Episode 526 - A Post-Thanksgiving Feast (Featuring: Obsidian)

Waypoint Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 175:28


While recovering from stuffing ourselves, we figured we'd stuff your ears with an extra long podcast! Patrick spent the break disappointed by Somerville, a game with an interesting opening but less intriguing gameplay. Rob's getting down in the muck with WRC Generations, the final game before the license goes to Codemasters. Then, Rob interviewed Obsidian's CEO Feargus Urquhart about the studio's rocky past, transition into Microsoft, and burnout. Then, we close out with a Thanksgiving-sized dip into the Question Bucket.Discussed: Sommerville 17:01, Midnight Suns 26:36, WRC Generations 32:09, FTC to possibly block Activision - Microsoft Merger 42:50, Interview with Feargus Urquhart 56:27, The Question Bucket 1:55:31 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The MinnMax Show
2022's Game Of The Year Debate: The Prologue

The MinnMax Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 125:48


Welcome back to The MinnMax Show podcast! On this episode, Ben Hanson is joined by Kyle Hilliard, Janet Garcia, Jeff Marchiafava, Sarah Podzorski, and Leo Vader to set the stage for our 2022 Game of the Year debate by suggesting games other folks should check out. Then we talk about the incredible historical work done with the Atari 50 collection, Obsidian's bold take with Pentiment, and why Kyle loves Pentiment. Then we're joined by generous Extra Life donor CalamityNolan from the community to help answer questions submitted on Patreon and award the iam8bit question of the week. You can support MinnMax on Patreon and help us hit our goal here - https://www.patreon.com/minnmax You can watch and share the video version here - https://youtu.be/BCkq7YPOuFQ Help support MinnMax's supporters! https://mintmobile.com/minnmax https://www.iam8bit.com - Promo Code: CORNBREADCASSEROLE You can check out Nolan's work here. http://sillyseance.com/ To jump to a particular discussion, check out the timestamps below... 00:00:00 - Intro 00:02:45 - Preparing for The Game Of The Year debate 00:39:04 - Atari 50: The Anniversary Celebration 00:45:52 - Pentiment 00:53:15 - Somerville 01:05:12 - Thanking MinnMax's biggest supporters 01:09:34 - Community questions 01:55:24 - Get A Load Of This Leo's GALOT - https://www.reddit.com/r/nucleuscoop/comments/opu0eg/list_of_nucleus_coop_supported_games/ Janet's GALOT - https://baronfig.com/products/gather-review-journal Hanson's GALOT - https://youtu.be/i3IOWaVDbx0 Nolan's GALOT - https://nyunews.com/news/2022/11/01/adjunct-union-tentative-contract-nyu/, Community GALOT - https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2022/11/shigeru-miyamoto-creator-of-super-mario-and-zelda-at-nintendo-turns-70 Follow us on Twitch - https://www.twitch.tv/minnmaxshow Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/minnmax Watch our solo stream archives - https://bit.ly/3vRAQbi Support us on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/minnmax Buy MinnMax merch here - https://minnmax.com/merch Follow us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/minnmaxshow Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/minnmaxshow Go behind the scenes on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/minnmaxshow Become a Game Champion by supporting MinnMax at the $50 tier on Patreon and lock in the game of your choice! https://www.patreon.com/minnmax Age of Mythology - Jesse Joxstrap Brown-Baldock Duck Game - RabidLime Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords - Logan Krause Ghost of Tsushima - ProcyonNumber6 Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective - Christopher Walton Kitbashers United - Games.archor.com Electroplankton - Divorced Cougar Marvel Vs Capcom 2 - Jawarhello Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast - Starkiller Hotel Dusk: Room 215 - Joe Dean Marvel Snap - PrettyGoodPrinting.com Illusion of Gaia - Spider_Dan Diablo II - Otsego12 Burnout 2: Point of Impact - Clayton Myers Bayonetta 3 - Patrick Polk Eternal Sonata - Clemens Zobel Disaster: Day of Crisis - DominicCichocki

Kinda Funny Xcast - An Xbox Podcast
Pentiment's Success Story w/ Josh Sawyer - Kinda Funny Xcast Ep. 116

Kinda Funny Xcast - An Xbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 65:59


Mike and Gary are joined by Obsidian's Josh Sawyer to talk about their newly released Pentiment, history, and the Fallout franchise! Time Stamps - 00:00:00 - Start 00:01:00 - Josh Sawyer Is here! 00:03:30 - Housekeeping 00:05:30 - Josh Sawyer on Pentiment 00:33:09 - Ads 00:36:15 - The First Announcement & Finding Success 00:43:16 - The RPG Elements 00:52:52 - Josh's Future & Viewer Questions!

Waypoint Radio
Episode 523 - The Year of the Narrative Banger Continues with 'Pentiment'

Waypoint Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 146:22


One podcast, extra large, coming right up! It's Pentiment release week and we've got a hankering for some 16th century murder mysteries! First up Rob talks to Obsidian's Josh Sawyer and Adam Brennecke about working at Obsidian, dealing with crunch, and of course Pentiment. Then Rob and Ren go deep on their experience with the game so far, and just how deep they've been hooked. Patrick and Cado join in for a dip in the Question Bucket that has us imagining a different world, one where maybe open world design didn't follow its current trajectory. Finally, Patrick and Rob couldn't wait until next week, so enjoy a mini-Sports! Update as the Bears are, maybe, possible, actually back.Discussed: Interview with Josh Sawyer and Adam Brennecke 1:23, Pentiment 36:35, Question Bucket 1:38:44, Sports! 2:05:29 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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Episode 596: Turkey Legs in the Renaissance

Back to Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 77:00


DISCUSSED: Merlin is playing with his new dingus; Dan almost talks about wallets; try Tailscale to make your stuff work better together; why you (yes, you) need a VPN; Dan is getting enthused about Obsidian; Merlin is freshly re-enthused about Daytum; and finally Dan is very excited about a Dracula he saw.