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Company initiated by an entrepreneur to develop a scalable economic model

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Latest podcast episodes about startups

B2B Mentors
Flashback Friday to Episode ONE of B2B Mentors - Connor's Curiosities #034

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:03


Today: Interview with my own father!? Nerd out on some B2B marketing? You got it! Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Strong Suit Podcast
Meet the Guru of SaaS & Leadership (Recruit Rockstars 429)

Strong Suit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:41


If you lead a SaaS company, you likely know Dan Martell, as the Founder & CEO of SaaS Academy. But even if you're in a different industry, Dan has a ton to teach about how to scale your business. Fast. Because he's built & exited 5 companies. Most noteworthy, Dan was Founder & CEO of Clarity.fm which connects business leaders with experts in any field (I'm a customer). It was successfully acquired by Startups.co Now, Dan is Founder & CEO of SaaS Academy. He coaches & teaches over 1,000 Founders to become high-performance leaders (…although much of what he teaches is relevant to any business.) Dan began his career as a software developer. But his passion (and gift) is leadership, strategy, culture, and communications. Plus as a native of British Columbia, Canada, he's just nice as heck. In this 20-minute conversation, Dan reveals how he's scaled his companies and how he teaches other leaders to do the same.

This Week in Startups - Audio
Coinbase chases NFT billions + Peter Thiel “The Contrarian” with author Max Chafkin | E1305

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 100:54


First, Jason covers Coinbase's announcement of their new NFT platform (2:06). Then, Bloomberg's Max Chafkin joins to discuss his book, "The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley's Pursuit of Power" (19:57). It's a wide-ranging discussion about Peter's life, business, and politics as well as a debate over the way Max framed him in the book.

Jane Hamill | Podcast
Fashion Startup Story: Tione Tall HQ

Jane Hamill | Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:47


I'm crazy excited to introduce you to another badass entrepreneur today and let her tell you her Startup Story. I found today's guest, Tionne Young of Tall HQ, on Instagram when she was doing an Instagram live. I'd seen her company before, but she did this live that just grabbed my heart. On today's podcast, she'll tell you the story and what's going on with her business.  Tionne has always wanted to be in fashion and kept telling people "I want to have my own clothing brand." She's a tall girl with a classic style and shopping was always a nightmare. She was always having problems finding clothes for that expressed her personality.  During lockdown, Tionne decided not to sit around, moping. She decided it was the time to take action and start living her dream by designing her own line for tall women. Now, she's in the middle of her launch and things are not going as planned. Let's just say she's totally kicking ass and taking names anyway.  Tionne is so brave and honest in this interview and I think you'll all learn a ton about what it's like to start your own business. Check it out: fashionbrainacademy.com/tione/

Equity
Coinbase goes fishing for Opensea's catch

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:18


This week was one of our strongest shows yet, with a wide diversity of news items that were genuinely fun (and complicated) to chew through. And even though we started off kind of grumpy, we laughed through tech difficulties, crypto puns, and fintech CAC. It's called coping.Here's what we got into:Magic Leap raised $500 million about which we have thoughts, Mindbody's acquisition of ClassPass caught our eye for obvious reasons (and the fact that it also raised $500 million), and we dug into SoWork's fascinating business proposition.mPharma and the race to horizontal, holistic mental health: Telehealth is great and useful but no panacea. However, in the realm of mental health it's potentially life-changing for millions.OpenSea went from being one of the main characters in our fraud show, to being the underdog that we're rooting for - now that Coinbase is building a copycat.Since we tried to keep the show tight, a ton of news was left on the cutting room floor. The good news, though, is that we're back tomorrow with a spicy bonus episode about Microsoft pulling LinkedIn from the Chinese market. Oof.

FounderQuest
Hook Relay Launched! Was it Fireworks or Crickets?

FounderQuest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:29


Show notes:Links:Hook RelaySSL Server TestSecond brand marketing tips Twitter thread XhtmlchopHook Relay Twitter announcementHook Relay blog announcementDerrick Reimer & Corey Haines Product Hunt launch Startup Director List Indie Hackers launch repeatedly Not very accurate auto-generated transcript:Ben - you know, last week I recorded a quick little message talking about why we weren't recording our podcast. That was in the middle of the let's encrypt ssl certificate fiasco that swept across the internet and you know, at the time it really didn't feel like a huge problem. Uh like from our perspective there wasn't much of an impact, but there was some impact, but then later on that day and the next day I was reading some articles and like apparently it was a pretty big deal for a lot of people. So uh yeah, wasn't wasn't just us, it's one Josh - of those things like I could just kept seeing it more and more like just pop up in random places though to like, not, not necessarily in our world, but it was just like affected all kinds of different things. Ben - Yeah, yeah, so shout out to ssL labs for their ssl testing tool to put a link to that in the show notes. Whenever you have a question about your ssl you should check that first because it does tell you when, when things are bad. Josh - Yeah, I hadn't used that tool before and it was very very helpful on customer support. Especially like sending to people and we needed to like prove that we were, we were not at fault like you know, it gave us like a smoking gun that we could. Yeah. Yeah. Really great. Starr - That's always a weird thing to do in customer services and it's like um it's like no, actually like I found the line in the library you mentioned. That's actually the problem. It does everything to do with this. Yeah. Yeah. And then um and then facebook goes down so I'm thinking I'm thinking we are like, like spooky Tober is starting up like things are starting to get witchy. Josh - I kind of like I I was like checked out the day facebook went down so I like missed most of like the fun on whatever online and I guess on what the other social networks that didn't go down, twitter mostly. But yeah, that's kind of wild. The story that I at least what I picked up. Yeah, I'm not on facebook. So Starr - my favorite part is how they house since everything was tied together, they couldn't get access to the building. They have the servers to do the like you know, manual physical reset then you had to do Josh - because of that security. Starr - Yeah. Like that's like I don't know that. It seems like it's out of some sort of movie or something. Yeah. It's just like a comedy. Josh - They like accidentally deleted their private keys to the building or something. Starr - Yeah. Or maybe like in oceans  type movie where um like they like the crew does that like the cruise like well if we mess with their DNS records and they'll be locked out of the hotel for six hours, let's give us time to like airlift the loot out. Josh - Yeah. Or what about like just like mission impossible. But with nerds. Uh huh. You know like trying to break into the building. Starr - I mean that's what we are here at found requests aren't right. Mission impossible with. Starr - Okay. Um So in addition to all that um just terrible stuff happening, there was um some good stuff happened. We had our, you know we have the hook relay, we did a little launch to our user base or honey badger user base. Um Do you wanna talk about that a little bit? Ben - Yeah that was that was the day before the ssl problem. So Josh - that was it. Yeah that's maybe that's why I was like the details. I was like trying to like remember what I did last week or whatever and I was like I could and then I remembered I'm like how did I forget about the hook really launch. But yeah, maybe that's I spent the next day, like on support. Ben - Yeah, yeah. Unfortunately, who really was impacted by the ssl thing. And so like, the day after our launch day, we had to deal with the on fire kind of situation. But you know, props to kevin very quickly finding that issue and fixing it. And uh, it's nice to have, you know, the service, uh, deployment that we have, pushing it out was quick. That was that was nice. But yeah, we, we were able Josh - to help some people on twitter because we, uh, we did some crowd sourced troubleshooting and yeah, we're able to share our fix with a few friends. So that was heroes. Hopefully we Starr - were, hopefully we think people like you for everyone. Ben - Yeah, but I think think the launch went well. We had an email out to our, to leveling up mailing list and got a pretty good response right on that. We had put a banner up and on the, on the website and put a banner up on the app. And those had some pretty good click throughs as well. I'm just looking at the stats from Fathom this morning and yeah, it's a good good share of traffic from those sources. So it's nice to see that people care enough to click through and zero working on that was pretty cool. Josh - Yeah, because I think, I think like the, uh, it was, I felt pretty encouraged by just the, you know, the level of engagement that we got from, from everything, like it seems like, I mean the worst that could happen is like you put out the, you know, you put out everything that's just crickets, like, you know, and so yeah, I mean people signed up, we got some sign ups and we started, I mean like we've our support and feature request throughput has increased for sure on like from almost zero to something. So, you know, we got, we got some feature requests coming in, that's that's all good. Starr - Alright. I suppose we should mention what hook really is and why people should be interested in it. Um since, yeah, that's some people might want to know, Ben - are you gonna tell the star what it is? Oh, I, I mean, I'm trying to find out Starr - your, well, uh, I'm on the edge of my Ben - seat over here. Starr - There you go. I don't know. Hook relay is an enterprise level Blockchain analysis tool. It's not love it, look really uh, lets you have um, web hooks that are, you know, as high quality of stripes. Web looks like very high quality, very fully featured and just like a couple of minutes without much code or work. And um yeah, and honey badger. We have a lot of, you know, web hooks that go out and stuff and we use that for all of ours, I think right now for some of them at least. And yeah, so so that's what it is. Ben - Yeah, great for debugging and in the past week I've been doing a little side project that has inbound web books and so uh since I don't have it's launched yet, it's been handling my inbound web books for me and just storing them so I can go back and you play the we play the payloads against my uh my test instance. And uh there's a there's a button in hickory. They that I think I think kevin added, which I'm totally in love with now it's the copy as curl button. And so I can just click that button and dropping my terminal and boom, now I have a curl payload that I can send to my my dove, you know, server great. Starr - So you can be so so the the thing you're working on the like you can just like go do other things and will collect your inbound web hooks like just like your Jeffrey Bezos or something like you could be on the beach um doing whatever you want and then just um yeah, then just copy the curl Ben - you got it. Yeah. And then and then even better once I do launch, I would just add my production U. R. L. As the hook relay in point and then we'll actually start delivering them. So I want to change anything with that web provider that's sitting in the stuff right? Josh - Doesn't have as replay to right, Like if you if you have a bunch, can we do we do that add or? Yeah there Ben - is a re send button so you can okay you can send it again. Josh - So like for local development you could also like pointed out like an end rock like to your local host or something and replacing my books or something if you wanted to do if you wanted to do it in real time. Right? Yeah, Starr - that's cool. Yeah, pretty heavy. Josh - Maybe we should make like a like a hook relay native End Rock. They just like, you know, you can spin up your hook directly to your local host or something. That would be kind of cool. Ben - I had the same thought this morning. Yeah like stripe provides you a cli tool that will listen to their web hooks and then relate it to your local instance while you're developing. I'm like oh yeah, we should have the same thing really. So they can just listen to your endpoint and suck it down and replay it for you with it on the feature list. Josh - Yeah I do. Starr - I mean what's there? There is a danger here though that like if you make it too easy for people like they might not feel like they're being productive or like they really bring much value. Like if you make it also turnkey for developers and so easy. Like the developer just might be like what what am I even here for What's my job? Josh - You wouldn't feel like a hacker anymore. Starr - No, no, like that's something we've got to watch out for as we move forward boldly. Josh - Well how do you like write some like assembly code for a capture or something? Mhm. Josh - So yeah, we got a lot of the ideas for the uh hook relay uh launched a honey badger customers through a tweet that I had sent out a few weeks before just asking like like what's the best way to um launch for, you know, for what company with one product to launch another product and let their existing customers. No, and ah asking twitter is always, I mean it's usually helpful at least in our indie hacker space, everyone's always got ideas so we got a lot of good ideas from people there um including I think one of, one of the ideas was like depending how far along we are, like, you know, do you make a separate brand or like how do you like, like how does it change the, like the parent company, you know, if you're moving from, Josh - You know, a one product company to multiple products. That's all, that's all interesting. We opted just, you know, we're kind of like honey badger is the company and then it's hook relay by honey badger, I think it's kind of our our approach there but there's a lot of different ways you can do it. Ben - Yeah the one the one snag on that has been the other day. I was poking around in stripe and I was looking at the email setting options. They have, you can, you know, have stripes and emails when a payment fails for example and then it points them back to a payment collection page. I was like, yeah, we should have that, it's like click the button to turn it on and I preview the email and the, it's based on the business name. So uh it says oh honey badger industries LLC, you know, payment page or whatever. And I was like, well people who are hungry customers aren't really going to recognize that name necessarily. Uh so I Ben - can't have that. And so I went dug around the stripe settings and it's like, well you can't really do anything but the actual business name on that particular page, even though on the end of stripe settings you can set the credit card like, you know, that shows up on the actual payment thing, you can change that and uh so that's set in our case to hook dot gov but you can't change the the email header from to be something different from the business name and well we haven't registered cookery they as a business name because it's like yeah, it's just a, it's just a product, right? So I didn't feel comfortable changing that in stripe because like, well it's really not our business name so I think what can you Josh - do like a D. B. A. Or something? Yeah. Ben - Yeah that's what I thought it's like, well I guess perhaps it's time to register that? D be a for every day so I can actually change the business name and blah blah. Josh - Yeah. It's kind of exciting though, like all the all these, you know, new problems come up, but it's because we have this new product that has to become more official. So um we're like we were also talking about like like now that we actually have some people using it, we're gonna need a way to like notify them of changes to the product or improvements or you know, all the all the little infrastructure things that we have for honey badger that we haven't quite gotten around to yet on hook relay. Mm Ben - Yeah, these are nice, nice things to deal with as opposed to like crickets. Josh - Yeah. Ben - So glad that somebody showed up to actually use the app. Nice. Josh - So next up for hook relay is this quarter, we've decided to do some uh spend some additional time on product development and implement some of those feature requests. I think that should be uh should be a good time. Ben - Yeah, I think I think we have a backlog of like  or so items and in good health, so I think we have plenty of stuff that we could keep us busy for the next few months on a greeting. It's cool. Starr - Yeah and you were talking about taking a, um, and sort of multi lunch approach, right? We just got out of always been watching. Yeah, always be launching. So we're going to just have from now on every episode of this podcast, we're just gonna launch really, I'm gonna make people explain what it is. Uh, Josh - next week is show hacker news. Starr - Yeah. Yeah. So I guess at some point like you have to just call these things campaigns and instead of launches, but it feels very dynamic to call them launches. Josh - Yeah. Well you got to call him a launch. Like for the sake of the whatever platform you're your campaign is speaking to because you know, you got to make them feel special first. It's the launch for them. It's, you know, it's, it's for them. It's, it's a, you know, it's the first launch ever. I've never heard of us before, I'm sure. Starr - Oh, that makes sense. It's like you're launching the campaign, Josh - right? Yes, you're launching the campaign. So I think we'll probably be doing, I will do a show H N. And we'll do a, we'll probably do something with indie hackers at some point. I imagine. Um, there's a list, I, I saw a list somewhere, I'll take it if I can find it, but just a list of like all those little, like all those, like a big list of platforms basically like that that you can, you know, forearms basically. But Ben - yeah, you know, we should go, we should go old school and we should do regional launches. Like I used to work for a company where it was very much local and so like every, every few months would be a new city. We're gonna send the crew, we're gonna set up stuff and we're gonna launch in this city. So we should totally do that. Like we should start and of course here in the Seattle area and then branch out to California and then you move across the country and you're saying Josh - we're gonna do a national tour. Starr - Does that mean you like, can we get a bus, you lock access based on geo location? A very p Ben - it's like, yeah, sorry, we're not in your area yet. Please check Josh - back. Mhm. Ben - Please sign up to be notified when we're in your area. Starr - Nice. Josh - Well if we do regional launches, we might have to have regional managers. Oh, you know, I gotta think about your chart. Mhm. Josh - Yeah. So I think like the launch, you know, there's a lot of small places you can kind of launch to. Um, I think the big one that is on our um, on our radar is product cut. But I think we're quite, you know, based on the advice, we've heard about doing an effective like initial product launch. It sounds like maybe it would be better to polish polish the product hops and feedback feedback about it. Maybe like be a little bit more established or something. Um it just seems like the, the products lately that have been really had really successful product launches have been, have had like um they put were like a lot of work into the actual like launch campaign Josh - before products like had a video and some of them almost seem like Kickstarter quality type campaigns or something, I don't know how over the top we're going to go, but I think that the current plan is to uh you know, kind of do some of the smaller things and implement some feedback and start to, you know, we might we're planning on doing like a redesign of the website eventually um with what we learn, so um then you have a designer in progress I think Ben - Yeah, three years. Yeah, yeah, first I guess it's the first time we've had an external designer working on one of our products, so we have a we have Josh - someone do, we had someone do the honey badger website at one point started, I think you did yeah, yeah, way back, I thought that was all star Starr - um now I built it, I built the html but I built it based off of uh like pds or something. Ben - Yeah, well this time it's being built so it's even more hands off, that's nice uh someone reached out to me on twitter and uh we mentioned a few episodes ago that we were getting this design done and I didn't know at the time what kind of built was option we had, whether it's going to be a tailwind, which is what our new hotness these days that we love or is going to be something else and it's going to be something else going to bootstrap, but even bootstraps as long as as long as we can modify it, that's that's my thing. Like, I remember back and way, way back in the day before a bootstrap when we were doing, you know, freelancing for people, we would get those designs from the designers and it would be a PSD Ben - right? And then I had no, no way to really deal with that. And so I would send it off to this chop chop shot. Yeah. X. Html shop I think was the name of the business, I think they're still around even and and they would they would take the PSD and convert it into html and CSS, which was, you know, of questionable quality I guess. I mean it worked, but it's like, oh, it's ugly, like just like I don't ever want to touch that and uh and being able to actually have like a designer give you html CSS and it's actually going to be, you know, structured like in the same way because it's based on a framework like Duceppe like that's that's awesome. That's much as Josh - an alternate, like tabs and spaces. Mhm Ben - Yeah, the good old days Starr - they just wanted to keep you on your toes josh. Josh - I remember, yeah, I used to do why I didn't do, I wasn't a chop shop, but I used to, you know, implement my own Photoshop, um, yeah, designs and html and stuff and yeah, that was, that was fun. Like getting all the pixel dimensions and the, you know, in your overall Photoshop layout, piecing it all together. Kind of like, it's kind of like a puzzle. Like you're putting a puzzle together. Starr - Yeah. I mean they called it a chop shop because like it was, they made a lot of, they made big use of the slice tool in Photoshop. Josh - Yeah. Starr - Where you basically, you basically went in and you know, you couldn't do CSS borders or drop shadows or anything like that. I mean, I guess you could do borders but not like nice. They didn't have rounded corners. They didn't drop shadows, anything like that. And so, um, you basically had to go and like tell Photoshop like, okay, like, like you could you tell it to split up the image in these parts and then like, you know, leave make this middle sort of a place for you to put some html so you can put stuff in the middle of your box and then, I don't know, it was just, it was not the best and so a lot of that bad. Html and CSS was, I mean, I imagine a lot of it was auto generated. Yeah. Josh - Yeah. Yeah. There were even some, some tools just to like that, you know, you kind of like dry your borders and stuff and fill out, I don't know, like fill out some stuff in the app and then it just like generates the html page for you. And that was always like the worst, like the absolute worst thing you could go with. But you know, it, I guess the people's standards weren't as high in those days either. So you could get away with a lot, Starr - I guess not. Josh - But yeah, we'll, uh, we'll get to product hunt eventually. And uh, yeah, I guess if if you as a listener have a tip for us on how to get a good product launch, go and let us know. Um, and also we will hopefully involve, um, we're gonna want to like bring in our networks to this, I think eventually. So, uh, yeah, I hope that all of our listeners will, um, will help us when the time comes to, uh, to have a good product launch with lots of up votes and, you know, telling your friends and whatnot. Ben - And, and maybe we could even get one of our listeners who might be interested in a half a particular talent for doing a product promotion. Like we could even just hand out to someone and say, hey, go go do that for us. Josh - Yeah, that would be, that would be nice too. Because then we wouldn't have to do it ourselves. Yeah, like a product consultant. Ben - Exactly, there's gotta be some out there, I mean product has been around long enough now, there's got to be specialists. Right? Josh - Yeah. Well isn't that kind of uh Cory Haynes helped derek with for the cow? Right. Yeah. Yeah, Ben - I'm sure Corey is really busy, so if someone wants to be like Corey do that for us, that would be totally awesome. Josh - We just need a we just need a guru. Ben - I was surprised on the day I signed up for the uh product hunt rss feed, I put that in my news reader and I was I mean I've seen you know probably things on twitter from time to time and I click through and I look at stuff but I never really followed closely, I was surprised how many launches there are products on every day, There's a lot there, so I think you really got to stand out in some way to be able to mix them, get some head space because there's just a lot of competition for things on the products on, Josh - I gotta say like just the Indy hacker space, like not indie hackers dot com but like just the overall in the hacker community is just like wild lately, like I don't know about you but I feel like a total just like dinosaur. Um Like I feel like I've like like I'm becoming out of touch so I need to like I need to I probably need to pay a little more attention to like, you know what the what the new uh what the latest is? Starr - I think it's inevitable that you get out of touch, right? I mean that's that's why Josh - Yeah, but like people I don't I don't think there yet, like I don't I don't want to be there yet, I'm not ready for it start. Josh - Uh huh Ben - Yeah geriatric highly valued developers there we are Josh - now we're we're you know, we're getting back out there. We did our we did our Emma or any hackers Emma. Starr - Uh that's right Josh - yeah, we'll have to do it, we'll have to do some Amas for uh for relay to like all that sort of stuff. I just like that. I love that. Like it just think it seems like the ecosystem is just much, it's so much more developed than when we launched honey badger. There's so many more places to go, especially if you have a tool that appeals to like the, you know, developer, you know, I guess just developers and yeah Ben - and it feels like there's so many people in the community now who are, you know, identify in that group. Uh you know like there were three micro conferences in the past three weeks or four weeks right? There was to locals and then one in europe. So Uh that's just one indicator that there are a lot of people out there like us, you know definitely more than there were  years ago who are enjoying this life of building things and sell them to people. It's nice Josh - love. It's awesome. We should talk about um the Q one  marketing campaign that we have in the works for Hook really? Because I thought that was an interesting idea. The I guess I'll just say it the the idea, I think this was been your idea uh to basically we want we want to like try some marketing like you know, putting some dollars behind Hook really and see if we can actually generate some, you know new customers that way. And um we already have like a marketing budget and um like a bunch of you know ongoing relationships and campaigns and stuff that we run for honey badger. So the idea was to basically just like have a swap. Josh - Not I think we're gonna go with a quarter, not a month, like just basically try swapping out some of our advertisements for honey badger which are typically like um more like just kind of general awareness brand style. I'm like, you know, keep us top of mind sort of advertisements. Um you know like we do a lot of podcast ads and that sort of thing, newsletter sponsorships. So swap them out for a little while and just replace them with hook relay and uh you know, see how that goes um at this, you know, I guess a side benefit of that approach is that we we get to see what happens when we stop putting money into the honey badger advertising, which is always, I mean like that's a good experiment in its own like, Josh - you know, so I'm interested to see how that how that turns out both on both sides. Like you know, do we, do we lose any momentum with honey badger? Do we gain a lot of, you know, how much momentum do we gain with hook? Really? Ben - It feels like kind of like the pricing experiments that you're always nervous about doing because you don't know if you're going to like royally hose your business, you know, you won't and in our case you don't know for a while you have to let it play for a few months before you find out. Right. And so uh yeah, so switching the marketing like that feels like one of those experiments like well this could be really bad or it could be like there's no impact. And so it's like, oh well then maybe it's we re evaluate how we spend our marketing dollars for honey badger at that point, you know? So yeah, I'm pretty exciting, nervous and excited about trying that. Experiment Josh - my prediction. I'll make a prediction is that I don't I don't really think it's I don't I don't imagine it's going to uh have a huge impact on honey badger, like conversions and sign ups and all that at least not if we do, if we do like a quarter, I would all kind of be surprised if we see any difference if we, you know, as long as we resume at some point. Um Just because like a lot of our advertising and we just we really don't have like clear, you know, like clear objectives necessarily. It's more just like brand advertising. Like and we see we do see a lot of sign ups like Josh - of people coming to us because they heard us heard about us on a podcast, or they saw us in a newsletter, but it's not like click click through, it's not like a like pay per click or something or like click through this and you're gonna convert and we're going to track that. So I think like the it would be bad if we stopped advertising entirely for like a year or two because people forget about you. Like I think that's why we do advertising for the most part at this point, it's just like so people remember that we're here. Um and so that's my prediction is that I don't think we'll see a huge impact on honey badger. Um but I think that because no one knows about hook relay, it could potentially have a big impact for hook relay Starr - uh side now. Um you know, just all of it, all of our listeners, you all should really um you know, enable tracking on your browser's disable your ad blocks and that will make life a lot easier for us because we will be able to um, you know, track funnels a lot easier. So Josh - we can do, we can do marketing, do real marketing on the internet. Um we are using uh, we're using fathom on hook relay and they're like the privacy, whatever privacy first um analytics tool that a lot of people use these days and they're also indie hackers and I don't know, maybe twitter friends for some of us, but they're pretty cool. And uh, they have a feature that um, you can set up like a custom, like domain that like hosts, they're tracking scripts like, because it's all like GDR and like privacy compliant like by default. But even so like if they're added to like a ad blocker, you know, like tracking prevention thing, um you can't host on your own domain so that, you know, it's, it's, you're guaranteed to have accurate accurate results Ben - except for those people who are still using links as their browser, Josh - right? If they're using or Yeah, they're like if they're browsing from their terminal that or if they have javascript disabled. Um Yeah. You know, I mean, I guess if you're, if your audience, your Starr - richard Stallman, if your Josh - if your audience is Lennox, it's like arch Linux users, you're, you're kind of out a lot. Like no matter no matter what. Ben - Just, just put ads on on slash dot and call it a day. Yeah Starr - slash hot. That's that's a tragedy in that they really went downhill. Ben - They're still around though. Like one of the cockroaches of the internet last time is still there. I don't know. I haven't looked at it for years, but you know, but back when I was posting my code to source forge, I was reading slash out everyday Josh - source forage Starr - source for it for ages Josh - still there, isn't it? It's Starr - really hard to use. Ben - It's probably still there. I don't even know. Yeah. Josh - And that was two cows Ben - subversion instead of get we're just this this is the way back episode. We're going back to P. S. D. S. And S. V. N. And slash talk. Josh - Every episode is kind of the way back episode. I mean, yeah, we're way back founders. So Ben - I mean our our company name is now a vintage meme. So it's gotta be a way back. Yeah. Josh - All right, okay. I just got like we had a marketing meeting earlier and Ben Finley, our marketing manager was like looking at R. S. E. O. Performance. He's like, Like we we could improve our website if we if we like if we optimize the three MB Jeff on the home page. I'm like wait we have like a three, we have like a chip on the home page and I remembered I had like this easter egg that if you click like the resolve button in the, in like the screenshot of our, of honey badger on honey badger. Yo it well you can go and do it and you can see what happens. Um We'll make sure we leave it in even if we optimize it. But yeah, that's how we roll is like, we just like kill our search engine optimization. Because Josh - we had to have uh like, yeah, for the walls, we had to have this easter egg. Starr - That's awesome. Ben - Uh The the main thing reminded me that I have an interview being published tomorrow. I believe in Saas Mag at a link that in the show notes but had a great chat. Uh And it was funny because I was like, we were talking about humor and that's like one of our core values of the honey badger our business. And I was like, well, yeah, because like, I mean, we named our company after me, right? So like, you got to have fun in that kind of business, right? Josh - For sure. We should, we should like send out a leveling up email that just is designed to rick roll our customers. I don't know if they'd appreciate that. Starr - We should rename hook related berries and cream. Josh - Uh huh. Yeah, that's a that's creative. You can do that. I mean hook really is kind of like, very like business business formal descriptive. So we could, we could definitely get weirder Ben - for sure. Yeah, that was, that was not one of my more creative days when I picked that name. Josh - I mean the other, you know the upside is that it actually tells people what it does. It's instead of, it is not just named after a, after an animal joke on the internet. Ben - Yeah. Josh - Yeah. Um also it has a proper casing. Ben - Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's you know, one of the things that's funny, I have this I now for whenever we write anything, like we're doing any kind of copy or a blog post or whatever and if we ever reference get hub without the capital agent. And I always catch it now because because of how many people miss capitalized honey badger, like so I knowing how much that like I catch that. I was like, I bet they get how people really appreciate what people actually capitalize their name properly. So yeah, it's like six out to me all the time. Starr - Just for the listeners. The proper capitalization is one capital at the front because it's one word. It's not two words Ben - and go, Josh - yep. For honey badger. Starr - Yeah, yeah, sorry, not get up Josh - as uh two capital letters to capitals. Get lab. But I also now notice the companies that are like us where they have just, they have opted for the lower case in the second word as well. There's a few of those out there. I'm not remembering them off the top of my head, but they always stick out. I mean, I usually remember those now too if I'm familiar with them or I I know that I need to go check and I always go and like check when I'm writing their name at least usually. Starr - And then if you just want to, oh I'm sorry. And then just like if you just want to like just set the world on fire, you can be stripe and have your logo, your name of the logo, low, all lower case. But then in your body text capitalize it. Like they just want to watch the world burn. Uh huh. Ben - Oh, Ben - they're probably trying to punk the new york times editors, you know? Starr - Yeah, probably. Starr - Well, um we're getting a little quiet. Are we reaching the end? Ben - I think we are Josh - depends how far you want to go because I mean like we've got a whole list of topics here, but we are already into this episode of ways. And uh I think like this has been a pretty good episode, you know, it's it's for once. We've actually like managed to stay on topic for the most part. Like this has been mostly a hook really episode. So I think we should probably quit while we're ahead. All right now. And you better you better wrap this up quick start because I'm like, I'm ready to like Starr - dive in the rest of this. So you're about to explain this episode of founder class has been brought to you by hook relay a striped quality web hooks in minutes. That's awesome. Thank you. Uh, if you want to give us a review on Apple podcast, whatever they call it now, I don't know itunes, music to itunes. Um, please do that. If you want to. If you're just in writing for our blog, we are, you know, currently looking for um, ruby python, PHP writers. Um, go to our blog, honey badger to I.  slash blog and look for the request page. And yeah. All right. So I will talk to you guys next week. 

SODOM & CORONA - Der epidemische Pandemie-Podcast mit Niels Ruf & Gästen
PRINZ Pi liest heimlich die Woke * SODOM & CORONA #37

SODOM & CORONA - Der epidemische Pandemie-Podcast mit Niels Ruf & Gästen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 109:33


"Kann man denn da parken?" hatte er gefragt und als dass zufriedenstellend geklärt war, setzte sich Rap-Gigant PRINZ PI in einen seiner Ferraris und kam zu uns ins Ghetto geröhrt. Bei SODOM & CORONA spricht er über seine Autosammlung, seine Start-Ups, die Kindheit in der Steglitzer U-Boot-Siedlung und testet mit uns die Eistees von SHIRIN DAVID und CAPITAL BRA. Wird ihm WET PEACH oder BUSTY BLUEBERRY besser schmecken? Bevor wir dass erfahren, bedanken sich die PodCats aber endlich mal bei ihren Donators, hauen die versprochenen Shout-Outs raus, regen sich über COMEDIAN XY, PODCASTERIN YZ und Morddrohungen von bzw. an junge PolitikerInnen auf. Get in the Ferrari, Losers, wir fahren zum McDrive! * ⭕️ SODOM & CORONA UNTERSTÜTZEN https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=V6BLDWHWAPKRN (Ab 2o€ gibt's 'n Shout-Out - den Text bitte in den Verwendungszweck) * ⭕️ TEILNAHME AN DER VERLOSUNG DES IGOR PAASCH-WERKS Zur Teilnahme 10€ mit dem Betreff IGOR PAASCH bis zum 31.09.21 an: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=V6BLDWHWAPKRN Die Gewinner werden bis zum 15.10.21 bei SODOM & CORONA gezogen & benachrichtigt, alle Einnahmen werden den Opfern des Jahrhunderthochwassers gespendet. https://www.aktion-deutschland-hilft.de/de/hilfseinsaetze/hochwasser-2013/ * ⭕️ MATZES BUCH "CASTINGALLEE" KAUFEN https://www.herzstueckverlag.de/products/castingallee-fotografien-2004-bis-2009-von-matthias-david * ⭕️ PRINZ PI INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/prinzpi23/?hl=de * ⭕️ NIELS INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/nielsruf/?hl=de * ⭕️ MATZE INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/matthiasdavidphotographics/?hl=de *

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
An Obscenely Simple Way to Boost Time On-Site 25 percent #1888

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:49


In episode #1888, Neil and Eric talk about an obscenely simple way to boost time on site by 25 percent. We discuss how to use video and audio content to add value to your blog posts, whether it's footage you've created or content from a relevant creator. Tune in today! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today's topic: An Obscenely Simple Way to Boost Time On-Site 25 percent. [00:30] Adding videos and audio to your blog post has a significant impact on time spent on site. [00:47] You can either use your own video content or use relevant videos from another content creator. [02:11] That's it for today! [03:24] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information or call us on 310-349-3785! Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro   Leave Some Feedback:   What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.   Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu    

Career Crashers
DJH 140: Corporate Job or Startup Job?

Career Crashers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:40


Let's be real, most corporate jobs pay well, but don't nourish your soul. Is it time for you to move on? What should you do next? That and more in this edition of the Daily Job Hunt. Get The Daily Job Hunt sent to your inbox every day as well as the sign-up bonuses at crash.co/daily

Millennial Investing - The Investor’s Podcast Network
MI Rewind: Invest Better Using Focus and Minimalism w/ Greg McKeown

Millennial Investing - The Investor’s Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:37


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:5:35 - What it means to follow Essentialism.11:03 - Why do you feel like you aren't succeeding?24:35 - When you need to practice saying no.29:37 - How can you be a better and more focused investor?And much, much more!*Disclaimer: Slight timestamp discrepancies may occur due to podcast platform differences.EPISODE RESOURCES: Get more FREE content from Robert.Get a FREE audiobook from Audible.Read the 9 Key Steps to Effective Personal Financial Management.Check out our Investing Starter Packs about business and finance.Check out our Investing Starter Packs about real estate.Greg McKeown's book Essentialism.Nir Eyal's book Indistractable.Scott Young's book Ultralearning.All of Robert's favorite books.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.Save with a credit union that helps you build financial confidence with Navy Federal Credit Union.Trade confidently with BMO adviceDirect. Start trading today with personalized advice with a minimum of just $10,000.Track performance, create custom watch lists, and trade from anywhere with confidence with a BMO InvestorLine Self-Directed account.Transform how you drive business results and connect with customers with Snap AR.Make it simple to hire and manage remote employees across all 50 states with Justworks.Invest in high quality, cash flowing real estate without all of the hassle with PassiveInvesting.Design like a pro with Canva Pro! Get your FREE 45-day extended trial today.Get high quality, sustainably-sourced Wild-Caught Seafood right to your door with Wild Alaskan Company. Plus, get $15 off your first box of premium seafood!Learn more about how you can get started investing in some of the best cash flow markets today with Rent to Retirement. Read this episode's transcript and full show notes on our website.Connect with Greg: Website | Twitter| LinkedIn Connect with Robert: Website | Twitter | InstagramSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Brand Tuned - Smart Thinking, Better Branding
Verbal Identity with Rob Meyerson

Brand Tuned - Smart Thinking, Better Branding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:31


Rob Meyerson is the principal and founder of Heirloom, an independent brand strategy and identity firm. His specialities include brand strategy and positioning, naming and messaging, brand architecture, qualitative research, and organizational change. In this episode,  we discussed why IP is not included in branding projects and covered:The lack of job training for brand consultants and the culture of learning by doing that prevailsChecking company and product names Building distinctive brand assets,  versus the simplicity in design approach that prevailsWhat to consider when naming — what makes some names stronger than other namesWhether the legal dimension is a limiting factor that constrains the creative processPositioning — does that impact your name choice?IP's role in managing competitionThe negative reputation of lawyersYou can view the podcast transcript here LinkedIn: Rob MeyersonTwitter: @RobMeyersonInstagram: @howbrandsarebuiltBook: Brand Namingrobmeyerson.comhowbrandsarebuilt.comwww.heirloomagency.comValuable Resources:Brand Tuned ScorecardBrand Tuned Acceleratorwww.brandtuned.com 

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Why unifying your departments and data could be the biggest growth level you pull (with Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer at Tradeswell)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:03


“You need one single unified environment to manage your businesses” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's such a connectivity between how a digital commerce grows, and you really need to have all of that data in one environment.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“The digital commerce landscape has changed in terms of consumer expectations for speed and shipping costs.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's a great opportunity, I think, for innovation still with meeting that need for discoverability and experience for consumers.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“Everything can be measured. That's the beauty of digital.” @jbernard23 #DTCPODWe Speak About:[00:59] Julie introduces herself and Tradeswell [02:47] Marketing and how it relates to other departments of the business[05:40] Recording data and what to do with it [08:33] Key differences in how consumers buy[12:43] importance of embracing technology[16:24] The present and future role of AI [20:07] Businesses sizes and technology [22:07] internal business strategies to implement before technology[24:51] Key learnings working with brands post-pandemic [28:12] What's next for Tradeswell and where to find the brand, and Julie BernardHow Tradeswell helps brands create profit through data Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer of Tradeswell, joins the POD to give some insight on the business's actionable insights, customer experience, and marketing data & technology  Tradeswell is a company that helps brands unify data, leverage AI-generated insights and accelerate essential decisions to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape.Julie realizes that to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape, the data and business operations function better when unified.A unique approach is taken by creating a quantitative trading platform that implements real-time algorithms and insights, to uncover and execute the optimal actions companies need to growJulie recognizes that technology can help small businesses operate at the same level of sophistication as their larger business counterparts.Understanding you data, and drawing insights from it, is key to growthTradeswell stands out as a platform that simplifies the process for a brand to visualize the whole picture of their ecommerce business, while leveraging machine learning to receive insights and cross-channel operations.The company understands that the technologies that are out there are more cost effective, accessible, and sophisticated than ever, and the brand works to help others make informed decisions Julie takes the approach of integrating authentical actionable insights and team empowerment to achieve success within the business The brand further acknowledges that just because it can be measured through data, does not mean that it shouldJulie recommends to to draw some conclusions and have insights on the data that you do have rather than being on a perpetual pursuit of perfectionStay tuned as Julie discusses AI and post-pandemic business learnings. If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Tradeswell Website: https://www.tradeswell.com/Julie Bernard's Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/jbernard23

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast
MD Imdadul Islam – Never Borrow Money to Invest

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:57


BIO: MD Imdadul Islam (Imdad) is a business strategist, speaker, and collaborator. He collaborates with CEOs, CXOs, sales leaders, Realtors, and Financial Advisors to help them grow via Personal Branding, Social Selling, and Employee Advocacy. STORY: Imdad met a guy who sold him on the idea of investing in his online business. He borrowed money from his mom and put it into the company. He received some returns the first two months, but after that, the guy went mute. Eventually, he learned that the company had closed shop, and that's how he lost his six-figure investment. LEARNING: Never invest with borrowed money. Know the business well before you invest in it.   “Don't borrow money to invest because that's not your money to lose.”MD Imdadul Islam  Guest profilehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/imdadsinsight/ (MD Imdadul Islam) is a business strategist, speaker, and collaborator. He collaborates with CEOs, CXOs, sales leaders, Realtors, and Financial Advisors to help them grow via Personal Branding, Social Selling, and Employee Advocacy. He has gained experience in the consulting profession by working with a number of Group Companies, SMEs, and Startups in Bangladesh. Worst investment everImdad was always interested in becoming an investor. So he'd network with many people and talk to his seniors about their investments and how they do it. He met a guy who shared an investment opportunity at a company dealing with some online business. Imdad didn't understand much about the business, but he believed the guy when he told him they could multiply his investment. Imdad went to his mom and asked her to lend him money to invest in the business. His mom loaned him a six-figure amount, which was quite a big deal because she wasn't rich, but she trusted Imdad. He took the money and invested it in the business. Imdad got some returns the first two months, then suddenly there were no more payments. His friend told him that the business was just going through typical business hurdles and would bounce back. When the payments didn't come through for a couple of months, Imdad visited their office only to find the company had shut down. His calls went unanswered, and soon enough, he realized he had been scammed. Lessons learnedBefore you invest, learn about the business. Understand how the company makes money, where your investment will go and if the company can generate a return for itself and you. Never invest by borrowing money because that's not your money, and should you lose it, the loss will be twice-fold. Andrew's takeawaysBe careful when a stranger or someone you barely know comes to you with an investment proposal. Such people are experts at playing on your emotions and will often scam you. Actionable adviceAt least have a basic idea of what you want to do before you do anything, not just in investment but in everything in life. No. 1 goal for the next 12 monthsImdad's number one goal for the next 12 months is to add value to more people and help them grow their personal brand. Parting words  “The best investment you can ever make is in yourself.”MD Imdadul Islam  [spp-transcript]   Connect with MD Imdadul Islamhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/imdadsinsight/ (LinkedIn) https://www.facebook.com/imdad.global/ (Facebook) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9XU6W76IwjvfUc1R9qEAQg (YouTube) https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/top-5-reasons-companies-need-take-care-employees-md-imdadul-islam/ (Blog) Andrew's bookshttps://amzn.to/3qrfHjX (How to Start Building Your Wealth Investing in the Stock Market) https://amzn.to/2PDApAo (My Worst Investment Ever) https://amzn.to/3v6ip1Y (9 Valuation Mistakes and How to Avoid Them) https://amzn.to/3emBO8M (Transform Your Business with Dr.Deming's 14 Points) Andrew's online programshttps://valuationmasterclass.com/ (Valuation Master Class) https://academy.astotz.com/courses/how-to-start-building-your-wealth-investing-in-the-stock-market (How to Start Building Your

This Week in Startups - Video
Is Netflix over cancel culture? + Startup Checklist: Choosing a Business Model | E1304

This Week in Startups - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 71:37


First, Jason covers the blowback Netflix is facing from Dave Chappelle's new special "The Closer" and the masterful response from Co-CEO Ted Sarandos (2:09). Then, continuing our startup checklist series, Jason explains 10 items founders need to go through before choosing a business model (25:08).

This Week in Startups - Audio
Is Netflix over cancel culture? + Startup Checklist: Choosing a Business Model | E1304

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 71:37


First, Jason covers the blowback Netflix is facing from Dave Chappelle's new special "The Closer" and the masterful response from Co-CEO Ted Sarandos (2:09). Then, continuing our startup checklist series, Jason explains 10 items founders need to go through before choosing a business model (25:08).

iDigress with Troy Sandidge
Ep 36. Learn From A Door To Door Salesman. Successful Sales, Marketing, & Growth Is A Methodology You Can Only Develop By Knocking.

iDigress with Troy Sandidge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 22:00


If a client says yes and signs but reneges...If a client says yes but ghosts you...If a client says no...Which situation was worse? The outcome was the same. That particular door of opportunity was not meant to open for you.We can't control the outcome, just like we can't swim upstream of a waterfall no matter how much effort we put into it.Whether it's an upmarket acquisition, increasing sales, maximizing marketing, expanding brand authority, and so on, they all require you to do one key thing: keep knocking.This episode breaks down the mindset, tenacity, patience, poise, and persistence required to be successful at anything in business, from marketing to sales to branding to network and just running your business in general. I will use a simple analogy to convey a big message, so be prepared to go on a mental journey!This is episode 36, #KeepKnocking#####• Rate & Review iDigress: RateThisPodcast.com/iDigress• Get Strategy Solutions & Services: GrowWithTroy.com• Follow Troy on Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram, & Clubhouse @FindTroy 

The Tim Ferriss Show
#538: How I Built The Tim Ferriss Show to 700+ Million Downloads — An Immersive Explanation of All Aspects and Key Decisions (Featuring Chris Hutchins)

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 182:07


How I Built The Tim Ferriss Show to 700+ Million Downloads — An Immersive Explanation of All Aspects and Key Decisions (Featuring Chris Hutchins) | Brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs recruitment platform with 770M+ users, Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement, and Helix Sleep premium mattresses. More on all three below.Chris Hutchins (@hutchins) is an avid life hacker and financial optimizer. He's the host of All the Hacks podcast and the Head of New Product Strategy at Wealthfront.Previously, Chris was co-founder and CEO of Grove (acquired by Wealthfront), co-founder of Milk (acquired by Google), and a partner at Google Ventures, where he focused on seed and early stage investments.Chris reached out with many questions about podcasting. He had already read much of what I had written, listened to several interviews, and this is intended to be an updated guide to all things podcasting.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula (and five free travel packs) with your first subscription purchase! That's up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product.*This episode is also brought to you by Helix Sleep! Helix was selected as the #1 overall mattress of 2020 by GQ magazine, Wired, Apartment Therapy, and many others. With Helix, there's a specific mattress to meet each and every body's unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now, to my dear listeners, Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs. Whether you are looking to hire now for a critical role or thinking about needs that you may have in the future, LinkedIn Jobs can help. LinkedIn screens candidates for the hard and soft skills you're looking for and puts your job in front of candidates looking for job opportunities that match what you have to offer.Using LinkedIn's active community of more than 770 million professionals worldwide, LinkedIn Jobs can help you find and hire the right person faster. When your business is ready to make that next hire, find the right person with LinkedIn Jobs. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit LinkedIn.com/Tim.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Somewhat Frank
#0027 - Captain Kirk Goes to Space, Zoolander's Birthday, Beyond Happypalooza, and More

Somewhat Frank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:13


On this episode of the Somewhat Frank Podcast, Frank Gruber (@FrankGruber) and John Guidos (@JohnGuidos) talk about Captain Kirk going to space, Zoolander's birthday, Beyond Happypalooza, and more. Frank and John also celebrate the following people from their networks: Leslie Jump is joining Assure Analytics - https://differentfunds.com/strategies/different-funds-team-to-join-assure/ Rohit Bhravaga's book Beyond Diversity: 12 Non-Obvious Ways To Build A More Inclusive World is coming out November 9th - https://amzn.to/3FEvmW9 Jenn Lim has a new book out called Beyond Happiness is out this week - https://amzn.to/3ADdFST Frank and John also also invite listeners to apply for the following upcoming events: Startup of the Year Awards Summit - If you're interested in an opportunity to be a part of those awards and for a shot at potential investment and bragging rights, if you're named Startup of the Year then join our community and if you're one of the 100 startups selected you could be in the running. More info at http://soty.link/apply NASA iTech Cycle II Forum startup competition - NASA is searching for non-government funded technologies. Apply here: http://est.us/NIT (the deadline is Friday, October 15th at 11:59 AM PDT) Frank is also hosting the upcoming Beyond Happypalooza festival on October 29th. Find out more about event here: https://est.us/beyondhappinesspalooza The guys talk about these new books/articles: Paint it white. — https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/whitest-paint-in-the-world?utm_source=N2K%20-%20No%20Ad%20Template%20(Duplicate%20to%20use)&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8537 Don't kill Capt Kirk! — https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/04/william-shatner-to-fly-on-blue-origins-next-human-spaceflight-on-october-12/ Space travel is bad for your health — https://newatlas.com/space/brain-damage-biomarkers-cosmonauts-space-travel/ Zoolander is 20! Only made $15M at box office but is a classic — https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/movies/a37762711/zoolander-20th-anniversary-ben-stiller-interview/ Wow this is a game changer — https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html?referringSource=articleShare Are unvaccinated kids as safe from COVID as vaccinated grandparents? — https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/12/briefing/covid-age-risk-infection-vaccine.html There's no stealing first in baseball — MLB Is Testing Ways To Fix Baseball's Boredom Problem — https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2021-10-11/mlb-rule-changes-atlantic-league-tests-tweaks-meant-to-save-baseball The guys are also still watching the following shows/movies: Ted Lasso - Season 2 (Apple TV) Only Murders In The Building (HULU) MLB Playoff Baseball Lastly, Frank and John chat about testing out the new iOS 15 iPhone update. As always, thank you for listening and feel free to reach out and let us know what you think at: somewhatfrank@est.us Get updates like this in your inbox before they hit the web by subscribing to the newsletter here: https://frankgruber.me/newsletter/ 

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
It Is Better To Miss An Opportunity Than To Take The Wrong One #1887

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:48


In episode #1887, Neil and Eric talk about the value of waiting to take the right opportunity. When you chase every shiny thing, you can drawn away from your mission. Stay focused, and stay in your lane and good things will come. Tune in to hear it all! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today's topic: It Is Better to Miss an Opportunity Than to Take the Wrong One [00:41] When you try to take everything, you are not focused.  [01:16] Choosing the right one is better than the wrong one.  [01:57] Stay in your circle of competence; you don't know everything, and that's fine. [04:07] That's it for today! [04:07] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information or call us on 310-349-3785! Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons
Why I Spent $110,000 On This NFT (& How I'm Thinking About the ROI)

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:45


In this episode, I am going to talk about why I spent $110,000 on this NFT!  TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:00] - Introduction [00:57] - The BAYC(Bored Ape Yacht Club) NFT  [03:00] - The Ape Festival! [04:00] - We all crave for having our own community  [04:33] - The beauty of the BAYC Community [05:11] - The relationship I built with the community is worth it [06:17] - What to expect when investing into something [07:08] - Outro   ——   ►Order the Leveling Up book today & unlock FREE bonuses: https://book.levelingup.com/offer   ►Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro   ►Start and grow your own agency: https://try.consultingschool.io/growth-chat/    ►Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ericosiu/   ————   Want to learn the SEO tactics that AirBnB, Lyft, and Heineken use to drive millions of site visits a month? Download the case study now: https://www.singlegrain.com/res/digital-marketing-agency/case-studies/   Leave some feedback: What should I talk about next? Please let me know on Twitter - https://twitter.com/ericosiu or in the comments below. Enjoyed this episode? Let me know your thoughts in the comments, and please be sure to subscribe.   Connect with Eric Siu: Leveling Up Podcast - http://www.levelingup.com/ Marketing School Podcast - https://www.singlegrain.com/marketing... Single Grain - Digital Marketing Agency - http://www.singlegrain.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/ericosiu   ►Subscribe to my Channel: http://youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=gogrowtheverywhere

Built in Seattle with Adam Schoenfeld
Jessica Eggert (Founder & CEO at LegUp) on redefining success, creating a category, and saying yes

Built in Seattle with Adam Schoenfeld

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 35:18


On this episode of The Built in Seattle Podcast, I talked with  Jessica Eggert, CEO & Founder at LegUp (legup.care).For more stories and lessons from startup life in Seattle, subscribe to my weekly emailEpisode HighlightsMaking a 15-year life plan and why it doesn't work.Entering the workforce at 19 while hiding her age.Moving forward without knowing what success looks like.How she learned to say "yes" and open to possibilities. How solving her own problems and wining it led to a business.Why she kept asking "let's see what this can be."Realizing she was solving the wrong problem.The challenges defining and naming a category.Developing company values toward diversity.Recruiting people from outside tech.Why Convoy is her Seattle business role modelWhy Rebekah Bastian & Ben Gilbert are her Seattle leadership role models.Where to follow Gordon:https://twitter.com/jess_eggerthttps://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicalocheeggert/Where to follow Adam:https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamschoenfeld/https://twitter.com/schoenyFeedback? Suggestions on who to interview? Email me anytime - adamseattlepodcast@gmail.com

Ideas de Master Muñoz
EP 10| ¿Qué tan lejos estas dispuesto a llegar por tus sueños?

Ideas de Master Muñoz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:52


Introducción  1:00 Análisis del Juego de squid game   5:00 Whole 30  Dieta que se convierte en marca    9:00 Mercado de ultra lujo en México   19:00 Última milla  Pide Directo: entregas de 30 minutos    24:30 Motocicletas a suscripción    26:00 Mercado de 5 trillones    31:00 La mejor idea del episodio  Fantasy y Startups    35:20 Spotify de blockchain  -Carrera de caballos en NFT´s    38:10 Bright hire Entrevistas por zoom   42:30 Startups de cámaras     47:00 ¿Quieres invertir con nosotros? Anuncios importantes 

Female Startup Club
Contour Cube™'s Sarah Forrai sold 20k worth of product during her launch after her TikTok video went viral amassing (6M views!)

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:47


Today we are learning from Sarah Forrai, the female founder of Contour Cube™ which you might be familiar with on TikTok. From 3D printed prototype to sell out success the revolutionary facial icing product Contour Cube is now TikTok famous having been viewed by over 25M people, gaining a global customer base and a following of over 150K. The Australian designed Contour Cube™ is a facial icing tool that has been uniquely designed to sculpt your face, de-puff eye bags and address your facial skincare needs from breakouts to fine lines.We're talking through her launch where she generated 20k and sold out of her products, how she's capitalising on her TikTok strategy and what she's doing when it comes to copycats. LINKS WE MENTION:Contour Cube's InstagramSarah's Instagram Female Startup Club's InstagramDoone's InstagramIn partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for ecommerce businesses.Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook GroupSay hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.comFemale Startup Club $1000 Monthly Cash Give AwayWebsite: World Intellectual Property OrganizationWebsite: Ted Talks

Love Your Work
266. The Foundation Effect

Love Your Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:54


On October 10th, 1901 – 120 years ago, almost to the day – the grandstand was full at the horse track in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. But not to see horses. There was a parade of more than 100 of these new things called automobiles, and several other events, including races of automobiles with electric engines and with steam engines. But the main event was a race of gasoline automobiles. By the time the event took place, it didn't look like it would be much of a race. There had originally been twenty-five contestants. Only three made it to the starting post, then just before the race, one broke down and had to withdraw. So there were just two cars, driven by the men who had built them. One was the country's most famous car manufacturer. The other, was a local. A failed car manufacturer, named Henry Ford. At the time of this race, the most famous car-maker in America was Alexander Winton. He had made and sold hundreds of cars. He had gotten tons of press driving from Cleveland to New York. At the time of this race, Henry Ford was a failed car-maker. He had made and sold a handful of automobiles, but his first car company had failed. It was clear who was going to win this race: Moments prior, Alexander Winton had set the world record for the fastest mile traveled in an automobile, going around the dirt track in a little more than a minute and twelve seconds. Winton's car was seventy horsepower. Ford's was twenty-six. He had never taken it on a turn, and it didn't have brakes. The race was supposed to be twenty-five laps, but just before the event, the organizers shortened it to ten. According to Richard Snow, author of I Invented the Modern Age: The Rise of Henry Ford, they probably didn't want to see the local loser lapped over and over. This race was more of a sprint. The Foundation Effect Has this ever happened to you? You pass by a construction site for months, and there's nothing going on. There's just a wall with a project logo, peppered with graffiti. Then one day, there's a six-story building frame there. Now, each time you pass, it's gotten taller. There was no visible progress for months, then there was rapid progress. You saw what I call “The Foundation Effect.” The Foundation Effect is the delay in your progress, as you build your foundation. You have false starts and failures, and it looks as if you're going nowhere. But once you have your foundation built, you progress rapidly. Back to the races Henry Ford, the failed carmaker, won the sprint. But it wasn't until much later he also won the marathon. Eight years after that race, Henry's Ford Motor Company released a car that changed everything. It was durable enough to make it over rough country roads, lined with horse-drawn-wagon tracks. It was versatile enough farmers could use the engine to run a wheat thresher or move hay bales down a conveyer belt. It was twice as good as any car out there, at half the price. The first year, they sold 10,000. The second year, 20,000. A few years after that, they sold almost 200,000. By the time the “Model T” went out of production nearly twenty years after introduction, the Ford Motor Company had sold nearly 15 million. More than half of all cars in the world were Fords. Meanwhile, Alexander Winton's company kept building custom cars, made-to-order. He just couldn't compete with Ford's Model T, and had to shut down. Despite having over 100 patents on automobile technology, few today have ever heard of Alexander Winton. You need a foundation How did Henry Ford create such an incredible car, that sold in such incredible quantities? He built a rock-solid foundation. Over and over, he rejected the mere illusion of progress to scrap everything and start over. As a creator, you may feel as if you're getting nowhere. You're starting projects, but not finishing them. The ones you do finish are failing. You're throwing iterations in the fire, like Radclyffe Hall. From recent episodes, you know creative waste is part of the process. You're building the underwater part of your iceberg, so some future masterpiece will be that much better. But you're also building your foundation. The foundation of a building holds it in place. Even when the building sways in the wind or shakes in an earthquake, the foundation is there to bare the stress. Architects and engineers can design a foundation using knowledge about the laws of physics. Many buildings have been built before, so there's a lot of collective experience to draw from. You, as a creator, need to build your foundation from scratch. It's what makes your work unique. As a creator, your foundation is made of the change you want your work to make, the medium through which you'll make that change, and the process you'll follow to make your product. These things take time to develop. It will look as if you're getting nowhere, but once they're in place – like a skyscraper once the foundation is laid – your progress will be rapid. How to build your foundation To build your foundation, you need to clarify your vision and master your execution, so you won't topple over. Here are some ways to do that. 1. Keep shipping This seems counterintuitive, because when a skyscraper goes up, they only build one building. They aren't putting up a few stories, scrapping it, and starting over. The reason they can build a foundation to support the skyscraper is, millions of other buildings have been built before that skyscraper. Architects and engineers can design a strong foundation because they have tons of data. You need to collect tons of data about your unique way of doing things. How do you get it done? How do people react? Does it express your unique point of view? What is that point of view? Overall, how do you make what only you can make? Henry Ford's hit car was the Model “T.” Why was it called the Model T? Because he had already built the Model S, the Model R, Q, P, O – you get the idea. He started with Model A. It took until Model T to build the foundation for stratospheric success. The way you build your foundation as a creator is to keep shipping. Remember, shipping is a skill. And each time you ship, you make your foundation stronger. 2. Don't just build. Experiment. It's funny that when most people think of Henry Ford, they think of the assembly line. A bunch of guys on a line, each doing one tiny job, such as placing a nut on a bolt, or merely turning the nut on the bolt. But for Ford to create those tasks, he first had to design the product that could be broken down into those tasks. Ford treated each car he designed and built as an experiment. He made them as good as he could, but knew they couldn't be perfect. They were going to break down, or have annoying maintenance requirements that needed to be improved. We can design buildings that don't collapse because other buildings have failed. Ford made new and better cars because his cars failed. That's how he improved the transmission, lubrication, and spark plugs. That's how he found a steel alloy that would be lightweight and strong – and countless other improvements to the design and manufacture of his cars. And that's how, even as he improved the Model T, he kept making it cheaper. When he introduced it in 1909, it was $825. Sixteen years later, inflation be dammed, it was only $260. 3. Walk away from failures (guilt-free) Henry Ford wasn't afraid to quit. Yes, he went from Model A to Model T, but that was in his third car company. He had one failed company before the race, and after he won that race, he gained enough notoriety to attract investors for a second car company. But he walked away from that company, too – only four months later. By the way, Ford went from A to T, and not all those cars were introduced to the public. Many were internal experiments that he walked away from – or, if you will, iterations thrown in the fire, like Radclyffe Hall's drafts. 4. Have a vision You can't walk away from failures for no reason. You can't learn from experiments if you don't know what you're looking for. You need a vision. You don't have a crystal-clear vision from the start. That's why you're doing all that shipping and experimenting and quitting in the first place. Why did Henry Ford walk away from the car company he started after the race? It wasn't going to help him carry out his vision. Ford had a vision to create an affordable automobile for the masses. His investors, on the other hand, wanted to build high-end cars for the wealthy. The company wasn't a foundation that was going to help Ford achieve his vision, so he stepped back, to build a foundation that would. Keep building your foundation If you're frustrated with your progress as a creator, maybe it's because you're still working on your foundation. If you're scrapping iterations and walking away from half-finished, and failed, projects, make sure it's in the pursuit of a vision. If it is, keep learning, until you get it right. Once your foundation is in place, the sky is the limit. Image: Monument by Paul Klee About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is author of Mind Management, Not Time Management, The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative. Follow David on: Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher YouTube RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »     Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/foundation-effect/

Entrepreneur Motivation Podcast
In the grind with Adam Osborne - EMP301

Entrepreneur Motivation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 77:43


In this episode, I speak with someone who is still “in the grind” and building his business up while also working full time.  Many times, podcasts just feature people who have “made it” and “figured it out.” It's likely the case that many listeners are still in a similar spot as my guest today, building something they're passionate about but also still busy with a career as well as a growing family. Adam Osborne is a high school math teacher from Georgia. He is also the founder of Spivey Education Services, a company that provides online math tutoring by real math teachers. Connect with Adam: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spiveyeducation/  Website:  https://spiveyeducation.com/  Connect with Chris: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chrisbello_  Get my free guide: https://chrisbello.com/free  Get help buying/selling a house in the US: https://calendly.com/chrisbellorealestate/workwithchris 

Go Rogue
The Journey to 100k Downloads Begins with Simple Prep with Startup Junkie

Go Rogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:15


Are you looking to grow your podcast's listener base?  Check out this episode of Rogue Creators!  Caleb Talley and Jeff Amerine joined Bryan and Loren to celebrate reaching 100,000 downloads on the Startup Junkies Podcast.  Caleb and Jeff co-host the show each week and talk with founders about the stories behind the businesses we love.  On this episode, they chat with Bryan and Loren about creating the Startup Junkies Podcast, preparing for interviews, maintaining relationships with guests, and much more!  Shownotes(2:11) What are you obsessed with?(8:07) The Creating Startup Junkies Book(9:31) The Inception of Startup Junkie(13:26) The Startup Junkies Podcast Origin Story(20:30) Tips for Growing Your Podcast(24:28) Using Your Podcast to Build Relationships and Make Connections(30:23) 1 Million Cups(34:51) What's Next for Startup Junkie?(40:24) Wrap Up(42:00) Rapid FireLinksBryan FittinLoren LewisCaleb TalleyJeff AmerineStartup Junkies Podcast The Grand Biocentric DesignThe Place We Find Ourselves PodcastCreating Startup Junkies   Quotes“One thing led to another because there was a need in the market for the mentoring, counseling, training, the kind of start up support stuff that we do.  And now, we probably touch 1,200 entrepreneurs a year through one-on-one counseling.  And in normal times we put on 250 events, and all that stuff, thanks to the hard work of Caleb and the whole crew, is now virtual.”  (10:46) “We decided, let's give the Zoom platform a shot, as far as recording the podcast.  I think that really opened it up for us where we weren't just having local entrepreneur guests on.  It gave us an opportunity to expand out and invite people that we otherwise would not have been able to invite on.”  (16:26)“You can be more conversational if you get a sense for the types of things that people are going to want to hear about.  How'd you get started?  How did you raise money?  How do you deal with building the team?  What kind of challenges do you face?  That sort of stuff.” (24:53)“[Matthew has] kind of streamlined the process for bringing [guests] on and getting them scheduled.  Part of that is getting some seeds of fun facts.  He's got a questionnaire of some things to kind of pull from them that we can throw out during the podcast.”  (25:32)

Niptech: tech & startups
405 – Et tu Baptiste – Innovations hardware

Niptech: tech & startups

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Cette semaine on pousse les auditeurs à venir à Lausanne pour courir et parler de psychédéliques et on parle aussi de tout un tas d’innovations et tendances dans le hardware. Podcast: Téléchargement Perso  NIPTECH NATION -> Christmas Run de Lausanne du 11.12.21 https://doodle.com/meeting/participate/id/6dBNPxNd  TCG Retail Summit in Budapest Twitter #TCG2021   Voice assistance TCG presentation  Open […]

Masters of Scale: Rapid Response
Overcoming institutional hurdles, w/ U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee CEO Sarah Hirshland

Masters of Scale: Rapid Response

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:58


In the last year, Sarah Hirshland has had to face one daunting issue after another as the CEO of the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee – each of which have required urgent, in-the-moment decisions. Most recently Sarah mandated that U.S. athletes be vaccinated against COVID-19 to participate in the upcoming Beijing winter games. But that's just the latest of a slew of cultural issues she's been tasked to act on. She's faced pandemic disruptions, social action protests, sexual misconduct scandals, mental health stress, and more. Through all of it, Sarah has been motivating her team around an evolving mission to reflect not just where America is as a country today but where it's going.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: Overcoming institutional hurdles, w/ U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee CEO Sarah Hirshland

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:58


In the last year, Sarah Hirshland has had to face one daunting issue after another as the CEO of the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee – each of which have required urgent, in-the-moment decisions. Most recently Sarah mandated that U.S. athletes be vaccinated against COVID-19 to participate in the upcoming Beijing winter games. But that's just the latest of a slew of cultural issues she's been tasked to act on. She's faced pandemic disruptions, social action protests, sexual misconduct scandals, mental health stress, and more. Through all of it, Sarah has been motivating her team around an evolving mission to reflect not just where America is as a country today but where it's going. Read a transcript of this interview at: mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Innovation City
The Power of Community in Startup Growth with Judy Sindecuse

Innovation City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:48


“I'm going to care about the people that I'm working with as human beings, and if they're doing well and if they're really driven in their businesses, that's what's going to make for a successful business and turnaround.” -Judy Sindecuse Today's guest is Judy Sindecuse, CEO at Capital Innovators, whose top-ranking Accelerator Program provides startups with the resources they need to succeed. Judy Sindercuse is a visionary leader with a proven track record of starting profitable companies. In this episode, Sindercuse sits down with the team to discuss how Capital Innovators went from a small nonprofit to one of the top 5 accelerators in the country, the strength of the St. Louis community, and what it takes for a city to build a culture of innovation!

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany
Meet Edupression a Vienna-Based App on Prescription

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:14


Daniel is the CEO and co-founder. One of his friends committed suicide, which made him start the company.

Life After Business
#270: The Art of Startup Fundraising and Selling Your Company with Alejandro Cremades

Life After Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 61:19


You can learn a lot from a world driven by growing enterprise value from day one. Let the expert who wrote two books on the subject walk you through the world of startups — from fundraising to exit — to show what focusing on the end goal can do for you and your company, starting today.Alejandro Cremades is a serial entrepreneur, M&A advisor, and author of the books The Art of Startup Fundraising and Selling Your Startup. He’s even been recognized by Barbara Corcoran of “Shark Tank” and is well-known for “The Deal Makers Podcast,” so to say he knows a thing or two about entrepreneurship is an understatement. Be ready to get pumped up about growth in this episode designed to help small- and mid-sized businesses navigate the funding landscape and achieve their long-term goals. What You Will Learn Why Alejandro thinks exiting is 10x harder than raising capital What types of investors are out there any why they invest The differences between a strategic acquisition vs a financial acquisition and when each exit makes sense Why Alejandro says the biggest mistake is when founders think “they are the company” The different rounds in fundraising - and what the requirements and expectations are for each round The art of the deal when negotiating the valuation of your company with an investor (let them talk first so you can talk them up) How to balance your priorities with an investor’s priorities while scaling the company Why it’s important to have an M&A advisor in an exit and how to avoid bad decisions under stress The one question you need to ask when seriously considering an investor Why VC competition has expanded globally vs what it was like 15 years ago Which businesses are going to suffer when a market corrects itself What Private equity and venture capital truly invests in (numbers vs founders) Bio: Alejandro Cremades is a serial entrepreneur and the author of The Art of Startup Fundraising (foreword by ‘Shark Tank‘ star Barbara Corcoran) and recently released Selling Your Startup. Most recently, he started Panthera Advisors, a premier investment banking and financial consulting firm after his own exit. Alejandro built and exited CoFoundersLab which is one of the largest communities of founders online with over 500,000 members. Prior to CoFoundersLab, he worked as a lawyer at King & Spalding where he was involved in one of the biggest investment arbitration cases in history ($113 billion at stake). Alejandro is an active speaker and has given guest lectures at the Wharton School of Business, Columbia Business School, and at NYU Stern School of Business. He have been involved with the JOBS Act since inception and was invited to the White House and the US House of Representatives to provide his stands on the new regulatory changes concerning fundraising online. Quotes: 11:56 - “When people raise money, they don’t realize that when you’re raising money, there is money in with expectations of money out.” - Alejandro Cremades 12:35 - “The way you raise money today is going to impact the way that you raise money tomorrow but then also, they way that you can exit your business.” - Alejandro Cremades 15:14 - “You should never think about fundraising as money. You need to think about fundraising as networks. It’s all about turning around the money and really thinking–more than anything–about who is giving you the money and how you can leverage their network in order to get to

B2B Mentors
Don't Wait Until You "Feel" Ready - Connor's Curiosities #032

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:57


Today: Don't Wait Until You "Feel" Ready - Connor's Curiosities #032Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

This Week in Startups - Audio
US inherits China's Bitcoin Mining Dynasty + Jacob Helberg on the “New Cold War” with China | E1303

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 85:03


Jason does a short news segment on China's Bitcoin Mining hash rate falling to 0 and how the U.S. is now the largest mining hub (1:59). Then, Jacob Helberg author of "The Wires of War: Technology and the Global Struggle for Power," joins to discuss China's long-term goals (9:03), the United States' lack of preparedness, the struggle for control of front-end and backend technologies (32:22), plus much more.

Indie Hackers
#230 – Grit, Timing, and Building Businesses You Love with Andrew Gazdecki of MicroAcquire

Indie Hackers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:58


Andrew Gazdeki (@agazdecki) has some contrarian viewpoints when it comes to the startup ecosystem today. I invited him here to find out about his beef with TechCrunch and how he is empowering founders with his own company, Microacquire.  Follow Andrew on Twitter: https://twitter.com/agazdecki Check out Microacquire: https://microacquire.com/

Equity
How to sell clothes online and actually make money

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:37


This is our Wednesday show, the time of the week when we niche down to a single topic. Today? Fashion.Natasha and Danny and Alex got together to dig into the world of fashion resale and rental. It's no small market, giving birth to both public companies, unicorns, and startups. Most recently, well-known fashion rental player Rent the Runway filed to go public, giving us a window in its own numbers.Those figures led us to a few questions about how best to go about making money from clothes in a retail context. From our chat:Selling vs. Renting vs. Reselling: To start, we wanted to help you group startups into three buckets: those who sell customers to people, those who rent goods to customers, and those who resell pre-owned goods to customers.Rent the Runway's numbers: We had some issues with Rent the Runway's business model given that it appears that the company is simply underpricing its clothing items given its cost structure. How Wall Street will price the company, or whether Rent the Runway is hoping to sell to a larger company came into the conversation.Who else should we have an eye on: To close, Natasha detailed a number of startups including Queenly, Curtsy and Rebag. Oh, and Depop (which recently sold to Etsy $1.6 billion).Startups are tearing up old retail models, which we are here for. We are less here for adjusted EBITDA that reads like magical realism. 

WeAreLATech LA Startups Podcast
Remix: Shantal Anderson, Germán Pineda, and Aidan Gold: WeAreLATech Startup Spotlight

WeAreLATech LA Startups Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:46


Don't miss out on the next WeAreLATech podcast episode, get notified by signing up here http://wearelatech.com/podcastWelcome to WeAreLATech's Los Angeles Tech Community Spotlight!   “Remix:  Shantal Anderson, Germán Pineda, and Aidan Gold” WeAreLATech Podcast is a WeAreTech.fm production.To support our podcast go to http://wearelatech.com/believe To be featured on the podcast go to http://wearelatech.com/feature-your-la-startup/Want to be featured in the WeAreLATech Community? Create your profile here http://wearelatech.com/communityHost,Espree Devorahttps://twitter.com/espreedevorahttps://www.linkedin.com/in/espreeGuest,Shantal Andersonhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/shantalanderson/Guest,Germán Pinedahttps://www.linkedin.com/in/pinedagerman/Guest,Aidan Goldhttps://twitter.com/AGfilchehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/aidangold/For a calendar of all LA Startup events go to, http://WeAreLATech.comTo further immerse yourself into the LA Tech community go to http://wearelatech.com/vipLinks Mentioned:Reel Mood, https://www.reelmood.comGoodBite App, https://goodbiteapp.comeGenesis, https://www.egenesisbio.comCredits:Produced and Hosted by Espree Devora, http://espreedevora.comStory Produced, Edited and Mastered by Cory Jennings, https://www.coryjennings.com/Production and Voiceover by Adam Carroll, http://www.ariacreative.ca/Team support by Janice GeronimoMusic by Jay Huffman, https://soundcloud.com/jayhuffmanShort Title: Shantal Anderson, Germán Pineda, and Aidan Gold

Mixergy - Startup Stories with 1000+ entrepreneurs and businesses
#2145 Wil Schroter and I talk about my burnout

Mixergy - Startup Stories with 1000+ entrepreneurs and businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


I almost cancelled today’s interview with Wil Schroter because on the way to the office I was feeling all the weight of burnout. So instead of talking about Startups.com, the company will built, I’m going to talk to him about this. Wil Schroter is the founder of Startups.com, which offers education, community, and tools to help startups launch faster. Sponsored byHostGator – Ready to take your website to the next level? Whether you're a first-time blogger or an experienced web pro, HostGator has all the tools you need to create a great-looking website or online store. A wide range of options includes cloud-based web hosting, reseller hosting, VPS hosting and dedicated servers. Founded in 2002, HostGator is the perfect web partner for business owners and individuals seeking hands-on support. Visit www.hostgator.com/mixergy to see what HostGator can do for your website. More interviews -> https://mixergy.com/moreint Rate this interview -> https://mixergy.com/rateint

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons
Gary Vee's Veefriends NFTs Traded Over $81M Because of THIS

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 6:04


In this video, I talk about the importance of using an NFT community manager, how they can bolster your NFT project, and how to go about hiring one. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:00] - Intro [00:42] - Look for NFT-specific community managers on Discord [02:24] - The CMX job board is the best board for NFT community managers [03:27] - Twitter is also a great tool for the NFT community [04:05] - Why the community manager is the most important role for your NFT project [05:22] - Outro   ——   ►Order the Leveling Up book today & unlock FREE bonuses: https://book.levelingup.com/offer   ►Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro   ►Start and grow your own agency: https://try.consultingschool.io/growth-chat/    ►Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ericosiu/   ————   Want to learn the SEO tactics that AirBnB, Lyft, and Heineken use to drive millions of site visits a month? Download the case study now: https://www.singlegrain.com/res/digital-marketing-agency/case-studies/   Leave some feedback: What should I talk about next? Please let me know on Twitter - https://twitter.com/ericosiu or in the comments below. Enjoyed this episode? Let me know your thoughts in the comments, and please be sure to subscribe.   Connect with Eric Siu: Leveling Up Podcast - http://www.levelingup.com/ Marketing School Podcast - https://www.singlegrain.com/marketing... Single Grain - Digital Marketing Agency - http://www.singlegrain.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/ericosiu   ►Subscribe to my Channel: http://youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=gogrowtheverywhere

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
The Three Best YouTube Marketing Strategies #1886

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:44


In episode #1886, Neil and Eric walk through the three best YouTube marketing strategies. From marketing hard in the first 24 hours to engaging in the YouTube Community section, there are numerous ways to up those views. Tune in to hear them all! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today's topic: The Three Best YouTube Marketing Strategies [00:28] Do whatever you can do get your video out there in the first 24 hours. [01:18] Utilize the YouTube Community section. [02:00] Try to get comments because these help videos go viral. [02:32] Don't try to copy anyone else; be yourself.  [03:07] That's it for today! [03:07] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information or call us on 310-349-3785!   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Handle with Care:  Empathy at Work
Empathy and Connection for Start-ups: an interview with Selfless.ly

Handle with Care: Empathy at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:39


- Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience I think everybody should have,   INTRO   Why aren't we focusing on culture from Day 1?  Today, we look at building connection in the world of start-ups.  My guests are Josh Driver and Zach Rodenbarger from Selfless.ly.  They have a lot to say about how to build connection AND their technology platform is also a platform for companies to give back, so this is like a double-impact interview.    Zach and Josh's origin story begins just before the pandemic, launching their platform with high hopes and ideals into a pretty brutal business environment.    They are talking about how they sustained connection, built their company, and expanded the scope of influence in the midst of the dual pressures of start-up life and a bruising global pandemic.  As a bit of a teaser, you will hear about the importance of taking a walk, how “hangry” can get in the way of communication, and why Nerf guns could be a good idea for your office culture.    Zach and Josh are both tech guys who are from the same Indiana town of Valparaiso.  The met in 2018, committed to the concept of building a platform where companies and individuals can give not just money but time and effort to support causes that matter.  The website describes the platform memorably:  “Selfless.ly is a unique company that was designed by selfless people to help the world become a better place.”     - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'd love to hear from both of you. Why do you think that that is even an important conversation to be having? And how would you define empathy work to me.   - Zach Rodenbarger There's a few tangible examples.   That is Zach Rodenbarger, the COO of Selfless.ly   - Zach Rodenbarger Sometimes in our interactions, Josh will come in or I'll come in and we'll have something and go back and forth. And then one of us will say, do you need to go for a walk?   - Zach Rodenbarger And I was like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Yes, I need to go for a walk. I need a little fresh air, you. And maybe that's just because we've been at our computers for a couple of hours or longer and need to have take a pause and have a step back. And so we've had that over the year, especially when we're working hard and looking at new timelines and goals and things. And I know I've needed a walk or two here and there.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes We had other good practices. Sometimes it's a walk. I also find that sometimes it's a snack. I have you eaten recent links to a snack?   - Joshua Driver Yes. We've encountered the snack situation as well. Yes. Hunger is a thing so much.   And this is Josh Driver, fellow-hangry sufferer and the Founder of Selfless.ly   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That was like one of my biggest learning curves early on in my marriage. I I used to think it was just Luke. It's totally both of us be like, Is this really a thing, or am I just really hungry right now? And you can't know until you're no longer hungry, like, you can't even find out.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think that's a good follow up on empathy. It's probably easier to see in other people. And then when do we take that step back and look at ourselves and actually admit that? And I think that is really helpful to business partnership or even as we continue to onboard new employees, you know, thinking through, how am I coming across to others?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But also, do you put yourself in their shoes and how are they feeling and so kind of both well and hearing that it actually takes a foundation of some relationship and trust to be able to take someone suggestion to do something like, go for a walk. I can imagine that a less mature or self aware moments. Somebody being like, maybe even the way it could be delivered. Just go take a walk. Somebody being like, I don't need a walk. You need a walk? No, I'm just making a really good point.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But to be able to be at a place where I imagine it takes some work get to that point.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes A lot of times I find with guests or people I get to work with those that really, like, are doing the work of promoting more human workplaces and more connection at work. There's an element that comes out of their own personal experience. So I would love to hear from both of you a time where meeting that connection and empathy at work was really important in your own personal story, so that could be giving it to someone or a time where you were like, I'm not. Okay. I need some support right now.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think when I left the startup space and went into a corporate job, I came into a workplace environment and culture that might have been a little hostile and toxic. Like, there is a big disconnect between the leadership and the teams and the mentality of you're lucky to have a job versus we're lucky to have you as an employee. I wasn't exactly realized yet. And I had noticed when I join the company in my role that there was a lot of hostile communication. People had segregated themselves on one side or another and coming into that since I had been startups for so long and been on the ground for creating that culture.   - Joshua Driver That was very new to me to be in the middle of this disconnect. And it taught me personally about how I want my next company to run and where I think we needed to head and be ego free and transparent and communicate in more of a we're all on the same level here. Like, don't view me as your boss. We're just jumping in together to fix an issue. And I think as far as feeling left out or where I really could have used some support was when my first full time job was as an EMT here, then wished hospital and going through some of the things for the first time and all the trauma there.   - Joshua Driver There's no debrief or support. I think it's better now than it was, but you kind of had to process and cope individually with some of the things that you would see. And so that was really difficult for me to overcome at times when you have to process seeing the such negative things at times.   - Joshua Driver Quite frankly, like volunteering someplace and getting the I feel like I'm making a positive difference outside of the trauma of emergency medicine was a big driving factor. A lot of my coworkers and stuff would turn to substance abuse and other things sometimes, but I was fortunate enough to have a good support system, whether it was my family or friend group to where if things were really getting rough, that somebody would jump in and say, hey, let's catch up or reconnect. And so I was lucky in that regard.   - Joshua Driver But a lot of first responders, unfortunately, don't have that type of network to help them with that.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Thank you for sharing that. And I imagine even as you talk about the importance of volunteering, that there's a through line to some of what you're currently doing.   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, how about for you?   - Zach Rodenbarger So for me, with thinking through empathy in my past experiences, we can look to even just in the early days of self asleep and thinking about, hey, we both took this leap to start something new. And then about six months later, COVID hits. And so how do we work through this time where everything just radically changed, where we just launched the company? We launched the company in January and February of 2020. And then a month later, radically different thinking through. How is my co founder feeling right now?   - Zach Rodenbarger How do I stay optimistic and pass that along to him and vice versa? We're both kind of feeling these challenges and seeing this real time, right that we had these ideas and projections and we're going to create group, volunteering outdoors, and we're going to invite people to these events and then that's not going to happen. And so how do we really think through and change that strategy? But also, how did I think through, you know, both of us leaving our corporate jobs to do this. And so losing that security and saying, okay, I understand that this is maybe something he's going through right now and the pressure he's going through.   - Zach Rodenbarger So how do I stay optimistic to then pass that along and vice versa? And that was really helpful during those times?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Did you ever have days where you were both just like, really down in the dumps? It wasn't like one person could encourage the other. It was just both low, especially early on in that pandemic.   - Zach Rodenbarger For me, I think for the most part, one or the other would see that and feel that and maybe because we're both high empaths. So if Josh was down, I was like, I can't be or vice versa. He may have a different perspective, but I remember thinking that. And so even though it was a really tough day, this is what it's all about. And so I'll stay positive or vice versa. And he would look at me be like, this is when he needs to step up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah,   - Joshua Driver I can't remember specifically when we had those times. But I remember even if we were going to be talking to a specific person turning in, saying, I don't have an inmate today to have this conversation. Do you mind just taking this on your own and doing that? I remember a few times where we had that discussion where if we're both feeling challenged, which is actual, we there. See, I think there were a few times where we might have just said, let's just call it a day early and go for a walk or go get a slice of pizza or something and and get out of the office for a little bit or go to the Lake each like, I think within reason we would step up on behalf of each other where we needed to.   - Joshua Driver It was just not the perfect day. Just saying, alright, let's take a break in re energize and come back to it tomorrow.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That can be so good. And it sounds like really, of course, of course, that would be a good thing to do. But it's amazing how hard sometimes it can feel in the moment, especially with the entrepreneurial churn and pressures and one's own expectations. So I acknowledge how important that can be and how like sometimes it can feel harder to do than it seems is a good job cutting.   - Joshua Driver I like to just get burn myself out trying to work on the issue at hand. Zach, does a really good job of cutting me off for like of a meter and saying, this is all the time we have for this. We need to move on. Otherwise, I'll sit down whatever whatever issue is at hand. So he does a good job of saving my own sanity.   - Zach Rodenbarger I definitely like to break tasks up into the smallest parts and pieces and just get something done for that day or something like that. And Josh definitely wants to power through and accomplish it all in one day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, I am that trait, Josh. It makes me think there was a there was a friend that I had in College and we used to kind of like joke about his mindset. We would joke that Ben would break his whole day down into micro goals, and it always allowed him to feel good about himself because he would be like, I'm on even the little things. Like, I'm gonna walk through the quad more efficiently than ever before and talk to two people. And I used to think like, what a funny quirk about how Ben's mind works.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But now I look and I'm like, man, Ben was probably just 15 years ahead of all of us in self awareness of like, oh, that's maybe a key to living like a more bounded and contented existence than the rest of us had a handle on at 22.   - Joshua Driver Yes, Zach is close to that, and I envy that very much because I don't have that level of organization and granularity that see and your friends have.   MUSICAL TRANSITION Building connection at work is important…and it can be hard to know where to start.  What can you do to support the mental health of your people, to care for them and keep them engaged in the midst of all of the pressures and disruption?  You don't have to figure it out on your own; let Handle with Care Consulting help.  With keynote options, certificate programs, and coaching sessions available, we have a solution to meet your needs and budget.  Sign up for a free consultation at lieselmertes.com.  Together, we can put empathy to work.    MUSICAL TRANSITION   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I find in building connections with people, there are times where it feels really easy and natural and times where it's a lot more challenging. What are times in either of you or both of you can answer where building connection at work feels really easy for you. And why.   - Joshua Driver Interesting. I would say that I'm   - Joshua Driver I love to people watch, and I'm always interested in everybody's story. How did you get to where you are today? What experiences have you had? And so it's easy for me to get to know people because I'm just naturally just so curious about everyone's story.   - Zach Rodenbarger I find I have to be maybe a little more intentional to provide that space to connect. And maybe that even goes to our overall topic of empathy to take a second and say, okay, if I was coming in on the first day or the second week, how would I want to be treated? Because I think it's easy for me. And as I mentioned earlier, probably Josh, it's easy for us to just kind of put our heads down and work. And so taking that time and being giving that space as well to make the connection, even if it's at lunch time only or something.   - Zach Rodenbarger But at least you're very focused on allowing that space to chat and providing that because I know for me during the workplace, well, we'll chat later or something, but if you don't provide that space, then obviously it's harder to make that connection, especially in the first week, the first six months, and things like that and thinking, when would I want to have someone reach out to me whether they're a colleague, a boss, or even an intern can be anything.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. That reminds me of even a slide that I was showing yesterday and a talk that I was doing about imagination and empathy. I hear that a little bit of what you're saying, and although that doesn't always get you exactly to the right place, because you can't ever fully know what another person is wanting or experiencing, it oftentimes will move you closer. What would I want on my first day or first week? And then to be able to act out of that can really close what can sometimes seem like a big distance.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You both kind of offered some things in your answer, but I'll ask it explicitly as well. What are sometimes we're building connection at work feels difficult.   - Joshua Driver I've started to embrace more of when I am feeling extroverted versus introverted and sometimes when I'm hyper focused on something in the distraction of having to communicate or interact can be frustrating because I need the focused time and especially with new employees coming on. You want to be available and transparent and present. And at our stage right now it's really difficult to be present with everything that we need to get done. And so making sure that I'm not coming off as disinterested is something that I always in the back of my mind.   - Joshua Driver I want to make sure that I'm not conveying because it's not true. But there are some times where I just want to get something done and want to be sequestered for a little bit.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Do you have yourself in moments like that, like needing to actively engage in self talk, even about things. So I'll get my hand like I have to think about my body language and moments like that of being like, oh, I need to show attention and care right now. I'm going to do something different. Like do you do mental pivots like that? And what do they look like?   - Joshua Driver Sometimes Zach and I have been together for so long now. I can tell with his expression where I've crossed the line of of being rational more. So there are certain triggers, I think too. And he'll say, yeah, you need to maybe just spend some time by yourself for a minute and go for a lock so I will replay a situation like that in my mind and try to think through. Alright, what did I say? Did I mean to come off this way or if I don't really came off a different way than I meant to trying to understand?   - Joshua Driver Like how did this person infer that this was what I was trying to say. And so that has been helpful to rethink the experience so that I try not to replicate that. Moving forward. I.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I Imagine there's a line walk between replaying the experience and getting stuck in a never ending loop. How do you thread that needle?   - Joshua Driver Not. Well. I like to solve everything and have closure. So if there's still a difference of opinion, I like to try to really put the pressure on myself to get it resolved. And in some cases I think I don't look at difference of opinion is like who's going to win this fight and get their way? I think it's more from their background and their perspective. Is there some truth to it and allow that was Zach especially? There are some things that he's very passionate about and has a perspective that he really feels strongly.   - Joshua Driver And I'd like to think for the most part if he fully believes in something that I may not be so sure on and wants to go that I just trust him implicitly that it's the right thing and that he's very good at doing his research and looking at different aspects of things.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, and out of that foundation of relationship, you know what you can extend to them.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think we're a lot of co founders that are state right now. We don't have time to be working on every project together, be on every call together and make decisions together. And so I think if you have a co founder that you don't feel that you feel like you have to micromanage or be a part of every decision, then that's going to be a really difficult culture to scale. It's going to make your company really difficult to grow. And so everybody that we've hired and when Zach joined Selflessly is very clear.   - Joshua Driver I want the empowerment. I want to create the space for them to be empowered to make decisions that are best for a company and feel confident that they are able to execute on whatever task.   - Zach Rodenbarger Is this where I say the complete opposite?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes This is a safe space.   - Zach Rodenbarger I've been trying to obviously likewise empowering each other. And we did used to be on most of the calls and get to feel how each is thinking. And so it did help in the first month to six months to be on a lot of the calls together or as he mentioned, in the same room even. And so I can overhear his call, whether he wants me to or not and understand kind of what he's thinking, the action maybe he would take or his thinking on that his rationalization, right.   - Zach Rodenbarger What would he be thinking in the same spot and so helpful to be able to, you know, have his perspective in in the back of my mind and probably vice versa from sharing that office for the first twelve months and everything. So that's been really good.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I hear a lot of respect and self inquiry in what you both have said. And yet I imagine there's still moments where like on an emotional on a practical on an interpersonal level, you guys have missed and or hurt one another in your journey. What has making meaningful repairs looked like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Nerf guns. Yeah. I think for one of my birthday, Josh got a couple of Nerf guns for me, and so if we need, we can shoot each other, but also part of the startup mentality, right? We wanted to bring a little bit of fun into the office, but if you needed, you could shoot someone from across the room. That's been one way.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes At least I'm totally thinking of my two sons right now, and the moment where Magnus turns to Moses, and he's like, okay, you can just hit me five times in the chest. That's fine. Just don't tell mom.   - Joshua Driver The biggest issue with that is that I'm a bad shot, so I'm not even like to get I like you. I can't make my points in the same way he can, because I tend to miss him completely, whereas he's really good at targeting me. So that was, in hindsight, not a great decision for a birthday gift start.   - Joshua Driver She has to make a lot of lessons learned.   - Joshua Driver Yeah, I would recommend that to other companies unless you're really good at aiming   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes either that or you want to devote part of your work day to target practice.   - Joshua Driver Yes.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, maybe you guys would like to expand on the I hear like some fun, some levity, like not taking yourself too seriously. Are there other things that you do to make repairs when you guys have gotten a little bit off?   - Joshua Driver I think that we find out if if we're having a conflict, that taking the time, like taking some space and cooling down is helpful, but also eventually, once we've had time to kind of process that situation. General, I think there was a time where I went and got a Blizzard or a box of dilly bars and dropped them off at the house. His house is like a don't let go of me. Ever don't leave me gift. I'm sorry. I was cantankerous and vice versa where I think we have a cool down moment and then we Zoom out and think about it there's.   - Joshua Driver There's always an apology and then some type of affirmation about the other one.   - Zach Rodenbarger I know I take a little more time sometimes to each person has their kind of respective way to do that and to cool down. And some people want to solve it. Same day some people take the night, take the weekend and so, you know, kind of learning the team, learning the other person and thinking through that, you know, how to talk through that and when and maybe even is more important if it's right away or give some space.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Have you guys ever had misses? Because I hear a little bit. You know, Josh, you said I'm gonna solve it now. Person. And Zach, I need a little bit more time. Did you guys have a learning curve initially and full disclosure. I have had to unlearn in my adult relationships that tendency and belief of like, if I can just say it to you four different times in four different ways, we can figure it out right now. Let's keep trying. And sometimes people are like, no, just shut up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Hard lesson.   - Joshua Driver I have had to learn that in general, my husband is similar. Where his cool down? He needs to think for a little bit and take a break. I think maybe in our early days I went back to like, don't walk away. Let's figure this out so we can move on. But then realizing that he needs a little bit more time and understanding to from his perspective, like, if he doesn't want to talk about it, it's not going to help for me trying to pull it out of them either.   - Joshua Driver So I've learned to kind of let that go that we're not going to necessarily resolve it today. But I do continue to like to think that I prioritize that moving forward so that we can eventually get through whatever that wall is that hurdle.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think my learning is definitely around witnessing people and then witnessing yourself. But it's very rare to convince someone of your perspective in an argument. And if you're both on one side, an argument is not going to convince the other person to jump on your side. And so where is that our email leading or can you take a step back and then provide the reason why you're thinking this way? The reason why that person is thinking that way. It's just interesting to see how arguments heat up and things, and there's no side switching.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes It's so true. Yeah. It makes me think of even a yet unresolved conversations argument that my husband and I are having and to be like, yeah, nobody ever switches sides in the middle like nobody is in the heat of it or very, very, very, very, very like the 1% does it happen and then usually with a fair degree of resentment.   - Joshua Driver So.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yes, that rings true.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'm struck that you are like building culture internally, but it selflessly is also like the product itself is something that is hopefully building culture and connection in the workplace. Tell me a little bit about how selflessly and volunteering and thinking outside of yourself is good for people in for workplaces.   - Joshua Driver But I think as we see culture being a normal discussion and given that we're still in a pandemic and becomes such a volatile polarizing environment in the world everywhere.   - Joshua Driver I always try to find, like silver linings or ways to maybe take take a moment to step away from the reality. And for me, my coping mechanism is to help others. And the reason why I've been able to spend that time to help others is because I've been very privileged and had the ability to do that where I understand that's not everybody's story coming out at our platform in understanding from not every company is a Lily or a Salesforce that has massive teams that work on these big the initiatives and have the resources.   - Joshua Driver There are a lot of companies I mean humans are humans, whether you work at a Fortune 50 company or a small startup.   - Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience.   - Joshua Driver I think everybody should have, but unfortunately, we work all the time or we have kids or other responsibilities that limit that time. So we set out to build selflessly so that companies didn't have to try to scrape the bottom the barrel to be able to provide purpose or the positive opportunities or the community engagement. We wanted to be a partner, so every company can experience the positive effects of being a crime brand or socially responsible organization, and that for a long time has only been afforded to gigantic organizations.   - Joshua Driver And so we wanted to be be the platform everyone can use. And so we have to be obviously an innovative with the pandemic and all these things that have changed the logistics on the nonprofit side. And unfortunately, a lot of this responsibility falls on nonprofits who are trying to keep their doors open and working on their mission. And so we took on the responsibility of of taking that work off of nonprofits and working on educating companies on how they can integrate philanthropy into normal business practices like employee engagement or team building or culture or heck, even the competitiveness of the sales Department.   - Joshua Driver How do we leverage a philanthropic component while a bunch of type as I go tell each other or something? And I think if there's always even a component of that philanthropic, if there's just even a small piece that goes back or gives back, I think that that's a really great thing to hard wire into a company's culture.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, anything you want to add?   - Zach Rodenbarger Yeah, I think obviously what Josh said, one of my kind of tag lines, even as we reach out to teams and think about them is kind of selfless. Teams make the best teams. And when you're have employees that are thinking about each other and how to help each other and not always just focused on their task, that's obviously going to make a better team and environment and better teamwork. And so by thinking through, how do we make selfless employees that's really part of selflessly is to help those employees encourage those employees, not Joe's employees to find a volunteer opportunity or find a way to give back to support a cause they care about to have those matching donations from the company and actually use those.   - Zach Rodenbarger And so all of these nudges that we want to help create selfless employees that are thinking about others and not just themselves. And so when you think about others that leads to that teamwork, really, everyone creating a better environment. And so putting all that together with what Josh said is exciting, that this is something we get to work on each day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. Well, my brain can't help but go to some sociological context. You know, I think in generations before, what you are tapping into is this, like human desire to be a part of something bigger, to be giving back, and that there was a while in the US where that was filled by a Church that was asking for a time, and hopefully they were giving towards meaningful things in that way. But that has become less and less central in American communities. There's still this impulse, but not quite the same.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You know, there were good and bad things about that prior model, but there's not that same sort of, like regular outlet. And we're also more connected in theory, to the needs of the world. But through the lens of social media, which doesn't often lead to direct action. So, like emotional sensing, selves are out there like feeling all these things. But there's not this bridging, it towards action that feels like it builds up like a physical, real community that we're regularly a part of. And that selflessly kind of helps to bridge some of those, like sociological shifts with a meaningful offering.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah.   - Joshua Driver I think without sounding like a sound bite, I feel philanthropy in the connection between a donor and a nonprofit or a company in its community or wherever this for profit and nonprofit connection is. For decades, we've given money to our Church, to the United Way, these intermediaries to trust that that's been utilized in the best way or is going towards the mission. And I think with technology improving and transparency, we've seen over time organizations that may not have made the best choices with the money that have come in and the the biggest concern is that this person had maybe a bad experience with this organization.   - Joshua Driver Are they going to find another one to support, or are they just going to stop supporting? And that's a big concern. And so now there's this big push for having more control over where people can donate and not necessarily have to be relegated to the confines of somebody's of an organization, agencies or whatever. But what that means is more transparency needs to be done on the nonprofit side. And the nonprofits don't have the resources necessarily to be able to give up regular updates about a campaign or whatever.   - Joshua Driver And so we've set up nonprofits to kind of fail from that regard. And then Conversely, I think we nonprofits. They're always fundraising. I've started my own nonprofit. We're always trying to raise more money so we can continue with our mission. And that leaves people out that may not have the liquidity or the resources to be able to participate financially, and we have to jump in. Or at least we take on some of the responsibility of how do we jump in and equate somebody skills and volunteer time to be worth just as much, if not more than them writing a check.   - Joshua Driver And so I think it's a generational shift about what philanthropy is starting to look like when we launch selflessly as we continue to grow selflessly. There's always people from the charitable sector that have their own perspective. You need to trust. This organization has been around for a century that they're just going to be doing the right thing. But we tend to grow because people want to break out of what the mold of philanthropy has been and want to have more control and be able to make more direct impact by us connecting those two sides and really always innovating on how to keep those two sides connected.   - Joshua Driver That means more resources go to the charitable sector. It just looks a little different. It's not an entry on a bank account. It might look like a donated product or a brainstorming session or some skilled services, but it can be helpful to breaking up some of the foundational infrastructure is a good thing, and I think we're along over you to really start shaking the tree and and changing what is no longer working. And that's a hard thing for people that have been in this space for a long time to necessarily want to accept.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, something that I heard both of you say as a mark of differentiation that you have cultivated and enjoy is a sense of whimsy, and maybe not taking ourselves too seriously. Tell me how that shows up in selflessly.   - Joshua Driver Well, my office looks like a kid play room. I just have random stuff all over the place, and then we have a Bulldog in the office. But I think the way that we talk to people, the way that we put ourselves out there, we didn't win the virtual background thing when you made those for your background as your company logo and all the strategic stuff. We didn't do that. I put on a background of me standing at the podium on Jeopardy or just keeping it. I'm sure people for first impression at times like, who the hell is this guy?   - Joshua Driver But I think that if we were always trying to display, everything is running great. We don't have any problems. We're constantly growing and just a few months away from being the Jeff Bezos to this is really nobody believes that. First of all, instead of constantly say everything is working. There isn't one company that everything's running smoothly, but I think we personality, my personality. We would probably suppress a lot of who we are individually if we always had to worry about being a highlight reel and being being always on and calculated and putting on this this front.   - Joshua Driver And I think having more real conversations, joking around, making mistakes, owning them and moving on or being open about what we've messed up for, mistakes we've made, I think, is so much more valuable in creating a deeper connection with our staff, which our network, our investors and being open and also accepting of the feedback too.   Joshua Driver We don't want to be a vendor or a tech provider. We want to be a partner. And I think that us being vulnerable and embracing that were not perfect, I think, is important to set that expectation for whom we're interacting with.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely. You want to be able to have fun with your team. You want your team to be able to have fun with customers and on those conversations. And you want people to look forward to having time together, whether it's on a Zoom call or in person, especially for your internal team. But then that customers start to feel that as well and enjoy the conversations with you. And maybe in the software, you start to see certain aspects and certain animations come across the screen or something like that.   - Zach Rodenbarger You're starting to see a little bit of other software as well, but we want to be have that enjoyment, especially if we're looking at company culture and encouraging people to get out and have some enjoyment and purpose and things like that. We want to come through in our mission and our software and allow really customers internal external everyone to start to see that, feel that and really enjoy the software and enjoy working with selflessly and working for selflessly.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes If listeners are intrigued about the platform, the mission, you guys in your story, where can they go to find out more about selflessly and how it can be used to build and increase the sense of connection at work?   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Joshua Driver Our website is Selflessly. I and our social media Tags or give selflessly on the Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and our email address the general email for Zach, it is Hello at Selflessly IO.   - Joshua Driver And.   - Joshua Driver We get all kinds of requests companies that want to become B Corps or our favorite messages or hey, I want to. We're a small company and we don't think that we can really make an impact. Can you show us how to do it like those are the things we really enjoy spending time with. Also, I think hearing from people that may want to start their own company or want to brainstorm. Sometimes we make time to have a coffee with a potential entrepreneur or give some feedback, help others where we can.   - Joshua Driver We'd love to hear from anybody who wants to reach out.   MUSICAL TRANSITION   Here are three key takeaways to build connection and care in the workplace…   Fun matters.From Nerf guns to dilly bar deliveries, introducing a little bit of levity, especially in tense and freighted situations, can be a game changer.  Where can you build some fun and some laughter into your office life? There is power in taking a break and thinking the best of the other person.You heard these two threads throughout the interview:  in offering a break or a walk to the other person, hoping and trusting that their moment of overwhelm is not their truest or best self.  This attention to the emotional temperature of a given situation is so important.  And I use it often in both my personal and professional interactions.  One way that people can move through their own disruption and overwhelm is by giving back to others.The act of moving beyond the constraints of your own situation, doing something positive for someone else, has all sorts of positive effects on the health of individuals and organizations.  If what you have heard today piques your interest, I encourage you to look up the good work that is going on at Sefless.ly.  More information about Zach, Josh, and the company can be found in the show notes.    OUTRO   To find out more about the work of Selfless.ly, visit https://selflessly.io

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How an Agency Grew Fast to Over $4 Million and Sold Quick

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:33


Hollis Carter is an entrepreneur and avid skier who, after founding many companies in his career, recently became the co-founder of the Baby Bathwater Institute, a membership-based community of entrepreneurs with a focus on cultivating natural, mutually beneficial relationships. Since his business relied on many in-person events, it was quite affected by the Covid 19 pandemic and subsequent restrictions. During this time of cancellations and being stuck at home, Hollis thought of a way to add value to the members during this new situation and started to offer a series of services with a performance-based model. This model quickly grew and he ended up selling it before actually having to fully build an agency. In this interview, he talked about the process of building and growing an agency to over $4 million and then selling it, all during a pandemic. 3 Golden Nuggets Growing an agency during Covid. Before the pandemic, Hollis was organizing many in-person events. Once they were canceled because of this new situation, he realized he had a perfect opportunity to offer a new service that would offer value to members of his mastermind. There was already a business relationship and he knew their products and believed in them. So he got ready to work under a performance-based model. “It was really very simple,” he says. The offer included podcast interviews, email lists, and content sites. He spent on setting up all the automation and tracking and found someone to handle that. And of course, under this model he was working with clients, not for them. Simplifying the offer. How can you make things simpler for you? First of all, don't just take a good deal. This agency had the advantage of having a group of companies whose product they trusted. Even then, our guest says, they took people who were so product-focused that we were going to get the content and the angles they needed. People who knew they needed to be told how to market this product. They also let clients use the work they were creating and focused on the 10% that drove revenue. However, there are some things they would do differently a second time around: setting a flat fee and, instead of complicated spreadsheets just telling the client “here's the number that came in, this is our cut,” would save a lot of time. Finally, figuring out how to set expectations of timeline, having a written document with a timeline that the client can reread instead of emailing you questions. Pulling from other industries. Hollis believes in taking knowledge from other industries into your own. He makes sure to have participants from different types of businesses in his masterminds and sustains there's always nuggets that you can pull from other industry practices that might not exist in a niche that you're opening, like what he has learned about hiring from the hotel space. He encourages others to give themselves a chance step outside what they know and learn something new that they can implement in their business from an unexpected source. Sponsors and Resources Ninja Cat: Today's episode is sponsored by Ninja Cat, a digital marketing performance management platform where you can unify your data, create beautiful, insightful reports and presentations that will help you grow your business. Head over to ninjacat.io/masterclass to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Growing an Agency Fast to Over $4 Million and Selling Quick Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here. I have another amazing show guest. We're going to talk about how when COVID hit, they formed an agency and ramped it up to over $4 million and sold it, during COVID. So it's a really cool episode and you're going to enjoy my guest. So let's go ahead and get into it. Hey, Hollis. Welcome to the show. Hollis: [00:00:29] Hey, man. Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:30] Pleasure to have you on. So for the people that have not heard of you or met you at one of your cool events, tell us who you are and what do you guys do? Hollis: [00:00:39] Yeah. My name is Hollis Carter. Living in Boulder, Colorado, but originally from Georgia, where I kind of got my first start in internet marketing stuff. I was like early in college and built a couple of online businesses and luckily had one that did pretty well and sold that. And then I moved to Colorado and did this skiing thing for a while and, uh, living in the mountains and it was great, but I could only talk about skiing and snowboarding and mountain biking with people. So, I'm now a front ranger living in Boulder and enjoy it and got back in the mix of things. Our main business is called the Baby Bathwater Institute. You've come out to one of our events that we had at out mountain. And, uh, I started, my other businesses based on the thing that I use to learn… Like no one was really teaching relevant stuff in the late nineties, early two thousands. So to do it, I thought let's sit at the bar and a lobby at a conference and got most of my nuggets. And so when we had some free time, me and my now business partner who were lobby con buddies for like a decade… We started hosting these events and the whole idea was curating nice people who are in the grow and scale phase and the actual founders of their business. And in a lot of different industries that we could draw knowledge from different places, less of a kind of echo chamber mastermind of people doing the same thing. Cause there's a lot of value in those, but it's very linear. This was more of organic group meetings to have fun and, um, draw things from other industries and stuff. But we have agency people, we've got guys from hotels, we've got guys from e comm businesses… I guess I say people, not guys, cause we have plenty of girls too. We've been doing it for about eight years and I love it. Compared to the businesses I've done before, it's probably the dumbest business model. Cause it's overhead-intensive, time-intensive, relationship intensive. But I actually like it. So we're doing it for years and we'll probably do it for a very long time and really enjoy it. Jason: [00:02:37] Very cool. And COVID hit you guys really hard because your whole thing is about live experiences and that kind of stuff, uh, which are a lot of fun. And so tell us about like… cause we were talking a couple of weeks ago, you were like, man, I couldn't do these live events and that's really what the membership was for. So we gave all this money back to the members because we couldn't do live events. But I started an agency kind of by accident and it quickly grew. So talk about how did you grow the agency so quick? What did you do? Because a lot of people are looking at going, and I've seen a lot of growth in agencies over during COVID, but yours was really pretty, pretty good. So tell us a little bit more about that. Hollis: [00:03:18] I think it was, it was different because much of it was born out just starting that momentum sort of grew versus sitting with a very particular plan. Where Baby Bathwater came less out of need more out of want, this came out of need. And so there… Also, we are locked in our house and I could stay focused on, cause I wasn't doing… Going to conferences or traveling or doing things. But I think the main frame was okay, just postpone slash canceled, who knows a handful of events. We basically lost about two and a half million bucks in that decision. Which happened before people in the states even believed that this COVID thing was gonna affect us because our president was in Italy. And so we saw it a little early. We knew we didn't want to let people go. There was no PPP stuff yet. And me and my partner, Michael, we always knew we could always fall back on our marketing skills, which is kind of what got us to a place to even know what people wanted from a mastermind. So our personal interests has been in the health and wellness sort of space. We see lots of stuff that's crap. And we see lots of stuff that's good. And we happened to know a few people who have amazing products that are members. But they're product guys, they're not marketing people at all. And so we kind of went in with the thesis of how do we enhance the people who are already members value and we can't do anything for 'em, but also don't run any risk of screwing up the relationship if we get in bed with them and do something different than what we already have a good relationship with. So, I mean, it basically started with four products. I knew we had people in the group who had platforms. That love the products, cause they give them out at events. They love them. And I know they have a lot of traffic and I knew these people have great products. Didn't even know what I'm talking about. Like you should just set up this campaign and get them on the podcast and set up an email. You can track it with affiliate links… And all like, can you just do that for me? Kind of thing. So, I mean, it was actually super, super simple. Essentially, out of a network license for post affiliate pro so that we could track all of the clicks and conversions and build it very slowly, not a lot of overhead. It costed maybe like five grand or something we spent getting set up and all that automation and tracking. We did have a really hard time finding someone to help us run that once it worked. We ended up finding the guy who made the tutorial videos for the original version of it and tracked him down. And it was the first hire because it was complicated and how he set up the company structure. But the basics of it was we had people get podcast, email lists and content sites. I mean, people have great products that had a unique hook. It couldn't just be like, like we did have a CBD, which is a crowded market with a bunch of people at all look the same. But this had clinical trials, some studies, so I could go get functional medicine doctors to say something unique about it and they could write a real piece of content. So really we just took the friction out of the middle, which was, it's hard for the product owners to focus on these things that are ancillary. Then buy an ad that are not doing very diligent tasks that can scale these like one-off promotions and managing people is hectic. Like if I had a brand, I wouldn't want to do stuff we were doing because I know the costliness of managing all these relationships and getting it on the calendar and getting all the stuff they need. But in our unique situation, we had time. We… the money. We wanted to serve the people who we wanted to have back when things came back online. And so it made sense to keep calling them chatting and working it out and figuring it out. So our deal is that we took... it's very minimal, it's just an average, about 10% of the revenue for 12 months of the customer. And we would do a, you know, a multi-tiered campaign where, you know, perhaps the person to get on a podcast and do an interview about the product that was very educational and content-heavy. So it didn't just come out of the blue of this promotion. It was like ease into with good questions and then we'd do an article. And then eventually kind of like an email with a special offer and a landing page just for that person. And like something I've been back in early on was when one big person promotes the rest. So we usually just go for, you know, one or two people we have a good relationship that have a big audience and then their affiliates would see it happen. And we'd get a few more of those. But we did, because it was so hands-on, mess around with people who could send, you know, thousands and thousands and thousands of clicks and had an audience that already trusted them. So very boutique, very niche, but where it worked, very effective. I'd say the biggest bottleneck was calendars. You could lock in a deal and they might not have three months so they could do it. But we hit a point where we were going to have to start hiring more people, we had a tech guy, an administrative helper in an industry that me and Michael were putting together. Then we hired someone to go start recruiting more promoters, and then we need to start hiring writers and creatives. At that point, we actually ended up selling the business so that we didn't have to build an agency. The hard part of building an agency, managing the creatives, training, we never really hit that point. Although it looks like I'll go back to the trough and do it again. But I mean, really it was about that simple. It was like performance-based so we couldn't mess up relationships. And also we didn't want anyone to ever tell us, hey, you have to do this for me. Uh, it usually mostly came from the merchants with the products. They'd be like, hey, where are the traffic? And we're like, hey, we don't, we don't work for you. We're not on a retainer, but it's coming, it's coming. Then we'll get paid. Well, we only get paid when we make sales. So that helped us not get stress out. Jason: [00:09:32] Do you feel like you have to comb through mountains of data, jumping between multiple platforms to spreadsheets, to slide decks and backing in, in order to create performance reports for your clients? It's a constant drain on your agency's time and resources. And that's where our friends at Ninja Cat can help. Ninja Cat is a digital marketing performance management platform that really unifies your marketing data and empowers your agency to automate insightful, beautiful client reports that scale. Now Ninja Cat cat keeps your marketing performance and presentation tools in one place, freeing you up from manual data wrangling. And it really gives your team more time to focus on strategy and growing your business. And for a limited time, my smart agency podcast listeners will receive $500 ninja credit. When you go to ninjacat.io/masterclass to claim your offer and schedule a demo. That's ninjacat.io/masterclass. Yeah, I see a lot of people going the performance route. You know, one of our mastermind members, David, he was always constantly under the million mark and just trying to figure out how to get over it. And he switched to this model and got a million dollars last year during COVID, just from one client for the performance deal. Kind of like what you guys are doing, or you guys did or about to do again. I guess we can talk about that. But I liked how, when you're the performance model, they can't tell you what you can and can't do, or a timeline. You're just like, I'm putting a campaign together on our own dime, our own resources. This is what you're agreed to pay. I really like that. But I also like too, that, you know, this is a home run. Like it's a good product. I want people to not kind of overlook that and just don't go up to anybody and go give me 10% of all your sales. And plus too, you guys had relationships with them so you knew you could trust them. Because it gets really tricky sometimes when you're like, yeah, give me 10% of sales and they could the books however they want. Hollis: [00:11:54] Yes. So that was an interesting piece of... The one thing that I guess is there is we did have these relationships we've built over almost 20 years now. Which, if you just do it on the street, we couldn't start from scratch with that. So that was like our one… competitively used to do something here, but the book side of things, we actually knew how bad that can get. So we control that this was a bottleneck and business model, as far as administration and just workload. I kept everything clean, but we were starting to get super risky. So we invoiced the merchant for the payments and wrote to the affiliates. We did everything. So we essentially became a bank taking the money, moving the money versus paying out of their own affiliate program. It started to get pretty hectic. You get one monthly payment. We're trying to keep the relationships paying on time. We never ran into any issues, but you could see it coming as things got more complex. Jason: [00:12:52] Well, I'm sure the IRS probably set up red flags of all the money moving around. Hollis: [00:12:57] Oh, it was crazy that was passing through and yeah… And so like in hindsight, if we do this again, won't do the complicated equation where we have 12 months tail customer. We also calculated a refund risk thing. You know, now it's going to be one time upfront with a small fee for us that continues, but like the calculating the refund piece to try to mitigate risks. Like I think we went into it wanting to be like a no-brainer where it's like, hey, we've taken all the risks where X, Y, and Z, that you won't have to do anything for. Our contract is like the nicest thing in the world. If this was the only thing we were doing, and we were focused on it that thing would have sort of bit us in the ass, as it started to grow. But it worked well. It was boutique small. And we only did this from March to October. So it was like a significant period of time, but you can see all the forethought we didn't put into it with, oh man, the amount of time to calculate these things if I would've... There's a bunch of things we do if we really want to scale it simpler. If we do this again, you know. Jason: [00:14:05] What are some of the other things that you do simpler. Because most people listening here, this is their full-time gig. They weren't just looking at like, well, let's just try this project out, which that's really pretty cool that you guys are able to do that. Hollis: [00:14:19] Yeah. I think, you know… fed the horse because we had all the relationships and we knew this I'd stayed up drinking wine with every person in the thing all night. I knew we could do well with good products, which you highlighted, is like products that kind of sell themselves. And then the owner of those products, I think this is the simplest thing is don't just take a good deal. We only took people who were so product-focused that we were going to get the content and the angles we needed. All they cared about is being the best. But they didn't care about was telling us how to market it, that they actually wanted us to tell them. They would use the campaigns to inform all of the rest of their staff. One thing we did do well and make it easy was, hey, use the work we're creating. We don't need any cut of it. You can take our landing pages, reuse them. If you get your own affiliates, you can run them through your program. You know, just do that. Cause we only focused on that 10% that drove our revenue. The things we probably would have done different or not such a complicated calculation of the things. I remember when I first started in some of the affiliate stuff, people would hold back a percentage for refunds. There was like a whole equation. But we made everything else so simple for them. We didn't need to go, that… We could have just said here's a flat fee. Here's a number. Honestly, it would have saved one employee 40 hours a month in weird stuff. And in places where ambiguity… where also the customer on both sides has to read a spreadsheet that's complicated versus like here's the number that came in and here is the cut… over. I think simplicity would have helped a lot in that sense. And then other simplicity things, I think just figuring out how to set expectations of timeline. Even though we didn't work for those people, said it on the phone, in the conversations of like, hey, we might get a campaign locked in that's going to be out this far. But then they get in their own world. Like, where's the stuff? And I'm like, no, we already told you this. And so, one outline. Here's how this works, one the phone. Before you email me any questions, reread this. This is the rules of engagement and how it works. But that I would say once it worked and had momentum, changing the relationships from I work for you to we work together changed the whole dynamic of it versus, you know, just collecting a flat fee. Jason: [00:16:49] Yeah. I love that of like we work together rather than you're the dog barking orders to me. And even if you don't do a performance model. Hollis: [00:16:58] Yeah. It feels like you kind of got to do that sometimes. Cause I feel like that's how we like learned. If you worked in a restaurant going up or we… Whatever, like that's how it was. When you're getting paid, you just got to say yes, please, and as you wish. Which honestly doesn't even serve the client that well. Sometimes you're doing shit that they don't even need to get done. They just wanted to show that they tell you to do something. But we're only going to focus on brings in dollars. It doesn't bog down either of our teams. And that's why we switched the contract that you can leave whenever you want. You know, the psychology there was great because it was like, we're paying equally versus that, you know, walked into some long retainer and some big set up fees and things like that. Obviously you have to have some results for that to be worth it, um, for the relationship to stay. But if you know you can deliver on it, then it's probably better to be in a, a mutual relationship where either party can leave in 30 days notice versus trying to lock in really long-term deals. Jason: [00:17:58] Yeah, exactly. Well, awesome. Well, this is amazing, Hollis. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience listening in? Hollis: [00:18:05] Listen, I mean, it's funny just because it's a friend of mine that just got off a call with one of our members who, who set them up on like a little dinner in the same town. And I forget the book references basically it's about taking knowledge from other industries and bringing them into your own. So what I saw was great was a lot of the product companies who were here like some of them were in retail and other things. They just didn't know how to pull stuff from other areas. There's always like these levers that you can pull from other industry practices that might not exist in a niche that you're opening that you're trying to mark it as that in. And so I was really, all we did was just start reaching into other tools that there's no way they're ever going to get to this. So obviously we can take over this part for them and we're not also dealing with the dynamics. So there's someone in the house already being paid to do this or anything like that. It's pretty clean that way. But I think we just learned that from sitting in these events from people like, you know, we have some hiring stuff we've learned from guys in the hotel space, which I never would have thought to learn that until I sat into that at one of these events or whatever. So I've never seen through blinders. Like it's good to be focused and linear, but I think there's just so many cool nuggets in different industries you can pull and bring in that we all just kind of forget to take a glance at. Jason: [00:19:30] Awesome. Well, cool. Well, what's a website people go and check you guys out? Hollis: [00:19:35] Just babybathwater.com. Jason: [00:19:37] Awesome. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show. If you guys enjoyed this episode, make sure you go to their website. They have really cool events. I went to the one in, in Utah. And it was really pretty amazing. And if you guys want to really grow and scale your agency faster, what got you here is not going to get you to the next level and you need to do a number of different things. Because probably what got you to this level is from referrals and word of mouth, or maybe you selling, or maybe one salesperson. The biggest thing that you need is systems in place in order to grow and scale faster and get to the point where you can pick and choose. If you want to do that, I want you guys to check out our agency playbook. Go to jasonswenk.com/playbook and check it out. And it might just be the thing that will get you to the next level. So go do that now. And until next time, have a Swenk day.

Start With A Win
Lose the Ego and Celebrate the Wins

Start With A Win

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:54


In this episode of Start With A Win, Adam and SWAW producer Mark pick up the conversation about Adam's first book, Start With A Win: Tools and Lessons to Create Personal and Business Success. Adam discusses the final chapters—chapters eight, nine, and ten. He discusses the role of the ego and how it has the potential to destroy humility. Adam elaborates the ego as the manifestation of insecurity, creating an emotional response triggered to protect vulnerabilities. Good leaders maintain emotional control by recognizing and acknowledging their egos and maintain transparency with themselves. Controlling your ego enables you to be vulnerable and accept others' mistakes, harnessing your abilities for positive attributes like confidence and decision-making. Adam discusses three keys to accountability and growth—mentors, coaches, and masterminds. Find a mentor who will challenge your thoughts and inspire you to take action with newfound perspectives. A mentor is someone willing to share time and wisdom in exchange for your attention and deliberate action to be the best version of yourself. A coach is someone who will unlock your potential and help you attain your goals and other pursuits. Ask yourself—are you coachable? What do you hope to accomplish with new insights? Mastermind groups provide peer accountability (challenging you and pushing you to be vulnerable) and establish the power of association—you are the average of the five people you accompany most. Adam emphasizes the importance of celebrating your wins, no matter how big or small. When leaders celebrate the wins of their team members, they instill hope, give appreciation, and provide recognition. Celebrating wins creates opportunities to surpass goals, build motivation, and exceed the maximum thought process in all endeavors. Uphold a transparent dynamic of analyzing, communicating, and celebrating wins to lead your team to maximize their potential and produce consistent results. Pre-order your copy of Start With A Win: Tools and Lessons to Create Personal and Business Success:https://www.amazon.com/Start-Win-Lessons-Personal-Business/dp/1119807077https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/start-with-a-win-adam-contos/1138838681https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/start-with-a-win-tools-and-lessons-to-create-personal-and-business-success_adam-contos/28078881/#edition=58850831&idiq=46017298Connect with Adam:https://www.startwithawin.com/https://www.facebook.com/REMAXAdamContoshttps://twitter.com/REMAXAdamContoshttps://www.instagram.com/REMAXadamcontos/ Leave us a voicemail:888-581-4430

The Tim Ferriss Show
#537: Hidden Knowledge — Mark Plotkin on How Animals Discover and Use Medicines (And Lessons We Can Apply)

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 55:29


Hidden Knowledge — Mark Plotkin on How Animals Discover and Use Medicines (And Lessons We Can Apply) | Brought to you by BlockFi crypto platform and UCAN endurance products powered by SuperStarch®. More on both below. This special episode of The Tim Ferriss Show features Dr. Mark Plotkin (@DocMarkPlotkin) .Mark is an ethnobotanist who serves as president of the Amazon Conservation Team, which has partnered with ~80 tribes to map and improve management and protection of ~100 million acres of ancestral rainforests. He is best known to the general public as the author of the book Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, one of the most popular books ever written about the rainforest. His most recent book is The Amazon: What Everyone Needs to Know. You can find my first interview with Mark at tim.blog/MarkPlotkin. He is also the host of the Plants of the Gods podcast, through which you can learn about everything from hallucinogenic snuffs to the diverse formulations of curare (a plant mixture which relaxes the muscles of the body and leads to asphyxiation), and much, much more.Today's episode focuses on how animals use medicinal plants, and it has some wild stories featuring cows, penguins, pigs, frogs, and everything in between. It's pulled from a chapter in Mark's book Medicine Quest: In Search of Nature's Healing Secrets. I loved the chapter, and I asked Mark if he'd be willing to record it in audio to share it with you all. He agreed and here we are. Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by BlockFi! BlockFi is building a bridge between cryptocurrencies and traditional financial and wealth-management products. I became excited enough about this company that I ended up becoming an investor.Their BlockFi Rewards Visa® Signature Credit Card provides an easy way to earn more Bitcoin because you can earn 3.5% in Bitcoin back on all purchases in your first 3 months and 1.5% forever after, with no annual fee. BlockFi also lets you easily buy or sell cryptocurrencies. For a limited time, you can earn a crypto bonus of $15–$250 in value when you open a new account. Get started today at BlockFi.com/Tim and use code TIM at sign up.This episode is also brought to you by UCAN. I was introduced to UCAN and its unique carbohydrate SuperStarch by my good friend—and listener favorite—Dr. Peter Attia, who said there is no carb in the world like it. I have since included it in my routine, using UCAN's powders to power my workouts, and the bars make great snacks. Extensive scientific research and clinical trials have shown that SuperStarch provides a sustained release of energy to the body without spiking blood sugar. UCAN is the ideal way to source energy from a carbohydrate without the negatives associated with fast carbs, especially sugar. You avoid fatigue, hunger cravings, and loss of focus. Whether you're an athlete working on managing your fitness or you need healthy, efficient calories to get you through your day, UCAN is an elegant energy solution. My listeners can save 30% on their first UCAN order by going to UCAN.co/Tim.If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!*For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Prosperity Through Multifamily Real Estate Investing
Tapping Into Your Home's Equity Using Home Equity Agreements

Prosperity Through Multifamily Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:42


Matthew Sullivan is the CEO and founder of QuantumRE, a company that solves a real problem for homeowners by helping them access a portion of their home equity without taking on more debt. This new financing tool is not a heat lock, it's not a loan, and it's not a reverse mortgage. That means homeowners can get cash from their equity with no interest and no monthly payments.  He and his team have helped over 100 homeowners use their home equity to pay off expensive credit cards, remodel their home, pay college tuition fees, or to diversify into other investments all without taking on extra debt.  Matthew also has a proven track record in real estate innovation through his experience as co-founder of the Secured Real Estate Income Strategies Fund and as president and founder of Crowd Venture dot com, a real estate crowdfunding company originally from London,  Finally, Matthew worked with Richard Branson's corporate finance team and was a director of the Virgin sponsored London Air Ambulance, a helicopter pilot himself. He's also the host of his own podcast, Hooked on Startups. If you want to know about this relatively new way of getting dead equity out of your home then this episode is for you.For today's episode we will cover: [00:00 - 9:12] Opening Segment.Getting to know Matthew Sullivan.Working with Richard Branson.The adventure to crowd venturing. [9:12 - 17:50] The chance to cast a wider net.How technology will be the new wave of real estate. Creative ways to find investment capital.What is house rich and cash poor?Different groups of people that are house rich but cash poor. [17:50 - 22:33] The opportunity of Home Equity Agreements.When the Home Equity agreement started.How something becomes a mainstream product.Capitalizing on block chain technology. [22:33 - 30:55] Protection by lean on title.Why the title isn't transferred.Protecting the lender.Benefits of a lean on title.Unlocking the dead equity.The difference between a loan. [30:55 - 38:30] The risks of Home Equity Agreements.The lender's downside risks.Getting the title backBenefits of no early payment penalties.Selecting the properties to implement this strategy.The client's downside risks. [38:30 - 44:01] The Psychology of home ownership.What if homes didn't gain appreciation during Covid?Debt related problems.  Using your house as an ATM.What if the owner doesn't want to sell.Being the deal expert when talking to investors.The challenges during raising the equity. [44:01 - 51:35] Final Questions For Matthew Sullivan.Cleaning the title. How the owner has no upfront cost.This isn't a repeat of the disaster of ‘07 - ‘08.Navigating through uncharted waters to make good operators in great ones.How to get people to stay in your property.Assessing your risk tolerance. [51:35 - 53:24] Closing segmentThe various ways to become a better investor.Knowing your strengths and weaknesses.Final words from everyone

upside
[614 Startups] Sam Baddoo of Fleri

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:20


On this episode, Elio interviews Sam Baddoo, Founder of Fleri. Fleri helps immigrants protect the people who matter most back home with health insurance. Every year immigrants in the Diaspora send billions of dollars to Africa oftentimes to pay for healthcare. Without direct insight into how the funds are being spent and whether adequate treatment is being provided, immigrants are left to worry about whether the money they are sending will contribute to their loved ones wellbeing.Fleri is changing that by allowing immigrants to purchase health insurance for the loved ones creating a win-win-win-win situation for the policyholder, patient, doctors and insurance companies. First, the policyholder knows that they are providing access to high-quality healthcare for their loved one and they can see what treatments have been received. Next, the patient has access to vetted physicians and receives care in clinically sound facilities. The doctors are able to treat patients with the ability to pay thereby providing capital for infrastructure investment and finally, insurance companies have the premiums to build robust networks and offer more affordable plan options.Fleri is building a commercial solution to what has been an intractable problem in the developing world by creating a robust healthcare insurance ecosystem with incentives for all stakeholders.Subscribe to 614 StartupsFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

B2B Mentors
4 Key Pillars of Social Selling - Connor's Curiosities #031

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:47


Today: 4 Key Pillars of Social Selling - Connor's Curiosities #031Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

The Iced Coffee Hour
Meet The Unemployed Investor Making $10 Million Dollars

The Iced Coffee Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 70:19


Today we're speaking with AskSebby about investing, the venture start up culture, and credit card churning - Enjoy! Subscribe To AskSebby: https://www.youtube.com/c/AskSebby Sebby's Startup: https://subscribe.so Add us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jlsselby https://www.instagram.com/gpstephan https://www.instagram.com/alex_nava_photography Official Clips Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeBQ24VfikOriqSdKtomh0w DOWNLOAD MY NEW FINANCIAL APP: https://hungrybull.page.link/graham GET YOUR FREE STOCK WORTH UP TO $1000 ON PUBLIC & SEE MY STOCK TRADES - USE CODE GRAHAM: http://www.public.com/graham MY NEW COFFEE IS NOW FOR SALE: http://www.bankrollcoffee.com/ Join the 2x weekly mentorship group: https://tinyurl.com/yaexko4o The Equipment used: https://tinyurl.com/y78py5g2 Audio Equipment Used In Podcast: Rode NT1, Rodecaster Pro The YouTube Creator Academy: Learn EXACTLY how to get your first 1000 subscribers on YouTube, rank videos on the front page of searches, grow your following, and turn that into another income source: https://bit.ly/2STxofv $100 OFF WITH CODE 100OFF For Podcast Inquiries, please contact GrahamStephanPodcast@gmail.com *Some of the links and other products that appear on this video are from companies which Graham Stephan will earn an affiliate commission or referral bonus. Graham Stephan is part of an affiliate network and receives compensation for sending traffic to partner sites. The content in this video is accurate as of the posting date. Some of the offers mentioned may no longer be available.

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
3 Pieces of Data That Are Key to Marketing #1885

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:40


In episode #1885, Neil and Eric talk about three pieces of data you need to track as a marketer. You might now be looking at all of these, which is why you should tune in to hear what they are! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:25] Today's topic: 3 Pieces of Data That Are Key to Marketing [00:27] Focus on LTV; you need to look at the long-term, not the short-term. [01:05] Understand the power of retention to align with product! [01:43] See how your upsells and downsells work out.  [03:03] That's it for today! [03:03] To stay updated with events and learn more about our mastermind, go to the Marketing School site for more information or call us on 310-349-3785!   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:    Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
99. The Honest Company's Jessica Alba: Make your customer the star

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:38


Jessica Alba's approach in founding and building The Honest Company revolves around three letters: IRL, a useful acronym for “In Real Life.” This phrase acts as a reminder for the company to shine the spotlight onto their customer's real needs – not only to understand them, but to address them as well. Alba built the company around her passion to make childcare and household products that are safe and eco-friendly. By asking her team “What's the IRL version of this?”, Alba focuses the company to make products that will enhance the customer's everyday lives. “A lot of these product ideas come from: What do I wish I had to optimize the life experience – and then, how can we do it?” Read a transcript of this episode: https://mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.