Podcasts about Rivian

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Latest podcast episodes about Rivian

Plug In For More
EV Travel and Camping: With the All Electric Family

Plug In For More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 31:35 Transcription Available


Welcome to the Plug In For More podcast!  Mike, Tom, and Bryant are here to help you on your journey to an Electric vehicle future.  Each episode we discuss current events, trends, and a specific topic of education related to EV's.  We bring together a diverse experience set, and pair it with guests who are experts in the field.  For even more information on EV's, check out www.EVUniverse.com. In this fun episode we sit down with the All Electric Family.  Katie and Steve are early EV adopters who have taken charge of educating the public on the benefits of EV ownership, and the dispelling of misinformation.  Their journey to owning both a Rivian R1T and a Ford F-150 Lightning has been an interesting one.  Listen in to hear about their lessons learned and words of wisdom for those looking to get into the EV space.Check out the All Electric Family at their various social media platforms;https://www.youtube.com/@AllElectricFamilyhttps://www.instagram.com/allelectricfamilyhttps://www.tiktok.com/@allelectricfamily?is_from_webapp=1&sender_device=pchttps://www.facebook.com/allelectricfamilyBe sure to follow PIFM on our various social media platforms, for more exciting content on EV's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pifm_podcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PIFMPodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqXpv3fnOcv-robjLbDINFQ/featured

Electrify News Podcast
(LIVE) Electrify Expo - Austin: Intro & All Things Charging

Electrify News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 10:07


Matt and Jo are live at the final Electrify Expo of the season, in Austin TX. They share the goal of the expo, and all of the amazing tools available for testing out EVs, the Chargeway app, as well as the Austin energy unlimited charging deal! They close out the episode by discussing how EVs truly are for everyone.----FOLLOW:InstagramTwitterFacebookWebsiteATTEND ELECTRIFY EXPO:Austin (Nov 11-13)PRODUCED BY:Lagos Creative

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla
Rivian's Q3 2022 Earnings Call

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 26:58


On this week's episode of Kilowatt, we cover Rivian's Q3 2022 Earnings Call.Links:Earnings CallSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/kilowatt. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/kilowatt. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

THE WEEKLY DRIVER
#248, Auto journalist John Berg talks LA Auto Show

THE WEEKLY DRIVER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 34:16


John Berg has spent decades in the automotive industry including as a reporter and photographer. John and I met recently at the LA Auto Show. We both had work to do, but we ended up talking for quite a while the media room at the Los Angeles Convention Center The automotive columnist for the Alameda Post, Berg is our guest this week on The Weekly Driver Podcast. A convertible Genesis concept with "wrap-around" lights was displayed at the recent LA Auto Show. All images @ James Raia. Berg, who drove from the San Francisco Bay Area to Los Angeles to the recently concluded 10-day show in his new, sixth-generation Chevy Camaro, is also a car collector. He owns nearly 20 vehicles. Co-host Bruce Aldrich and I talk with Berg about the car industry and his passion for cars. We also ask for his impressions of the show, the vintage vehicles on display to debuts and concepts. Several manufacturers at the LA Auto Show recognized their past while also presenting current models and concepts, including this 1956 Lincoln Continental. What did he make of the Genesis concept and its wrap-around headlights? What about Vinfast, the Vietnamese company that showcased two more vehicles and is now taking orders? And what of the absence of Tesla, Rivian and others? We discuss all of it in our usual half-hour of light-hearted banter To read more of Berg's work, visit: https://alamedapost.com/automotive/   New rich exterior paint colors were among the themes of the LA Auto Show, including the stunning green on a Genesis sedan. The Weekly Driver Podcast encourages and appreciates feedback from our listeners. Please forward episode links to family, friends and colleagues. And you are welcome to repost links from the podcast to your social media accounts. The idea of more eyeballs on more content works for us. Support our podcast by shopping on Amazon.com. A graphic display at the bottom of the post links to automotive selections of the online retailer. But there's also a search function for anything available directly from the site. If you shop via this site, we receive a small commission. It helps us continue to produce independent content. The site began in 2004 and includes more than 700 reviews. The podcast is in its fourth year, and we've had a diverse collection of guests — famous athletes, vintage car collectors, manufacturer CEOs, automotive book authors, industry analysts, a movie stuntman and episodes from auto shows and car auctions. Please send comments and suggestions for new episodes to James Raia via email: james@jamesraia.com. All podcast episodes are archived on theweeklydriver.com/podcast Every episode is also available on your preferred podcast platform. Several of the more prominent platforms are listed below. Amazon.com iheartradio Spotify

Work Stoppage
Ep 133 - Unions Keep Workers Safe, Not OSHA

Work Stoppage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 86:13


After a bit of complaining about workers being forced to come in during the holidays, we start this week's episode with a check-in on the longest running strike in the US at Warrior Met Coal in Alabama. The strike wave in the UK continues to grow as academic workers held the UK's largest ever academic strike and the RMT announced new rail shutdowns. The largest strike in the US continued into its third week as the University of California refuses to meet workers needs for a living wage and benefits. Electric truck maker Rivian continues to show that tech industry "disruption" usually just means violating labor and safety laws. The horrifying death of a foundry worker at Caterpillar in Illinois exposed the total toothlessness of OSHA and raises the question: how much is a human life worth? In happier news, three major unions announced an agreement to collaborate to unionize Delta wall-to-wall, in a move that could set a new pattern for organizing. Truck drivers in South Korea have launched another major strike after the right wing Yoon government backed out of a deal agreed to earlier this year. And of course, we end with Starbucks, where the company keeps closing stores, but union drives keep winning at a faster pace. Join the discord: discord.gg/tDvmNzX  Follow the pod at instagram.com/workstoppage, @WorkStoppagePod on Twitter,  John @facebookvillain, and Lina @solidaritybee

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla
Mercedes Wants Your Money

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 17:59


Podcast:Daily Tech News Show November 28thLinks:Vinfast hopes its new VF 6 and VF 7 electric SUVs make it the 'EV manufacturer for everyone'VinFast VF6, VF7 debut in L.A., and a sports car could be added to lure U.S. buyersFord Wants U.S. Government To Be Lenient With EV Tax Credit RequirementsLucid Now Offers Ready To Deliver Air EVs On US Customer WebsiteRivian faces allegations of unsafe work conditions in Normal, IL plantFaraday Future Is Struggling Yet Again, Deliveries In QuestionLG Chem To Build $3 Billion Battery Cathode Factory In TennesseeMercedes offers 'Acceleration Increase' — as a $1,200 subscriptionTesla now has 40,000 Superchargers around the worldTesla Cybertruck reaches 1.5 million pre-orders – Can it live up to the hype?Tesla teases Apple Music integration coming soonElon Musk: South Korea Among Top Candidates For EV InvestmentNext Tesla gigafactory location could be in South KoreaTesla is rumored to integrate Dolby Atmos in its electric carsTesla Full Self-Driving Beta is now available to all owners in North AmericaTesla's next-generation FSD chips to be supplied by TSMC: reportTesla reportedly places massive order of next-gen self-driving chips with TSMCSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/kilowatt. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/kilowatt. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Overland Journal Podcast
Getting Electric with Rivian, Hummer, and Ford

The Overland Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 61:28


Full show notes available at Overland Journal This episode sponsored in part by:Nimbl Vehicles 

Alles auf Aktien
Zweistellige Dividendenrenditen und die unsichtbare E-Auto-Aktie

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 17:43


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Holger Zschäpitz über ein positives Protokoll, eine tolle Traktoren-Aktie und neue Tesla-Kursziele. Außerdem geht es um Deere, Manchester United, Borussia Dortmund, TAG, Deutsche Pfandbriefbank, Hapag Lloyd, Deutsche Mittelstand Real Estate, Kloeckner & Co, DIC Asset, ProCredit Holding, TTL Beteiligungs- und Grundbesitz, Instone Real Estate, Fair Value Reit, LEG, ProSiebenSat.1, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Sixt, BASF, Wacker Chemie, Evonik, E.on, Volkswagen, Allianz, Deutsche Post, Fresenius, Covestro, Vonovia, Global X SuperDividend ETF (WKN: A3DEKS), WisdomTree Global Quality Dividend Growth ETF (WKN: A2AG1E), SPDR Global Aristocrats (WKN: A1T8GD), Lucid und Rivian.

The Clean Energy Show
Oil's Last Lavish Party: The 2022 World Cup in Qatar

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:34


Two hundred billion dollars of oil and gas money to through The World Cup in Qatar. Turns out Qatar is 'new money' and yet has a huge sovereign fund of $300B. Even they know the transition is coming. The governor of Tokyo suggests turtleneck sweaters for saving on energy. Will the trend take off? Donate to The Clean Energy Show via PayPal! COP27 was a big, fat compromise and we need to do better but it does seem the world is slowly coming together to oppose fossil fuels. The sexy new Prius is fast and sporty. Too bad it isn't an electric vehicle. We predict continued bad sales for Toyota. Biden pours billions into aiding the U.S. power grid to transition to renewable energy. Canada begins a program to replace oil furnaces on the East coast with heat pumps. Other topics: GoComics, Carlos Ghosn, Unilever to make precision fermented ice cream could be the blow to dairy we've been predicting, Mazda might be the only Japanese auto company to get serious about EVs and Volkswagen may be dropping the ball. A listener bought his first EV and is worried his reduced winter range won't come back. Don't worry, it will! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Transcript------------ Hello, and welcome to episode 140 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, with the World Cup underway in Qatar, we look at what might be the peak of petrol state decadence. I mean, what does $200 billion even get? Dennis a soccer tournament without beer. Hell, even my kids pee wee soccer tournaments had beer. The governor of Tokyo has solved the energy crisis. The solution? Turtleneck sweaters. Speaking as a Canadian, wait until they hear about Tukes and woolly socks. Well, the Cop 27 climate summit was a bit of a wash. You know, like standing in the middle of Miami. Domino's Pizza is moving to Chevy Bolt electric delivery vehicles. They've ordered 800 bolts from GM, and if they don't receive the cars in 30 minutes, they're free. All that and more of this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Holy brian we're back with another show, another week. We're nonstop robotic machines here. Yeah, a lot is going on. And also this week, will I fit into the surprisingly sexy new Prius? The answer will sadden you, I think. Biden gives billions to the US power grid, and Canada follows the US. And installing heat pumps in regions where oil furnaces are popular. And I still can't figure out why oil furnaces are popular. They just didn't want to run the they just became popular, I think. Rural areas where it's hard to get them on the grid, I guess. And how are you this week? I'm going to tell you right now that I'm not well. I've been sick. You sound terrible, James. No, I'm not possessed. That is, my lungs. I've had illness. I flu since last we met. Brian pretty much okay, but it's not going well. Here's what I did. I tested my family because they're all sick. They gave it to me. My daughter brought it home from high school, and I knew I was going to get sick, so I just tested they tested. My wife and my daughter tested, and they're negative. So I thought I'm like I was singing at my nose. It's not like I have something different. I don't go anywhere, as you know. Anyway, I've had a hellish number of days, so I am barely able to be here today. And by the end of the show, I will be soaked in sweat. Oh, dear. Because I'm still doing anything is like a chore. I skipped lunch yesterday because I couldn't go downstairs. Oh, no. That maybe answers my question, because the pet peeve of mine. People often say they have the flu when what they really mean is that they have a cold. So you said you have a flu. Do you really believe it's, the damage, or is it a bad cold? I was going to jokingly bring the CDC chart on this to the show, and I thought, no, I'm not going to. But now I wish I did. Yeah, well, people say that all the time. Oh, I had the flu. And no, you just had a bad cold. If you've got the flu, it typically means you cannot go to work or go downstairs for lunch. Yeah, well, there's overlaps, okay? But having fever and severe aches is very uncommon for colds. You can have a mild fever. You can have a brief fever. But to have a long fever and severe aches, which I did, even with pills, I've been thrown down pills left and right until yesterday when I decided I've had enough. But I took one for the show, so maybe it'll kick in halfway through. We'll see. Anyway, I had to do some harrowing things, like go drive my family home from the gray cop, the super bowl of Canada, because they were volunteering there, because my daughter is going on a school trip, and that was one way to fundraise. Well, it killed my wife. She was a little bit sick still, and she had to work 10 hours one day serving rich people, which is always fun. Then my daughter asks, dad, is it legal to quit high school and go get a job? And I said, look, young lady, you want to be the people getting served, not the servers, okay? You want to stay in school. You want to be those rich bastards getting horse Durham served to them by people like you raising money for school trips. You don't want to be the person who's 30 years old, has six kids, and is trying to serve. I mean, we need those people. Those people will exist school and becomes an entrepreneur and starts a million dollar web company. Well, sure. I think she's more likely to start a bakery or something. Yeah. Not a huge amount of money in that. No, but people do do that. There's a lot of people who do that. In fact, there's a number of successful local businesses which are at least popular with people who rave about their goods. Yeah, there's some great bakeries. Finally, there's great bakeries here. There never used to be. It was always ironic because we're surrounded by fields of wheat. There's just nothing but wheat around here. But 20 years ago, you could not get a decent loaf of bread in the city. It was crazy. But now there's some really great places. Okay, so breaking news. I think we're probably the first podcast to deal with this important topic. There is an important website on the internet that has been down for four days now. It's not Twitter. It's not Twitter. It's more important than twitter. It's GoComics.com. GoComics.com. Yes. This is a website I go to every single day to get my daily comic strips. You know, I was always a newspaper guy, and one of the reasons I like newspapers was reading the daily comics. Now, many years ago, I switched to reading the comics online because you can get whatever comics you want. You don't have to just settle for the ones that are in your newspaper. So I go to this website every single day, GoComics.com to read a handful of comic strips, and it's been down for four days. When was the last time you had a website you visited and it was down for four days? People don't have patience for that anymore. No, 4 hours would be pushing the limits for most people. Four days. And you can get a lot of the comic strips in other places, but there's a handful that are only on GoComics.com. It drives me crazy. I've been looking into it, and cyber security apparently is the issue. And there's not a huge amount of information on the web, which is why we're an important news source now for this story. But getting the word out there. Yeah. Anyway, it's driving me crazy. Go to homes.com. Do you want to explain what a comic strip is to people under 45? Briefly, a few panels in a newspaper, usually with a punchline. The one I'm really missing is Nancy and Nancy classics. And this was a comic strip I didn't know about really much in my youth, but Nancy by Ernie Buschmiller, which ran like in the they do reprints of this on Go comics as well as the new strip, which is quite good. So I don't know. I'm having withdrawals. Another problem I have is I don't have enough fluids to get through the show. Okay. I was about to start the show and I have this giant water bottle from Costco that I've got. Electric pump on the top with a lithium battery. And it shows now to quit. What? It's got a pump on it? No, I bought the pump on Amazon. You could basically use these things in water coolers, although they're not quite water cooler size bottles. They're a little below that, but they're still as much as a human can carry and maybe beyond. I had my son happened to be home for Thanksgiving, canadian Thanksgiving in the head. So we decided we're only going to buy it when our kid is home from college to lift it upstairs because it's crazy heavy. Like one of those giant water bottles with a pump on it. Yeah, I put the pump on it. You can buy these pumps on Amazon for like $18. And mine just went dead right when I needed it most. Before that, I was going to help a water bottle before the show. And now I'm like, I'm going to have to be careful, very careful. Any coffee fits and I'm done. The show's going to come to an abrupt end. Well, if you have to pause, let me know. I certainly can't go downstairs for water. I'm not, you know, that strong. No. Well, at least I mean, it sounds like you're in better shape than you were yesterday. What have you been watching on TV? Well, I've been sick. Yes. Well, it's time for Brian's movie corner. Brian's movie corner. You mentioned this last week. There's a documentary on Netflix called Fugitive the Curious Case of Carlos Gon. And have you watched it yet? No, I skimmed it a bit because I was trying to see if they talked about the leaf in his history. Okay. Sadly, there's no real information about electric cars, but it was a nice refresher in who Carlos Gon is. I'd kind of forgotten what a superstar he was in the automotive world. He was originally the CEO of Renault, like 20 years ago or something. Turned around, renew. And then he became the CEO of Nissan at the same time. Turned around Nissan? They were heading into bankruptcy as well, that he made both companies very profitable. And then he got arrested for allegedly embezzling funds from Nissan and then very famously, escaped the country in a giant case on a private jet. He literally snuck out of the country after he was released on bail. So. Yeah, it's a pretty good dock. It was interesting. Yeah. Unfortunately, there was really nothing about electric cars. He was one of the proponents of the original Nissan Leaf. So maybe they're lagging in electric cars because he's no longer there. I'm not sure. You know, in the documentary. Well, first of all, there was a documentary. Who killed the electric car? This is about the EV One program. The first attempted car company making EVs. Yes. General Motors EV. One like 99 2000 in that area. Then they destroyed them all. They didn't let anyone buy them. Legendary. And that was a good documentary. And then there was the revenge electric car, which came at the point where Tesla was getting launched and starting to get the S off the ground. Their first mass produced car, I believe. And there was Carlos talking to Elon at the auto show and they were kind of awkward. It was very cool encounter because it was awkward to Egomaniacs who didn't want to give anything away. Carlos had said at that time that we're doing this just to hedge our bets. If Latter Eagles take off, we'll be prepared. But he didn't really get behind them. He didn't make them compelling enough. He basically looked at the car for the first time without approving it. He just looked at it at the auto show. Oh. This is what it looks like. Okay. And it was not a great looking car. It was divisive. I don't hate it. There's a lot of you know, it's iconic in a way because it's designed with big buggy headlights to deflect the wind so that you don't hear them on the mirrors because you would in an electric car because they're so quiet. And then who else was there with Chevrolet? There was what's his name? With GM. The cigar smoking what's his name? I can't remember. Bob Lutz, the legendary Bob Lutz, who always said that EVs would fail and the Tesla would fail. But then he was the guy sort of behind the Volt, which was coming out. So there were three things. There was a trifecta, this is history now. This used to be just my daily life, but it was the Volt with a V, which was a plugin hybrid. Essentially. It was an EV with a backup engine. And then there was Tesla getting off the ground. This was all happening in 2010, and this is when this documentary was made. And the first model years were eleven. By the way, there is a Cadillac ELR, I think it's called, for sale in Vagina, which was based on the Volt platform. They only made a couple thousand of these things, so they're kind of rare. But it's a really good kind of plug in hybrid Cadillac with all the luxurious Cadillac. What's it going for? I'm not sure. It was still kind of incoming. I saw a little thing on the web. But anyway, so Carlos Gon, a controversial figure, and there's no particular conclusion in the documentary because he managed to escape Japan and go to Lebanon, where he is originally from. And he has, I guess, not been extradited or anything, so he's never gone on trial. So no one really knows what the full story is. But there was another executive at Nissan that was sentenced to, for helping to COVID up his salary. They were trying to keep his salary quiet because it was quite high. So somebody at Nissan did do time for that. And then the pilot, like the guy who was like a US special forces guy who got him out of the country, he ended up doing a couple of years of time. I hope it was worth it, buddy. Yeah, I hope it was worth it. I don't know. I mean, I assume he was well paid. Carlos has got a lot of money. When you're that rich, you're going to throw it to millions really quickly. Just take them, just get into freedom. Quite clear on why he ended up back in Japan and in jail when Carlos Gonz has managed to not go back. Well, I think the pilot, he probably had a business there. He probably had a relationship with Japan if he was able to. I mean he could be, but he was an American. But they didn't really explain that. But yeah, so they made the point a couple of times that in Japan the conviction rate is 99%. Wow. If you are arrested in Japan, there is a 99% chance that you will be convicted. So the documentary sort of implies that there's something kind of hinky with the Japanese justice system. Well, that's why you flee. You don't wait for your trial and that's why you flee. Basically the charge is the yes. Like as soon as you're arrested, it's game over. And Carlos Gon, in an interview after he got out, he barely did 150 days in solitary confinement when they first arrested him, what he says were inhumane conditions. No butler. It's inhumane. No butler. But, like, his hands were cuffed in solitary confinement for, like, 150 days. Yeah, I probably would have done the same thing. Guilty or not guilty? Yes. He felt like he wasn't going to get a fair trial and very luckily managed to escape. So he was in a case that they said was an instrument case. They pretended that they were musicians and it was a big square case, but they said it was some type of an instrument and it couldn't go through the scanner because it was sensitively tuned, like it had just been tuned or something. And you can't put it through the scanner. I can just picture them putting it through the scanner and seeing the Carlos Scone in there, all curled up. All curled up. So? Yeah. I don't know. It's only about 90 minutes. It's an interesting little dog. Well, he is guilty, Brian. I've looked at the evidence and it seemed pretty over. Pretty compelling case. I don't know what the punishment would have been for him, but why was he in solitary confinement? I don't understand that if he was, but also, why would he need to embezzle money? Like, his salary was nine, he was making €9 million a year. Why would he need to embezzle money? I don't know. Maybe a gambling dance. Maybe he was paying for the Leaf program. I don't know. Who does? I don't know. Well, let's get out of the show. Cop 27, wrapped up in Egypt, and that's been a mixed bag of stuff for them. I'm not going to talk about it too much, but what did you think about how that went? Well, it's how these things usually go is that there's lots of optimism and then it's ultimately a compromise. There's always a compromise at the end of it, because this is a UN climate summit with hundreds of countries and getting everybody to agree. I don't know, sounds like it was not the best, but also not the worst. I see this as a very crucial time because there's a lot of fossil fuel bad things going on. They're trying to claw at what they can to make as much money as they can, and they would be happy to throw the climate down and our targets with it. So Bloomberg had a story on it. They said the United Nations climate summit just barely avoided ending in a deadlock. They went into extra a day or so afterwards. And the final compromise left big doubts over the prospect for new efforts to curb emissions. I quote, despite attempts by big powers like the United States, India and the European Union, the agreement failed to raise ambitions on reducing emissions. That could mean the world misses the one five degree Celsius warming target that enshrined the 2015 Paris agreement calls to phase out all fossil fuels, not just coal. Which is all they could come up with. They couldn't touch fossil fuels and to peak global emissions by 2025, which is likely to happen anyway according to the IEA. We're shot down by many nations who export oil, and I'm proud to say we have a bad record, Canada on this, but we didn't oppose it. Even though we are a big oil exporter. I'm sure it had a different government been in power. That would have been the case, probably. So while the phase down of all fossil fuels didn't make it to the final text, momentum grew around the idea that wasn't even in the cars before the summit. As many as 80 countries now support it. So we're moving towards banning fossil fuels, basically. We're getting closer to that. There was like a damage fund as well, right? That was a big part. I agreed to put in money to a fund for the countries most affected by climate change. Yeah. And that's all I'll talk about on that. But we'll update some more stories as we go. Here what's happening with $250,000,000 in Canada, right? Yeah. So I think we mentioned this before. There's a few more details. So there is a Greener Homes grant here in Canada that I've applied for, and they have now expanded the program with another component to it, which is to switch people from heating oil to a heat pump. So there's an extra $250,000,000 now in Canada. It's a separate stream in the Greener Homes grant, and it won't technically be available until early 2023. But this is mostly for people in Atlantic Canada, where heating oil is apparently a fairly common thing, rural properties, and everybody gets heating oil delivered. It's not a thing around here at all. We don't have this here. No, even though we have lots of rural properties. We have natural gas. We have the government who did that. Right. We have a government utility. That's kind of why we have government utilities here. But if you're in a rural property, I think it's mostly propane here. You can get your propane tank filled up. But anyway, this is up to $5,000. It's only for middle and lower income Canadians. And the twist on this, too, is you can get the money upfront, usually with this program. Wow. You apply and you spend all the money and then you get a reimbursement. But just because it's meant for middle income and lower income Canadians, you can actually get the money up to $5,000 upfront to switch you. And the potential is to save, like, according to them, as much as $4,700 a year on your heating costs. So what would a heat pump cost? Have you done any looking into it for your own house? As much as like 2025 grand. But I think for a heat pump, it depends. We need, of course, these super frigid cold heat pumps. I think in Atlantic Canada it's not as cold, and hopefully it wouldn't cost as much, maybe 10,000 or $15,000. But yeah, you get the money up front. And I checked in on the this is sort of similar and in line with what's happening in America with the biden. What's that called? The IRA. The Era. The IRA. The inflation Reduction act that starts on January 1, 2023. If you want to get a rebate on your heat pump in the US. It's anything installed after January 1 so you can get after the factory bait for yourself. Not going from an oil furnace. Right? Yeah, I'm going to go through the normal program, and I think I'll get up to 5000 as well for myself. It's too bad, though, because that would be hard for somebody low middle to finance ten grand if they weren't pressing. Yeah, and I guess that's why this program is that way. In Atlantic Canada, rural properties are probably fairly inexpensive, so you can have lower income people that own houses and they're going to be in trouble. But yeah, you can get the money upfront, which is very cool. And yeah, very much in line with what's happening in the US with the Inflation Reduction Act. So I encourage everybody to check your local jurisdiction, your local state, your local province to see what rebates are available. And things are really going to get rolling in 2023. So basically, they're starting with the biggest bang for the buck is so the biggest savings would be for people with oil furnaces, so they would be most compelled to make that switch. Right. And heating oil is one of the things that's really gone up in price with the recent inflation that we've been having. I was doing some research on this this morning, and I said that heating oil heats up twice as fast as you get more bang for your BTU, basically that it really heats up fast anyway, but probably causes more pollution than natural gas. Yes, natural gas is relatively clean as far as fossil fuels go, although there's a lot of methane in there. The new priest finally was announced on Wednesday in Tokyo and in the La auto Show, and there's been lots of speculation about it, so I've been kind of curious. Ultimately, though, there are actually Prius fans out there who are saying, wow, it's great, look at this. And what do you think? I've got a picture of it up. Well, I love the styling. Like the design road that Toyota has been going down the last few years, I just do not like. And they reached a kind of an apex with that excessively angular design of the Prius. So I think they had kind of no choice but to go in the opposite direction. But it almost looks to me like they designed it to be an EV. Like, EVs are often designed for aerodynamics. That's right. That's right. Yeah, they did. They cut down the roof line for that very reason, because there was no other way to gain efficiency. So it's just a huge shame it's not a full EV, because it looks like it could be. It looks a lot like the original Hyundai Ionic, which was a very aerodynamic shape. So I love the direction they're going. This is a huge improvement in terms of the style, I think, of the Prius. But just a shame it's not fully electric. It just feels like that would have been the correct move on it. Yeah. Obviously, you refresh the models every few years and it's totally time for a full EV refresh. And that's not what this is. Now, some people make the argument that at the moment in time that we're in right now, that a plug in hybrid, which there's a version of that right? There's a plug in version of the Prius. Some people think they all plug in. They don't. They're basically just a hybrid power train, which utilizes an electric motor to be more efficient. But it's all gas during the energy. So the plug in version has gone up in range from pretty significantly. Basically, the energy density of the batteries have gone up. It's taking up the same space to go from, I think it was, 40 range, which is a lot more usable. And in Canada, we would get the full $5,000 off. So that means you've heard it here first, because no one else has said this. The plugin. Prius prime PSE e v will be cheaper than the normal prius So why would anyone buy a Prius rebate? This is the situation that was like that in California when the Prius Prime first, there was no point. I mean, even if you don't care about plugging it in, why would you buy it? Because you have to resell it. You have to have a residual value. You might as well have the one that costs more. So it makes no sense for them to sell anything but the Prius Prime in Canada, and they also went with more horsepower, which I thought was a bit weird. Yeah, they really bumped up the horsepower. Finally, after 20 years of being mocked by truckers, by bumper stickers on truckers. Yeah. So it's quite a lot faster now. But of course, that cuts into the miles per gallon a little bit, but not too bad. Yes. Overall, though, I think it could be more efficient than it is. But the zero to 60 is a lot faster. Way faster. Yeah, that's fun. But here's my big problem with it, and that is that it sits lower. And then my wife has a Prius if you're new to the show. And that's her work car that she has to have inspected constantly because it's used for work. She takes social work clients around in it. They're not going to even talk about pricing or announcing it until sometime in the first half of next year as far as the prime is concerned. So that doesn't do me I need a car now. Brian should go buy that. Buy that Caddy. Yeah, you should actually look into it. It could be fun. You'll ever may launch ice cream from cow free dairy in a year. This is an update to a previous store because we've been talking about precision fermentation. And here it is, Brian. Here's the headline. You wait for things to happen and then there it is in front of you. Yeah. And the dairy industry likely to be the very first of the animal based products to be severely disrupted. Here's a clip from the robot who reads the Bloomberg stories. The company is working on a process called precision fermentation that uses substances like yeast and fungi to produce milk proteins in a VAT. A product could be available in about a year. If successful, unilever could be the first major food company to create an ice cream made from cow free dairy, dubbed lab grown milk. In a burgeoning industry dominated by smaller startups, a consumer giant like Unilever developing a precision fermentation version of one of its major brands raises hopes that the technology can scale up and be cost effective. The idea is that it's going to be cheaper and then also cleaner. Much cleaner. Yeah. I think a version of this ice cream already exists because there was a picture of Tony Siba eating some of it in that last YouTube video that he put up. So I think this does exist, but it's probably kind of expensive and only in health food stores. Whereas Unilever would make it a mass market product. It would probably be quite expensive. Yeah. So right now, the ideas he says by 2030 that the proteins in milk is going to be replaced by fake stuff, precision fermentation, and it's going to be cheaper and dairy is going to go bankrupt. And this is the first sign of that happening. They're doing it. Maybe they'll advertise it as an expensive but greener option, I'm guessing. At first, yeah. And more expensive at first, but I think eventually, ultimately cheaper. And unlike beyond meat, there really will not be a difference. It will be identical. It'll be very identical. Yeah. Because you're mostly tasting the fat and the sugar. The milk protein is a minor part. I think most of it is water. It's 10%. That's not water.   That's the part you replace. The others are fats and sugars, which are easily replaced, obviously. Yeah. Anyway, speaking of Japanese automakers, Mazda looks like it could be, and I'm not convinced of this, but it could be doing something significant. They could be the first of the Japanese automakers to actually set a target. That is reasonable. Mazda is raising its EV sales target to 40% by 2030 and they're investing $11 billion to accelerate this transition. Sounds like they got the memo. Yeah, well, we were making fun of them for their MX 30, which is. A very low range electric car. They are down to selling, like, only a handful of them. So they've been a real laggard. And so this is their first step up to the plate. I mean, it's not maybe what it should be, but it sounds like they're getting the idea. Right. That's something. It's probably too late. I don't want to be a naysayer, but at least they have a target. Hopefully they survive. Brian 505. I've sold more brownies at bake sales than they have in these cars. It's 100 miles of range, 160 range, which is in today's market, no good unless it's a cheap car. But it's 33,000 us. Yeah, that's a lot of money. You expect something for that. I mean, you can get a Leaf, you can get a Chevy Bolt that does way more mileage than that and probably is a more capable car. Yeah, for maybe only slightly more money. And they even said this EV has been sold out, so you can't find one. So there was a demand there. There's going to be some Mazda fans who want to go EV. But anyway, this is a story about VW maybe delaying their EV plans. Like, VW was maybe one of the great hopes of the EV transition. And now the CEO's been replaced, right? Yeah. As we reported, they're on track to deliver 500,000 EVs this year, which is a significant amount. That's way ahead of everybody else except for Tesla. Herbert Dies was their CEO that put all this in motion. He really had a radical vision for VW and really felt like it had to be a radical remaking of the company or, you know, they were going to run into problems. And so yeah, so he started a lot of ambitious programs that have gotten them to 5000 EVs a year, which is significant. But he was sort of moved out recently as CEO, and the new CEO is definitely scaling back these plans to be much less ambitious. I don't like that. No, I think Herbert Dees was on the right track. And you what, like with Mazda? So Mazda wants to sell 40% EVs by 2030, but that means there's going to be people to buy the 60% of EVs that are gas in 2030. No, it doesn't work that way. Doesn't work that way. When EVs are available, people are not going to want the gas cars. So I don't know. The new CEO of VW seems to be betting that such things are possible. And every car commercial on television is electric. Can you buy the cars? Not so much. Not so much. But for some reason, we're in this weird time where, yeah, all the car companies are vying to look like. Then there's Toyota, who says, we're electrified. That's enough. Right? Electrified. So, VW, they've got the second generation platform that they were planning to come out in 2026. They call this their trinity. EV. And now it's going to be more like 2030. Under the new CEO, 26 might have been difficult to actually achieve, but if you're moving the goal post down to 2030, even 2030 may not be moving it up to 2024. And hey, you may not make the deadline, but the commission should be moving up anyway. So that's a three year delay, basically. Or worse. Let's hope not. And that's no good. We can't deal with that. And it was already a kind of a target that wasn't even as gracious as it should be. They've got a lot. It takes a lot to turn a giant ship like VW around. I don't know. They're the best at it. The biggest car company in the world are the best at it. They are manufacturing in and out well. They do really well to get up to 5000. That's impressive. I think what they're not getting is what you said, that once the pendulum sort of swings towards EVs and that the weight starts to get on the teeter totter on the EV side, look out, it's not going anywhere else. It's going to chip way over and then you're going to be caught with your pants down. So who's going to be able to provide those cars? Hopefully? Well, Tesla, you and I are already at the point where we would never in a million years consider buying another gasoline car. But we're still kind of the outliers. But every year the percentage of people who won't consider a gas car just goes up. Yeah, and it is regular people are considering EVs. And there's people around here with pickup trucks. I'm reading about them all the time. Their neighbors are, their business associates are, their clients are. This becomes normalized very quickly now. It's really going to pick up. Yeah. So, moving on to Tokyo, the governor of Tokyo, this is Eureka Koiki, has suggested everybody wear turtlenecks to help reduce their energy bills. Okay. It's sort of a funny thing and a fun thing to make a joke about off the top of the show, but I'm in favor of this. There's an energy crisis going on. Everybody's going to be struggling to make enough power, make enough heat. Can I make a turtleneck work? I mean, not everybody can. Yeah, I don't think I own any turtlenecks, but everybody. The idea is that dress warm and you can save money on your electricity bills, which are going up in Tokyo, just like they're kind of tending to go up everywhere is in my neck. That's the coldest thing, though. I mean, really. Well, the idea is here's the quote, warming the neck has a thermal effect. I'm wearing a turtleneck myself. And wearing a scarf also keeps you warm. This will save electricity. This is what the governor of Tokyo said around the house is true. He wants people around their tiny little Tokyo apartments to wear a scarf. I mean, it sounds radical, but why not? We have a problem here. I don't know what it's like in other places, but we often have this problem in North America where like, office buildings particularly often have very poor heating or cooling that can't be controlled very well. So there's often a problem around here where people have to wear sweaters in the summer because the air conditioning is ranked too high and nobody can seem to turn it down. Or I've actually heard of people who have electric space heaters under their roof. Yeah, I've seen that it's really bad in the summer. I've seen that it's too cold because the air conditioning is too high. That's not good. Yeah, so you're overusing the air conditioning and then some poor employee has to use UTC heater to sort of gain back the energy. So I think this in many ways, used to be like a common sense thing where people just dressed warmer in the winter because it was kind of common sense. But then you go to work in an office building where the heat is all wonky, so maybe it's too hot in your office in the wintertime and then you just end up wearing a Tshirt instead in the winter. It's all messed up. I wear fleeces and sweaters inside the house now, but that's because I'm getting old, right? Yeah. I'm still turning up the temperature tin more than it should be. And then I'm also wearing those things. That's not good. I do the same thing. Yeah, it's not good at all. I can't laugh, by the way. Otherwise I'll go into a coffee and fits. I don't sound anything funny. Well, Brian, as you know, the World Cup has started. And I know you don't have world cup fever, but I do. Is that what you're suffering from? Sure. I took a title for my World Cup fever this morning. Argentina lost to Saudi Arabia and the biggest upset in World Cup history. Some people say, wow, I'm sorry, Argentina, if you're listening. In fact, this is probably way too soon for me to even bring it up, but I apologize anyway. Of course, all the coverage, it's been announced like ten years ago that they were getting this. So a Qatar, which is a small nation state with oil, was accused of using their oil money to spend on the World Cup and bribe. And there's been some people who've actually been, you know, charges and so forth. There's a new Netflix documentary. I won't make you watch it, but it's there. OK on FIFA. This is a tiny Middle Eastern autocracy with a population of barely 3 million people. How do they get the world's biggest sporting event? You know, like, this is by far the world's biggest sporting event. It happens only every four years, but the temperatures there in the summer are 50 degrees Celsius or 122 Fahrenheit. And that's when the World Cup you normally played during that time and I, as you know, was in Death Valley when it was that temperature. And I could only get out of my healthier, man then, and I could only get out of my car for ten minutes at a time. My kids could do 1213. But then you're like facing the Grim Reaper. He starts to encroach on your area, looking for you, to kill you, because you can't play soccer in that, I guess. They spent $200 billion of their petrol money on this games. They've built eight stadiums. One of them I'll talk about in a minute. That's a little bit different than the other ones. It's recyclable, we'll just put it that way. But yeah, they've got air conditioning. The temperature is only 24 degrees with like 64% humidity. These games have been checking on them. So, yeah, it's perfectly reasonable for soccer. But I read you a bit from the Atlantic here. It says Qatar might now be home to about 3 million people, but the proportion of actual Qatari citizens who lived there is a little more than 10%. So there's hardly any. The rest compromised some very rich expatriates of other nations and a huge army of poor migrants up to 6000. And some may have died, by the way. This is a whole separate issue which is not part of our show. But my God. My point is that this is the pinnacle of oil decadence. And to think that thousands of lives were not cared about and lost from other countries to make this destruction of everything and we'll never have this again. This is peak oil. I don't think we'll see crap like this ever again. This is the moment in time where it's all going to fall apart. They did not have any infrastructure, they're not a sporting nation, they didn't have a fan base, they had nothing. But they were very rich with their oil money. But Brian, their new money, they haven't had this money for very long at all. Guitar has had huge reserves of natural gas, which was discovered, I think, quite a while ago, maybe the by Shell, but they just left it there because they couldn't do anything with it. They had all this natural gas and nowhere to get it anywhere. So in the was this coup, I think the leader of the country, the King or whatever the term they use for it, left to go on vacation to England and his son took over. Which is why if I'm ever in that situation, I'm never leaving because my son would take over in a second. He was just sorry, Dan. But he did a good thing for the country in a way, because he invested in liquefied natural gas tank so that it could be transported on a ship. So when you cool it natural gas. It's like transporting oil on a tanker. But it's ridiculous how much -165 degrees celsius or something like that they are now the third richest country in the world. And they learned how to extract natural gas from the ground much more cheaply. So even after they cool it and put it on a ship, a tanker full of natural gas is four times cheaper from Qatar than if it originated in the United States through their normal channels. That's why they are so rich, is because their gas is cheap, even though they have to do that. So they started a sovereign wealth fund, though this is the shocking part that I didn't know about. Even though they blew 200 billion on these Games to make them a respectable country, which is not working out, by the way, because all we're doing is talking about how crappy they are, the LGBTQ rights and everything like that, and the fact that they can't serve beer at the games. And they yanked that privilege two days before. So they started a sovereign wealth fund like Norway did, and they have $300 billion in it because they saw the writing on the wall. They knew that our Canadian jurisdictions here who have oil in the provinces don't think that way at all. They think spend, spend oil forever. But when you had something they didn't always used to have this. So they've only had it since the 90s. So in that short time, they've got a 300 billion dollar sovereign wealth fund and they're building up infrastructure. Part of the game spending is that to make it for an investment possible. And I don't know that that's going to work, especially with their human rights problems, that a whole lot of people are going to go there, but they are planning for the end of oil by diversifying their investments around the world. So, yeah, that fund is going to do all kinds of things around the world. So there's been of course, it's supposed to be a carbon neutral World Cup. And it's a joke. It's a bloody joke. Here's a clip from Bloomberg. Organizers estimate that the World Cup will emit three six megatons of carbon dioxide. International flights in and out of Doha will account for the majority of emissions. However, organizers argue that this World Cup will be more energy efficient than others, since fans won't have to fly to different venues and can instead just take public transit. The sticking point is always the flights. Most Olympics and World Cups, it accounts to more than 85% of total emissions. So that surprised me. I guess it makes perfect sense when you hear it, but it's not the building of these eight giant stadiums and you know, all the infrastructure around it, it's the flights and during the actual Games. And it's the same with the Olympics. It's a very carbon intense thing when all these people do that. Yeah, when you got to travel so many people around the world, that's what you do, you fly. Now, the game today was in stadium nine seven four, which is built with shipping containers it's not entirely shipping containers. It's like steel girders and shipping containers. But the 400 seat stadium can be disassembled and rebuilt elsewhere. So this is the world's first tear down build a back stadium, supposedly, and apparently, if everything goes on shipping containers, it can be shipped anywhere. Yes. So this will be available for my Ikea soon. Quite the price, but yes, it was designed by a French architectural firm. Other things they're trying to do is they have built solar farms to offset the emissions from the games. They're using electric buses, an electric mass transit. So that's good. They're not burning their own product, and they are supposedly buying carbon offsets, but they're way behind on that. Brian yeah. So Domino's Pizza has announced, and this sort of falls into that category of story that we're going to have to stop reporting soon, because this is just going to be business as usual very soon and maybe is already. But Domino's Pizza in the US. Has ordered 800 Chevy bolts, and they're kind of custom painted with the Domino's logo and everything. And they've got about 100 of them so far. And these are going out to Domino's Pizza locations in the US. So they will eventually have 800 fully electric delivery vehicles for the fleet of pizza delivery vehicles. And of course, they're doing this because it just makes sense. And the bolt is not a particularly expensive car. So imagine all the money they'll save on gas. This is just the EV calculation that every business in the world is going to be making when it comes to fleet vehicles. I wish on your Domino's app, if you could select an EV to have it delivered like you can on other apps for a ride sharing, that would be nice. Do you ever eat domino's? Never. I would think he would hate Domino's. That would be an anti Brian pizza right there. No, when we have excellent pizza to choose from in our city, I don't see a reason to use donald okay, well, I agree. The pizza shows up in advance a lot of times where people have some there. Okay, so Joe Biden has promised $13 billion for the US. Power grid. So this is part of the green spending from the US. And as we talk about frequently on the show, the grid all over the world is going to need some upgrades. And so this is a decent amount of money, $13 billion to upgrade the grid. And as we go greener in the next couple of decades, it's important to get the foundation correct first before we do that. So this is a nice, like, really forward looking thing. I think that the US government is doing $13 billion available to do grid upgrades around the country. So I think that's great. It is subsidizing what they could probably do themselves, though. How do you feel about that? Yeah, well, I mean, it's a weird thing about all of this spending. Right. Because companies like Tesla don't even need subsidies, really. Their cars are profitable already and yet they're going to benefit from these subsidies. So it's always a bit weird and taxing fossil fuels. A carbon tax, it would probably have been the better way to go with all of this. But however it gets done, there are certain things politically that are difficult to do. Like a carbon tax. Yes. It wouldn't necessarily be my first choice for how to deal with it, but at least they're dealing with it. Let's dip into the mailbag. Brian. This is a message from Nick. Hello, Brian and James. I live in New England, and recently got a 2022 Ford Mac E. That is an electric vehicle, small crossover. Right. My battery life, as he calls it, was originally at 230 miles. He means range. So the range of that car when he first got it was 230 miles or 370 colder out. It is 170 miles and 274. So it's a lot. About 100, roughly of range. So I know about range decreasing in colder weather. My question is, does the range come back when the weather gets warmer? With the cost of new EVs, a range of 170 miles is not acceptable. Fan of the show since day one. Thanks. Wow. Thanks. How many episodes? 140. Congratulations, Nick. Thank you for sticking with us. So, yes, I would be bold. Enough to say that I think, James, you and I are the two leading experts in the world on EVs and cold weather. Yes. You've come to the right place, Nick, because Alaska has nothing on us. We're in the Southern Canadian prairies where it gets to -40 and it has recently not this year, but it has and -40 celsius is the same as -40 fahrenheit that's where the two scales cross over. Yeah, it does get that cold here. So I don't know everything about how the mach e battery meter works, but yeah, usually the range on any car is calculated on your recent trips. So if your recent trips have been in the cold then your car is going to be smart enough to figure, okay, well, the next trip is going to be so I assume that range will come back in the summer. Of course it will. But in a way, Brian, this is a stupid question for us, to us, for people like us. But that concerns me that the people buying EVs, really, that there are things that this would be scary to somebody nick's, obviously an EV enthusiast, but a regular person who doesn't care, who just goes out and buys their next car, might be very concerned about this if they don't know about it. That's right. You're going to look at the range thing. Now, the one thing I can recommend is I don't know if you can do this in your car, but in a Tesla you can change the battery to percentage rather than miles. Or kilometers. So when I first bought my car, it would give me the range in kilometers and started around 400 km. But then you tend to get obsessed about that range and every time you plug it in, it's like, oh, it's 5 km less than it was last time I charged it. So I just switched it to percentage. And so then you don't end up obsessing about that mileage. But then if you're going on a trip, you use the trip calculator. And the trip calculator will tell you in a Tesla that gives you a graph that says, okay, you'll get at your destination and your battery will be 20%. And that's what you monitor. And sometimes it's a little bit off in a Tesla. Now these days, about 5% error. Is that's pretty good though? Actually for this they are getting better. It used to be about a 10% error where it would tell you, oh, your battery will be 20% at your destination and then you'd get there and it would be more like 10%. Yeah, is way worse though. So we're slowing down that's one tip. Yeah, it's switching it to percentage and not worrying about it. Now when you get to the summer and it is not giving you the same range, it is always possible that your battery has cells that have deteriorated or something. So it is something you have to keep an eye on, but presumably that will come back. Yeah. And the way we do it on the Leaf is you put in the little data reader you buy on Amazon. It's a bluetooth device. For $20. It hooks up to an app for your car that's made by a third party. Mine is called Leaf Spy. Tesla is a little different because they have a different connector. I don't know how you guys do it or even if you need to, but there would be if you got into this, you can see how your battery is doing and know the state of health of it, but this means nothing. Okay, so let's say you lived in Hawaii where it's the same temperature every day. If you drove like a mad person for a day or two, it would show that you have a lesser battery, right. Because you're driving with a heavy lead foot. But if you're driving like a nun, then you're going very slow and gentle and that's going to show a higher range. It's not really showing what your battery is capable of, it's just what it's capable of based on your recent driving. And that is a weird concept to get around to people. And also I mentioned too, it is typical for batteries to lose range like battery degradation. And the typical formula seems to be you are going to lose about 5% of your battery in the first couple of years and then it kind of slows out. So I assume my battery has lost about 5% of its capacity but I don't know exactly how I would confirm that. Yeah, and it's not something you should obsess about. You should know that when you buy the evidence, buy bigger than you think you need, and then you don't worry about that. Right. That's always a good thing. But there's lots we can talk about here very quickly. Okay. Now, the first thing is that in winter, a gas car loses range. You just don't notice it. You're not thinking about that. Right. There's many factors. There is the dense winter air, so your aerodynamics are off. This affects EVs a little bit more because they're more efficient. And they're also usually more dependent on the aerodynamics of the vehicle for efficiency. So if you put winter tires on, that's going to be less efficient, for sure. That could lose you 10%. It could lose even more depending on what your tires there's the snow on the ground or ice on the ground. The fact that it's just not a smooth, rolling surface. It's like if you're pedaling a bike through snow, it's going to be harder to pedal that bike. There are different factors like that the battery becomes less strong in cold weather. When the battery is cold, it's chemically not capable of holding as much of a charge. It can't hold as much of a charge, the battery, in colder weather. And don't forget that you're using your battery to heat your cabin. That is a lot of heat. Even if it's a heat pump, even if it's just not that cold, but a little bit cold, you're still using a lot of energy. In fact, it's different in every car. Your car is a PTC heater. Mine is, too. So it's just like a toaster. It's like red hot elements heating up. That's the least efficient. And then the heat pumps. Sometimes there's both a heat pump and a PTC heater. Sometimes there's just a heat pump that uses less energy, but it's still using energy. Brian yeah. When I checked in, the Mustang Machoe does not have a heat pump heater. So it has a normal oh, really? Heater, which is not as energy efficient. So you're definitely going to lose range with that. Yeah, you're definitely going to use range. Unless you're using it to make these long trips on the highway, then that's when the only time you really need to concern yourself. Unless you have a long commute, for the most part. If you can charge every night at home, just don't think about it. Nick. Don't think about it. Enjoy your fast heating car and your efficiency and how wonderful it is. And, you know, keep us up to date, too, as you drive it through the winter, because we're not in the worst part of winter yet. Drop us a line again and how you like the car and how it made it through the winter. Yeah. And it's really only on road trips that you ever need to think About It. If you're just driving around the city like you said, you charge at home, you're always going to have enough. With Tesla, they spaced the superchargers about 150 km apart. Roughly. It varies a bit. So that's about 100 miles apart. If you're going to go nick on a road trip. You want to make sure that there is a charging station. Roughly every 100 miles and you should be fine like around here when it does get -40 I don't think it's going to get to -40 where nick is so he's probably not going to have to worry about it. But they based on about right. So mine. I've got the standard range. Tesla model. Three and it can just barely make it between chargers when it's -40. If it's only -20. -15 celsius. I mean it's not constantly -40 but we call that the worst case scenario around here. Okay. EV drivers call that you want to be prepared for the worst case scenario. We've gone years without it getting that cold. Yeah. And then the last couple of years, it's gotten a few days. That cold. So you want to be prepared for those days. And it's usually only that cold overnight. But last winter, and this was covered on the podcast, I drove up to Saskatoon and The Daytime Temperatures was -36 Celsius, which is about -32 Fahrenheit daytime Temperatures. This was at Noon, and that's what I had to drive through and just kind of barely made it in my Standard Range car. Yeah. So that's an issue. And another thing to keep in mind is if you are doing highway trips so that in winter it charges slower, the battery can't take the charge as fast because it's like regenerative braking too. You can't put your brakes back into the battery pack as well when it's cold. No, that's kind of the biggest thing for me because summer road trips, I'm only spending about 20 minutes at the charger. But the winter road trips in these cold conditions, it's more like you're spending an hour at the charger. And at that point, it gets annoying. And I'm at the point now where if this winter, I have to drive up to Saskatoon and it's -40, I'm going to take a gas car because I just don't want that. I have to wait an hour at the charging station. The worst case scenario in the worst place in the world is what we're talking about. And we tell people around here that you could lose up to 50%. It varies from car to car. I've heard somebody talking to about 17% in his ionic five when it wasn't too cold. Okay, but that's, like, the worst worst case scenario. Now, if you're driving around the city and you do 60 miles in a day, at the very worst, and you have 170 miles, who cares? You plug in at night, it's going to charge the same way as it always does. If. You're on the highway and it takes you a half hour to charge, it might take you an hour to charge. And that's a major change, too, in habits to be aware of. Yeah. And of course, electric cars, they're not as efficient on the highway as they are in the city. Higher speeds are tougher for electric cars. You drain the battery a lot faster. And I really wish that when they publicized the range for electric cars, that they did a highway figure and a city figure. I think that's the way it should be done. But they don't do that. They pick a number kind of somewhere in between the two. Yeah, but you'll get used to this, Nick. There's a lot of weird little things that people fret about when they try something new. I did it. Brian did it. It's normal. We EV owners tend to think too much, but just enjoy the car. You'll get used to it. And tell your friends about it. Time for the lightning round of fast paced look at the rest of the news. And Brian, we've overstayed her welcome, which is good because I don't have a lot of stories. This week. Rivian starts international deliveries of the R one T, rather, and the R one S in Canada. So you've seen one here, right? Yeah. It must have been an American one that drove up over the border, because I saw one on the road. But yeah, officially, deliveries of the Ribbean just started in Canada. Now, post the IRA, the inflation reduction at next era expects wind with storage will cost $14 per megawatt hour United States later this decade. This is only because this act was passed. And solar with batteries, $17 per mega, 1 hour. This is down because of this act. This is how much the IRA is going to affect everything and speed things up, if I may say. Yeah, for sure. This is a Brian story. I can't believe you didn't see this one, Brian. There's a induction oven maker who has added a battery to their stoves. Lithium battery. This is because, I guess some of these induction stoves use a lot of draw, right? Yeah. And some places aren't wired for it. And you'd have to get an extra panel if your panels full. So they've solved that problem. Interestingly with putting a battery in a stove. That makes a lot of sense. Yeah. So the big draw when you need it comes from the batteries. Well, we talked about this before in terms of heat pump, water heaters, because that's a similar problem with those, because you tend to need a few thousand watts to run those, I think up to 7000 watts to run an induction cooktop. So that's a lot of juice. It's one of the reasons I did a panel upgrade on my house. But it cost a few thousand dollars to go from 100 amp to 200 amp. So I guess the idea is you can charge up this battery and so it can draw more power. You can sort of just plug it into in a regular outlet, as it was, but with the battery have much bigger output. Right. So that solves that problem. But it's just weird, that sort of appliance with a battery in it. And I imagine it adds to the price, but it's cheaper than maybe rewiring your house, if you want to do that. So I thought I thought it was quite interesting BYD the Chinese, mostly EV maker and bus maker has sold as 3,000,000th, Bee, V or PHEV. I thought that was an interesting milestone. Some are plug in hybrids, but that's still an impressive number. Oh, it's time for a CS. Past 636 fossil fuel lobbyists were preying on government delegations at Cock.   Oily bastards. That's a lot. Scotland approves a 38 megawatt solar plant next door to a closed nuclear plant. And guess how much the objections were in the community? Zero. No objects were their objections. Will they put up a nuclear plant? Probably. Probably. Some concern solar. Not so harmful, not so scary. A village in the French Alps this is from CNN demolishes its ski lift because there's no snow left. It hasn't snowed in years. lack of snow meant that the last time it ran was about 15 years ago, and just for one weekend. And since then, it has not been. This is sad. Sad. This is why the Winter Olympics will now be held in Qatar with fake snow and perhaps potato flakes. Finally, this week, India is looking to produce its own solar modules to meet all of its demand and then some. That's right. India requires a lot of solar, and they want to make it themselves. You know, it makes sense. Perfectly capable country of ramping up something like this. I'm looking for takers for a $2.4 billion in government aid to offer stimulation to domestic manufacturing of solar equipment. They want to do all of their solar and export all as well. That's great news. That is our time for this week and a bunch more. I apologize to myself more than anything. My body wasn't ready to go long. It was ready to go short this week, and I went long. So see you next week. See you next week. Bye.

RBR+TVBR InFOCUS Podcast
The InFOCUS Podcast: AM Radio, With Jim Motovalli

RBR+TVBR InFOCUS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 12:14


What is the purpose of AM radio? Does it have much of a future, given the rise of the electric vehicle and the removal of AM radio accessibility in several EV models from the likes of Tesla to BMW?Those are just some of the questions RBR+TVBR Editor-in-Chief Adam R Jacobson discussed with automotive technology expert Jim Motavalli in an interview airing on WPKN-FM 89.5 in Bridgeport, Conn., at 9:30pm Eastern on November 22.The full conversation can be heard on WPKN, either live or on demand through the end of 2022. We are pleased to offer excerpts of that conversation in today's InFOCUS Podcast, presented by dot.FM.

Crain's Daily Gist
11/22/22: Pay a little extra to upgrade that reservation?

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 19:48


Crain's reporter Ally Marotti talks with host Amy Guth about a new restaurant tool that lets diners choose their seats. Plus: Thanksgiving travel surges to near pre-pandemic levels, ABA council votes to eliminate LSAT requirement for law schools, Rivian employees say rapid production led to injuries and safety oversights in Illinois plant, and CME and Cboe recommit to crypto after FTX disaster.

Plug In For More
Winter Driving in an EV - Part 3 - Traction and Tires

Plug In For More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 21:50


Welcome to the Plug In For More podcast!  Mike, Tom, and Bryant are here to help you on your journey to an Electric vehicle future.  Each episode we discuss current events, trends, and a specific topic of education related to EV's.  We bring together a diverse experience set, and pair it with guests who are experts in the field.  For even more information on EV's, check out www.EVUniverse.com. This episode is part 3 of a 3 part series looking into issues facing EV owners and winter driving.  The episode examines tires for electric vehicles.  While some may think there is a big difference between ICE and EV tires, that is not always the case.  Listen in to learn more about the relationship between rolling resistance, traction, and your driving environment.  Be sure to follow PIFM on our various social media platforms, for more exciting content on EV's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pifm_podcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PIFMPodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqXpv3fnOcv-robjLbDINFQ/featured

GLT's The Leadoff
The Leadoff - Monday 11/21/22

GLT's The Leadoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 7:40


WGLT's The Leadoff is everything you need to know for Monday, Nov. 21, 2022. You'll hear about Rivian trying to force arbitration with a former employee who's sued over allegations of sexual harassment. Plus, a former radio and TV program at Lincoln College finds a new life.

GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes
WGLT's Sound Ideas - Monday 11/21/22

GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 23:10


On today's episode, employment lawyers are skeptical of Rivian's plans to force arbitration in a sexual harassment case, state Sen. Jason Barickman assess Republican party messaging following an unsuccessful election, plus a Bloomington machine shop helps major employers in Bloomington-Normal avoid supply chain delays.

The EV Musings Podcast
150 - The EV6 Episode

The EV Musings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 51:10


This is episode 150 of EV Musings a podcast about renewables, electric vehicles and things that are interesting to electric vehicle owners. On the show today we'll be looking at Kia's EV6. This season of the podcast is sponsored by Zap-Map, the free to download app that helps EV drivers search, plan, and pay for their charging. LINKS Cool thing: Doctor performs vasectomy using Rivian power.https://insideevs.com/news/608228/doctor-rivian-r1t-vasectomy/ Social Media: Patreon Link: http://www.patreon.com/evmusings Ko-fi Link: http://www.ko-fi.com/evmusings EVMusings: Twitter https://twitter.com/MusingsEv and Facebook http://www.facebook.com/The-EV-Musings-Podcast-2271582289776763 Octopus Energy referral code (Click this link to get started) https://share.octopus.energy/neat-star-460 'So, you've gone electric?' on Amazon : https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07Q5JVF1X 'So, you've gone renewable?' on Amazon : https://amzn.to/3LXvIck

America on the Road
Hitting the Gas In 2023 Volkswagen Golf R: Is It Just Too Good?

America on the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 42:04


The 2023 Volkswagen Golf R offers a wealth of good stuff: 315 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque, 6-speed manual or 7-speed DSG transmission, adaptive-damping suspension, a giant display screen, and impressive driver assistance technology. With a starting MSRP of $44,740, it is an amazing performance bargain. But at the same time, one of our testers asks the question, “Is it too smart for its own good?” While there is no doubt that the Golf R delivers more than enough performance per dollar spent, the interface between the car and its driver might blunt some of its goodness. Depending upon your point of view, the car's systems could require the driver to make too many choices. And those choices must be made through a touchscreen display that isn't all that easy to use, especially at speed. Guest co-host Matt DeLorenzo, author of How To Buy an Affordable Electric Car, and Host Jack Nerad will explore that in this episode. We'll also explore the all-new 2023 Kia Sportage compact utility. Jack Nerad and his wife had the opportunity to test all aspects of the Sportage HEV (hybrid) on a recent tour of Central and Southern California that took them from the SouthBay of Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo on the Central Coast and then to the desert east of Palm Springs. It was a revealing drive, and Nerad tells all about it in this show. In the news this week, an all-new, upcoming version of one of the seminal SUVs has just been revealed. The International Scout has achieved legendary acclaim (and it is also the vehicle driven by the hero in Nerad's latest book, Dance in the Dark.) Now Volkswagen has purchased the rights to the Scout name, and it will begin selling off-road-ready battery-electric SUVs under that brand starting in 2026. We'll tell you what we think about the whole thing coming up. And despite rosy predictions, this year has been an extremely tough one for electric vehicle start-up manufacturers. Rivian, Lucid, Lordstown, and Canoo are among the EV makers suffering big losses as they try to reach profitability. We'll give you the gory details a little later in the show.

Stu's EV Universe
SEVU 42: Creation Care and EVs

Stu's EV Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 27:58


This week, Stu speaks with Reverend John Odom about how electric transportation fits into the fabric of creation care. We explore a specific EV charging collaborative program, how a greater global view often leads to increased care for the planet, the need for all humankind to protect the earth and there is even a brief shoutout to William Shatner! Support us on Patreon at: www.patreon.com/StusEVU Learn more about Evolve KY at: www.evolveky.org Topics: Creation Care, Presbyterian, EVs, Transportation, Faith, Electric Vehicles, EV chargers, Adopt a Charger, Churches, Presbyterian, Unitarian, William Shatner, Pollution, Climate Change, Fossil Fuels, Oil, Petroleum, Community Gardens, Community, Christianity, Christian Faith, Rivian, Nissan LEAF, Chevy Volt, Tesla, Equity, PlugShare --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

MotorWeek
Volvo EX90 Reveal, Honda CR-V Hybrid First Drive, & the Rivian R1T Road Test!

MotorWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022


The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz
KIDS, COME MEET YOUR NEW MOM ALEXA!

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 35:21


Kelly and Lizz, sans guests, have a LOT to catch you up on today. Kell is feeling super pregnant, is looking forward to the holidays, and will be doing a lot of hand washing and saying her prayers to keep her and the baby healthy into the new year.  Did today's millennial word start with drag queens? In any case, 'wig,' as in, 'I was so shocked my wig fell off,' is just another bit of Gen Z slang that the gals will not be using.  Kelly's driveway dump features Alexa timer parenting, teaching your kids to be polite to robots, and how she plans to make her hospital stay a super cozy spa time with her new baby. The gals discuss when the Christmas tree will go up, and Kelly gets jazzed about the yard blow-up she's sneaking into her outdoor decor. Her excitement spills over to kitten heels making a comeback. To wrap up the segment, Kelly shares a little rant about giving credit for vague advice. Minivan mom Megan writes in on today's advice segment looking for a spacious recommendation for her family. Kelly explores this mama's many options, including another minivan for the teens and a sleeker Expedition or Tahoe for herself.  In industry news, EV registrations through September are up 57% in the US. Volvo is releasing a new three-row SUV EV. The EX 90 will be under $80,000 and will launch in 2024. The car is said to be safer than any Volvo car to come before it. Head to The Car Mom's YouTube to check out the new Rivian tour and subscribe so you don't miss Kelly's complete Honda Pilot release reaction that is coming soon! Today, listener Amanda from North Carolina is here to get you out of a dinner rut. Amanda's at-home butter chicken and chickpea recipe is easy to throw together and is super Instant Pot friendly. → To share your ditch the drive-through recipe with us, call (959) CAR-POOL and leave us a message! Uncommon Goods — today's sponsor — is your secret weapon if you want to avoid basic and bland gifts this holiday season. They scour the globe for the most remarkable and truly unique gifts for everyone on your list. From jewelry to kitchen, bar, him, her, kids, and more, Uncommon Goods has something for everyone. Uncommon Goods is here to make your shopping stress free.  → To get 15% off your next gift, go to uncommongoods.com/carpool for 15% off. Don't miss out on this limited-time offer on Uncommon Goods! Today's episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. Improve your energy, recovery, focus, and aging with a greens powder that doesn't taste like grass. AG has 75 high-quality vitamins, minerals, whole foods, and probiotics you can take daily in just water. AG contains no sugar, no GMOs, and no nasty chemicals or artificial ingredients. For less than $3 a day, invest in your health whether you're eating gluten-free, keto, paleo, dairy-free, or vegan — this is your ultimate daily nutrition insurance. → Get your free one-year supply of immune-supporting vitamin D and five free travel packs with your first purchase when you use our link: athleticgreens.com/carpool → Want our advice on your next car (or just got a life question for us)? Shoot us an email for a chance to get your questions featured on the show at hello@thecarmomofficial.com Follow the Carpool Podcast on IG Follow the Carpool Podcast on YouTube Follow Kelly on IG Follow Lizz on IG Visit thecarmomofficial.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz
Crypto, ETFs, and Stocks (Podcast)

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 35:28


Mike McGlone, Senior Commodity Strategist with Bloomberg Intelligence, and Katie Greifeld, cross asset reporter with Bloomberg News, join for an in-studio roundtable to talk FTX and Sam Bankman-Fried, crypto regulation, and where the bottom is for Bitcoin and other digital assets. Sean O'Hara, President at Pacer ETFs, joins the show to discuss ETF investing and strategies he likes for the rest of 2022. Noel Archard, Global Head of ETFs at AllianceBernstein, joins the show to discuss ETF investing and market conditions and what they portend for ETFs in 2022. Kevin Tynan, Senior Autos Analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence, joins the show to talk about Rivian and Tesla stock moving in the premarket. Marianne Scordel, founder at Bougeville Consulting, joins the show to discuss Paris overtaking the UK as the largest stock exchange in Europe. Hosted by Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
13 Nov 2022 | Briefly

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 4:16


➤ Rivian's LED Headlights Are Giving Owners Headaches In Snow and Ice ➤ Polestar PSNY earnings: Lower operating loss, confirms guidance ➤ Electric vehicle recharging infrastructure must be installed in new homes ➤ Sales of used electric vehicles reach record highs | RAC Drive ➤ China's power battery installed capacity soars 98.1% YoY in Oct. 2022 - Gasgoo ➤ IONITY to hit UK charging network targets before due date - electrive.com ➤ BMW electric vehicle lineup will include lower-priced models ➤ Tritium, DC-America Join Forces | Tritium Tritium ➤ Honda dealers may service upcoming Sony electric vehicles - Autoblog ➤ Kempower to deliver more than 50 rapid and ultra-rapid DC chargers to South Australia ➤ BYD Introduces Type A Battery Electric School Bus with V2G technology  - BYD USA

Tailosive EV
Ep. 129 - Rivian is BUSY & The Rise of 7 Seaters

Tailosive EV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 85:49


Join Drew, Randy, and Mike as they discuss which Aptera models they would get, Rivian's delay of the R2 platform, and the safety features of the new Volvo EX90!0:00 Aptera Tiers16:00 Rivian Business28:00 Lucid Losing44:00 Canoo Barely Alive55:00 Volvo Safety is AwesomeDrew:https://twitter.com/TailosiveEVRandy:https://twitter.com/RandyVazquezMike:https://twitter.com/GamerikePublished: 11-12-2022, Recorded: 11-10-2022© Tailosive Podcasts 2022 | All Rights Reserved

The Brief from WABE
The Brief for Friday, November 11, 2022

The Brief from WABE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 9:20


Fans and loved ones celebrate the life of Migos rapper Takeoff at State Farm Arena; the highly touted electric vehicle plant to be built by Rivian is delaying the start of production; and the latest episode of Georgia Votes 2022 looks at how the parties will prepare for the upcoming midterm runoffs on December 6.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Emprendeduros
EP. #156 | Empieza el colapso de Crypto

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 64:59


¡Invierte en el Fondo de Los Emprendeduros! https://forms.gle/8u3iM1uncw6sq4bY7 ¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro nos dan una actualización de mercado donde hablan de la situación del Mercado, de la inflación y del empleo. Revisan el reporte de ingresos de Berkshire Hathaway, Lyft, Disney, Roblox, AMC, Rivian, Beyond Meat y WeWork. Finalmente nos dan una actualización de Cryptos donde hablan de la caída de FTX, su relación con Binance y las posibles consecuencias.

GLT's The Leadoff
The Leadoff - Friday 11/11/22

GLT's The Leadoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 8:40


WGLT's The Leadoff is everything you need to know for Friday, November. 11, 2022. You'll hear about Rivian's efforts to ramp up production. Plus Illinois state Sen. Dave Koehler reflects on his reelection victory in a newly shaped district that includes Bloomington-Normal.

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis
TSLA Continues Fall, China Production Record, EV Credit Bill, Rivian Earnings, Twitter (11.09.22)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 20:43


➤ TSLA stock continues to drop on high volume ➤ Walking through the math on Elon Musk's stock sales and Twitter requirements ➤ Tesla sets production record at Giga Shanghai ➤ More discussion on China demand ➤ EV tax credit changes proposed in Congress ➤ Tesla establishes new warehouse in Germany ➤ Foxconn discusses EV plans ➤ Rivian reports Q3 earnings ➤ Elon Musk shares more on Twitter plans ➤ Twitter notes: https://bit.ly/3NVyxgt Shareloft: https://www.shareloft.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/teslapodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tesladailypodcast Tesla Referral: https://ts.la/robert47283 Executive producer Jeremy Cooke Executive producer Troy Cherasaro Executive producer Andre/Maria Kent Executive producer Jessie Chimni Executive producer Michael Pastrone Executive producer Richard Del Maestro Executive producer John Beans Music by Evan Schaeffer Disclosure: Rob Maurer is long TSLA stock & derivatives

GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes
WGLT's Sound Ideas - Thursday 11/10/22

GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 23:40


On today's episode, Rivian starts a second production shift, state Sen. Dave Koehler shares thoughts on his reelection win and Bloomington-Normal being added to the district, a political scientist examines the shifting political demographics, and State Rep. Dan Brady discusses his future following his failed bid for Secretary of State.

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3446 - End of ICE Age Sales Frenzy; Geely's $25,000 EV Pickup; VW's New Type of Fuel Cell

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 10:06


- End of ICE Age Sales Frenzy - Alfa Tops JD Power Sales Satisfaction Index - Rivian's Losses Growing - Volvo Adds Big EV SUV to Lineup - Honda Launches All-New Accord - Green Metals a Priority at Ford and Volvo - VW's New Type of Fuel Cell - Geely's $25,000 Pickup - Tesla Goes Zoom-Zoom-Zoom

Autoline Daily
AD #3446 - End of ICE Age Sales Frenzy; Geely's $25,000 EV Pickup; VW's New Type of Fuel Cell

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 10:07


- End of ICE Age Sales Frenzy- Alfa Tops JD Power Sales Satisfaction Index- Rivian's Losses Growing- Volvo Adds Big EV SUV to Lineup- Honda Launches All-New Accord- Green Metals a Priority at Ford and Volvo- VW's New Type of Fuel Cell- Geely's $25,000 Pickup- Tesla Goes Zoom-Zoom-Zoom

We Are Auto
134. New 2023 Honda Pilot, Mini Manual Driving School, Rivian Electric Amazon Vans | News

We Are Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 24:42


Thank you for listening to We Are Auto, the podcast about cars - for enthusiasts, by enthusiasts! Please leave a 5 Star rating and write a review!   In episode 134: - Honda's new 2023 Pilot SUV - Mini USA launching a manual transmission driving school - Expect to see Rivian Electric Amazon Vans this holiday season            and more! Follow along! Facebook Instagram Youtube Website

TD Ameritrade Network
Rivian (RIVN) Delivery Goal: 25K In 2022, Is It Likely?

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 4:22


Rivian (RIVN) earnings report will be released today in the post-market. The RIVN stock price today is down over 13% so far. The EPS estimate is -$1.78 and the revenue estimate is $513.89M. "Rivian's goal is to have produced 25K electric vehicles by the end of 2022. That means that they would have to increase their production by 75% per quarter. Also, investors would like to see the Amazon (AMZN) partnership details during their earnings call," says Kevin Green.

Quick Charge
Quick Charge Podcast: November 8, 2022

Quick Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 7:36


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from Electrek. Quick Charge is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn and our RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. New episodes of Quick Charge are recorded Monday through Thursday and again on Saturday. Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories we discuss in this episode (with links): Tesla (TSLA) earns 8 times more per car than Toyota Tesla pulls another demand lever in China Theron Reever: Electric ATV that will make you stop waiting for the Tesla Cyberquad Porsche has produced its 100,000th Taycan electric car Nikola (NKLA) partners with ChargePoint and will sell entire portfolio of charging solutions to fleets 2023 Kia EV6 price starts at $49,795 – $7K more than 2022's base price Foxconn is investing another $70 million in Ohio's Lordstown Motors to pursue revamped ‘EV program' Amazon meeting holiday demand with fleet of over 1,000 Rivian electric vehicle delivery vans https://youtu.be/QGHua7ebpOY Subscribe to the Electrek Daily Channel on Youtube so you never miss a day of news Follow Mikey: Twitter @Mikey_Electric Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify TuneIn Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at tips@electrek.co. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

The Clean Energy Show
Highway to Climate Hell; Autonomous Driving Delayed

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:46


As COP 27 kicks off in Egypt, The UN chief says we're not doing enough to prevent a climate catastrophe. On the bright side, France is mandating all parking lots have solar panels over them resulting in the power of 10 nuclear reactors. An analyst says Tesla may never achieve full self-driving. South Dakota produced more energy from wind than any other source. Why a switch in power in the United States Congress won't kill Biden's Inflation Reduction / Climate act. Brian's PTC cabin heater in his Tesla Model 3 had to be replaced and that meant driving in a parka for two and a half hours to the closes service center. Clip from the Energy Vs Climate podcast with guest Katherine Hamilton. Netflix has a documentary on Nissan head and current criminal Carlos Ghosn called 'Fugitive: The Curious Case of Carlos Ghosn." He was accused of stealing millions from Nissan and escaping in a storage chest on a plane. The eight billionth human being is about to be born. We disguss the Energi Media YouTube channel where Markham Hislop talked to an analyst from Guidehouse Insights about what's taking level 4 autonomy so long. Porsche has made 100,000 EVs. Tesla (TSLA) is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota, and they are starting to notice back in Japan. Pakistan's utility knows going green means consumers pay less for their electricity bill. Electrek editor Fred Lambert on Elon Musk's feedback loop of constant praise. The "hydrogen-is-not-all-that" podcast suggested by one of our listeners can be found here. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! What should we do for Patreon perks coming in 2023? Let us know your ideas! Transcript  Hello and welcome to Episode 138 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, several companies are throwing to the towel and full selfdriving, but please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. The state of South Dakota and now produces more electricity from wind than any other source. Must be the hot air coming from Mount Rushmore, am I right? No. UN Chief Antonio Gutierrez says we are on the highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. Again, please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. In France, the government has ordered that all parking lots must be covered by solar panels, all because President Emmanuel Macron can't get the top back up on his convertible Renault. All that and so much more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. And also this week, Brian, why a switch in power in the United States Congress, which is voting as we speak, as we record this won't kill Biden's inflation reduction act, but a change in government in Canada actually would be problem for us north of the border because well, I'll get to that later. And we also have a bit of an update live from Cop 27, sort of. And what's new with you? How was your trip to Saskatoon? Because last week you're heading north two and a half hours in the snowy Canadian winter to get your Tesla fixes. That's the closest Tesla service center to you. Yeah, that's right. So the heater has not been working right and didn't seem to be working quite right last winter, but kind of not enough to generate an error message. But now I had an error message, so they seemed to know what to do to fix it. So drove up Saskatoon, where the closest service center is, and yes, they replaced the whole heater. That's what they did. Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. It's under warranty. Everything's fine, isn't it? Everything's fine. When does the warranty end? Let me ask you, because it has, as we pointed out a couple of weeks ago, two and a half years, a quarter decade, getting close to the point where this is going to start killing you in the wallet. I don't recall when it ends, but I think it might say specs of warrant. It says in the app somewhere. Yes, here in the app. The Tesla app, basic vehicle, limited warranty, expires in March 2024 or 80,000, battery 2028 or 160 and the drive unit 2028 or 160,000 km as well. So, yeah, a couple more years to go on the basic warranty. Okay, I see. This could be a different discussion in the future. OK, what was it? Was it the PTC heater, the resistive heater? Yeah. Or you don't have a heat pump, so that's what it was. No heat pump. So the resistive heater. Yeah, for some reason they were sure about that. They were pretty sure by the time I got there. Because they have all the data from the car, like everything, the car is digitized and they can see all the data from my car. So as I dropped it off, they said, yeah, it's probably the whole heater needs to be replaced. And they were prepared to do that. And at the same time, too, there's been a recall for the trunk lid harness or something. I think it's to do with the cables, the wire harness to the camera in the back. So they did that at the same time. And it took about like 4 hours for them to do it. Wasn't too bad. Is that right? You had an appointment at 08:00 a.m. And they went right at it and started working on it. Yes. Call me around 1130. And they had the part, which is good again, I assume because they had all the data, they could order the parts ahead of time that they would need. That's nice. Yeah. And they gave me a loaner car, which I drove around Saskatchewan for a while. And yes, I got back before there was another blizzard. What was that? A couple of days later, our second blizzard of the year. Which is not technically a blizzard environment. Canada doesn't call it a blizzard. Do not call it a blizzard. But boy, was it a blizzard. It was crazy. Another nasty, nasty one. And I think we were the epicenter this time. Last time it was Moose Jaw. Yes, really nasty. Tons of snow. Yes. Crazy out there. How was your trip back? Was it okay? And the heater was all hot. How was it there, though? It was below zero, so I put on my parka. So you didn't have heat? There was a little bit of heat, not enough. And the heated seat was still working, but with the parka on, it was fine. Here's what I'm thinking, and that is the newer cars have a heat pump. Yeah, that's right. Newer cars have a heat pump instead of a resistive heater. So they don't have both then? I don't think so, no. You'd think that they might need one as a backup. But maybe the car generates enough heat that it holds. It's taking heat from the motor, it's taking heat from the from the batteries or something. There's a loop of different things that heat up here. But we do know there has been problems with some of the heat pumps as well in extreme cold. Is it in the heat pump itself or something related to the heat pump? Anyway, that's interesting because you didn't get a price on what that would be. Didn't show the invoice of what that repair would cost. No, they didn't. Just said zero. I'd be interested. I guess you could look it up online. What somebody else did we'll talk more about this sort of thing in future months. So anything else? You went up? You managed, your feet didn't get cold? Yes. No. It was a little bit chilly, but it wasn't too bad. Was it the most unpleasant trip you've had because you work cold? Yeah, I guess so. Yeah. I've got a really warm parka, so it felt almost normal. With that on, the heat can radiate up from the heated seat and fill the market. There you go. And then the other thing that's going on with me is they started shooting a TV show across the street from me here in the neighborhood. Really? You know, that's happened before, hasn't it? What is it about across the street? Because there used to be somebody of relevant who lived there who was connected to the film industry. Yes. They're gone. Not anymore. And it's their house that's being rented for this shoot. That's a weird coincidence, though. Yeah. And our good friend Jay is working on the shoot, so I've run into him out there on the street. Wow. I bet he doesn't know we're talking about him. No, probably not. I assume he doesn't listen to the podcast. No, he wouldn't. He's an old man. I don't think he knows what a podcast oh, he's an angry old man, Brian. Angry, angry old man who is actually six months younger than me. So he's working in winter and there's a TV show shooting across the street from you. I think Jay would prefer to be shooting in a sound stage where there's a lot more room for everybody and it's a lot more comfortable because, of course, it's a blizzard, remember? Why couldn't it be a James Cameron green screen affair? That's what you want to work on. But yeah, no, there's a lot of traffic on the street, lots of cars parked on our streets. But it's fine. Back in the day when I was a kid, I did a couple shows outside. It's horrible. Even in the fall when it's warmer than this, to spend 14 hours outside is just not good. I mean, they're shooting really inside the house, but there's so many crew people that they got to have to spill out into the cars and into the yard and everything. Is there somebody blocking traffic? No, no one closing off the traffic so far. Okay, that'd be annoying. You're coming home, you got to pee. Some little film student has a stop sign and says, no, you can't. So it's really weird. Happened to be on Sunday. I was biting my own business watching TV. We were snowed in. It was a blizzard, as you say, right. I couldn't do anything. So my son's home from college, and he took a shower. And I got to thinking, what is that cable cam on football games called? What is the brand name for that? Because I started thinking about that, and so I googled it, and it's called a Sky Cam. And then that took me to the Wikipedia page of the sky camp. And then I found out that the Sky Cam company was bought by this company, then bought by that company, and then it was bought by the person my son hates most of the world, which is Stan Crockey, the owner of the Arsenal Football Club in the Denver Broncos, and a bunch of other things. He's a bad man, according to people who support the team. And then I was gravitated towards a section that said incidents, because of course, that's sexy. I'm going to go there. There were three incidents, Brian. One in, like, 1981, when they first invented, and by the way, it was invented by the same person who invented the steadicam. Yeah. So that person, I'm assuming, is rich now. Yeah. So this is a camera that's on a giant cable that runs across the stage, two cables. So it's a couple of cables so it can fly over the players during a football game with a camera, I believe it's like a big X of cable, so it can go in three dimensions, back and forth. And just above the helms of it, you see them, you may not notice them. I don't think anybody who's paying attention notices them. Anyway, there was one incident at a small college football game back in the 80s when it was first came out. There was an incident in like, 25 years ago, and the third incident was an hour before I read it. An hour before I read it. It was a game that we didn't have. Here was the New York Jets game, and apparently the game was delayed by an hour because the Sky Cam fell from the I just thought that was weird. You're reading three incidents in history and going, this was an hour ago. The third one was an hour ago. And somebody had updated the Wikipedia. And of course they did, Brian, because Wikipedia, it's all about updating quickly. When we die, our family won't know before Wikipedia knows. Like, it will be updated instantly. Well, you know, there's no entry about me on Wikipedia, so if anyone out there well, there will be by then to write one. Me, too. I keep begging people to write one for years. I keep writing it myself, and they rejected, even though I have many awards if you're not allowed to accolades. And yeah, last night my partner had a grocery store order far away, and we went to the east end of town to pick up groceries because she ordered it in advance before the blizzard without checking the weather. It was a herring affair. And we decided to use her coupons for Carl's Jr. Which she never go to, but we thought that would be exotic someplace. We have a bit, let's go there and try this coupon out. And we got there and ordered it all went smoothly. And we got to the drive through window and there was this car load of teenagers in front of us who had been stuck there for an hour. And no one at the drivethrough told us anything. But the car in front of us was stuck right at the window for an hour. So we had the card that my partner uses and many, many years ago we went to the grocery store chain Superstore and they had clearance, these pieces of rectangular plastic that are grippy that you put under your wheel. They're like a little tread of plastic that's really pointy. Yeah. So it's something you keep in the trunk and if you get stuck in the snow, you put them under your wheels. Never used them. Cost about $0.50, like they were discounted from like twelve bucks to fifty cents. Never used them. But she had them in the car, put one under the front wheel, cut them out of there in a second. Wow. And they threw $20 at me, which I refused, of course, but they were so thankful to get out, they ever would. And of course it's embarrassing because you're blocking a fat guy from getting his burger behind you and that's no good. So, yeah, we got them out instantly, which was funny as hell. Good deed of the week. Sure. Now let's get on to some discussions with past stories because I wanted to talk about the Energy Vis Climate podcast. Okay? This is my name's. Sake ed. Woodynham calls himself I call myself Whittingham. He calls himself Woodynham. He's from Alberta. It's 90% chance for cousins. Okay, I haven't worked it out yet, but two people, there's like six Whittingham in Canada and apparently two of them fell into clean energy somehow. But whose podcast is more popular, that's what I want to know. Well, he's a big deal. He's been in the news for working for governments as a consultant. So he would have a lot of like this is not the same kind of podcast that people necessarily listen to because it's in the weeds, it's in policy. There's a lot of policy for people who work in the industry. That's a huge news. Well, I do listen to it. And they had Kathryn Hamilton on, who used to host the Clean Energy or the Energy Gang podcast. Now she's gone off to other things and I think she worked for the US government for a while. She's from the States, of course, and she's a clean energy expert and got decades of clean tech and policy in DC. And she was talking about the US midterms. And I was worried, I've said before on the show that I'm worried about what's going to happen because it's probably going to change. Power is going to change in one way or another in Washington, whether it's now or later, it always changes. How safe is the clean? The big biden thing is not going to be reversed because they're evil, they reverse things. They don't believe climate change at all. They're a hoax. So I just thought she had a really interesting answer that I'll play for you now. So I don't think that shift will have a direct impact yet on the climate goals. It will certainly prevent anything additional from happening. And the US. Congress holds the purse strings for the federal government. So just on appropriating funds to keep the government going, that will have an impact. But the pieces that are in IRA are pretty strong. I mean, they are tax credit, unless they were to completely rewrite the tax code. And I'll give you a little secret. When you give somebody something, don't ever try to take it away. So you're going to have all of these people taking advantage of credits. And in fact, manufacturers are already moving into states that are heavily Republican states and the last thing they want is those tax credits to go away. In fact, during the Trump administration, they never put on the table rolling back solar and wind tax credits. They just didn't because they knew that was a losing proposition for them. Yeah, I didn't realize that even during Trump they didn't roll back very much, did they, as far as climate goes, because business people were investing and that's the thing. Now in Canada, it's a different story. What they call it, and they refer to it as a runway. In the states, solar and wind have a ten year runway that it's guaranteed that if you invest, you can keep investing and it will still work out. You're not wasting your investment. You need to give assurances and security to people to make these investments because that's what the clean energy transition is. It's largely investing, but in Canada we don't have that. So our government is a minority parliamentarian. Government that may switch to 2025 will probably I mean, the government don't last forever around here either. And that government hardly wants to get rid of carbon taxes and doesn't seem to legitimately believe in climate change either. They're not that far off in the Republicans. But yeah, apparently the Canadian government is working on making that so that it's a guaranteed thing because investors are already threatening. They might be grandstanding, but they're threatening the one is going to the states because that's where the guarantee is, I don't know. And there's even definitely companies worried about doing business in places like Alberta because of the sort of backwards looking energy policy that they have there. If you're a giant business, giant international business, you're going to think twice setting up a business in a place that is denying climate change. And we were talking about Carlos Gon last week, the former chairman of Nissan who oversaw the implementation of the Nissan Leaf, the first mass produced electric car, which I happen to own a ten year old version of that. And there's actually a Netflix documentary that just came out a week ago as we were talking about that. Oh, fantastic. Well, I don't know that it is fantastic. I'm not reviewing it. I'm not endorsing it. It's called fugitive. The Curious Case of Carloscone. And I watched a bit of a lot of talking heads. It's interesting because it's kind of like a heist movie, right? Because he's accused of stealing millions from the car company he led, he was arrested in Japan and smuggled out of the country by two Americans in a storage chest, who, coincidentally, were also just convicted this week. As soon as I brought it up, things started happening. Brian wow. Okay. Well, I think I'll check that out. It was an interesting story just because of that one detail that he had to escape the country in a storage chest. Yeah. Oh. We have some breaking news. The 8th billionth human being is about to be born in the world. We go now to Antonio Gutiris, the head of the United Nations. The 8th billionth member of our human family is born. How will we answer when baby 8 billion is old enough to ask, what did you do for our world and for our planet when you had the chance? After President Trump announced that America would withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Accord, elon Musk immediately announced he would quit presidential business councils. We are in the fight of our lives and we are losing. Greenhouse gas emissions keep growing, global temperatures keep rising, and our planet is fast approaching tipping points that will make climate chaos irreversible. Twitter owner Elon Musk has told his followers on the platform to vote for a Republican congress. Tuesday, Musk tweeted, quote to independentminded voters, shared power curbs the worst excesses of both parties. Global warming, which a lot of people think is a hoax. The Earth will end only when God declares it's time to be over. We are on a highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. This is a clean energy show with Brian Thompson and James Whittingham. Okay, so a quick start here from South Dakota. Now, we often talk about North Dakota here on the show because we're just above North Dakota here. In many ways. In many ways, I love North Dakota. Home of the Fargo Film Festival. Home of the Fargo Theater. Anyway, South Dakota, which is just below North Dakota, it is now getting most of its electricity from wind they previously had. Hydroelectric was the biggest source, but now 52% is coming from wind turbines in the province there. So congratulations to South Dakota. And what I say to that initially is, why not us? Brian why not us? I wonder what led that to happen. Like, what was it? Private investment? Because we have a utility owned, government owned utility here. Was it the private sector that saw cheap electricity that drove the investment in? That what sparked that? Because South Dakota is not in the day and age of accusing everything green as being on one side of the political spectrum and therefore the enemy the other, then I'm surprised that a state like South Dakota was able to do something like that. Yeah, in South Dakota and North Dakota, both tend to be conservative leaning states. It is slightly surprising, but as we know, it's a great idea. So we have very similar wind profile here in our province and a little bit of wind power, but it really needs to be cranked up. You know, it's interesting politically when I was in Fargo with you, that I was asking, because that was just when Trump was becoming a thing and I was trying to get a Trump sign to bring over, was asking around for one. They were all lefty apologizing for their country. But it just goes to show that even in very right wing states, you have pockets of people who are, you know, not everybody is going to be one way or the other. There's always pockets, even in the most extreme leaning states. Yeah, fargo is a college town. They've got, like, I think, three universities in Fargo or Fargo morehead. And of course, people involved in the film festival, I guess, tend to be people in the arts, more left leaning, but as a whole, pretty conservative places. And my son always points out that Wyoming has Casper, which is also a small college town, because we've been through Wyoming a few times and I've been shaken by some of the images I've seen there. And there's lots of bad things to look at and signs and messages. But, yeah, Casper, which is a town we did go to, it was like a Fargo of Wyoming. It was kind of like a cool little college town with a nice Taco Bell, I may add. Nice. And, you know, I wanted to go there for the eclipse. The total eclipse of the sun that was the closest to us was Casper, Wyoming. Oh, interesting. I think we had just done a six week vacation in the mountains with our camper, and I couldn't convince my partner to do it. I regret that ever since, because it would have been a one day trip to see something remarkable. No. And I thought about driving to Calgary or Winnipeg to see Kate Beaton, author of the Duck's graphic novel, which I was plugging on the show. But these blizzards prevented these blizzards are bad. You never know this time of year whether we live in western Canada, where you're going to get bad weather, and certainly any mountain pass, even the Sierra Nevada mountains, are getting killed with a whole whack of snow. I've got a story I wanted to talk about. I guess a few companies, at least a couple in the last week or so, that have dropped plans, like, Ford has announced that it has dropped plans for a level three driver assistance, which would lead them to robotaxis. And they're going to focus on level two just for the consumer rather than as a business. So that's been a big shift. Mercedes is kind of doing the same. They say robotaxis are no longer a goal. We thought that in 2016 or 17, and that's kind of when the neural net sort of became a thing and they thought, well, everything is going to be solved quickly, but now they're backing off of that and they thought they could solve the robotaxi problem quite quickly. And so did certain CEOs who now social media magnets, but committing to both a ride hailing solution and a passenger driven assistant solution was expensive. So they thought they just concentrated on the one that make people because people are demanding it now. They're demanding basically the different versions of autopilot for different cars just to drive itself on the highway. How was your autopilot, by the way, in wintertime? How is it doing on actual highways? Yeah, generally really good. It can kind of sense generally through the snow. Okay, well, self driving taxis that operate all day, every day and all kinds of weather have been a dream for many for decades, including one of the Google people who started their autonomous program, Waymo. Yes. So now he's programming trucks to operate within the confines of industrial sites. Only one of these guys. And he says the foreseeable future, that's as much as the complexity as any driverless vehicle will be able to handle, in his opinion. He says, forget about the profits, the combined revenue of all the robotax the robotruck companies, it's not a lot right now. It's probably more like zero. So our friend of the show, Mark Hislamp, who is one province over from us or two provinces over, but from where we live, he's got a YouTube show called Energy Media, and he also has a podcast from time to time, and he has a guest on from Guidehouse Insights. He's an automotive engineer and EV analyst. His name is Dulce Meade and he's somebody that I go to for EV information and sort of market knowledge like that. And boy, he's got some cold water to throw on the robotaxi thing. I got some clips from him. This is him talking about that it's going to be a while before someone solves this to be at the point where you can really start to scale it up dramatically and get to a level of number of vehicles on the road where you can start to build a really viable business out of it. It's probably closer to eight to ten years, closer towards the end of this decade than where we are today. And again, this is Marks YouTube show energy Media. I'll have a link to it in the show notes, so we can borrow from him without guilt. And also he's talking about how AI sort of plateaued. What I was just talking about, the Neuron net development in early 2010s was something that people thought would move fast but apparently he sees a big plateau happening and slowing down. We had that big advancement in the middle part of the last decade, and that suddenly moved things forward very quickly. But then it plateaued and it's been climbing very slowly ever since it hit that plateau. And so that's why it's hard to predict when we'll get to that stage where these systems are at least consistently as good as or better than humans. Now, there's been a Department of justice investigation into Musk over full selfdriving claims. According to Reuters, prosecutors in Washington, San Francisco are examining whether Tesla misled customers. I hear when you look at sort of on stage discussions from people in this space, they're really bad mouthed Tesla. Now, you could take that with a grain of salt and say it's envy, or I don't believe in their approach, but Tesla is always proving people wrong. Anyway, this is his opinion, his contrary opinion on the Tesla approach, and he doesn't think much of it. There are some fundamental flaws in the Tesla approach relying on cameras only, and particularly because of the way they've configured the cameras, where you don't have any stereoscopic imaging, so you can do parallax imaging to get some accurate distance measurement. Tesla is relying entirely on AI inference to try to measure distance to objects, which is an inherently flawed approach. The system that they have devised is not really capable of robust automated driving, and probably never will be. Between the name and what Elon Musk has consistently said for the last six years, since October of 2016, when they launched autopilot version two. And he started his presentation with starting today, all vehicles rolling out of the Tesla factory have all the hardware they need to get to level five. Autonomy. Which was a lie then and it's a lie today. He's a pinch angry, I think, which is up to the sort of a toad that I hear of these things. But yeah, well, we'll see. But Tesla's future is highly reliant on that's one big aspect of it. It's not just selling cars. Yeah, well, I suspect that they probably wouldn't do the same thing now. So that's back in 2016, and Tesla was not in a profitable position back then, so they started selling full selfdriving, I think partly just as a way to get revenue into the company, a future promise of a future feature. Since then, they've become very profitable and very stable. So if they were starting this program now, I don't think they would be selling this feature for the future at ten, $20,000. But, yeah, I suspect back then they just wanted the cash flow. And another problem that I've seen come up is people like you who have the full self driving beta but aren't using it. So apparently that's a bit of an issue because it's kind of annoying. Right? It turns off and you think, Well, I'll just drive normally for now. Yeah, I've. Got better things to do. Sure. Even as you're retirement. But this has become an issue because they're getting less data and they need more data, which is maybe one of the reasons why they're trying to roll it out to even people with bad driving scores. Yeah, but could they possibly even crunch all the data that they're getting? Almost on the inside observer, I have a friend who owns a Tesla, but you I'm amazed at how the promises keep coming that it's later this year, end of the year, next year, and year after year it's always there. But watching the progress of Auto full self driving beta, it does seem to be a slow crawl. Something could happen where everything comes together. I don't know, everything about it to ComEd and maybe they'll solve something that puts everything together and suddenly it makes a giant leap forward. But right now and we'll see. We'll see. Because we're six months away from testing your car again on the same route, and we'll see how it does. And we had a rainy day last year, so it wasn't perfect, but yeah. Anyway, France is doing something quite unusual, even for France. Yeah. So there is new legislation that was approved this week that requires all parking lots in France with spaces for at least 80 vehicles. This is both existing and new parking lots be covered by solar panels. So this is great. You think that has an 80 vehicle parking lot? What would that be? A strip mall? A strip mall would have that. Yeah, I guess so. We have quite a few kind of small parking lots in our city. I think that wouldn't qualify. Or even a big hotel. Brian would have 80 spots, wouldn't it? I mean, if you have 80 rooms, you'd have 80 spots. Yeah, it just makes sense. Like, this is schools, maybe. Yeah, schools. This is space that it's just there. And if we put solar panels on it, it will keep the rain off the cars and produce electricity. It's a nice incentive. So you have to do this. Yeah, this is the law. So according to the government, the potential of the measure could reach up to eleven gigawatts, or the equivalent of the power of ten nuclear reactors at midday on a Sunday in the summer. So that's interesting. That's a lot of power just from parking lots. No, and we've had stories in the past about covering canals. Like in California, I might as well cover the canals. It's just all this space that we have that could have a double use. And parking lots is one of them. You know, though, I wonder what the business model is for this, what the payback is, because I don't know what France's tariff system is, or if they have any money for just putting out the panels or the feed in of the electricity to the grid, how they pay and what the payback period is. But let's say that it's reasonable. You would have customers that would be pretty happy to be parking under a structure, an outdoor structure that shaded you, perhaps shield you from precipitation. And you could sit and wait for your spousal unit to shop. And you wouldn't cook in the sun. He would be shaded and comfortable. No, we have a real problem here. We have very hot sun in the summertime, so always better to get a parking spot with shade. I thought this was interesting. So it's the bigger parking lots that are going to have to do this first. Car parks with 400 spaces or more have about three years to comply, and then the smaller parking lots get about five years to complete. So this isn't just new construction. This is existing construction. Existing parking lots. That is a big deal. My goodness. Yeah. No, and if you think of some of the like, think of I don't know if they have Walmart in France, but you think of Walmart, the Walmart, the giant parking lots that we have for places like Walmart or shopping malls. Man, that would be a lot of solar panels. Yeah. I've been thinking about what we'll use, because the grocery store that we went to last night of the blizzard actually has a bunch of stuff built on the outside of what used to be a parking lot. There's actually an office building there with yeah, they've been restaurants used to be a gigantic parking lot, but they keep adding businesses to it. And that confused me because it's hard to find now it's easy to find a store at the end of a giant parking lot that's 10 miles away. There are walmarts in China. Do they? Yeah, they do. Wow. There's no French walmart in France, so I just Google that. Of course, there's a French Disneyland, but there's no French Walmart. It's basically the same, right? Yeah. Disney. When we do go to a robot taxi future, we're going to need less parking spaces. Right. So the way I envision it is, say I've got a shopping mall close to me that's got lots of parking spaces. And I think that what they could say is, well, you know, part of this shopping mall can be designated for Robotaxis because, you know, robotaxis will go mostly at the peak of when people get on and off work and on and off school. It's just like rush hour. But for the rest of the day, they'll have to sit somewhere. They'll need somewhere to have they'll need to go somewhere where they can charge and where they can somewhere nearby, different areas of town. I don't know where that's going to be. Yeah. Plus, I imagine it will be like the movie Cars, and they'll want to hang around together at a party, have social issues and things like that. Of course it will be like that. But at the same time, I'm wondering if we'll need less. Well, I mean, that's what Tony Seba says. We'll need less parking lots. And there's a significant amount of Los Angeles that has nothing but parking lots. And that's also a heat gainer for it increases the urban island, t island of cities as parking lots. Yeah. Well, hopefully we can densify all of our cities and just start building more building and housing on all these parking lots we're not going to. Right? And that'll be an exciting future. Plus like a driven right to the door. And hopefully some sort of device will lift me up and put me on an automated cart that will drive me around. Because walking is just too much for sure in the future, I think. So Porsche has made 100,000 cars. What does it mean? 100,000 of Brian? This is the Porsche Taycan electric car. They've now produced 1000 of this car. So it's been a pretty big success for Porsche. These are in demand. They are selling more of these than the 911, which is kind of the marquee car for Porsche. What I didn't know is it's not a huge company. This is really a niche player. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles last year. So they're a small car company niche and of course, very expensive. Tesla deliver like, one and a half million. Yeah, and they're just getting going. This is with two new factories that just went up. This is just with one. Yeah. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles total, and 41,000 of them were the all electric Ticans. So they have plans to electrify more of their lineup. But like a lot of things, it's been a little bit delayed. The Macan was the next one that they were going to electrify, and so far they haven't managed to do that. They've been surprised by that, haven't they? I mean, I think they've been overwhelmed by demand, but they've also stepped up to meet that demand, which is great, too. Yeah, but it really does make sense if you're someone who's interested in a Porsche, you're interested in performance driving. And as we know, Electric makes for fantastic performance driving. And if you're wealthy, then you want to impress your wealthy green friends. Well, there's nothing more luxurious, though, than driving quiet, so I love that. I don't know. Would that impress your green friends to a Porsche can? Some of them seems a little excessive. I've impressed myself. Maybe that's really what counts in the car world. Yeah. I don't know. It's a lot of money and you could probably solve the world hunger in a small nation somewhere for the purchase of that car. But Electric says that Tesla is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota. And Toyota is basically one of the world's largest automakers, and they're starting to apparently notice. Back in Japan, according to Electric, for example, tesla reported $3.3 billion in net profit last quarter, compared to Toyota earning just roughly 3 billion. So. Yeah, Tesla. This is despite Toyota delivering eight times more cars than Tesla in the same time period, and Tesla beat them on profits. That's kind of wild. It is. So they made the same money, same profits. But wow, I mean, the demand for Tesla is high. There's this whole inflation thing going on. There's the supply problem, the chip shortages. So they have eat up their prices a little bit. Thousand here, thousand there, as a lot of people are. What do you think it is? It's like a third of profit per car or something like that. It's really high. It's higher than most people. Yeah, I don't know. But the traditional automakers make more money on things like service and part of stuff. So this milestone of Tesla beating Toyota and earnings during a quarter is especially impressive when you consider that just a decade ago, toyota owned 3% of Tesla with just a $50 million investment. Think of how they get rid of that. So now Tesla generates $50 million in free cash flow almost every day, which is why the CEO can do cookie things and do whatever they want. So it's now time for the Tweet of the Week. This is where I highlight a tweet that I like. There's a couple of good ones. Maybe I'll do two. This week from Jenny Chase, solar analyst with Bloomberg NEF New Energy Finance. It's a casual line from those hippies at Pakistan's National Electric Power Regulatory Authority. And this is basically what they said in their report. They said the existing average cost of supply electricity to consumers is high, way too high. And one way to reduce this high cost is to procure cheap electricity from indigenous resources like wind and solar. Now, if we heard that from our utility in Canada, that would be remarkable. But this is coming from Pakistan, a very conservative place, who is not known, especially in governmental terms, to talk like this. But they see the value of this. No utility talks this way, actually. But Pakistan is and because she lives in the solar space, she knows nobody else is saying that but Pakistan Solar, or pardon me, the electricity utility is saying that one way that we're going to lower prices is by buying wind and solar. So good for them. Yeah. As we've said before, the fuel costs for wind and solar are zero. And now a secondary Tweet of the week. Just because I wanted to do too, and I hate deciding, brian, it's a lot of work to decide. Why should I have to decide? Fred lambert lambert. Lambert. Lambert. Fred Lambert, editor in chief at Electric. He says his personal account he says when I talk about Elon's feedback loop being hijacked by superfans, this is what I mean. And he has a story from the Mercury News in San Jose, California. And before I go on, I just want to say that Fred owns like, five teslas has been the biggest fan of Tesla and he's a journalist, but he's been reporting on Tesla forever. He is an enthusiast. He's cheering them on in every way. But Elon Musk blocked him once a long time ago because he had something mildly critical to say and Elon couldn't just take that. So what Fred thinks is that Elon like Michael Jackson and other people, they have this feedback loop of everybody who's constantly praising them. And this is a story from the San Jose newspaper that says that this one guy who's like a dad was tweeting him like 19 times a day or something. And Elon was often responding to him because it's such praise. And the softspoken superfan dad praised him for being fit, ripped and healthy and asked, hey Elon Musk, what's your secret? It sounds like almost a joke, like a comedian might do that because it's the opposite of true. He's not fit, he's not ripped, he's not healthy. You look at him and you see a guy who doesn't he's like an It guy who never gets an hour of sleep. It looks like he hasn't had sleep in years. And certainly not the healthy lifestyle and certainly no son. And the world's richest man's response was how do I keep fit and healthy? Fasting and diabetic drug that promotes weight loss. So good for you. When you're rich, you get to have the diagnosis. Drugs that promote weight loss and fasting is not good. Sumo wrestlers fast. They don't eat until 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. Yeah. Wow. Not to 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. That is a CES fast fact for you. That's because they store more weight if they don't eat all day. They train their body to fast. See, in human history, back when we were in caves and such, ten years ago, if you didn't eat, your body would think it was a famine and it would store extra weight. It would just change. So like fat people like me would survive in a zombie apocalypse. So my nutritionist tells me because we would need 20% less calories because we're that more efficient. Anyway, so we get a little bit of feedback here from the Twitter says clean energy fraud. You guys are talking about the future of hydrogen. So check out this podcast and what was it? It says this guy's super anti hydrogen and has some great points. And this is from Nelson. The podcast was our friend Mark Mslop at Energy Talk Show. He has a podcast as well. Occasionally puts out a guest, Paul Martin, a chemical engineer with a 30 year history of working with hydrogen and a member of the Hydrogen Science Coalition. And I'll put a link to that in the show notes if you want to hear some smack talk on hydrogen. And coming up in the show is the lightning round zoom through the rest of the week's headlines in a fast fashion. We like to hear from you. It's really what we live on. Brian doesn't get up in the morning without the hope of somebody contacting us. Clean energy show@gmail.com. We're on TikTok and Instagram and everywhere else. Clean energy, pond. We're on mastodon. At Mastodon Energy. We're on YouTube. Clean energy show. Speak Pipe. You can leave us an online voicemail message. Speak pipe.com. Cleanenergyshow. That sound means it is time for the lightning round, where we'll end the show this way. A fast paced look of the week in clean energy and climate news. Canada is putting the break on China's $4 billion lithium acquisition free. China is here buying up all the lithium they can, and Canada has finally said no. So Chinese companies have been the biggest financers of overseas lithium projects globally in recent years, including purchases of Canadian listed assets. And that's a new development, Brian. Yeah. So this is new legislation that limits the foreign ownership of some of these critical minerals that we're going to need for the electric revolution. Call it the biden approach, saying no more China. The Charging Interface Initiative, a global industry association focused on the electrification of transportation, has launched its new megawatt charging system. MCs is going to be called. We have CCS, the non Tesla standard for charging connectors. This is going to be MCs. So memorize that term. Brian. MCs is the new megawatt charging system standard for North America. So this will be some specific kind of plug and protocol for how to charge at even higher speeds. Megawatt speeds for trucks, basically for trucks, big trucks. Not necessarily all semitransport trucks, but medium trucks as well. This is interesting. The 2023 Kia EV six base trim has been dropped. And the starting price that means has dropped to an unfortunate $50,000 US. That means brian, I can't afford it. Yes, that's too bad. I mean, we sometimes do get different trim levels here in Canada, so we'll see. But 50,000 is a lot. Another CS fast fact, the golden toad is the first species to go extinct to climate change. Put that in your toaster and smoke it. It's too warm for them. And I guess the towed has had enough. Panasonic has broken ground on their EV battery factory in Kansas. This is what we refer to early red states getting a lot of this EV manufacturing, green tech manufacturing and jobs. And they'll be making 2070 cylindrical cells. A Viking bus orders 31 Mercedes Benz E Cetera buses as long distance runners in the country known as Denmark. Hello, Denmark. The reason I bring that up is because we've mentioned this before. When will long distance city to city buses electrify? Well, the answer is, I guess it's starting. That's great. The market share of zero mission light duty vehicle registrations in Canada hit 9.4% in the third quarter of this year. And that's a new record. It's up from any previous record which shows that the EV adoption is accelerating in Canada. Yeah, we're definitely past some sort of a tipping point, which is often said to be around 5% of the market. So, yeah. Canada at 9.4% EVs. That's fantastic. How many Ford Mustang electrics do you see around? I see them almost every day now. Maybe it's the same neighborhood, I don't know, but I see them everywhere. The North End, one of 600 EV sold in Europe will be made by Chinese makers of EVs by 2025. Fitch solution says, according to the China EV Post, So that's interesting. Something we've been following since the early days of this podcast is when will Chinese EV makers start to make gains in Western markets? Yeah, and I guess you're at first, because it's always Europe first, isn't it? Because they need their EVs over there. It's physically closer and they have tougher regulations to kind of phase out combustion. A slight majority of California voters favor the recently announced ban on new sales of gasoline powered vehicles by 2035. Only 52% and 43% disapprove, but hopefully they'll come around when prices do. I don't think anyone's going to complain about the range and prices there and charging infrastructure. Another fast fact air conditioners and heating elements consume 50% of electricity in America. Did you know that? That's a lot. No, that's a lot. Analysis as seen by the BBC shows that the production and transport of LNG causes up to ten times the carbon emissions compared to pipeline gas. So build more pipeline. I'm kidding. This around here, liquid natural gas as opposed to actual gas that goes through pipes. The greater than 8% electricity from a solar club in Europe for 2021. Here's the countries that have 8% or more just from solar germany, Spain, Greece, Italy, Netherlands not bad. And there's a whole bunch of 5%. A whole whack at 5%. Good for you. Greece, by the way. I always think of Greece as a leader in clean energy, but these things, they sneak up on you. Amazon is meeting holiday demand this year with a fleet of over 1000 Livian electric vehicle delivery vans. So we are talking about those for a long time now. And I guess there's a thousand on the roads for Christmas this year. Yeah, that's not bad. But 10,000 next year and 50,000 a year after that or something. Yeah, they've definitely ordered more than that. Amazon is a big investor in Rivian and they're desperately trying to scale up their production of these vans and their pickup trucks. So hopefully things speed up nicely. And finally this week, Tony Sieve says in a post that speaking of Amazon, amazon created a vast information technology infrastructure, but the use of just five weeks of the year, the holiday shopping season, which is Christmas in November and December where we live, they overbuilt capacity for the rest of the year. And he says, well, let's call that super data center. And thus the Amazon AWS cloud was born, which you see advertised on TV. It's now a trillion dollar business because they overbuilt something. So the reason he mentions that, Brian, is why? Because this is what's going to happen to solar, wind and batteries. Because solar is intermittent. Wind is intermittent. We need to overbuild it. But because these technologies are so cheap and getting cheaper, we can easily overbuild it. So Amazon, of course, a large amount of shopping happens in November and December, the Christmas shopping season here in Canada and the US. So they had to really beef up their online system to handle all these transactions in December. And what did they end up with? Amazon Web Services, which is now a trillion dollar business, apparently. Yes, it's a lot of money just for overbuilding something, because that's what's going to happen with the energy markets, because we're going to have extra solar, extra wind around. That is our show for this week. You know what? Next year we're going to have a Patreon. If you have any ideas for the patreon, let us know what kind of perks you might be interested in. And by God, write us right now. Cleanenergytow@gmail.com or clean energy pond everywhere on social media. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe to our show on your podcast app to get new shows, new episodes delivered every week. We'll see you next time. See you next week!  

KQED’s Forum
Bay Area Tech Layoffs Stoke Fears of Impending Recession

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 55:32


In the past week, reports of major layoffs at tech employers including Twitter, Meta and online payments company Stripe are fueling fears of a tech bust 2.0. Earlier this year, electric vehicle makers Tesla and Rivian, software maker Autodesk and fintech company Robinhood also cut hundreds of workers. The news is sending jolts through the Bay Area, which has enjoyed historically low unemployment for several years with high demand for tech workers. We talk about what these layoffs mean for the Bay Area's economy and how to gauge the threat of an impending recession. Guests: Jeff Bellisario, executive director, Bay Area Council Economic Institute Sheera Frenkel, technology reporter based in San Francisco, The New York Times; co-author, "An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination"

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3444 - BYD Could Overtake Tesla; Renault Splits Into 5 Companies; Kia Raises EV6 Price, Hyundai and Genesis Next?

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 11:20


- Renault Splits Into 5 Companies - EV Startups Surge and Falter - BYD Could Overtake Tesla - Honda Launches China EV Blitz - Honda Unveils All-New Pilot - Tesla Handles Power Steering Recall w/ OTA - V2G Could Save California Grid - Citroen Starts Selling Used Parts - Kia Raises EV6 Price, Hyundai and Genesis Next?

Autoline Daily
AD #3444 - BYD Could Overtake Tesla; Renault Splits Into 5 Companies; Kia Raises EV6 Price, Hyundai and Genesis Next?

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 11:21


- Renault Splits Into 5 Companies- EV Startups Surge and Falter- BYD Could Overtake Tesla- Honda Launches China EV Blitz- Honda Unveils All-New Pilot- Tesla Handles Power Steering Recall w/ OTA- V2G Could Save California Grid- Citroen Starts Selling Used Parts- Kia Raises EV6 Price, Hyundai and Genesis Next?

We Are Auto
133. The Best Paint Colors, Rivian R1T, Porsche 356 | Car Talk

We Are Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 20:34


Thank you for listening to We Are Auto, the podcast about cars - for enthusiasts, by enthusiasts! Please leave a 5 Star rating and write a review!   In episode 133: - We chat about some of the best paint colors for cars - Derek spots a Rivian R1T - Michael spots a pair of Porsche 356's            and more! Follow along! Facebook Instagram Youtube Website

Plug In For More
Winter Driving in an EV - Part 2 - All about heating

Plug In For More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 26:22


Welcome to the Plug In For More podcast!  Mike, Tom, and Bryant are here to help you on your journey to an Electric vehicle future.  Each episode we discuss current events, trends, and a specific topic of education related to EV's.  We bring together a diverse experience set, and pair it with guests who are experts in the field.  For even more information on EV's, check out www.EVUniverse.com. This episode is part 2 of a 3 part series looking into issues facing EV owners and winter driving.  The episode examines heating systems in Electric Vehicles and why they are so much different from their ICE counterparts.  Be sure to follow PIFM on our various social media platforms, for more exciting content on EV's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pifm_podcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PIFMPodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqXpv3fnOcv-robjLbDINFQ/featured