Podcasts about Coding

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Best podcasts about Coding

Show all podcasts related to coding

Latest podcast episodes about Coding

Curious Kid Podcast
Curious About Coding

Curious Kid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 19:08


In episode 173, we get curious about coding for James of Houston, Texas, Tiger of Rochester, New York, and Leo and Felix of Shelburne, Vermont.  We learn what coding is, the history of coding, and some of the basic concepts of coding.  Olivia interviews software engineer Steve to find out what makes a good coder and so much more.  Visit the Curious Kid Podcast Website - http://www.curiouskidpodcast.com Send Us An E-mail - curiouskidpodcast@gmail.comLeave Us A Voicemail - 856-425-2324Support Us On Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/CuriouskidpodcastShop Curious Kid Podcast Merchandise - http://tee.pub/lic/fqXchg3wUVUFollow Us On Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/curiouskidpod/Follow Us On Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/curiouskidpodcast/Follow Us On Twitter - https://twitter.com/CuriousKidPod

Aww Shift
Mark Gaunya - Captivated Health

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 20:07


Welcome back to the Aww Shift Podcast! Today, our guest is Mark Gaunya, the Founding Principal and CEO of Captivated Health. Benefits Pro recognizes him as a Top 5 Broker of the Year Finalist, Benefits Adviser nationally, and one of the top 30 Thought Leaders. Mark developed innovative solutions to complex challenges to save clients time and money. He's passionate about consumerism, health & well-being, and its exponentially positive cultural and financial impact on businesses and organizations. Mark is also the Principal of Borislow Insurance, which serves clients who invest $1m+ in their employee benefits program by developing innovative solutions to complex challenges, saving time and money. Today, Mark talks with us about the healthcare system issues that consumers face today. [9:21] Why should I listen to you? The first thing you'll notice is that I'll be paying attention to you because I'm naturally curious about other people and their stories. I'm curious about what makes people tick, what motivates them, what they care about, and what they are passionate about. We'll have a great conversation if we can discover areas of commonality.  [9:55] What do you do better than other people? I take complicated stuff and make it simple for people to understand. [10:37] How can you bring the conversation of healthcare understandable to the ninth-grade level? Like anything in life, you'll first have to understand the language. If you are having a conversation while translating one word at a time, it's nearly impossible to do. That is exactly what nine out of ten individuals in our country are doing with healthcare right now. It was purposefully designed to be overly complicated. [12:14] If you look at the big rule makers; the government, health insurers, regulatory bodies, they've developed this system through an opaque process called “Coding” and “Billing.” A code is created and sent to an insurance company. The produced code or negotiated price is then discussed between the healthcare provider and the health insurance.  [13:13] How did healthcare become what it is today?  There's a lot of money in healthcare. Looking at healthcare as an industry sector, it's three and a half to four trillion dollars of our economy. In most areas in the country, healthcare is the largest employer. [13:56] I know many people in all these areas, and they are all great people. But they are in a construct that doesn't put you and me at the center of it. It puts the people who are making the rules at the center of it. Fortunately, there was a law that was passed. Healthcare is now pricing quality transparency. But the challenging news is how we implement that. The first step is, if you can't see it, you can't measure it. If you can't measure it, you can't improve it. As a healthcare consumer, the first thing you need to understand is the inverse correlation between price and quality. [16:47] How money is affecting the Healthcare System  Most individuals are unaware that many of our chronic pharmaceuticals are manufactured in tier one English-speaking countries like Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand. By the time they get here, they're seven to eight times more expensive than they should be. [17:19] An annual supply costs $17,000 in countries where medicine is manufactured. However, when it arrives through the FDA and drugstore chains in the United States, the same medicine costs $69,000 due to the layered fees throughout the system. The costs that consumers do not perceive are added on top of the profit margins.  Financially, you are ultimately assessed by the performance of whatever service you provide, but you are not measured on the value you provide. [18:48] How does your company help?  We work directly with employers who sponsor health insurance for their employees. When you look at this country, about 180 million people get their insurance from their employers. We focus on a particular area of the market with between 50 and 500 employees. Those employees or employers typically buy a “fully-insured plan” from a national carrier. They charge their employees a premium that they share for the plan they're offering. We do something similar, except that it's not fully insured called “Partial Self-Insurance.” The employer exits the blind market in which they have no idea what is going on with getting charged. They go into an environment where they are willing to accept the risk of covering their people's healthcare costs. They find themselves in a position where they can act as their own insurance business. What we do is act as their intelligence chip on the inside, operating that for them. [22:23] How did this become something you're passionate about?  I started to tackle the problem of our healthcare system because of my mother, who was a nurse, and my father, who was an Orthopedic Sports Medicine Physical Therapist. They taught me the business of healthcare. They weren't only medical professionals. They were also business owners that were incredibly creative. They were entrepreneurial in the sense that they just believed that healthcare could be delivered more effectively. I went to work for my mom and dad when I got to school. I went to their work for a bunch of insurance companies. For the last 17 years, I've been on the consulting brokerage side of the business and representing employers and consumers.   Key Quotes  [15:37 – 15:44] “When you provide information and transparency of information, there are a lot of things we see that people don't want us to see necessarily.” [17:50 – 18:00] “You are ultimately measured by the performance of whatever service you're providing. But you're not being measured on the value you're providing relative to the price you're providing.”  [21:38 – 21:46] “The right call doesn't necessarily mean the least expensive. The right call means the highest quality care you can receive at the lowest possible price point.”   Learn more about Mark Gaunya on:  Email: mark@borislow.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-s-gaunya-gba-lia-186a956/ Website:http://www.captivatedhealth.com/             http://www.borislow.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/markgaunya  

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech
Caroline Kerns: How Dabbling in Careers Led to Community and #DevRel

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 47:04


Caroline is originally from Germany and has tried many different careers on for size. She has had roles ranging from recruiting, automotive, and retail and her interest in programming began a few years ago with a desire to create a Jane Austen quote website (because who doesn't want to read daily Jane Austen quotes?). Since then, she's dabbled in JavaScript and Python and today is the Community Manager at Vonage. In today's episode, we chat all about the power of community, especially within the Developer Relations space. Reflecting on her time as a recruiter, Caroline shares tips on how to write the best possible resume and get it in front of a hiring manager. We talk about how the pandemic impacted online communities and led to developers streaming on Twitch and she also gives advice on how to find tech communities that are inclusive and the right fit for you! Resources: Follow Caroline on Twitter @grumpysnek: https://twitter.com/grumpysnekCaroline's LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/captcalli/Software and Game Development Twitch Category: https://twitch.tv/directory/game/Software%20and%20Game%20Development The Live Coders Twitch: https://twitch.tv/team/livecoders Instafluff Twitch: https://twitch.tv/instafluff BaldBeardedBuilder Twitch: https://twitch.tv/baldbeardedbuilderWe Belong Here Podcast:Follow Lauren on Twitter @LoLoCodingWeBelongPodcast.comSubscribe on AppleSubscribe on SpotifyWe Belong Here Discord CommunityJoin us on Discord Server today! bit.ly/webelongdiscord 

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast
Fast Facts: Coding Edition “D1110 vs. D4346”

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 10:11


On this week's episode of Fast Facts - Coding Edition with Teresa Duncan, MS Teresa gives us a break down of codes D1110 and D4346 highlighting important information on each that you should be aware of! DentistRX: https://www.dentistrx.com  More Fast Facts: https://www.ataleoftwohygienists.com/fast-facts/  Teresa Duncan Website: https://www.katrinasanders.com  Nobody Told Me That Podcast: https://nobodytoldmethat.libsyn.com/  Chew On This Podcast: https://chewonthisdentalpodcast.libsyn.com/ 

Life as a Coder
Risk Adjustment: Data driven Healthcare

Life as a Coder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 38:25


In our first episode of Season 5 we are hitting the ground running with a popular topic. Creating a Risk Adjustment Education experience for Coders and Facilities will be so valuable for the Industry and help improve the quality of patient care. The data we collect and the education we provide as Risk Adjustment educators and coders helps to accomplish this. How to improve your Risk Adjustment Team What does it take to discover the financial Impact of your Risk Adjustment program integrated through data solutions? How can a Risk Adjustment education program Reduce Coding Errors and ensure Complete code capture to account for proper reimbursements, manage costs of high-risk patient populations, and provide a high quality of care? What is the value in bringing in Subject Matter experts to educate Coding staff on Risk adjustment? Contact jmcnamara@oncospark.com for more information on our Upcoming Risk Adjustment Experience. Support us by joining our Podcast membership. You can save up to 16% off your membership by paying annually. Visit www.patreon.com/lifeasacoder --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lifeasacoder/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifeasacoder/support

Coder Radio Video
All Roads Lead to Clippy | Coder Radio 447

Coder Radio Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022


Mike has a significant moment of clarity and sets out on a new path for 2022. Meanwhile, Chris is just happy to be out of the woods.

Club Top Shot

CTS is back after a holiday hiatus. We reminisce about random NFTs from 2021 and discuss the hot current market (Smol and $Magic, ChainFaces, Doodles), Andy's new Survivor-esque project idea, Underdog best ball sweats, if any of these NFT projects can deliver on the promise of token and games, DeFi Kingdoms and Jewel, and whether Andy could teach Jack how to code. We wrap the show with a round of Lodden Thinks.

SaaS District
What Advice Would You Give Your Younger Self (2021 Founders Compilation)

SaaS District

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:34


2021 marked the start of a new chapter for the SaaS District Podcast. We had many top list entrepreneurs that shared their life and work experience and moved us in many ways, unlike ever before. We've asked several SaaS founders: "What advice would you give your 25 year old self?" and compiled our top responses in this video for you. Thank you all for joining us in season 2, see you in the next year. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6o0rITTY7R8&list=PLWm57LROxl0ErPFwtz43ngTdMP3NMnxUa (All Interview Episodes) 00:25 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwTjKWBU0jg (Matt Cole: Top SMB SaaS Player in LATAM on How to Gain Visibility and Control over your SaaS) 01:56 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xj118pR-U18 (Mohit Mamoria: From Idea Generation to Launch of an Email Productivity SaaS in Less Than 6 weeks) 02:26 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwV90ZMQM-0 (Guillaume Moubeche: Bootstrapping Lemlist from $0 to $10M ARR: A Personalized Sales Automation SaaS) 02:59 - Neil Shah: How to Build Your SaaS without Coding, SaaS Product Design Best Practices 06:38 - Andrew Gazdecki : How MicroAcquire is Disrupting The M&A Industry, A Smarter Way to Exit Your Startup Tag Us & Follow: https://www.facebook.com/SaaSDistrictPodcast/ (Facebook) https://www.linkedin.com/company/horizen-capital (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/saasdistrict/ (Instagram) More About Akeel: https://twitter.com/AkeelJabber (Twitter) https://linkedin.com/in/akeel-jabbar (LinkedIn) https://horizencapital.com/saas-podcast (More Podcast Sessions)

political and spiritual
(Part 2)Robert X..DE-CODING THE ECONOMIST COVER STORY OF PLANET TRUMP

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 217:00


(Part 2) WE WILL GIVE OUR VIEW ON WHAT THE ROTHSCHILD'S ARE SAYING IN THIS ISSUE BUT THERE'S BEEN A VERY INTERESTING TURN..........THEY HAVE LITERALLY CHANGED THE JUDGEMENT CARD WITH TRUMP SITTING ON THE TOP OF THE WORLD.........THIS IS MIND BLOWING.....WE SAY IT WILL USHER IN THE 1010 ERA OF TECHNOCRATIC CORPORATE CONTROL........WE WILL FOLLOW THIS FORUM WITH OUR LOOK AT 2017 AND THE TECHNOCRACY

Simple Programmer Podcast
860 Coding Is Not The Same As Programming - Simple Programmer Podcast

Simple Programmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 11:08


Simple Programmer is now BACK with a brand new YouTube ChannelSUBSCRIBE HERE: https://simpleprogrammer.com/subscribespyt

B•INSPIRED Podcast
B•Inspired Podcast - Making History with Entrepreneur Zachary Weber

B•INSPIRED Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 11:19


B•Inspired would like to welcome you to our next guest Zachary Weber. Zachary will share how he utilized his Covid shutdown for what would become an opportunity of a lifetime. Where he could learn skills beyond the "3 Rs"....... and more along the lines of Coding, Robotics, and Entrepreneurship. Join us as we chat with this 9-year-old entrepreneur where we discuss his recent venture with Co-Creator of Netflix, Marc Randolph.B•Inspired EpisodeB•Inspired Podcast is a audio/video Podcast where we bring you real stories from folks just like you and I who share stories of love and loss, struggles and perserverance, laughter and tears and overcoming adversity!#inspire #astronade #netflix

MIGS on the Mic
"Coding secrets from a MIGS coder"

MIGS on the Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 17:49


Cheri Gardner shares her inside-knowledge on surgical coding for Minimally Invasive Gynecologic SurgeryHosts:  Amanda Ulrich MD ; Steven Radtke MD ; Michelle Pacis MD MPH

Simple Programmer Podcast
859 Top 5 Online Coding Certifications - Simple Programmer Podcast

Simple Programmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 21:33


Simple Programmer is now BACK with a brand new YouTube ChannelSUBSCRIBE HERE: https://simpleprogrammer.com/subscribespyt

Remote Ruby
David Heinemeier Hansson on Rails 7.0, Hotwire, and the future of Rails

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 86:53


[00:01:13] DHH tells us what Hotwire is and what's new in Rails.[00:16:38] Jason brings up Hey being able to go full import map, and wonders if DHH sees being able to move to import maps only for Basecamp 4 eventually or will there be esbuild involved.[00:25:51] Hotwire Strada comes into the conversation and DHH fills us in on this. Chris talks about how the CSS and JS bundling turned out so clean and simple. [00:30:11] DHH shares his thoughts on building something in a simple, clear way versus taking the complex path. He also shares some info about Tailwind in Rails 7.[00:36:20] Another question that comes up is DHH's thoughts on ViewComponents, and we find out what he means by, “I love a large tent at Basecamp.”[00:45:35] DHH gives his views on authentication being built into Rails.[00:51:00] Andrew asks DHH if there are any plans of restarting On Writing Software Well series on YouTube.[00:57:08] We found out some things that have been added to Rails 7 that DHH is excited about that aren't front-end. [01:03:31] Chris brings up how he feels Rails has always been an entrepreneurial framework and DHH shares what he hopes they will eventually end up with devise.  [01:05:33] DHH talks about the no code days, why he's so keen about how Rails works today, and why he's so spirited about learning being a key value.[01:13:11] Jason asks DHH what's been the most favorite decisions he's made in Rails that he's most proud of. [01:17:46] With Hotwire being shipped in Rails 7, find out what's next for DHH.[01:21:51] Andrew asks DHH how to choose between “action and active” when you're naming these resources.[01:23:34] DHH shares some incredible numbers on how code contributors and others in the community helped with Rails 7 and tracking.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverAndrew MasonGuest:David Heinemeier HanssonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Ruby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterDHH WebsiteDHH TwitterDHH HEY World Rails 7 with DHH- Livestream with Remote Ruby (YouTube)Rails 7: The Demo with DHH (YouTube)Hotwire Discussion: Strada Release DateOn Writing Software Well (YouTube)

Maine Science Podcast
Sean Birkel (climate change)

Maine Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 43:56


Sean Birkel is a climatologist and Research Assistant Professor at the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine. Sean is also the Maine State Climatologist and is part of the Maine Climate Council. One of his ongoing projects is Climate Reanalyzer, where visitors can visualize climate and weather datasets. Sean was also a critical part of the The Warming Sea project, meeting with Composer Lucas Richman as well as middle school students. ~~~~~Tickets are now on sale for the 2022 Headliner: The Warming Sea - an exploration of Hope in the face of the climate crisis. (thewarmingsea.me) - March 19, 2022, 7pm, Collins Center for the Arts.~~~~~~The Maine Science Podcast is a production of the Maine Science Festival. It was recorded at Discovery Studios, at the Maine Discovery Museum, in Bangor, ME. Edited and produced by Kate Dickerson; production support by Maranda Bouchard and social media support from Next Media. The Discover Maine theme was composed and performed by Nick Parker. If you want to support the Maine Science Podcast and/or the Maine Science Festival, you can do so at our website mainesciencefestival.org either at our donation page OR by getting some MSF merchandise through our online store. Find us online:Website - Maine Science FestivalMaine Science Festival on social media: Facebook    Twitter     InstagramMaine Science Podcast on social media: Facebook    Twitter     InstagramMaine Science Festival Store - https://bit.ly/MSF-storecontact us: podcast@mainesciencefestival.org© 2021 Maine Science Festival

Meteor Monthly Wrap-Up
Meteor Monthly Wrap-Up #9: December 2021

Meteor Monthly Wrap-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 25:54


In this episode, we cover everything that happened in 2021 from releases to Meteor Cloud launch, Push-to-Deploy, NPM installer, Meteor Impact, and much more.There was a lot to cover on this episode which included:* Meteor Cloud launch* Free deploy with shared MongoDB* Node.js 14 update* NPM installer* Meteor Compat Packages* Meteor Impact/Meteor Hackathon* Meteor 2.5.1 (M1 support)* Push-to-Deploy* Meteor UniversityThanks for listening!Important Links:Meteor Compat Packages: click hereNode.js 14 update: click hereMeteor 2.5.1: click herePush-to-Deploy: click here

GoRails Screencasts
Migrating from Rails UJS to Hotwire: Data Method, Confirm, and Disable With

GoRails Screencasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 12:38


Code Completion
62: Recover Your AirTags Responsibly

Code Completion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:38


Welcome to Code Completion, Episode 62! We are a group of iOS developers and educators hoping to share what we love most about development, Apple technology, and completing your code! Follow us @CodeCompletion (https://twitter.com/CodeCompletion) on Twitter to hear about our upcoming livestreams, videos, and other content. Today, we discuss: - 2021 Retrospective - MacBook Pros with M1 Pro and Max - iPhone 13 Pro Macro Mode, and ProRes - Colorful 24” iMacs - AirTags - GPT-3 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPT-3) - GitHub Co-Pilot (https://copilot.github.com) - Avatar 2 by Corridor Digital (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJAOSTtj0OU) - ATP (https://atp.fm/461) Your hosts for this week: * Spencer Curtis (https://twitter.com/SpencerCCurtis) * Dimitri Bouniol (https://twitter.com/DimitriBouniol) Be sure to also sign up to our monthly newsletter (https://codecompletion.io/), where we will recap the topics we discussed, reveal the answers to #CompleteTheCode, and share even more things we learned in between episodes. You are what makes this show possible, so please be sure to share this with your friends and family who are also interested in any part of the app development process.

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaching the Coding Gates with Anil Dash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:03


About AnilAnil Dash is the CEO of Glitch, the friendly developer community where coders collaborate to create and share millions of web apps. He is a recognized advocate for more ethical tech through his work as an entrepreneur and writer. He serves as a board member for organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the leading nonprofit defending digital privacy and expression, Data & Society Research Institute, which researches the cutting edge of tech's impact on society, and The Markup, the nonprofit investigative newsroom that pushes for tech accountability. Dash was an advisor to the Obama White House's Office of Digital Strategy, served for a decade on the board of Stack Overflow, the world's largest community for coders, and today advises key startups and non-profits including the Lower East Side Girls Club, Medium, The Human Utility, DonorsChoose and Project Include.As a writer and artist, Dash has been a contributing editor and monthly columnist for Wired, written for publications like The Atlantic and Businessweek, co-created one of the first implementations of the blockchain technology now known as NFTs, had his works exhibited in the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and collaborated with Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda on one of the most popular Spotify playlists of 2018. Dash has also been a keynote speaker and guest in a broad range of media ranging from the Obama Foundation Summit to SXSW to Desus and Mero's late-night show.Links: Glitch: https://glitch.com Web.dev: https://web.dev Glitch Twitter: https://twitter.com/glitch Anil Dash Twitter: https://twitter.com/anildash TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is a little bit off the beaten path from the cloud infrastructure types I generally drag, kicking and screaming, onto the show. If we take a look at the ecosystem and where it's going, it's clear that in the future, not everyone who wants to build a business, or a tool, or even an application is going to necessarily spring fully-formed into the world from the forehead of some God, knowing how to code. And oh, “I'm going to go to a boot camp for four months to learn how to do it first,” is increasingly untenable. I don't know if you would call it low-code or not. But that's how it feels. My guest today is Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch. Anil, thank you for joining me.Anil: Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, let's get the important stuff out of the way first, since I have a long-standing history of mispronouncing the company Twitch as ‘Twetch,' I should probably do the same thing here. So, what is Gletch? And what does it do?Anil: Glitch is, at its simplest, a tool that lets you build a full-stack app in your web browser in about 30 seconds. And, you know, for your community, your audience, it's also this ability to create and deploy code instantly on a full-stack server with no concern for deploy, or DevOps, or provisioning a container, or any of those sort of concerns. And what it is for the users is, honestly, a community. They're like, “I looked at this app that was on Glitch; I thought it was cool; I could do what we call [remixing 00:02:03].” Which is to kind of fork that app, a running app, make a couple edits, and all of a sudden live at a real URL on the web, my app is running with exactly what I built. And that's something that has been—I think, just captured a lot of people's imagination to now where they've built over 12 or 15 million apps on the platform.Corey: You describe it somewhat differently than I would, and given that I tend to assume that people who create and run successful businesses don't generally tend to do it without thought, I'm not quite, I guess, insufferable enough to figure out, “Oh, well, I thought about this for ten seconds, therefore I've solved a business problem that you have been needling at for years.” But when I look at Glitch, I would describe it as something different than the way that you describe it. I would call it a web-based IDE for low-code applications and whatnot, and you never talk about it that way. Everything I can see there describes it talks about friendly creators, and community tied to it. Why is that?Anil: You're not wrong from the conventional technologist's point of view. I—sufficient vintage; I was coding in Visual Basic back in the '90s and if you squint, you can see that influence on Glitch today. And so I don't reject that description, but part of it is about the audience we're speaking to, which is sort of a next generation of creators. And I think importantly, that's not just age, right, but that could be demographic, that can be just sort of culturally, wherever you're at. And what we look at is who's making the most interesting stuff on the internet and in the industry, and they tend to be grounded in broader culture, whether they're on, you know, Instagram, or TikTok, or, you know, whatever kind of influencer, you want to point at—YouTube.And those folks, they think of themselves as creators first and they think of themselves as participating in the community first and then the tool sort of follow. And I think one of the things that's really striking is, if you look at—we'll take YouTube as an example because everyone's pretty familiar with it—they have a YouTube Creator Studio. And it is a very rich and deep tool. It does more than, you know, you would have had iMovie, or Final Cut Pro doing, you know, 10 or 15 years ago, incredibly advanced stuff. And those [unintelligible 00:04:07] use it every day, but nobody goes to YouTube and says, “This is a cloud-based nonlinear editor for video production, and we target cinematographers.” And if they did, they would actually narrow their audience and they would limit what their impact is on the world.And so similarly, I think we look at that for Glitch where the social object, the central thing that people organize around a Glitch is an app, not code. And that's this really kind of deep and profound idea, which is that everybody can understand an app. Everybody has an idea for an app. You know, even the person who's, “Ah, I'm not technical,” or, “I'm not really into technology,” they're like, “But you know what? If I could make an app, I would make this.”And so we think a lot about that creative impulse. And the funny thing is, that is a common thread between somebody that literally just got on the internet for the first time and somebody who has been doing cloud deploys for as long as there's been a cloud to deploy to, or somebody has been coding for decades. No matter who you are, you have that place that is starting from what's the experience I want to build, the app I want to build? And so I think that's where there's that framing. But it's also been really useful, in that if you're trying to make a better IDE in the cloud and a better text editor, and there are multiple trillion-dollar companies that [laugh] are creating products in that category, I don't think you're going to win. On the other hand, if you say, “This is more fun, and cooler, and has a better design, and feels better,” I think we could absolutely win in a walk away compared to trillion-dollar companies trying to be cool.Corey: I think that this is an area that has a few players in it could definitely stand to benefit by having more there. My big fear is not that AWS is going to launch stuff in your space and drive you out of business; I think that is a somewhat naive approach. I'm more concerned that they're going to try to launch something in your space, give it a dumb name, fail that market and appropriately, not understand who it's for and set the entire idea back five years. That is, in some cases, it seems like their modus operandi for an awful lot of new markets.Anil: Yeah, I mean, that's not an uncommon problem in any category that's sort of community driven. So, you know, back in the day, I worked on building blogging tools at the beginning of this, sort of, social media era, and we worried about that a lot. We had built some of the first early tools, Movable Type, and TypePad, and these were what were used to launch, like, Gawker and Huffington Post and all the, sort of, big early sites. And we had been doing it a couple years—and then at that time, major player—AOL came in, and they launched their own AOL blog service, and we were, you know, quaking in our boots. I remember just being kind of like, pit in your stomach, “Oh, my gosh. This is going to devastate the category.”And as it turns out, people were smart, and they have taste, and they can tell. And the domain that we're in is not one that is about raw computing power or raw resources that you can bring to bear so much as it is about can you get people to connect together, collaborate together, and feel like they're in a place where they want to make something and they want to share it with other people? And I mean, we've never done a single bit of advertising for Glitch. There's never been any paid acquisition. There's never done any of those things. And we go up against, broadly in the space, people that have billboards and they buy out all the ads of the airport and, you know, all the other kind of things we see—Corey: And they do the typical enterprise thing where they spend untold millions in acquiring the real estate to advertise on, and then about 50 cents on the message, from the looks of it. It's, wow, you go to all this trouble and expense to get something in front of me, and after all of that to get my attention, you don't have anything interesting to say?Anil: Right.Corey: [crosstalk 00:07:40] inverse of that.Anil: [crosstalk 00:07:41] it doesn't work.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's brand awareness. I love that game. Ugh.Anil: I was a CIO, and not once in my life did I ever make a purchasing decision based on who was sponsoring a golf tournament. It never happened, right? Like, I never made a call on a database platform because of a poster that was up at, you know, San Jose Airport. And so I think that's this thing that developers in particular, have really good BS filters, and you can sort of see through.Corey: What I have heard about the airport advertising space—and I but a humble cloud economist; I don't know if this is necessarily accurate or not—but if you have a company like Accenture, for example, that advertises on airport billboards, they don't even bother to list their website. If you go to their website, it turns out that there's no shopping cart function. I cannot add ‘one consulting' to my cart and make a purchase.Anil: “Ten pounds of consult, please.”Corey: Right? I feel like the primary purpose there might very well be that when someone presents to your board and says, “All right, we've had this conversation with Accenture.” The response is not, “Who?” It's a brand awareness play, on some level. That said, you say you don't do a bunch traditional advertising, but honestly, I feel like you advertise—more successfully—than I do at The Duckbill Group, just by virtue of having a personality running the company, in your case.Now, your platform is for the moment, slightly larger than mine, but that's okay,k I have ambition and a tenuous grasp of reality and I'm absolutely going to get there one of these days. But there is something to be said for someone who has a track record of doing interesting things and saying interesting things, pulling a, “This is what I do and this is how I do it.” It almost becomes a personality-led marketing effort to some degree, doesn't it?Anil: I'm a little mindful of that, right, where I think—so a little bit of context and history: Glitch as a company is actually 20 years old. The product is only a few years old, but we were formerly called Fog Creek Software, co-founded by Joel Spolsky who a lot of folks will know from back in the day as Joel on Software blog, was extremely influential. And that company, under leadership of Joel and his co-founder Michael Pryor spun out Stack Overflow, they spun out Trello. He had created, you know, countless products over the years so, like, their technical and business acumen is off the charts.And you know, I was on the board of Stack Overflow from, really, those first days and until just recently when they sold, and you know, you get this insight into not just how do you build a developer community that is incredibly valuable, but also has a place in the ecosystem that is unique and persists over time. And I think that's something that was very, very instructive. And so when it came in to lead Glitch I, we had already been a company with a, sort of, visible founder. Joel was as well known as a programmer as it got in the world?Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: And my public visibility is different, right? I, you know, I was a working coder for many years, but I don't think that's what people see me on social media has. And so I think, I've been very mindful where, like, I'm thrilled to use the platform I have to amplify what was created on a Glitch. But what I note is it's always, “This person made this thing. This person made this app and it had this impact, and it got these results, or made this difference for them.”And that's such a different thing than—I don't ever talk about, “We added syntax highlighting in the IDE and the editor in the browser.” It's just never it right. And I think there are people that—I love that work. I mean, I love having that conversation with our team, but I think that's sort of the difference is my enthusiasm is, like, people are making stuff and it's cool. And that sort of is my lens on the whole world.You know, somebody makes whatever a great song, a great film, like, these are all things that are exciting. And the Glitch community's creations sort of feel that way. And also, we have other visible people on the team. I think of our sort of Head of Community, Jenn Schiffer, who's a very well known developer and her right. And you know, tons of people have read her writing and seen her talks over the years.And she and I talk about this stuff; I think she sort of feels the same way, which is, she's like, “If I were, you know, being hired by some cloud platform to show the latest primitives that they've deployed behind an API,” she's like, “I'd be miserable. Like, I don't want to do that in the world.” And I sort of feel the same way. But if you say, “This person who never imagined they would make an app that would have this kind of impact.” And they're going to, I think of just, like, the last couple of weeks, some of the apps we've seen where people are—it could be [unintelligible 00:11:53]. It could be like, “We made a Slack bot that finally gets this reporting into the right channel [laugh] inside our company, but it was easy enough that I could do it myself without asking somebody to create it even though I'm not technically an engineer.” Like, that's incredible.The other extreme, we have people that are PhDs working on machine learning that are like, “At the end of the day, I don't want to be responsible for managing and deploying. [laugh]. I go home, and so the fact that I can do this in create is really great.” I think that energy, I mean, I feel the same way. I still build stuff all the time, and I think that's something where, like, you can't fake that and also, it's bigger than any one person or one public persona or social media profile, or whatever. I think there's this bigger idea. And I mean, to that point, there are millions of developers on Glitch and they've created well over ten million apps. I am not a humble person, but very clearly, that's not me, you know? [laugh].Corey: I have the same challenge to it's, effectively, I have now a 12 employee company and about that again contractors for various specialized functions, and the common perception, I think, is that mostly I do all the stuff that we talk about in public, and the other 11 folks sort of sit around and clap as I do it. Yeah, that is only four of those people's jobs as it turns out. There are more people doing work here. It's challenging, on some level, to get away from the myth of the founder who is the person who has the grand vision and does all the work and sees all these things.Anil: This industry loves the myth of the great man, or the solo legend, or the person in their bedroom is a genius, the lone genius, and it's a lie. It's a lie every time. And I think one of the things that we can do, especially in the work at Glitch, but I think just in my work overall with my whole career is to dismantle that myth. I think that would be incredibly valuable. It just would do a service for everybody.But I mean, that's why Glitch is the way it is. It's a collaboration platform. Our reference points are, you know, we look at Visual Studio and what have you, but we also look at Google Docs. Why is it that people love to just send a link to somebody and say, “Let's edit this thing together and knock out a, you know, a memo together or whatever.” I think that idea we're going to collaborate together, you know, we saw that—like, I think of Figma, which is a tool that I love. You know, I knew Dylan when he was a teenager and watching him build that company has been so inspiring, not least because design was always supposed to be collaborative.And then you think about we're all collaborating together in design every day. We're all collaborating together and writing in Google Docs—or whatever we use—every day. And then coding is still this kind of single-player game. Maybe at best, you throw something over the wall with a pull request, but for the most part, it doesn't feel like you're in there with somebody. Certainly doesn't feel like you're creating together in the same way that when you're jamming on these other creative tools does. And so I think that's what's been liberating for a lot of people is to feel like it's nice to have company when you're making something.Corey: Periodically, I'll talk to people in the AWS ecosystem who for some reason appear to believe that Jeff Barr builds a lot of these services himself then writes blog posts about them. And it's, Amazon does not break out how many of its 1.2 million or so employees work at AWS, but I'm guessing it's more than five people. So yeah, Jeff probably only wrote a dozen of those services himself; the rest are—Anil: That's right. Yeah.Corey: —done by service teams and the rest. It's easy to condense this stuff and I'm as guilty of it as anyone. To my mind, a big company is one that has 200 people in it. That is not apparently something the world agrees with.Anil: Yeah, it's impossible to fathom an organization of hundreds of thousands or a million-plus people, right? Like, our brains just aren't wired to do it. And I think so we reduce things to any given Jeff, whether that's Barr or Bezos, whoever you want to point to.Corey: At one point, I think they had something like more men named Jeff on their board than they did women, which—Anil: Yeah. Mm-hm.Corey: —all right, cool. They've fixed that and now they have a Dave problem.Anil: Yeah [unintelligible 00:15:37] say that my entire career has been trying to weave out of that dynamic, whether it was a Dave, a Mike, or a Jeff. But I think that broader sort of challenge is this—that is related to the idea of there being this lone genius. And I think if we can sort of say, well, creation always happens in community. It always happens influenced by other things. It is always—I mean, this is why we talk about it in Glitch.When you make an app, you don't start from a blank slate, you start from a working app that's already on the platform and you're remix it. And there was a little bit of a ego resistance by some devs years ago when they first encountered that because [unintelligible 00:16:14] like, “No, no, no, I need a blank page, you know, because I have this brilliant idea that nobody's ever thought of before.” And I'm like, “You know, the odds are you'll probably start from something pretty close to something that's built before.” And that enabler of, “There's nothing new under the sun, and you're probably remixing somebody else's thoughts,” I think that sort of changed the tenor of the community. And I think that's something where like, I just see that across the industry.When people are open, collaborative, like even today, a great example is web browsers. The folks making web browsers at Google, Apple, Mozilla are pretty collaborative. They actually do share ideas together. I mean, I get a window into that because they actually all use Glitch to do test cases on different bugs and stuff for them, but you see, one Glitch project will add in folks from Mozilla and folks from Apple and folks from the Chrome team and Google, and they're like working together and you're, like—you kind of let down the pretense of there being this secret genius that's only in this one organization, this one group of people, and you're able to make something great, and the web is greater than all of them. And the proof, you know, for us is that Glitch is not a new idea. Heroku wanted to do what we're doing, you know, a dozen years ago.Corey: Yeah, everyone wants to build Heroku except the company that acquired Heroku, and here we are. And now it's—I was waiting for the next step and it just seemed like it never happened.Anil: But you know when I talked to those folks, they were like, “Well, we didn't have Docker, and we didn't have containerization, and on the client side, we didn't have modern browsers that could do this kind of editing experience, all this kind of thing.” So, they let their editor go by the wayside and became mostly deploy platform. And—but people forget, for the first year or two Heroku had an in-browser editor, and an IDE and, you know, was constrained by the tech at the time. And I think that's something where I'm like, we look at that history, we look at, also, like I said, these browser manufacturers working together were able to get us to a point where we can make something better.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I do have a question for you about the nuts and bolts behind the scenes of Glitch and how it works. If I want to remix something on Glitch, I click the button, a couple seconds later it's there and ready for me to start kicking the tires on, which tells me a few things. One, it is certainly not using CloudFormation to provision it because I didn't have time to go and grab a quick snack and take a six hour nap. So, it apparently is running on computers somewhere. I have it on good authority that this is not just run by people who are very fast at assembling packets by hand. What does the infrastructure look like?Anil: It's on AWS. Our first year-plus of prototyping while we were sort of in beta and early stages of Glitch was getting that time to remix to be acceptable. We still wish it were faster; I mean, that's always the way but, you know, when we started, it was like, yeah, you did sit there for a minute and watch your cursor spin. I mean, what's happening behind the scenes, we're provisioning a new container, standing up a full stack, bringing over the code from the Git repo on the previous project, like, we're doing a lot of work, lift behind the scenes, and we went through every possible permutation of what could make that experience be good enough. So, when we start talking about prototyping, we're at five-plus, almost six years ago when we started building the early versions of what became Glitch, and at that time, we were fairly far along in maturity with Docker, but there was not a clear answer about the use case that we're building for.So, we experimented with Docker Swarm. We went pretty far down that road; we spent a good bit of time there, it failed in ways that were both painful and slow to fix. So, that was great. I don't recommend that. In fairness, we have a very unusual use case, right? So, Glitch now, if you talk about ten million containers on Glitch, no two of those apps are the same and nobody builds an orchestration infrastructure assuming that every single machine is a unique snowflake.Corey: Yeah, massively multi-tenant is not really a thing that people know.Anil: No. And also from a security posture Glitch—if you look at it as a security expert—it is a platform allowing anonymous users to execute arbitrary code at scale. That's what we do. That's our job. And so [laugh], you know, so your threat model is very different. It's very different.I mean, literally, like, you can go to Glitch and build an app, running a full-stack app, without even logging in. And the reason we enable that is because we see kids in classrooms, they're learning to code for the first time, they want to be able to remix a project and they don't even have an email address. And so that was about enabling something different, right? And then, similarly, you know, we explored Kubernetes—because of course you do; it's the default choice here—and some of the optimizations, again, if you go back several years ago, being able to suspend a project and then quickly sort of rehydrate it off disk into a running app was not a common use case, and so it was not optimized. And so we couldn't offer that experience because what we do with Glitch is, if you haven't used an app in five minutes, and you're not a paid member, who put that app to sleep. And that's just a reasonable—Corey: Uh, “Put the app to sleep,” as in toddler, or, “Put the app to sleep,” as an ill puppy.Anil: [laugh]. Hopefully, the former, but when we were at our worst and scaling the ladder. But that is that thing; it's like we had that moment that everybody does, which is that, “Oh, no. This worked.” That was a really scary moment where we started seeing app creation ramping up, and number of edits that people were making in those apps, you know, ramping up, which meant deploys for us ramping up because we automatically deploy as you edit on Glitch. And so, you know, we had that moment where just—well, as a startup, you always hope things go up into the right, and then they do and then you're not sleeping for a long time. And we've been able to get it back under control.Corey: Like, “Oh, no, I'm not succeeding.” Followed immediately by, “Oh, no, I'm succeeding.” And it's a good problem to have.Anil: Exactly. Right, right, right. The only thing worse than failing is succeeding sometimes, in terms of stress levels. And organizationally, you go through so much; technically, you go through so much. You know, we were very fortunate to have such thoughtful technical staff to navigate these things.But it was not obvious, and it was not a sort of this is what you do off the shelf. And our architecture was very different because people had looked at—like, I look at one of our inspirations was CodePen, which is a great platform and the community love them. And their front end developers are, you know, always showing off, “Here's this cool CSS thing I figured out, and it's there.” But for the most part, they're publishing static content, so architecturally, they look almost more like a content management system than an app-running platform. And so we couldn't learn anything from them about our scaling our architecture.We could learn from them on community, and they've been an inspiration there, but I think that's been very, very different. And then, conversely, if we looked at the Herokus of the world, or all those sort of easy deploy, I think Amazon has half a dozen different, like, “This will be easier,” kind of deploy tools. And we looked at those, and they were code-centric not app-centric. And that led to fundamentally different assumptions in user experience and optimization.And so, you know, we had to chart our own path and I think it was really only the last year or so that we were able to sort of turn the corner and have high degree of confidence about, we know what people build on Glitch and we know how to support and scale it. And that unlocked this, sort of, wave of creativity where there are things that people want to create on the internet but it had become too hard to do so. And the canonical example I think I was—those of us are old enough to remember FTPing up a website—Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: —right—to Geocities, or whatever your shared web host was, we remember how easy that was and how much creativity was enabled by that.Corey: Yes, “How easy it was,” quote-unquote, for those of us who spent years trying to figure out passive versus active versus ‘what is going on?' As far as FTP transfers. And it turns out that we found ways to solve for that, mostly, but it became something a bit different and a bit weird. But here we are.Anil: Yeah, there was definitely an adjustment period, but at some point, if you'd made an HTML page in notepad on your computer, and you could, you know, hurl it at a server somewhere, it would kind of run. And when you realize, you look at the coding boot camps, or even just to, like, teach kids to code efforts, and they're like, “Day three. Now, you've gotten VS Code and GitHub configured. We can start to make something.” And you're like, “The whole magic of this thing getting it to light up. You put it in your web browser, you're like, ‘That's me. I made this.'” you know, north star for us was almost, like, you go from zero to hello world in a minute. That's huge.Corey: I started participating one of those boot camps a while back to help. Like, the first thing I changed about the curriculum was, “Yeah, we're not spending time teaching people how to use VI in, at that point, the 2010s.” It was, that was a fun bit of hazing for those of us who were becoming Unix admins and knew that wherever we'd go, we'd find VI on a server, but here in the real world, there are better options for that.Anil: This is rank cruelty.Corey: Yeah, I mean, I still use it because 20 years of muscle memory doesn't go away overnight, but I don't inflict that on others.Anil: Yeah. Well, we saw the contrast. Like, we worked with, there's a group called Mouse here in New York City that creates the computer science curriculum for the public schools in the City of New York. And there's a million kids in public school in New York City, right, and they all go through at least some of this CS education. [unintelligible 00:24:49] saw a lot of work, a lot of folks in the tech community here did. It was fantastic.And yet they were still doing this sort of very conceptual, theoretical. Here's how a professional developer would set up their environment. Quote-unquote, “Professional.” And I'm like, you know what really sparks kids' interests? If you tell them, “You can make a page and it'll be live and you can send it to your friend. And you can do it right now.”And once you've sparked that creative impulse, you can't stop them from doing the rest. And I think what was wild was kids followed down that path. Some of the more advanced kids got to high school and realized they want to experiment with, like, AI and ML, right? And they started playing with TensorFlow. And, you know, there's collaboration features in Glitch where you can do real-time editing and a code with this. And they went in the forum and they were asking questions, that kind of stuff. And the people answering their questions were the TensorFlow team at Google. [laugh]. Right?Corey: I remember those days back when everything seemed smaller and more compact, [unintelligible 00:25:42] but almost felt like a balkanization of community—Anil: Yeah.Corey: —where now it's oh, have you joined that Slack team, and I'm looking at this and my machine is screaming for more RAM. It's, like, well, it has 128 gigs in it. Shouldn't that be enough? Not for Slack.Anil: Not for chat. No, no, no. Chat is demanding.Corey: Oh, yeah, that and Chrome are basically trying to out-ram each other. But if you remember the days of volunteering as network staff on Freenode when you could basically gather everyone for a given project in the entire stack on the same IRC network. And that doesn't happen anymore.Anil: And there's something magic about that, right? It's like now the conversations are closed off in a Slack or Discord or what have you, but to have a sort of open forum where people can talk about this stuff, what's wild about that is, for a beginner, a teenage creator who's learning this stuff, the idea that the people who made the AI, I can talk to, they're alive still, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, they're not even that old. But [laugh]. They think of this is something that's been carved in stone for 100 years.And so it's so inspiring to them. And then conversely, talking to the TensorFlow team, they made these JavaScript examples, like, tensorflow.js was so accessible, you know? And they're like, “This is the most heartwarming thing. Like, we think about all these enterprise use cases or whatever. But like, kids wanting to make stuff, like recognize their friends' photo, and all the vision stuff they're doing around [unintelligible 00:26:54] out there,” like, “We didn't know this is why we do it until we saw this is why we do it.”And that part about connecting the creative impulse from both, like, the most experienced, advanced coders at the most august tech companies that exist, as well as the most rank beginners in public schools, who might not even have a computer at home, saying that's there—if you put those two things together, and both of those are saying, “I'm a coder; I'm able to create; I can make something on the internet, and I can share it with somebody and be inspired by it,” like, that is… that's as good as it gets.Corey: There's something magic in being able to reach out to people who built this stuff. And honestly—you shouldn't feel this way, but you do—when I was talking to the folks who wrote the things I was working on, it really inspires you to ask better questions. Like when I'm talking to Dr. Venema, the author of Postfix and I'm trying to figure out how this thing works, well, I know for a fact that I will not be smarter than he is at basically anything in that entire universe, and maybe most beyond that, as well, however, I still want to ask a question in such a way that doesn't make me sound like a colossal dumbass. So, it really inspires you—Anil: It motivates you.Corey: Oh, yeah. It inspires you to raise your question bar up a bit, of, “I am trying to do x. I expect y to happen. Instead, z is happening as opposed to what I find the documentation that”—oh, as I read the documentation, discover exactly what I messed up, and then I delete the whole email. It's amazing how many of those things you never send because when constructing a question the right way, you can help yourself.Anil: Rubber ducking against your heroes.Corey: Exactly.Anil: I mean, early in my career, I'd gone through sort of licensing mishap on a project that later became open-source, and sort of stepped it in and as you do, and unprompted, I got an advice email from Dan Bricklin, who invented the spreadsheet, he invented VisiCalc, and he had advice and he was right. And it was… it was unreal. I was like, this guy's one of my heroes. I grew up reading about his work, and not only is he, like, a living, breathing person, he's somebody that can have the kindness to reach out and say, “Yeah, you know, have you tried this? This might work.”And it's, this isn't, like, a guy who made an app. This is the guy who made the app for which the phrase killer app was invented, right? And, you know, we've since become friends and I think a lot of his inspiration and his work. And I think it's one of the things it's like, again, if you tell somebody starting out, the people who invented the fundamental tools of the digital era, are still active, still building stuff, still have advice to share, and you can connect with them, it feels like a cheat code. It feels like a superpower, right? It feels like this impossible thing.And I think about like, even for me, the early days of the web, view source, which is still buried in our browser somewhere. And you can see the code that makes the page, it felt like getting away with something. “You mean, I can just look under the hood and see how they made this page and then I can do it too?” I think we forget how radical that is—[unintelligible 00:29:48] radical open-source in general is—and you see it when, like, you talk to young creators. I think—you know, I mean, Glitch obviously is used every day by, like, people at Microsoft and Google and the New York Timesor whatever, like, you know, the most down-the-road, enterprise developers, but I think a lot about the new creators and the people who are learning, and what they tell me a lot is the, like, “Oh, so I made this app, but what do I have to do to put it on the internet?”I'm like, “It already is.” Like, as soon as you create it, that URL was live, it all works. And their, like, “But isn't there, like, an app store I have to ask? Isn't there somebody I have to get permission to publish this from? Doesn't somebody have to approve it?”And you realize they've grown up with whether it was the app stores on their phones, or the cartridges in their Nintendo or, you know, whatever it was, they had always had this constraint on technology. It wasn't something you make; it's something that is given to you, you know, handed down from on high. And I think that's the part that animates me and the whole team, the community, is this idea of, like, I geek out about our infrastructure. I love that we're doing deploys constantly, so fast, all the time, and I love that we've taken the complexity away, but the end of the day, the reason why we do it, is you can have somebody just sort of saying, I didn't realize there was a place I could just make something put it in front of, maybe, millions of people all over the world and I don't have to ask anybody permission and my idea can matter as much as the thing that's made by the trillion-dollar company.Corey: It's really neat to see, I guess, the sense of spirit and soul that arises from a smaller, more, shall we say, soulful company. No disparagement meant toward my friends at AWS and other places. It's just, there's something that you lose when you get to a certain point of scale. Like, I don't ever have to have a meeting internally and discuss things, like, “Well, does this thing that we're toying with doing violate antitrust law?” That is never been on my roadmap of things I have to even give the slightest crap about.Anil: Right, right? You know, “What does the investor relations person at a retirement fund think about the feature that we shipped?” Is not a question that we have to answer. There's this joy in also having community that sort of has come along with us, right? So, we talk a lot internally about, like, how do we make sure Glitch stays weird? And, you know, the community sort of supports that.Like, there's no reason logically that our logo should be the emoji of two fish. But that kind of stuff of just, like, it just is. We don't question it anymore. I think that we're very lucky. But also that we are part of an ecosystem. I also am very grateful where, like… yeah, that folks at Google use Glitch as part of their daily work when they're explaining a new feature in Chrome.Like, if you go to web.dev and their dev portal teaches devs how to code, all the embedded examples go to these Glitch apps that are running, showing running code is incredible. When we see the Stripe team building examples of, like, “Do you want to use this new payment API that we made? Well, we have a Glitch for you.” And literally every day, they ship one that sort of goes and says, “Well, if you just want to use this new Stripe feature, you just remix this thing and it's instantly running on Glitch.”I mean, those things are incredible. So like, I'm very grateful that the biggest companies and most influential companies in the industry have embraced it. So, I don't—yeah, I don't disparage them at all, but I think that ability to connect to the person who'd be like, “I just want to do payments. I've never heard of Stripe.”Corey: Oh yeah.Anil: And we have this every day. They come into Glitch, and they're just like, I just wanted to take credit cards. I didn't know there's a tool to do that.Corey: “I was going to build it myself,” and everyone shrieks, “No, no. Don't do that. My God.” Yeah. Use one of their competitors, fine,k but building it yourself is something a lunatic would do.Anil: Exactly. Right, right. And I think we forget that there's only so much attention people can pay, there's only so much knowledge they have.Corey: Everything we say is new to someone. That's why I always go back to assuming no one's ever heard of me, and explain the basics of what I do and how I do it, periodically. It's, no one has done all the mandatory reading. Who knew?Anil: And it's such a healthy exercise to, right, because I think we always have that kind of beginner's mindset about what Glitch is. And in fairness, I understand why. Like, there have been very experienced developers that have said, “Well, Glitch looks too colorful. It looks like a toy.” And that we made a very intentional choice at masking—like, we're doing the work under the hood.And you can drop down into a terminal and you can do—you can run whatever build script you want. You can do all that stuff on Glitch, but that's not what we put up front and I think that's this philosophy about the role of the technology versus the people in the ecosystem.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to, I guess, explain what Glitch is and how you view it. If people want to learn more about it, about your opinions, et cetera. Where can they find you?Anil: Sure. glitch.com is easiest place, and hopefully that's a something you can go and a minute later, you'll have a new app that you built that you want to share. And, you know, we're pretty active on all social media, you know, Twitter especially with Glitch: @glitch. I'm on as @anildash.And one of the things I love is I get to talk to folks like you and learn from the community, and as often as not, that's where most of the inspiration comes from is just sort of being out in all the various channels, talking to people. It's wild to be 20-plus years into this and still never get tired of that.Corey: It's why I love this podcast. Every time I talk to someone, I learn something new. It's hard to remain too ignorant after you have enough people who've shared wisdom with you as long as you can retain it.Anil: That's right.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Anil: So, glad to be here.Corey: Anil Dash, CEO of Gletch—or Glitch as he insists on calling it. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me how your small team at AWS is going to crush Glitch into the dirt just as soon as they find a name that's dumb enough for the service.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Coder Radio Video
Blizzard Battery Battle | Coder Radio 446

Coder Radio Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


Mike finds a new normal and doubles down on what works. Chris meanwhile is stranded in the woods and is having a bit of a panic.

Podnews podcasting news
Facebook Podcasts coding issue leads to inflated numbers

Podnews podcasting news

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 2:08


In Podnews today: One major podcast hosting company isn't filtering the bad data out Visit https://podnews.net/update/facebook-podcasts-coding for all the podcasting news, and to get our daily newsletter.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
1st Talk Compliance: Melody Mulaik, President of Revenue Cycle Coding Strategies

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 23:10


Host Catherine Short welcomes Melody Mulaik, President of Revenue Cycle Coding Strategies, a company that provides auditing, education and other collaborative consulting solutions to meet coding and compliance needs. Melody joins us to address a current hot topic, “AUC – Delayed but not Gone.” 2022 was scheduled to be the official implementation date for AUC/CDS implementation but the 2022 Proposed Rule threw everyone a little curve ball. While a delay might occur, it does not change the direction of the program or the need to prepare and test. As providers continue to either prepare their own practices or bridge the gap with imaging facilities, it is important that everyone be on the same page throughout the CMS implementation and remaining testing period. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

CodeNewbie
S18:E8 - How to use different memory techniques to learn coding (Kylo Robinson)

CodeNewbie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:38


In this episode, we talk about how to use different memory techniques to learn coding with Kylo Robinson, full stack developer, coding coach, and creator of The Great Sync Javascript Mental Model. Kylo talks about how realizing he wasn't understanding the fundamentals of javascript led him to create a world of memory techniques, what some of those memory techniques are, and how he uses them to retain different coding principles. Show Links DevDiscuss (sponsor) DevNews (sponsor) New Relic (sponsor) Retool (sponsor) Microsoft 30 Days to Learn It (sponsor) The Great Sync Javascript Mental Model HTML CSS JavaScript Eloquent JavaScript Just JavaScript Redux React Egghead.io Maggie Appleton

devMode.fm
Standup - "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Fire Ant"

devMode.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 55:27


Ryan Irelan & Andrew record another devMode standup where we discuss topics ranging from the etymology of the word “sanguine” to the entomology of the Texas fire ants that attacked Ryan.

The James Altucher Show
Make You a Millionaire! - Annual Meeting 2021 with Jen Glantz, Paolo, James Quandahl, and Jay the Engineer!

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 68:46


It's the end of the year, so it's time to have an annual meeting with the "Millionaire's Series" candidates to look at their progress!In this episode, Jay Yow, The Engineer, has an annual meeting with James Quandahl, Jen Glantz, and Paolo. They talked about their journey, expectation, experience, and their obstacles that they faced during this whole journey!My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book!Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president.I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts:Apple PodcastsStitcheriHeart RadioSpotify Follow me on Social Media:YouTubeTwitterFacebook

Parenting ADHD Podcast, with the ADHD Momma | Positive Parenting | ADHD Tools | Homework Strategies | ADHD at School | Learni

.tatsu-row > .tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}.tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g.tatsu-column > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-column-overlay{mix-blend-mode: none;}.tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-top-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-bottom-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-left-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-right-divider{z-index: 9999;}@media only screen and (max-width:1377px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}}@media only screen and (min-width:768px) and (max-width: 1024px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}}@media only screen and (max-width: 767px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-PMRz9XgA3g.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}}.tatsu-Hr8OwtFON .tatsu-section-pad{padding: 1px 0px 0px 0px;}.tatsu-Hr8OwtFON > .tatsu-bottom-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-Hr8OwtFON > .tatsu-top-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-ZT0g21PMtS.tatsu-row-wrap > .tatsu-row{padding: 0px 0% 0px 0%;}.tatsu-xldQ78jPMZ.tatsu-text-block-wrap .tatsu-text-inner{width: 100%;text-align: left;}PAP 155 Using Strengths to Find Success with ADHD with Ari Sokolov .tatsu-row > .tatsu-v3DwjID6kf.tatsu-column{width: 58.1%;}.tatsu-v3DwjID6kf.tatsu-column > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-column-overlay{mix-blend-mode: none;}.tatsu-v3DwjID6kf > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-top-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-v3DwjID6kf > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-bottom-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-v3DwjID6kf > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-left-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-v3DwjID6kf > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-right-divider{z-index: 9999;}@media only screen and (max-width:1377px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-v3DwjID6kf.tatsu-column{width: 50%;}}@media only screen and (min-width:768px) and (max-width: 1024px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-v3DwjID6kf.tatsu-column{width: 50%;}}@media only screen and (max-width: 767px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-v3DwjID6kf.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}}.tatsu-Tl-2Azjm0{margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px;}.tatsu-Tl-2Azjm0 .tatsu-single-image-inner{max-width: 100%;}.tatsu-Tl-2Azjm0.tatsu-single-image{transform: translate3d(0px,0px, 0);}.tatsu-row > .tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column{width: 41.9%;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-column-pad-wrap > .tatsu-column-pad{padding: 0% 0px 0px 0px;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-column-overlay{mix-blend-mode: none;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-top-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-bottom-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-left-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-right-divider{z-index: 9999;}@media only screen and (max-width:1377px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column{width: 50%;}}@media only screen and (min-width:768px) and (max-width: 1024px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column{width: 50%;}}@media only screen and (max-width: 767px) {.tatsu-row > .tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column{width: 100%;}.tatsu-aYVtWBgW2e.tatsu-column > .tatsu-column-inner > .tatsu-column-pad-wrap > .tatsu-column-pad{padding: 10% 0px 0px 0px;}} .tatsu-Am6cxV0OIl.tatsu-section{background-color: rgba(251,251,251,1);}.tatsu-Am6cxV0OIl .tatsu-section-pad{padding: 0% 10% 5% 10%;}.tatsu-Am6cxV0OIl > .tatsu-bottom-divider{height: 100px;color: #ffffff ;z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-Am6cxV0OIl > .tatsu-top-divider{z-index: 9999;}.tatsu-Am6cxV0OIl .tatsu-custom-height-wrap{align-items: center;min-height: 65vh;}.tatsu-TH-tkJREm0A.tatsu-text-block-wrap .tatsu-text-inner{width: 100%;text-align: left;}Ari Sokolov grew up with ADHD, but she didn't let her struggles in school define her. Instead, she found ways to make her strengths of creativity and problem-solving work for her. And everything changed when she accidentally walked into a computer science class in middle school and discovered coding. Coding is an outlet for her ADHD creativity and hyperfo...

Code Completion
61: Worth Learning A Little Bit About

Code Completion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 42:15


Welcome to Code Completion, Episode 61! We are a group of iOS developers and educators hoping to share what we love most about development, Apple technology, and completing your code! Follow us @CodeCompletion (https://twitter.com/CodeCompletion) on Twitter to hear about our upcoming livestreams, videos, and other content. Today, we discuss: - Web Development - wat (https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/wat) - MacStadium Collocation (https://www.macstadium.com/colo#products) - Vapor (http://vapor.codes) - W3Schools (https://www.w3schools.com) Your hosts for this week: * Spencer Curtis (https://twitter.com/SpencerCCurtis) * Dimitri Bouniol (https://twitter.com/DimitriBouniol) Be sure to also sign up to our monthly newsletter (https://codecompletion.io/), where we will recap the topics we discussed, reveal the answers to #CompleteTheCode, and share even more things we learned in between episodes. You are what makes this show possible, so please be sure to share this with your friends and family who are also interested in any part of the app development process.

Coder Radio Video
Say No to Node | Coder Radio 445

Coder Radio Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


We're both impressed by Rails 7 and how an old foe got us down again.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Gitpod, iPad Coding, Web3, WTF NFT

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 63:09


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk with Geoff and Pauline from Gitpod about developing on Gitpod, Web3, and The NFT Bay. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Logrocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 01:20 Guest introduction 02:46 Coding in the browser anywhere Gitpod JetBrain 04:58 How does GitPod work in the browser? NoYaml Cobalt2 Finding VS Code Extensions for Gitpod 09:27 How does GitPod actually work? 10:57 What is Kubernetees? 13:11 Is there a full VS Code environment? 18:21 Sponsor: Linode 19:01 Who are the heavy users of Gitpod? 24:32 Teams on Gitpod Gitpod Roadmap Centered.app 30:11 Do the developers of Gitpod use Gitpod to build Gitpod? Gitpod Careers 32:51 What language is Gitpod written in? 33:15 Sponsor: Logrocket 34:10 Living in a van coding 38:16 How do you stay productive on the go? 40:18 What was The NFT Bay? The NFT Bay 44:54 Is there any good in Web3 ideas? Lularoe Documentary 49:42 Sponsor: Freshbooks 50:13 Selling NFTs is difficult 51:34 Sick Picks! 58:40 Shameless Plugs ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Sweet Bobby Podcast Wes: Woosh Cloths Pauline Uniqlo Geoff Helinox Chair Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Psychology of Devx Gitpod Community Workshops as Code Ghuntley.com Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Let's Talk Pella
Let’s Talk Pella – 6th Grade Coding

Let's Talk Pella

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 8:33


Pella Schools Technology Teacher Paula Winward and Students Olive Picray, Aaron Vande Lune, Sam Te Grootenhuis, and Parker Evans discuss a week of coding classes at Jefferson Intermediate School.

BIMThoughts
E2144 – Konrad Sobon

BIMThoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


In this episode, we chat with Konrad Sobon of bimbeats & Bad Monkeys fame about Dynamo, Programing, The Revit API, Teaching, his coding origin story, favourite language and more. Show Notes Episode Hashtag: #DadJokes Here is where you can find Konrad on the World Wide Web: Website: bimbeats Website: Bad Monkeys Blog: archi+lab LinkedIn:Konrad K … Read More →

Tech Unlocked
EP 52 | What is Web3? Is it the future of the internet? with Steph Orpilla

Tech Unlocked

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 63:09


What will the future of the internet look like? How will it be developed? Will it have the simple structure of Web1 (the early days of the internet) or maybe be structured like Web2 which is the internet we are currently using today?  Today on the show, Grace chats with Steph Orpilla is a Software Engineer at Amazon and Blockchain developer about Web3 + the future of the internet, DAOs, the future NFTs and how to become a Blockchain developer. Steph Orpilla is a Software Engineer at Amazon (previously AWS, SONY, and startups). At work she focuses on frontend development, building bespoke experiences to enhance Prime Originals. After hours, she's a Web3 developer with 2 Dapps and counting built on the Ethereum blockchain. Steph is also the winner of the 2021 EthGlobal Hackathon. Whether developing a feature, writing a smart contract or trying something entirely new, she loves the challenge of creating elegant solutions while learning by doing. Key takeaways: What is Blockchain technology What is Web3 and why should you care about it Web1 vs Web2 vs Web3 What are DAOs? Are they really decentralized? How to find Blockchain dev jobs How to know what NFT or Blockchain projects to invest in  Why you can't  just right-click save (screenshot) an NFT The future of NFTs How brands/businesses will leverage Web3 tech   Resources: How to Get Into Crypto and Web3 as a Developer Consensys, Chainlink, Colt Steele's Blockchain course NFT projects to look out for (Not financial Advice): Stapleverse by Jeff Staple: https://www.stapleverse.xyz/ WGMInterfaces: https://twitter.com/WGMInterfaces Steph Curry NFT: 2974sc.com   Follow Tech Unlocked for career tips: Website Substack Twitter Instagram Connect with Grace: Twitter LinkedIn Connect with Steph: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephorpilla/ https://www.instagram.com/_steph.js Enjoyed listening to this episode? Please leave a review on iTunes and Spotify. Questions about sponsorship? Email us techunlockedpod@gmail.com    

CodeNewbie
S18:E7 - How a coding background can give you an edge in product management (Shruti Anand)

CodeNewbie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 32:21


In this episode, we talk about product management with Shruti Anand, product manager at Lacework. Shruti talks about getting a bachelors in computer science and masters architecture and software engineering, then pivoting to product management, and how her technical background has given her an edge in her product management career. Show Links DevDiscuss (sponsor) DevNews (sponsor) New Relic (sponsor) Retool (sponsor) Microsoft 30 Days to Learn It (sponsor) Lacework Linked list Scrum Kanban IDE GitHub Jira Miro

Podcast Junkies
282 Coding, Freelancing & Choosing Your Own Adventure with Rob Joseph

Podcast Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 58:58


Episode SummaryHarry welcomes to the show app developer, freelancer and podcaster, Rob Joseph. Rob is the host of the Coffee & Coding podcast, a show that provides interviews & insights with experienced developer's across all aspects of App Development, including topics ranging from Flutter, Cyber Security, Freelancing, Android & iOS. In this episode, Harry and Rob discuss Rob's background in coding and the inspiration to launch his own podcast. They talk about the freedom that comes with freelancing and how it differs from running your own business. Finally, Rob shares his process for curating meaningful interview questions and his decision to launch a podcast about podcasting.  Episode SponsorsFocusrite –http://pjnk.es/focusrite ( http://pjnk.es/focusrite) FullCast –https://fullcast.co/ ( https://fullcast.co/) Key Takeaways06:17 – Harry and Rob talk about Rob's background in coding and the freedom that comes with freelancing  19:18 – The distinction between freelancing and starting your own business  24:29 – Why app design?  30:22 – The inspiration behind the Coffee & Coding podcast and Rob's first guest  34:13 – Rob's interview process and his growth as a podcast host  46:22 – The decision to launch a podcast about podcasting  54:51 – Something Rob has changed his mind about recently and the most misunderstood thing about him  58:24 – Harry thanks Rob for joining the show and let's listeners know where they can connect with him  Tweetable Quotes“The biggest thing [about freelancing] comes down to trust. And I think if you have an objective way to measure the goal that you want, then really the in-between doesn't matter.” (15:14) (Rob)  “The biggest thing that drove me into app developing was actually two things. One, I read an article on Life Hacker that said this is our perfect to do list app. So, in my young brain I'm thinking, ‘Right, if I build this app, that's the million dollar idea.' I started to kinda learn app development from there. I didn't really make a dent, but what it taught me was that I could do some of it.” (25:09) (Rob) “I approached it [Coffee & Coding] pretty much the same way that I approach my apps, which is that I build stuff that I want. So I really wanted to listen to a show that was about app development but it wasn't technical.” (30:39) (Rob) “You want to get the best conversation from them. You want to get the best content for your guest. Personally, I want to have a great conversation. So, why would I ask you questions that I know the answer to?” (44:33) (Rob) Resources MentionedFullCast Website –https://fullcast.co/ ( https://fullcast.co/) Podcast Junkies Junkies Facebook Group –https://www.facebook.com/groups/podcastjunkiesjunkies/ ( https://www.facebook.com/groups/podcastjunkiesjunkies/) Link to Podfest Expo Virtual Summit –https://podfestexpo.com/ ( https://podfestexpo.com/) Link to Follow Up Then – https://www.followupthen.com/ (https://www.followupthen.com/)  Rob's LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/therobj/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/therobj/)  Rob's Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/lowcarbrob/ (https://www.instagram.com/lowcarbrob/)  Rob's Twitter – https://twitter.com/LowCarbRob (https://twitter.com/LowCarbRob)  Rob's Podcasts:  Coffee & Coding – https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-coding-the-app-developer-podcast/id1516149785 (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coffee-coding-the-app-developer-podcast/id1516149785)  Inside the Podcast Studio – https://insidethepod.co/ (https://insidethepod.co/)  Link to ‘Make Noise' – https://www.amazon.com/Make-Noise-Creators-Podcasting-Storytelling/dp/1523504552/ref=asc_df_1523504552?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80401880071863&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584001425728657&psc=1...

Remote Ruby
Getting a Junior Developer Job with Jason Meller and Caitlin Cabrera

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:46


[00:02:40] Jason gives us an explanation of what Kolide is, how they found Caitlin, and why they decided to hire her.[00:06:09] Andrew asks Jason when he was looking for someone for a mid to senior position, and what led him to believe that maybe that's someone who doesn't fit into a senior category but can still have the impact of someone with a senior paycheck.[00:08:42] Find out the most impactful thing that Andrew's company did for him as a Junior Developer, and Caitlin shares her journey to how she got to her current position.[00:16:04] With Caitlin doing the contract work and getting experience before getting her first job, Chris wonders if that helped her when she was applying.[00:17:25] We find out how the interview process was for Caitlin and Jason explains the process the team came up with for her interview.[00:23:53] Jason tells us what makes a good interview and Caitlin and Andrew share some great interviewing tips. [00:28:25] Andrew asks Caitlin if any of her interviews were actually good ones and if there were any jobs she would have felt miserable working at. [00:30:36] Andrew talks about platforms out there to get help if you are a bad interviewer, and Jason explains more about the management way shifting towards employers learning a style of interviewing to get what they need out of the process.[00:33:34] Jason tells us some big challenges he's experiencing being an interviewer, and he shares something he didn't know about bootcamps.  [00:37:52] If you're a Junior out there looking for a job, Caitlin shares some advice and words of wisdom. [00:41:18] Chris wonders what Jason's strategy is on making sure that Caitlin is well supported and can get questions answered and absorb everything she can to flourish at Kolide.[00:49:32] We end with a deep conversation on ADHD. [00:57:43] Jason announces Kolide is hiring! Panelists:Chris OliverAndrew MasonGuests:Jason MellerCaitlin CabreraSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Ruby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterRemote Ruby Podcast-Episode 53: Building Kolide with Jason MellerJason Meller TwitterJason Meller Linkedin Caitlin Cabrera WebsiteKolideKolide CareersKolide Twitter

Imagine America Radio
The Future of Software Development Careers

Imagine America Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 18:11


On this episode, Imagine America Radio interview Dr. Evelyn Zayas, the information technology department chair at Rasmussen University. We discuss the importance of a formal education in software development, what makes a person a good fit for software development, how long a software development program typically is, and what career opportunities are available for individuals studying this program. To learn more about Rasmussen University, visit their website: https://www.rasmussen.edu/about-rasmussen/

The Hospital Finance Podcast
2022 Inpatient and Outpatient coding updates

The Hospital Finance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 11:31


In this episode, we are joined by Sandy Brewton, Senior Healthcare Consultant at Panacea Healthcare Solutions, to talk about both inpatient and outpatient coding changes that will affect you in 2022. Learn how to listen to The Hospital Finance Podcast® on your mobile device. Highlights of this episode include: How many new codes have been Read More

Becoming A Stress-Free Nurse Practitioner
Ep #46: The New NP's Guide to Billing and Coding with Erica Dorn

Becoming A Stress-Free Nurse Practitioner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 21:31


Tune in this week to discover the secrets when it comes to billing and coding. We're sharing the most common areas that new nurse practitioners struggle with when it comes to charting, billing, and coding, and how you can adopt the new mindset that will make your job as a real-deal NP so much easier.   Get full show notes and more information here: http://www.stressfreenp.com/46

Coder Radio Video
Mining the Logs | Coder Radio 444

Coder Radio Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021


The broader software problem the Log4Shell vulnerability reveals, and the story of how Chris lit his Coder robe on fire... While wearing it.

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech
Shamira Marshall: From Attorney to Software Developer

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:07


Shamira Marshall is an attorney who learned to code in 2019 and today is a software engineer at GoDaddy. Her interest in tech started in law school and then attended Ada Developers Academy to make the career switch. Which is where she and I met! Resources: Ada Developers AcademyShamira on Dev.to/MiraMarshallShamira on Twitter  @MiraMarshalll We Belong Here Podcast:Follow Lauren on Twitter @LoLoCodingWeBelongPodcast.comSubscribe on AppleSubscribe on SpotifyWe Belong Here Discord CommunityJoin us on Discord Server today! bit.ly/webelongdiscord 

Blerds and Nerds Podcast
A Conversation with Lual Mayen

Blerds and Nerds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 89:25


On this episode, Shannon, Jaja and James sit down with content creator, developer and CEO of Junub Games - Lual Mayen. Lual discusses the powerful story about his life growing up in a refugee camp in Uganda and how he taught himself to code and develop his own video game. There a lots of lots of gems dropped in this episode! You don't want to miss it. Make sure to rate, review and subscribe on your podcast platform, and on Youtube.  Find Lual here:  https://instagram.com/lualmayen https://linktr.ee/lualmayen   National Resources List https://linktr.ee/NationalResourcesList   Youtube  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK56I-TNUnhKhcWLZxoUTaw   Email us: Blerdsnerds@gmail.com   Follow Our Social: https://www.instagram.com/blerdsnerds/ https://twitter.com/BlerdsNerds https://www.facebook.com/blerdsnerds   Shannon: https://www.instagram.com/luv_shenanigans Gyasi: https://www.instagram.com/gsturg93 James: https://www.instagram.com/llsuavej  Jaja: https://www.instagram.com/jajasmith3   

Off the Chain
#753 Bringing Coding To The Masses w/ Amjad Masad

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 37:19


Amjad Masad is the Co-Founder & CEO of Replit, a website dedicated to writing code and building apps. In this conversation, we discuss software development, the importance of coding, how to educate more people on this technical endeavor, and why Replit is such an impressive business. ======================= BlockFi provides financial products for crypto investors. Products include high-yield interest accounts, USD loans, and no fee trading. To start earning today visit: http://www.blockfi.com/Pomp ======================= Choice is a new self-directed IRA product that I'm really excited about. If you are listening to this, you are likely part of the 7.1 million bitcoin owners who have retirement accounts with dollars in them, but not bitcoin. I was in that situation too. Now you can actually buy real Bitcoin in your retirement account. I'm talking about owning your private keys and using tax-advantaged dollars to do it too. Absolute game changer. https://www.retirewithchoice.com/pomp ======================= Circle is a global financial technology firm that enables businesses of all sizes to harness the power of stablecoins and public blockchains for payments, commerce and financial applications worldwide. Circle is also a principal developer of USD Coin (USDC), the fastest growing, fully reserved and regulated dollar stablecoin in the world. The free Circle Account and suite of platform API services bridge the gap between traditional payments and crypto for trading, DeFi, and NFT marketplaces. Create seamless, user-friendly, mainstream customer experiences with crypto-native infrastructure under the hood with Circle. Learn more at circle.com.

Remote Ruby
Discussing Tech Careers with Thiago Araujo and Stefanni Brasil of Hexdevs

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 60:28


[00:01:39] Thiago and Stefanni tell us a little bit about themselves, how they started doing the open source livestreams, and what their goals are for them.[00:07:56] We find out how Thiago got interested in doing this stuff, how he got started in Ruby, and what led him to focus on this particular area.[00:11:51] Find out the reason why Jason dropped out of college and what Andrew was angry about in college. Stefanni asks Andrew and Chris if it makes a difference when they do interviews with the degrees they have.[00:19:42] Thiago talks more about what they see happening with people that go to a bootcamp, get their first job, and they get stuck. [00:22:39] Andrew brings up Junior Developers and Stefanni expands on why that demographics jumps out as the biggest problem to them. Thiago, Andrew, and Chris share stories about the importance of being a mentor. [00:32:20] Find out what Thiago means when he said, “It can either be learning and be curious or judging,” and Jason brings up a good book he read.[00:33:49] Andrew, Stefanni, Chris, Thiago, and Jason share stories about techs having a bad rep.[00:45:06] Stefanni and Thiago tell us the details about a workshop they are doing soon that sounds amazing![00:52:31] Thiago asks the guys if there were any workshops they really liked or presented at and any tips they can share so they can make sure their workshop is super interesting and fun for everyone.  [00:59:36] Find out where you can follow Stefanni and Thiago online. Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverAndrew MasonGuests:Thiago AraujoStefanni BrasilSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Ruby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar TwitterThiago Araujo TwitterThiago Araujo LinkedinThiago Araujo GitHubStefanni Brasil TwitterStefanni Brasil WebsiteStefanni Brasil LinkedinStefanni Brasil-GitHubhexdevshexdevs Software Design Workshophexdevs podcastUnfu*k Yourself: Get Out of Your Head and into Your Life by Gary John BishopHow to Contribute to Ruby on Rails-Stefanni Brasil (YouTube)

Coder Radio Video
Reptilian Power Play | Coder Radio 443

Coder Radio Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021


We peak in on one of the nastiest corporate moves in a while, and Chris has a big confession.

NosillaCast Apple Podcast
NC #865 Kilowatt Thanksgiving Special, Stuck Coding? Write a Letter, Meross Smart Plugs, Level Lock with Pat Dengler

NosillaCast Apple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 46:12


Steve and I Were on the Kilowatt Podcast CCATP #707 – Tom Merritt on Meta and the Metaverse Tiny Tip – When You're Stuck Coding, Write a Letter You'll Never Send Meross – Inexpensive HomeKit-Compatible Smart Plug Pat Dengler on the Level Lock (no blog post) - level.co/... Join the Conversation: allison@podfeet.com podfeet.com/slack Support the Show: Patreon Donation PayPal one-time donation Podfeet Podcasts Mugs at Zazzle Podfeet 15-Year Anniversary Shirts Affiliate Links: Parallels Toolbox Affiliate - get 3 mos free Learn through MacSparky Field Guides Backblaze One Free Month

No Plans to Merge
Aeropress and ADHD

No Plans to Merge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 99:49


We talk about coffee mechanisms, some alpine news, and a big segment on ADHD. Also Daniel is very bullish on those Dapper Ducks.

The Laracasts Snippet
Be the Tortoise

The Laracasts Snippet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:50


If you've worked in programming spaces for any period of time, you will surely have heard the advice, "It's better to go slow than fast." We all instinctively knows this, and, yet, we're simultaneously obsessed with optimizing every facet of our workflow.