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Hypertext Markup Language

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mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
El contenido es el rey

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 15:59


Microsoft compra Activision Blizzard / Más de 500 millones de abonados a música en streaming / YouTube cierra Originals / El CEO de Airbnb "se va de Airbnb" / Intel presenta un minero de Bitcoin / AdBlock Plus gana el juicio / Primera candidata real de exoluna Patrocinador: Cuidado con las Macros Ocultas https://www.cuidadoconlasmacrosocultas.com/ es un podcast de divulgación tecnológica para empresas impulsado por Cuatroochenta que responde a preguntas clave de nuestra época en cada episodio: ¿Cómo es un ciberataque desde dentro?, ¿cuál es el impacto medioambiental de la nube?, ¿qué cambiará realmente la IA? — Suscríbete en Spotify https://open.spotify.com/episode/1IyJTLfo2XlrwNwwm0q2gp?si=2gOAVIqdR3yDHLlRU3CX5g, Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/es/podcast/cuidado-con-las-macros-ocultas/id1582767310?i=1000547511042, Ivoox https://www.ivoox.com/m05-automatismos-robots-avatares-el-nuevo-digital-audios-mp3_rf_80668395_1.html, Google https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9vbW55LmZtL3Nob3dzL2N1aWRhZG8tY29uLWxhcy1tYWNyb3Mtb2N1bHRhcy9wbGF5bGlzdHMvcG9kY2FzdC5yc3M/episode/ZjgxYjg5MDQtODAyYi00MjI5LTk3Y2ItYWUwODAwOTdhZWVi?ep=14, etc. Microsoft compra Activision Blizzard / Más de 500 millones de abonados a música en streaming / YouTube cierra Originals / El CEO de Airbnb "se va de Airbnb" / Intel presenta un minero de Bitcoin / AdBlock Plus gana el juicio / Primera candidata real de exoluna

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 816. Ready for an iPad Pro Max?. Apple TV+ eyes, sports. Again.. The power of Apple's Headset. ProMotion or not ProMotion. Apple starts allowing 3rd party in-app payment. Fewer users updating to iOS15. Private Relay confusion. Airplay and Firewalls. SuperDuper backups stuck. Special thanks to our sponsors: BetterHelp SimpliSafe Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 815. AirPods Pro 2 details emerge. Big week for AR/VR headset rumors. The notch-less iPhone 14 Pro. Here comes the M2. An Apple Display that is "half the price". Apple close to landing Brad Pitt F1 flick. In car Wi-Fi question. Cleaning up your passwords. Spam in your Calendar?. Thing of the Moment: TP-Link AV1300 Gigabit Passthrough Powerline ac Wi-Fi Kit. Special thanks to our sponsor: Zocdoc Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

Dev Questions with Tim Corey
084 Do I Really Need To Study HTML and CSS As A C# Web Developer?

Dev Questions with Tim Corey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 12:05


HTML and CSS seem easy. Do I really need to learn them? Does it matter if I learned HTML and CSS ten years ago? Can I just skip right to learning JavaScript or C# since they build web pages for me? These are the questions we are going to answer in today's episode of Dev Questions.Website: https://iamtimcorey.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IAmTimCoreySign Up to Get More Great Developer Content in Your Inbox: https://signup.iamtimcorey.com/

That's my JAMstack
S3E2 - Salma Alam-Naylor on shipping, learning, and rendering in the Jamstack

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:58


Our Guest: Salma Alam-Naylor What she'd like for you to see: Unbreak.tech Her JAMstack Jams: All the amazing rendering options! Her musical Jam: Move On by Emily Vaughn Grant (pay special attention at 1:47 in the track for the double tracked bass!) Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello Hello everyone. Welcome to another JAM PACKED Jamstack episode. This is That's My Jamstack the podcast where we ask the best question since sliced bread. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host Brian Robinson and this week, we have a very special guest. I'm pleased to introduce the winner of the Jamstack community creator award from Jamstack Conf 2021 Salma Alam-Naylor. Salma helps developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. She does that via her Twitch streams, YouTube channel and blog. One quick update for the episode, we recorded this prior to Salma joining the Netlify team. So while we mentioned Contentful, in various parts of the episode, Sam is now on the DX team at Netlify. Bryan Robinson 1:04 Alright, Salma, well, thanks for joining us on the show today. Salma Alam-Naylor 1:06 Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:08 Awesome. So tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? What do you do for fun, Salma Alam-Naylor 1:13 I am currently a developer advocate for Contentful. I've also got like kind of other stuff that you do. So you might know me on the internet as white Panther. And I help developers build stuff, learn things and love what they do. I write educational blog posts about web development. I do a lot of live streaming on Twitch, I make YouTube content. And I'm an all round Jamstack enthusiast To be honest, for fun, I mean, I kind of do that for fun as well. But if you want to know about non web dev stuff, I actually love interior design. And I'm moving in the next like two months. So hopefully, when people hear this, they would have actually finally moved house. So I can't wait to get my hand stuck in to that little project. I also like to play cerebral puzzle games with my husband on on a computer, most recently, a game called Super liminal, which is all about like perspective and maths and stuff. It's very good. Bryan Robinson 2:19 I'm gonna jump in real fast. I have a six year old and we were playing super limited together. Nothing about it. I was like, this is super fun. And like we were having good time. He that was really cool. And then it gets creepy. I didn't expect they get super creepy. And he's like, I don't want to play this game anymore. Daddy. We never have to play it again. You're fine. Salma Alam-Naylor 2:38 Yeah, it was a good game. It's a good game. I remember this one bit that when you get on like a roof, and there's the moon. And we were like on the roof thinking this you have to we have to get above the roof because of the weird glitch thing when you turn the light on and off. But it wasn't it was an Easter egg. It wasn't a thing. It was fun. And I'm also, you know, my background is in music. I did a music degree. I was a music teacher. I was a musician. So I still try to play music for fun with my family. And I do want to get back into making music. Actually, I missed that a lot. But so when I move into my new house, I'll have a proper studio purposely for the music. So I think I'm looking forward to that a lot. Bryan Robinson 3:21 That's amazing. So what's your instrument of choice or musical talent of choice, I suppose. Salma Alam-Naylor 3:27 So when I was growing up, and when I was a teacher, my main instruments were piano and flute, but and singing, but I also taught kids how to play in rock bands for a few years. So I was a bass player. I don't really do much bass now. And I did some guitar and played some drums and stuff. But making music now I really like making electronic music mainly. I was also a musical comedian for a few years. Interesting. touring the UK, singing weirdly satirical British political songs. We'd get cancelled now so you can't hear any of it. Bryan Robinson 4:14 Out of curiosity. Is there any comedy in Britain? That's not satirical political comedy? I feel like everything kind of falls into it. Salma Alam-Naylor 4:23 Yeah, it's pretty much there's a lot to satirize in the British political system. But I guess that's for another podcast. Bryan Robinson 4:31 Yeah, sure. Awesome. Yeah. Let's let's maybe not talk about about the Jamstack. He's, he said that you're a Jamstack enthusiast. So what was your entry point into this ecosystem philosophy, what have Salma Alam-Naylor 4:45 you it was actually with Jekyll, the first static site generator many, many years ago, and that was the only one that existed you know, like around 2015 2016 and I had no idea what it was doing. But I was experimenting, I had really no idea that it was part of the Jamstack. At the time, I was just building a website, I had no idea that it was a static website, and really what that meant, but I was building something with liquid templates that compiled into a website. And I was hosting it on GitLab Pages at the time, not GitHub Pages. I was because I used to get lab for work. And so I kind of naturally gravitated towards GitLab at that time. But I guess the ecosystem sucked me in. I really don't know how I went from building my first Jekyll site to where I am now. I have no idea how, how this has happened, or what made it happen. But clearly, the Jamstack has, has a good thing going right. Like, it's fantastic. Bryan Robinson 5:51 So what are you doing right before you started playing with Jekyll, you were at some sort of company doing tech stuff he's mentioned you are you are using GitLab. So what was that like? Salma Alam-Naylor 5:59 So I did a variety of different things. Before I ended up here. I was working for some startups, I was working for a global e commerce company that was using like Java, whether bespoke kind of E commerce system with JSP front ends. I was also before that I was building a new e commerce platform in a startup that was JavaScript based what we're even using PHP, we're using PHP with JavaScript front end. But it was a it was a plain JavaScript front end, it wasn't statically generated, it wasn't using a framework or anything like that. After the global e commerce company, I was actually working for another startup building a React Native app. So like my career actually had nothing to do with the Jamstack. It was all my side projects. Until my last job, I was working at an agency, product agency. And we built quite a lot of things in the team. And actually we started gravitating towards next J S for these quick. They were initially proofs of concept, because next JS was pretty young at the time. But it ended up that next JS was a really scalable front end with a lot of capabilities. So we normally have like a dotnet back end and an extra as front end kind of thing with the API layer in the middle. And that was really my intro into the enterprise levels, scalable, robust, we can build whatever we want with the Jamstack kind of thing. Bryan Robinson 7:38 Alright, so let's fast forward a little bit. That was your last thing, right? How today, are you using the Jamstack philosophies professionally, I mean, obviously, Contentful is pretty, pretty big in that world. But also personally with both your educational stuff and anything else you're doing on the side. Salma Alam-Naylor 7:52 So one of the biggest philosophies that I like to promote the Jamstack is that just do it, just build something and get it live, just build it learn some stuff while you do it, and have a good time. Like, I can try things out without having to over commit to anything on the Jamstack I if I've got an idea for a website, a lot of the time I will get the idea or buy the domain, I will go on my Twitch stream for three hours. And I will build it and release it in that three hours. And that is the joy of the Jamstack. Salma Alam-Naylor 8:05 And what I love about that as well as it's so accessible to developers, because you don't have to over commit or pay for anything at that stage of IDEA inception. And so it's so accessible, and it's so in reach for so many people, for example, dot take dotnet I don't want to like hate on dotnet. It's great. It's a fantastic enterprise solution for enterprise products. But as a developer, as a front end developer, even though the dotnet comes with front end or back end stuff, what do I do when I've built an app? Like how do I put it online? So like I can just hook up a Jamstack hosting platform to my GIT repository, do a git push and great, there it is. It's online on a on a URL, I don't have to buy a domain even it's just there. And it's it's just so beautiful. And it's it really embodies the actual kind of agile kind of continuous delivery methodology as well. Salma Alam-Naylor 9:26 Every commit is a release, every commit is an immutable release. So you can roll back, you can have a look at the history you can you have, you can just click in a UI in like Vercel or Netlify or GitLab. Just click Oh, look at that. That's what I mean and week ago, I can compare that with what I've got now. And, and it scales. You don't even have to worry about scaling. If you get like a big hit on your proof of concept or whatever. And you know, it just enables developers to move fast to try things out to experiment and test Have fun without all the nonsense that developers have to deal with, day in, day out. And it's just a joy. Salma Alam-Naylor 10:09 And I've learned so much like, I never would have thought like, when I was building my like first websites maybe 10 10-12 years ago, my first proper websites, I never would have thought that I would be utilizing a CDN at the edge. And all of these different rendering methods, depending on the data that I needed to serve, auto scaling, immutable deploys, Git integration, infrastructure, serverless functions, you know, it's like a whole ecosystem that lets you try stuff, to see if it's gonna work. And if it does work, you can go further and make it robust. Like one of one of my biggest slogans is also build first engineer later. And that I think, is a really like, core part of the Jamstack. Just get it live and see what happens. Bryan Robinson 11:00 And you can get it live in any number of ways too, right? You can if you're making a content driven thing to begin with, you don't need a CMS. But yes, it takes like a few lines of code tweaked. And your next js, your 11ty, your whatever static site generator, right, like just ingest from somewhere else. And it's good to go? Unknown Speaker 11:19 Yes. It's very exciting. It's very exciting. Like imagine. So this has happened in the all in the last like six years since like, 2015, when the Jamstack kind of first came about, like what's going to happen in the next six years, and the next six years, and the next six years, I actually did. At the Contentful, fast forward conference at the beginning of November, I actually did the keynote with Stephan Judas, about the last 10 years of web development and how Jamstack came about to solve the problems of old school monolith solutions where back end and front end were divided, where everyone was reinventing the wheel the whole time. And the Jamstack has really come to like, solve these problems, where as a front end developer, you don't need all this back end nonsense anymore. You're and and because of that, it's like enabled developers, it's increased their skills is giving them the power is empowering developers to to build stuff that they couldn't have even dreamed of before. And I think that's really, really, like wonderful for the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 12:24 Like I have a four year old. And I can't wait to show him the stuff like he could put a website live. That's just an HTML page and JavaScript file, potentially, you know, on the Jamstack, when he's like, eight years old, you know. And imagine us being able to do that when we were eight. Bryan Robinson 12:46 At like 14, I think I had my first website. And it was like Microsoft front page built like graphical UI, it was, it was quite choice. Yeah, my six year old, I built him a website in a day, he happened to have a piece of art that he brought home from school, that instead of writing his name on it, he had to write his his first first name, and last initial, because that was yet another, another kid in his class with that name. And then he wrote.com At the end, and I said, I bet that domain is open. And it was and like, I threw it together, uploaded the artwork. And then he told me, he's like, I want to like button. And I was like, I bet I could do that. But you have to do three pieces of art every week to to make it so that I'll build that for you. And then like, I was able to walk him through what I done. And he had no real understanding. But it was like, okay, I can. This is simple enough, I can show you and it's Yeah, super low bar. Salma Alam-Naylor 13:43 Yeah, I can't wait. I can't wait for that. It's so empowering. And it's so exciting to see what our children could make one day with, how it's being innovated, and the improvements and the things that are being done on the Jamstack. And Bryan Robinson 13:57 how it kind of opens up into like the the kind of natural open web platform. Yeah, walled garden is not something that you have to buy into. And it allowed, like, I used to teach a journalism class on HTML and CSS. And I was like, look, you'll you can you can do this. And if you do this, you don't have to depend on these other platforms anymore. And like, I would talk about the history of the web and how in the 90s, it was a creator focus space. And in the current state, in fact, like anything from like, 2010 on, it's very consumer based. And so it's like, there's this dichotomy of the web, and the more people that can be creators, the better. Yes, yeah. So we've talked about next JS some, obviously, you work at Contentful. We talked about the olden days of Jekyll and all that good stuff. What would you say is your current jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite product? Or maybe it's a philosophy or framework. What makes you love the Jamstack? Salma Alam-Naylor 14:53 It's sounds really nerdy. But what I like about the Jamstack is the different types. Types of rendering that are available. This is like, this is so ridiculous, but it's like. So obviously, I work for Contentful. Right, and I'm dealing with data like data comes from a CMS. But data is not all created equal. And so there are four types of rendering depending on the data your data needs, like, it's not just about like pages and posts and stuff, like there are some bits of data that are very granular, they might need to be more up to date than the others, because obviously, mainly Jamstack is static first, right? And so but not everything can be static. But not everything needs to be client side. And so that what the Jamstack has now is like these four types of rendering. So back in the old, old web days, everything was server side rendered, right, you you your web request, hit a server that went to the backend that generated from all the logic a, an HTML document and gave it back to the client, right. So we still got server side rendering on the Jamstack, which I think right now is really great for personalization for things like E commerce, and other things. Because I especially talk a lot about using query params with get server side props with NextJs. JS, for those kind of personalized experiences, rather than just serving everything statically to the same as same to everyone. But then we've got the static, so there's, the second one is static generation. So you've got a plain site content site, nothing changes, nothing needs to update it, just serve it as quickly as you can statically do your visitors great. But now we've got some fancy stuff, there's incremental static regeneration, which is based on a cache validation strategy called stale while revalidate. And what this does, especially inside next js is you choose when the server re validates your data. And at certain intervals, and if it is out of date, it will rebuild in the background via serverless functions. And then for the next visitor, it will show it up to date. So that's like good for kind of data that it's great if it's up to date doesn't matter if some people see it if it's out of date. And then you've got distributed persistent rendering, which so if you want the Jamstack to scale, you, you might have 1000s, and 1000s, and 1000s of pages, right from your CMS, your E commerce site or wherever. Now we know that with the Jamstack, a site to go live and be deployed, it needs to be pre built and pre rendered, right, but 1000s and 1000s of pages could take hours to build. And if you want to continuously deploy and be agile and move fast and break stuff, you can't have every single bill taking hours and hours and hours. So distributed percentage rendering, what it does, it lets you choose what pages are pre rendered, and then doesn't pre render the other ones, you could pre render like your top 20 pages or wherever at build time. But then when someone goes to visit a page that hasn't been pre rendered, it gets pre rendered at request time, and then cached at the edge for future requests. So we've moved away from like building static pages and static data on the Jamstack blanket to a flexible model where you can choose when your pages rendered, depending on the type of data that you're serving your visitors and how up to date it needs to be. It sounds really weird, but this is my favorite part of the Jamstack. Bryan Robinson 18:19 So it obviously, right? Because like that's a lot. And like when you when you actually said like my favorite parts, the rendering modes like okay, all right, but no, totally. And like, here's my absolute favorite bit of that entire of that entire conversation, right? You don't have to understand any of what Salma just said, if you're listening, right? Because you can start and you can, like we talked about, like the accessibility of the Jamstack earlier, you can start and you can just upload an HTML file and you're Jamstack. But then you can bring on something like a nextjs or an 11ty or a Gatsby or what have you. And then you're doing a different kind of Jamstack. And then you can bring in, like you said, the incremental static regeneration ISR. We love acronyms. And that uses SWR another accurate acronym, and then you've got DPR. But you can learn those things slowly as you go. And like you said before it, you can build stuff and put it live and have no understanding of any of that and then come back and get a little bit of performance boost or a little bit of build boost or these little things. And you can go Salma Alam-Naylor 19:24 When you need it. You know when it's appropriate when your site needs to scale when you've now got a CMS when you've got different types of data when you convert to use this database or something like that. And it's so flexible. It's not just static sites. It's it's a whole ecosystem that is so far removed from the monolithic way. We used to do things with just everything, everything from the server at request time done, or you know, everything from the CDN or request time static done. It's like there's these combinations Have those but then some more clever stuff that makes your workflow more efficient. That means that you don't need to worry about these things. And it's just like whoever thought of these things. I wish I had thought of those things. Oh, yeah. I'd feel pretty accomplished. Bryan Robinson 20:20 Oh, yeah. And I mean, we'd be having a completely different conversation if either of us were there. But But, but in all seriousness, right, like, the fact that I built my son's website, and it has a like button, I have no clue. Like, I've been doing this a long time, I have no clue how 10 years ago, I would have done that, because I would have had to stand up a server, I would have had to learn PHP or Python, or a server side scripting language, I would have had to do all these things, I would have had to do the JavaScript on the fly on the front end, I wouldn't have done it just pure and simple, I would not have done it. And literally, it was two hours of work 2 serverless functions and low clients are JavaScript and I was done. Salma Alam-Naylor 20:56 Do you remember back in the day when front end development involved, like httpd conf files and things like that, and I had no idea what that meant server configuration, get out of my life, I just want to build some front end with JavaScript, I don't care about that stuff is in my way. And the amount of I used to work on the LAMP stack when I was first starting because I was doing PHP at work. And so like to set up a whole PHP server on your on your local machine with PHP, MyAdmin, and blah, blah, blah, like, I'm not hating on PHP is great. But as a front end developer, you don't want to deal with that. Because that's not what you are an expert in, that's not what you want to do. That's not what makes you happy. It's, you know, it doesn't make me happy, like the four different types of rendering on the Jamstack makes me happy. Bryan Robinson 21:51 Well, and I mean, you get further into that. And you have to think about the DevOps. And like I, I pride myself on being able to find all the edge cases and break everyone's DevOps, that's something that I'm incredibly good at. And it comes from, like, I learned about Vagrant, and, you know, virtual machines on my laptop. And I, I haven't installed a vagrant or virtual machine on my laptop in six years now. And it is so refreshing. Salma Alam-Naylor 22:18 Yes, I remember that used to do that was all I did at work on these big monolith systems and deploy systems. I wonder how far those systems are away from that now. But I wonder if that's still the same, but it's just, there's always, there's big pain points between Windows and Mac, as well. And the Jamstack doesn't really have that, because you're just running some Node in a terminal right to develop locally. And then you're just sending it to the CDN. It's just Bryan Robinson 22:46 that like, like between Linux that you might have your server and Mac the Mac flavor versions, then then you got like title case sensitivity. Like no, no, don't make me think about that. Please. Bryan Robinson 22:59 Let's pivot a little bit. You have a music history. And so I'm very excited now that I've learned that for the next question, which is what is your actual musical jam right now? What's your favorite musician or album or what's playing on a day to day basis for you? Salma Alam-Naylor 23:14 So I think whenever you ask a musician this question, they will always say, the classic developer line it depends. Always It depends. I have I like such a varied bag of music because I used to listen to such a varied bag of music when I was learning music and writing music. I like music from progressive metal to EDM to jazz to folk to weird sounds. A solid favorite band that I will always reach for is Architectes, which is a British metal core band. And me and my husband. I actually met my husband when I joined his band. So we've got like a lot of music in common. It was a progressive metal band long story a long time ago. But the song I have on repeat right now is more on the EDM side. It's called probably no one's ever heard of this. It's called move on by Grant and I love it right? Because another weird nerdy thing. This is a music nerdy thing now. You know how often in pop songs your head double tracked guitars like panned left and right. This song for the first time in my life, I have heard double tracked bass guitars, and they're playing slightly different things. One minute 47 into the song is a feast for your ears. It's amazing to listen to, and I can't stop listening to it because of this double bass track thing. Move on by Grant if you want to hear some nerdy stuff, musically. Bryan Robinson 24:42 Now for that you probably need stereo headphones, right? Yeah, exactly. Get the benefit of that. Yes. Wow. Okay, that's I am not disappointed by the answer in any way shape or form. I learned a lot I didn't even know that was the thing double tracked anything so excellent nerding on that Salma Alam-Naylor 25:01 Yeah, great nerding love it. Bryan Robinson 25:04 Alright, so before we go, is there anything that you would like to promote out into the Jamstack ecosystem, anything, you're doing Contentful anything. Salma Alam-Naylor 25:11 So on my Twitch streams, I stream twice a week. Currently, I always build on the Jamstack. And one of the most challenging projects I'm building is something called Unbreak dot tech, where, and sometimes it's weird to bring these stuff. These sometimes it's weird to bring these things up in these kinds of podcasts. But as a woman in tech on the internet, it's very difficult, full stop, to realize. And sometimes it generally falls on the women and the marginalized people to talk about the issues that we face. However, unbraked dot Tech offers a platform for men to talk to other men, about being a better person and treating women and marginalized people better. So I've been working on that on my stream, I am welcoming contributions from men who want to talk on the matter. And we'll see how it goes. It's a complete experiment. I have no idea. You know, again, I'm using the Jamstack to experiment and see how it goes. So it's all good. It's hosted on Netlify using like Netlify forms, it's built with NextJs. JS. And I work on that every now and then and see where it goes, you can now submit videos as well as articles to the site, and they have captioned I've got captions and all sorts of accessibility stuff going on. So that's the thing. Catch me on twitch twitch.tv/white p four, and three are the Bryan Robinson 26:45 one of the hardest screen names in the business. Salma Alam-Naylor 26:48 Yeah, I regret it holy. Bryan Robinson 26:50 Anyway, definitely check out on what was it Unbreak tech it on Unbreak dot tech unbrick break dye Tech because I have heard way too many stories, and everyone should know the stories and again, the women and the marginalized people have had to tell them enough. So men, let's step up and do a little bit more around that. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:09 I appreciate that. Bryan Robinson 27:10 Salma, thanks so much for joining us on the show today. And I hope you keep doing amazing things, especially with Unbreak dot tech, and Contentful and everything in the Jamstack. And we hope to see some really cool stuff in the future. Salma Alam-Naylor 27:21 Thank you, Bryan. Thanks for having me. Bryan Robinson 27:24 Thanks again to our guest, and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoyed the podcast, be sure to leave a review, rating, Star heart favorite, whatever it is, and your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
…I am committed to the “Table Rush!”

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:14


Yes, I did publish the last two episodes.   We need to be reminded of the basics.  Do the next indicated step.  What platform do I create the questionnaire on and then how do I deliver it?  As soon as it was clear that I had momentum and it was going to be done the next steps opened up.  The next indicated step frees me to commit to the “Table Rush!”Administrative: (See episode transcript below)WATCH the Table Rush Talk Show interviews here: www.TableRushTalkShow.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Zvegintzov  00:02The last two episodes were quite volatile with my emotions it seems.  Very curious to see if I've published them when I get to this episode. I, my coach Vince likes to remind me that one of the great things about well, two things, one is that we need to be reminded, as entrepreneurs, or whatever we're trying to do, we need to be reminded of the basics. Here's a reminder of the basics. Here's a reminder of the basics. And the next indicated step is such a great reminder, do the next indicated step. That's what I'm going to talk about on this episode. And then there was something else what was it? Oh, yes. This is funny. The other thing, which I'll talk about a different day, or perhaps this episode, is he reminds me that information has become commoditized. And the skill set that we can bring to the table is organizing information for people. That effectively all the informations out there a lot of it free, truly, or just about free. So being able to organize it for people and help them get through it is a is a skill set.Mischa Zvegintzov  01:58Yeah, so the next indicated step was in a bunch of turmoil trying to decide on the last episodes if I published them, but alright, what am I doing with this dang podcast and YouTube channel? Am I committed to Table Rush? Or am I going to stay strong with the Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path To Peace. And a lot of that turmoil was i by Tuesday, by the or by Thursday, by the day of this recording, on my to do list with my other coach, Coach, Stephanie. I'm all coached up. Was to have my questionnaire completed. I was creating...I am creating a questionnaire for my, for the, for people that I can help get their webinars and video sales letters together. So I created a questionnaire to gauge where they are, so I can meet them where they are, and then see if I can help them. And yeah, so that I've got, of course, I waited till the last minute on that. Pretty close to the last minute, I'd actually started. You know, over the past, I had two weeks to get it done. And I could have got it done. Day one. But I waited. I did over the two weeks start to look at how I wanted to do it. Was it going to be Google Forms? Was it going to be an alternative delivery method? And then ultimately, what I put it in a funnel? And should I start in a funnel? The question was, do I create the questionnaire in the funnel? Turns out, at least in Click Funnels, it's more effective to create the funnel in an alternate alternative application. And then you put the HTML frame into your funnel. So it in effect looks like it's created. And click funnels. So step one, well, step one, figure out delivery method. Step two, take action. And that already written out or penciled out, and another program notability the general framework of it with most of the questions. So anyhow, I just needed to get it into Google Docs and was it gonna hire someone to do it or learn how to do it and now Next time I'll hire somebody?  So I decided to do it myself super glad I did. I can hire somebody next time... or... I see the power in creating questionnaires.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:12Anyhow yesterday's turmoil was what am I gonna do? Like do I want to go old podcast name different avatar? Or you know different objective for the avatar? Let's say that avatar equals perfect customer. So I think I'm shifting objective of the perfect customer. I like that that's a great way to say that.  Same avatar new objective. Ooh, that's good. Or maybe same avatar in a different space?  I don't know doesn't matter. All I know is this as soon as I was pretty much completed with the questionnaire... and it took all day yesterday and I've been working on that a little today as I still have till noon pacific standard time to get it done. But for all intents and purposes it is done just doing little minor editing. But as soon as it was clear that I had momentum and it was going to be done the next steps opened up. Or the vision for next for next indicated step coalesced and I think that's so cool and so powerful. Mischa Zvegintzov  06:47Which also leads me to... I want to talk about my creative process.  And how the the the creative process... the shortening...in a good way.  Meaning the time from inspiration to creation and fruition... the pain loop shortening.  There's pain in there for me.  So there's your open loop.  Anyway, back to the next indicated step. Mischa Zvegintzov  07:17Once I had that the Google Form questionnaire done effectively my mind was flooded with new inspiration for Table Rush for interviewing next steps and it was not towards Bitch Slap and God bless the Bitch Slap it was like a Bitch SlapI got one hey don't forget focus on the next indicated step it's the next indicated set man I was future tripping and and all sorts of psychic pain. When get the next indicated step done. So as of this recording I am committed to the Table Rush. The Table Rush perhaps marketing and sales show. It's definitely going to be Table Rush tagline not sure yet. Oh, marketing and sales talk show. And in brackets, bracket... in bracket, pitch section...exit bracket "The Table Rush marketing, sales, marketing and sales Talk Show and pitch session". Or it might be build your way. Selling one to many something like that. I don't know definitely Table Rush enough out of neon babbling. Future episodes are going to be organizing information as a skill set. And what was the other one? Can't remember.

On Top of PR
What to ask before hiring a PR agency with Jason Mudd

On Top of PR

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 14:58


Five things you'll learn from this episode:The role of trust in a relationship with a PR agencyThe importance of enjoying who you work withHow to verify that an agency can do what needs to be doneWhy you should pay attention to what an agency talks about on their websiteHow to determine where you fit in on a list of clientsQuotables“You have to wonder, is this company in a position to grow with us or grow into us, or are we better off finding a company that already has that type of experience and can demonstrate it in their portfolio and case study?” — @jasonmudd9“Life is too short to work with people and companies and organizations that you're not excited about doing business with.” — @jasonmudd9“If you're not finding them talking about it actively, then they're probably not practicing it actively.” — @jasonmudd9“You wanna make sure you're not gonna be their biggest client, and you wanna make sure you're not gonna be their smallest client.” — @jasonmudd9About Jason MuddJason Mudd, APR, is a trusted adviser and dynamic strategist for some of America's most admired brands. Since 1994, he's worked with American Airlines, Budweiser, Dave & Buster's, H&R Block, Hilton, HP, Miller Lite, New York Life, Pizza Hut, Southern Comfort, and Verizon. He founded Axia in July 2002. Forbes named Axia as one of America's Best PR Agencies.Clients love Jason's passion, innovation, candor, commitment, and award-winning team. In an increasingly tech-forward world, Jason's grasp of technological demands on companies provides his clients in multiple sectors a unique advantage toward reaching their top audiences. After teaching himself HTML in 1994, Jason helped pioneer internet marketing strategies as an early adopter of e-commerce, search engine optimization (SEO), and social media, inspiring tech giants like Yahoo.At Axia, Jason attracts, develops, retains, innovates, and leads top PR talent and clients. He oversees strategic communications for the firm's national clients and provides high-level consultations to client leadership teams at billion-dollar global brands, both business-to-business and business-to-consumer, including spokesperson training, crisis communications management, analytics, social media, online reputation management, and more.Guest's contact info and resources:Jason Mudd's Twitter Jason Mudd's LinkedIn More about Jason on APR Additional Resources:How to fire your PR firm eBookHiring a PR firm eBook PR firm cost calculator  Episode recorded: October 7, 2021Sponsored by:On Top of PR is produced by Axia Public Relations, named by Forbes as one of America's Best PR Agencies. Axia is an expert PR firm for national brands.On Top of PR is sponsored by ReviewMaxer, the platform for monitoring, improving, and promoting online customer reviews.Burrelles has a special offer for On Top of PR fans. Check it out at burrelles.com/ontopofpr.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/OnTopofPR)

Entreprendre dans la mode
News & Analysis avec Viviane Lipskier de BrandAlchimy — Les tendances à venir pour accueillir 2022 à bras ouverts

Entreprendre dans la mode

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 60:58


Pour commencer cette nouvelle année, quoi de mieux qu'un épisode avec Viviane Lipskier ! Viviane est la fondatrice de Brandalchimy, elle est l'expert DNVB en France et accompagne les marques à repenser leur business model dans l'économie Direct to Consumer (D2C). Elle est l'auteure des « DNVB : les surdouées du commerce digital ». Aujourd'hui, on la retrouve pour parler des tendances de la nouvelle année. Après avoir passé des mois chez soi en tenue d'intérieur et pour la plupart en télétravail, que nous annonce 2022 ? Entre micro et macro tendances, identifier et analyser ces signaux de société s'avèrent plus que nécessaire si on veut ancrer sa marque dans l'air du temps. On s'intéresse plus particulièrement dans cet épisode aux micro tendances. Au programme, un décryptage complet sur les sujets qui animent notre quotidien : mode, beauté, digital, retail, carrières, food, bien-être et design. Une année qui se veut sous le signe de la nostalgie avec notamment le retour des années 90 dans la mode, l'expérience dans le retail et sur le plan de l'innovation, de nouvelles façons d'éduquer son public et de médiatiser son contenu. Viviane nous donne les clés pour comprendre ces tendances et ainsi les adapter pour faire évoluer l'activité de son entreprise, innover et élargir sa cible. «Il y a une convergence des marques, des médias, des créateurs de contenus où finalement le contenu de marque devient multisensoriel et dépasse le côté promotionnel.» Ce que vous allez apprendre dans cet épisode : Pourquoi suivre les tendances 2022 ? La définition d'une tendance et sa gestion Mégatendances et micro tendances Les tendances mode et beauté Les tendances retail Les réseaux sociaux comme plateformes de narration Quels signaux pour la carrière et l'éducation Les tendances food Les tendances bien-être Les tendances design «Suivre les tendances permet à ta marque d'évoluer dans le temps.» «71% des jeunes adultes sont prêts à changer de job et gagner moins d'argent s'ils trouvent plus de sens dans une nouvelle vie professionnelle.» «Les réseaux sociaux ont gagné du terrain en tant qu'outil éducatif et on en est qu'au début.» N'oubliez pas de vous inscrire à la newsletter de Entreprendre Dans La Mode, les industries créatives et l'art de vivre sur www.entreprendredanslamode.com Aussi, si vous souhaitez me contacter ou me suggérer de nouveaux invités, vous pouvez le faire sur Instagram sous le pseudonyme @entreprendredanslamode Enfin, le plus important : laissez-moi un avis sur Apple Podcast ou iTunes, 5 étoiles de préférence ; cela m'aide à faire connaître le podcast à plus de monde et me motive à faire de meilleures interviews ! Merci de soutenir ce podcast et à bientôt pour un nouvel épisode ! Références: Les tendances selon BlackRock L'innovation technologique : https://www.blackrock.com/fr/intermediaries/themes/mega-tendances/innovations-technologiques Évolutions démographiques et sociales : https://www.blackrock.com/fr/intermediaries/themes/mega-tendances/evolutions-demographiques-et-sociales L'urbanisation rapide : https://www.blackrock.com/fr/intermediaries/themes/mega-tendances/urbanisation Changement climatique et pénurie de ressources : https://www.blackrock.com/fr/intermediaries/themes/mega-tendances/changement-climatique-et-rarete-des-ressources Richesse des pays émergents : https://www.blackrock.com/fr/intermediaries/themes/mega-tendances/un-nouveau-rapport-de-force-economique Factfulness Hans Rosling Lauren Elyse@laur_elyse : https://www.pinterest.fr/laur_elyse/_created/?utm_source=PBS_Predicts2022_OhMyGoth&utm_campaign=PinterestPredicts2022&utm_medium=PBS&utm_pai=Advertiser Pinterest trends report : https://business.pinterest.com/fr/pinterest-predicts/ Billie Eilish Perfume : https://www.glossy.co/beauty/billie-eilish-is-launching-a-celebrity-perfume-people-will-actually-care-about/ Nail art @tathsrodrigues : https://www.pinterest.fr/tathsrodrigues/_created/?utm_source=PBS_Predicts2022_Nailscapes&utm_campaign=PinterestPredicts2022&utm_medium=PBS&utm_pai=Advertiser Hairecare #56 : https://www.wundermanthompson.com/insight/trend-check-best-of-our-2021-predictions-brands-marketing-food-drink-beauty-and-retail?j=75100&sfmc_sub=45072414&l=65_HTML&u=4957986&mid=110005021&jb=10013 Deciem - The Ordinary : https://deciem.com/en-fr/theordinary Pacifica Beauty : https://www.pacificabeauty.com We are social : https://thinkforward.wearesocial.com/in-feed-syllabuses.html Funk : https://www.funk.net @spainsays : https://www.instagram.com/spainsays/?hl=fr

ライコンの人生構想ラジオ
【朝配信】#36稼ぐまちが地方を変える「民間の営業力が産業と雇用を生み出す」 from Radiotalk

ライコンの人生構想ラジオ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 12:01


おはようございます☀ 1日の始まりに ライコン・ラジオ✨ 今日もステキな一日を〜✨ いってらっしゃい‍♂️ 【ライコンの活動一覧】は、 HTML名刺にまとめてます。 プロフィールのリンクから 飛べるようにしてます まちづくり幻想 (著者:木下斉) #木下斉 #稼ぐまちが地方を変える #朝活 #地方創生 #地域おこし協力隊 #奄美大島

Our Hometown News
Job Opening: Website Production Representative - REMOTE - Part Time

Our Hometown News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 1:15


Website Production Representative - REMOTE - Part Time Position Summary: The Production Representative is responsible for publishing editorial and advertising content to community newspaper websites. Essential Tasks/Responsibilities: Execute a content extraction process on newspaper PDF files to convert the articles and ads to HTML and publish to a WordPress Website. Exercise quality control on content published to website. Correct publishing errors using the WordPress article editor. Must be available to work on Tuesdays and Wednesdays 3pm to midnight EST, and commit to a minimum of 20 hours per week. Work Non-traditional hours (late nights/early mornings) - great second job opportunity...Article LinkLet us know your thoughts about this episode by reaching out on Social Media!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ourhometownincInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ourhometownwebpublishing/Twitter: https://twitter.com/ourhometownincLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/our-hometown-com/..........Our Hometown Web Publishing is The Last Newspaper CMS & Website You'll Ever Need.  We help you generate revenue, engage with readers, and increase efficiency with Our Hometown's Digital & PrePress CMS features to fit your needs & budget.OHT's Web Publishing Platform is:-Powered with WordPress-Hosted on Amazon Web Services-Integrated with Adobe InDesign & Google Drivehttps://our-hometown.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKw6KpKUiQkWldrX2-J1Kag?view_as=subscriberOur-Hometown can be reached via email for comments or questions at: ops@Our-Hometown.com

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing
[Ep89] - Re-activate Previously Disapproved Google Ads

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 8:22


1. Put Your Product At The Top Using Google Business Profile - Google Business Profile, formerly Google My Business, has a new feature in the products section that lets you mark a product as “special.” After you mark a product as special, that product will be moved to the top of the products you listed in your Google Business Profile listing.2. Like Bing, Does Google Have A Limit On Crawling Long pages? - Google does have a limit but most pages won't come to that limit. Google's John Mueller said on Twitter when it comes to really large HTML file sizes, Google can handle it - and you should not worry about it. John responded, "we don't have a documented limit, last I saw someone check it was 10's-100's of MB, so I wouldn't worry about that." John did add that it might impact your page speed and core web vitals metrics. He said, "giant HTML pages do slow things down, so it's probably still something to keep on your to-do list."3. Google: No Difference In SEO Value Between Nofollow, UGC, Or Sponsored Link Attributes - Google supports no-follow, UGC, and sponsored link attributes. Someone asked John Muller if one is better than the other. John responded on Twitter "there's no practical difference in terms of "SEO-value" for the site you're linking to." They all do the same thing - which is not pass any link value from the source page. 4. Re-activate Previously Disapproved Google Ads - Google now allows you to reactivate an ad that was once disapproved because of a past violation but now that ad is no longer disapproved because Google changed its Ad policy. But Google doesn't just automatically flip the ad on fully because you might not expect a past ad that was disapproved before would activate on its own and thus use your budget. So Google notifies you in the console about this as “Eligible (Limited) Policy (Past Violation)”Here is how Google defines past violations "Google continuously re-reviews ads to ensure they conform with our policies. During the standard re-review process, our system may identify disapproved ads that no longer violate our policies. If your ad was disapproved for an extended period of time and our enforcement system later decides that the policy no longer applies, we may keep the ad disapproved and classify the ad as “Past Violation”. We do this to prevent you from unintentionally exhausting spending on old ads. In order to re-activate your ads, please follow the steps below."

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
496: 2022 Predictions

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 48:20


We're talking about our predictions for web tech in 2022: Container queries, web3, React, HTML elements, CSS compatibility, utility frameworks, designer and developer tooling, multiple frameworks, and more episodes of ShopTalk Show!

API Busters
Seeing the forest and the trees in 2022

API Busters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 55:29


Thanks to Lob.com for sponsoring APIs You Won't hate - join the lobster pod at https://www.lob.com/careers

ライコンの人生構想ラジオ
【朝配信】#35稼ぐまちが地方を変える「民間の知恵が活かせる運営方法を」 from Radiotalk

ライコンの人生構想ラジオ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 11:28


おはようございます☀ 1日の始まりに ライコン・ラジオ✨ 今日もステキな一日を〜✨ いってらっしゃい‍♂️ 【ライコンの活動一覧】は、 HTML名刺にまとめてます。 プロフィールのリンクから 飛べるようにしてます まちづくり幻想 (著者:木下斉) #木下斉 #稼ぐまちが地方を変える #朝活 #地方創生 #地域おこし協力隊 #奄美大島

The Informed Life
Dan Klyn on the BASIC Framework

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 35:51


Dan Klyn is co-founder of The Understanding Group, an information architecture consultancy based in Michigan. Dan has also created useful and influential IA frameworks, and in this conversation, we focus on his latest: the BASIC framework. If you're enjoying the show, please rate or review it in Apple's Podcasts directory: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-informed-life/id1450117117?itsct=podcast_box&itscg=30200 Show notes Dan Klyn The Understanding Group The BASIC framework Chris Farnum Peter Morville Louis Rosenfeld Andreas Resmini Richard Saul Wurman Bob Royce Edith Farnsworth House Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Kimbell Art Museum Louis Kahn Renzo Piano Brian Eno Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Dan, welcome to the show. Dan: Thank you. Jorge: It is such a pleasure to have you here. As I was telling you before we started recording, you're one of the people that I originally thought of having as a guest on the show, when I first conceived of the show. I am constantly inspired and just amazed by the contributions you've brought to our field of information architecture. And I'm honored to have you on the show and looking forward to hearing about you. In particular, about a framework that you've been sharing recently. About Dan Jorge: But before we get into that, I'm hoping that you will tell us about yourself. Who are you, Dan? Dan: Sure. Let's see... I was a fat baby. I think the reason that I have the pleasure of talking with you today... we can blame Chris Farnham, who is an information architect in Southeast Michigan. I went to a conference about information architecture in 2009. My first professional conference had ever been to in any field, and I didn't know if I was particularly welcome or fit well into the field of information architecture, but I had a mentor who encouraged me and that was Peter Morville. So Chris Farnham and Peter Morville, these two guys from Ann Arbor are the only people I thought I knew at this conference, which was true for about five minutes. And as we were walking to the opening reception, Chris said, "Hey, those two guys walking in front of us... those guys are architect-architects. Like, you know, like what you're interested in, Klyn!" Because even back then, the architecture part of information architecture is what I was mostly interested in. And walking in front of me on the way to this opening reception at the IA Summit, as it was called back then was Jorge Arango and Andreas Resmini. And I never talked to Chris again for four or five years, I think. And I have held fast to Jorge and Andreas ever since. And I'm so grateful to have had... I've been given by you guys permission to be as excited as I am about the architecture part of information architecture. Which is so different than my experience with other professionals in the built environment. When I started enthusing about information architecture and the ways that I think what makes places good for people in the built environment has something immediately relevant for us to learn from, as people who make digital products and services.... they're not into it. They scold me for not having consulted the correct sources. Or having the wrong opinions about some buildings or what have you. And you and Andreas both welcomed my amateurism, at a time when you could have just, you know... I don't know! So that's why I'm here. Hi, my name is Dan Klyn. I'm an information architect and I am fascinated by — I am on fire about — the ways that architecture in the built environment can teach us how to do things with digital products and services. And any second now, metaverse-icle products and services and such. So that's what I'm interested. I'm interested in the spatiality of meaning. That is a mouthful that nobody wants to hear, but that's how I say it sometimes. And I have drawn most of my ways of thinking about and seeing this from an increasingly intensive pursuit of Richard Saul Wurman from a biographical standpoint. I figured if I could learn everything that he knows about information architecture, then that would be pretty good. So I've been trying to turn him upside down and shake him, and catch what comes out of his pockets for about seven years or so now. So, that's what I do. Jorge: That's a great intro and I feel like this episode is turning into the Jorge and Dan mutual appreciation society. But I think that we can't wrap up the intro without also naming the fact that you are a co-founder of The Understanding Group, Dan: right? The Understanding Group Dan: That's right. Yes! And Mr. Wurman having been so essential to the founding of our company. Bob Royce and I, when he... he as a serial entrepreneur was in the school of information and library studies at the same time that Peter and Lou were back in the day. And so, as somebody from a business development background standpoint, interested in information architecture, his interest in it went all the way back to Richard Saul Wurman. And the first time I saw Richard in person was a speech that he gave at the University of Michigan and the only person that I knew in the audience and we sat right next to each other right in the front row is Bob Royce. So yeah, together, our enthusiasm for information architecture, digital strategy... whatever ways that we can apply architectural thinking to usually large-scale software and information systems, that's what we wanted to start a company to focus on. And certainly we were inspired by and got to learn through their advice. Peter and Lou having operated the world's first really large scale information architecture consultancy, which was called Argus, which operated back in the late 1990s and disbanded, about the same time that a lot of things did in March of 2001. Yeah, there's probably a way that you could have a business that focuses on information architecture and that... we want it to be that. So, that was 10 years ago and TUG continues to be among the... if you were to say, "Hey, who should we get to help us with information architecture?" people would probably say, Jorge Arango, Abby Covert. An aspiration that we're just pleased that we are often in that same sort of three or four things that you would just know about when it comes to taking on significant information architectural challenges in software and digital products and services, yeah! That's what we've become. "The spatiality of meaning" Jorge: I want to circle back to this phrase, "the spatiality of meaning." And you referenced being inspired by Mr. Wurman. And you also talked about "Being on fire about the architecture of the built environment," and talking about gravitating to Andreas and myself at that first information architecture summit. And one thing that the three of us have in common, the three of us being Mr. Wurman, Andreas, and myself, is that our background is in building architecture. But that is not your background, right? Dan: Correct. Library science over here. Jorge: Library science. So, I'm wondering what drew you to the architecture of the built environment? Dan: It's gonna sound... it's exactly... think of the most boring cliche way to answer your question and that's the answer. Since I was a little boy, I had a Crayola drafting set of a T-square and a triangle. And big paper. And my parents got me a tilty desk. Like it was the only thing I knew that I wanted it to be until I didn't think that I could because I was bad at math. So, for as long as I can remember, I wanted to make the shapes that I make on paper turn into an experience that people could have. Especially me, but other people may be also. And since then, and especially since becoming a consultant who travels a lot, I have had an extraordinary opportunity to go to buildings. And I have had my cognition, my heart rate, my pulse, my skin temperature... I have been physically changed by every different kind of place that I've been to. And by doing that on purpose, that's where the BASIC Framework comes from is an awareness that I developed at some point that what these buildings do is they are machines that uniquely change our human experience by changing our blood pressure and our cognition and our pulse. And the effects that it uses are both, you know, the physics of the earth, the density of the walls... if you're in a crypt of a cathedral and the density of the walls is two feet thick and it is granite, the air pressure changes in there make what your body can... what's possible for you to experience has been concrete-ized literally in ways that are just extraordinary. And so, by putting myself in so many of these different places, and yes, I've catered to my list of initially is canonical buildings that architects who control what is considered to be a good building in the Western tradition, right? But that's the kind of list that I started from. And by going to as many of these places as possible, continually re-energizing and re-believing in reifying the reality... not some neat-o idea that I choose to have, but an actual experience that is undeniable that the way that these places have been set up through the arrangement of material and space and through the arrangement of the information that is either encoded in that material or inscribed on that material, the situatedness of things in space changes how we... how we experience things. The radical architect, Christopher Alexander — people scoff! Like, spit their coffee out when he says stuff like that he knows how to make God appear in a field. But that's... I think also a part of why I've been so interested in this is having been raised in a deeply religious context and hearing about power that people can have access to and experiences with and transformation, transfiguration, transubstantiation, immanence... that I've had those experiences. And they're not so much with sermons of words — it's sermons in stone that really changed my whole life. So, now I seek out experiences in places so that I can understand better how to somehow transfer or remember at a minimum, all of the different ways that I've been made to feel through experiences with architectures. And then, how can I tap into that at some other time for some other purpose. That's how I've been trying to rationalize such the luxurious experience of going to so many kick-ass buildings. Jorge: Well, that was beautifully put and I'll reflect it back to you. What I heard there is that this phrase, "the spatiality of meaning," at least part of it, has to do with the fact that buildings play a functional role in our lives, right? Like they keep us dry and warm — you know, safe from external conditions. But there's this other role that they can play — at least some buildings can play — which has to do with somehow moving us, reminding us of perhaps higher states of being somehow. And the question is... you and I both work on architecting experiences that people have mostly within the confines of the small glass rectangles that we carry around in our pockets. And what's the connection between these — if any — between these transcendent experiences that you have when walking into a special place and the sort of experience that you can have through a digital artifact? Back to screens Dan: Well, I'm trying to think about it in terms of the last thing that I worked on or some real case in point. And I'm thinking about an app that I've been working on that has all kinds of different functionality. And there are ideas about what does prominence mean? So, imagine that this app that has all sorts of different kinds of functions, that there's a giant global organization, and there are people who are mapped to those functions and that they all feel like their thing needs to be the most important and therefore the most prominent or vice versa. So, there's a space race, or there's a competition for the most opportune positions on screens in this screen-iverse that they operate. And finding an order that both works from the, "I'm a brain in a jar," and there are semantic categories and there are things... there's knowledge in the world, not just in my head. And on the basis of knowledge in the world and on figuring things out from a sense-making standpoint, there's no right way. But there are good ways. And so what I'm trying to learn from the built environment, every location in the built environment is special. So, it's not so much that I've been to special places and then, "oh crap. What do you do when you're working on something quotidian? Something that's just every day." It's the idea that every place is charged with wonder. Every... everything is amazing. Because look at it! There it is! People made that! And so, trying to help this organization, this global organization with all these poor people who are, you know, if their thing is high up on the screen, then they win. Trying to posit order for how to situate all of those things in space that's both good for the organization that they can continue to operate as an organization and as a business. It's good for people who have to use it because it isn't like, "oh! Where is the blank?" And also then the trifecta is: and could all of this be key to our embodiment as human beings? And so, we came up with a way to position proprioceptively. Imagine yourself looking at your phone screen. There's left, right, up, down. To make left and right and up and down mean something, other than "most important," "least important," or "most prominent" and "least prominent." So, things of this nature you can expect to find them over to the left. Things of that other nature you can expect to find those to the right. And governance... a way of working with the organization to help diffuse the person with the highest tolerance for discomfort wins, for there to be reasons for belonging and space and place that everybody can understand, and that, when people follow it, it creates more wellbeing and prosperity. It sounds like fantasy, but that's really what we get to do when we're doing it right. And it's great! And I couldn't do it if I didn't have these experiences in my own body and have felt and believed in the pleasure and the learnability and the... to reliably be able to reach over here and get something because you know it's going to be there. And on what basis, other than, "well, that's where it always was." Jorge: What I'm getting from what you're saying there is that in both cases, in both the physical environment than these information environments, there is the possibility of a higher level of order that might bring coherence to what might otherwise be forces that are pulling the experience into different directions, that make it incoherent, right? Dan: That's right. The BASIC framework Jorge: And with that in mind I wanted to ask you... during your career, you've shared a few frameworks that have been influential and helped us see the type of work that we do in different ways. And recently you've shared a draft of a framework that is new to me at least, called BASIC. And it seems to me to be an effort in this direction of providing kind of a framework for order and coherence. Dan: Yes. Jorge: And I was hoping that you would tell us about the BASIC framework. What is it? Dan: I am learning along with everybody else what it is. That's one of the risks! When you put something out there that isn't done yet, that's the reason to do something like that. And so, having put it out there not entirely baked, and then asking for and eliciting feedback... one of the first most powerful pieces of feedback that I got after presenting it for the first time at a meetup online was from a colleague in the UK who posited that what BASIC is, is it's about where you as the designer... it gives you five vantage points into the problem space. It's like, "where should I stand to see the thing that would be good to notice?" So, that's one way to start explaining it is: it's an easy-to-remember acronym that gives you five ways to have a posture vis-a-vis some kind of a complex system. And if you stand in these five places, and if you ask some of the questions that I've provided with each of those postures, then possibly you will see the architecture of the thing. So, that's really the goal. And one of the ways that I came to make it, was a friend of mine... we went on a field trip. We went to the Edith Farnsworth house in Plano, Illinois by Mies van der Rohe. And we were so lucky! It was in the winter and we were the only ones on the tour. So we had a whole hour with the docent. Couldn't go in because it was winter, have since of rectified that. Have been back with the same friend and we got to go inside. But first time we're just outdoors, in the snow, circling the Edith Farnsworth house. And then afterward, I shared the photos that I took. And my friend noted that... he looked at the photos that he... we went to the same place, we took many of the same pictures. But that there was something going on in the pictures that I was taking that he wanted to know about, because it seemed like I was accessing different parts of the same experience. And whether it was just purely on the basis of the otherness of the what... something that somebody else is doing it in the same place, you wonder what that is? It's not... I don't believe it's because I have superior aesthetic judgements or anything like that. I think it has to do though with having developed a set of postures for when I'm trying to relate to buildings first of all, in order to see the right stuff. By my own internal compass, the right stuff. And then, talking this out with my friend and then him encouraging me to do something with it because it seemed like it could be learnable. Like, if I stood there and if I cocked my head that way, I would see it too. So, that's what it is. It's postures that you can use. Questions... So, the first one is boundaries. And if you didn't do any of the other elements, if you found a way to perceive the boundaries... and where was the boundary before where it is now, and who gets to move the... just some really dumb questions about boundaries and where one material stops and another begins is an especially potent thing to notice in buildings. But whether it's buildings or an intranet, the boundaries. How did they get here? Where were they before? Is there a plan to make there be different boundaries? Do you see any evidence of, you know, the ghost traces of where things used to be, or where they're fixing to go? And then you can go right on down the line. And the second one, let's see, what is the second one? You've got the book there, you tell me! Jorge: There is a little booklet that you can print out and I'm holding one in my hands. So, the first one is boundaries. The second one is associations. Dan: Yes. Perfect! So, what do we associate a stepped gable with in the built environment? I'm Dutch. If you go to Holland, Michigan, nearby where I live, there are these buildings that were built within the last 20 years that have these stepped gables not because they serve any functional purpose, but because they remind everybody who lives there, that many of the people here have Dutch heritage, and that that's how the buildings look. So there are direct associations like that. There are more diffused associations, like the kind... does it link to a PDF? You associate that differently than if it's to HTML page, then if it's a video. So just associations. The A, S... Situatedness. Why is anything where it is? If you go to the Kimbell Museum in Fort Worth, Texas — which I encourage you to do — there has been an expansion to that museum. It was originally by Louis Kahn opened in 1972, the year I was born. An expansion to the museum was done by Renzo Piano in the nineties. You now enter the Kimbell from the back, relative to where the architect imagined you would enter the building. So just little... why is anything where it is gives you access to so many architectural decisions that were made in the environment. And then the last two are twinned. And probably I'm too in love with BASIC because it's so easy to remember and I want it to be basic like food-hole, air-hole, dumb-basic. But the last two are invariants. So, what are the forces in the environment that don't change or that seem like they don't change? Brian Eno has wisely said that repetition is a form of change. So you have to be careful with this one. And that's why it is paired with cycles. And those two postures, those two places to stand relative to some complex system... if you were able to perceive what was invariant in the environment, that would explain to you why it shows up the way that it does and each of these elements in the model has a building that I've been to. They're all in the United States so far, and the example cartoon of a building for invariance is a garage I saw in Seattle. Where I live in Michigan, the roofs are a pointy, peaked roof, like kids around here would draw a picture of a house. But in Seattle, there's a shape of a roof that is inverted to catch the rain because it is on a steep hill, in a microclimate that is a rainforest basically. So, it's an invariant. There's so much water there, you're going to change the shape of the roof to rise to channel those forces better. And that was the consequence... consequence to that, a million other decisions about the building. And then cycle, the last one, you can plug that one into what's invariant. In Michigan, we have four seasons. In Seattle, they have maybe two. And so, by looking at what has the system done to anticipate cyclical change in the environment that it's in... put all those five postures together, ask a question from each one, and I feel pretty good that you're not talking about the design so much as you're talking about the architecture of the system. Jorge: What attracts me so much about this framework is that it takes a systemic lens at examining the... or a set of lenses, right? To your point, these are different vantage points from which you can examine the system. And although it is grounded in architecture, as in built architecture — and like you said, the booklet includes drawings of buildings as illustrations of these various lenses — they seem applicable to other types of things that might be architected, right? Like this notion that you can examine the system through the perspective of what distinctions does it manifest, versus what perhaps memories, cultural or otherwise, it triggers, right? Like those are very different perspectives that are part of architected systems, regardless of whether they are buildings or what have you. Dan: That's right. And the caveat here with any methods that I've developed, if you're trying to apply them, it has to be in an architectural context where the nature of the change that is expected or at least possible? Is more than an increment. It can be executed incrementally but the nature of the change... if you're looking for recommendations about how to change the architecture, it should be safe to presume that those kinds of changes are harder to do, possibly take more time, and are more costly because they are more consequential. And so, if people are just making shit, then this framework won't help you because there isn't a reason for everything that was done. And that is... I'm so glad that we've got to here and maybe because of time, we might land here or start landing here, is: the built environment is such a terrific teacher because almost always, except now, every decision that was made is because of a reason. And the traceability of every move that is made to a reason, you need to do that in design too, if you're doing it right. But when you're talking about architecture what that means is that it's being taken on and thought of systemically. And if the thing is being made in a way where it doesn't care about being systemic, then these lenses won't help you because it just is the way that it is because it is. This all presumes total accountability for every move that you make as a recommender of changes to an environment. And I've recommended changes to a digital environment that have made it so that people's jobs went away. I'm glad that I haven't worked on products and services where the changes I've recommended have caused harm to people, that I know of, but it's certainly possible. And as we enter into this metaverse time of everything being part of the experiences that we work on, I think having a framework like this is also helpful because it might check an impulsive feeling of, "oh, I get it." Or, "I've seen it." Or, "I know what it is." Or, "clearly the solution is..." Maybe this framework would help you go slower and not move with so much certainty. Maybe these are five ways to undermine the decision that you were about to make. And I would be good with that, in most cases. Jorge: How do you keep that from paralyzing you altogether? Because when you say you have full accountability over a thing, like... Dan: It all depends on having extraordinary clients. Without clients who are willing to work in that fashion... I mean, whether you want to take maximum accountability for your recommendations or not, Jorge: I can see what you mean, but I can also understand how that sense would or could paralyze you as a designer, right? So, how do you keep the dance going? Responsibility Dan: It's a two way street and if the client isn't playing along and giving you that accountability and that responsibility, then you're not actually... you know, it's not actually happening. So, I think it absolutely depends on having the right clients and TUG has been so fortunate to have not prospered enough to have clients that aren't the right kind. It's weird to engage with information architects to affect change to complex digital products and services. And I think we show up... weird enough, where we've scared away the ones who wouldn't be a good partner with us in wanting to have that level of accountability, that level of traceability for the recommendations that we make. Because it requires that the stakeholders be super accountable to what they want, because you're going to get it, right? Like, that's what I'm saying is, as your architect, if you show me your intent, if you let me make a model of your intent and then the model is more or less correct, then I can make a whole bunch of decisions about the situatedness of things in your space that will deliver against that intent. So God help you if you don't know what you want. Because I need that in order to make decisions on your... with you, not on your behalf. When we started TUG a long time ago, we decided the word agency must not be the word for... We don't want to borrow anyone's agency for money for a couple of months and then give it back to them. They need to keep their agency all along the way to keep instructing us and intending back when we make our moves to make sure that things stay good. So, yeah, it's all about having the right clients and quite frankly, it has a lot to do with my own personal choices over the last year or so to get away from consulting as much as I personally can, and be more in the mode of scholarship and writing because I don't know how much longer the client world is going to be able to make room for the kinds of work that I personally want to do. Closing Jorge: Well Dan, I would love to hear more about what that might be. And I would like to extend you an invitation to do another recording with me, if you are open to it, to explore that and the notion of architecting the thing that architects the thing, somehow, right? Because that's what is implied in what you're saying, I think. But for now, where can folks follow up with you? Dan: Well, I think maybe BASIC would be a good way to start. So if you go to understandinggroup.com/basic, you can download a PDF of the most recent version of the little mini booklet. I've created an instructional video for how to cut and fold said booklet so that it has its maximum booklet-iness for you when you make it. And from there I... yeah, I'm omni-available, except through Facebook, WhatsApp, or Instagram. Jorge: You're not going Meta. Dan: I would accept money from Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp to research the potential for harm to human beings, through what they intend to do in the so-called metaverse. But I'm not willing to use their products. Jorge: It sounds like that might yet be another reason for us to have a second conversation here. But I'll just allude to it because I'll include links to the stuff that you've been discussing on the show. And, I'll just reiterate that the booklet is beautiful, simple, useful. I have one printed out and keep it on my desk. So, I encourage folks to check it out. Thank you, Dan, for... Dan: The only thing better than that for me Jorge, is if I could be little and be there on your desk instead of the booklet, but that's... I'd love that. Jorge: I can see you on a little screen here. On a little window in my screen, so... it's not the same, but it's... it'll have to do for now. Well, thank you so much for being with us, Dan. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. Dan: Let's talk again.

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaching the Coding Gates with Anil Dash

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:03


About AnilAnil Dash is the CEO of Glitch, the friendly developer community where coders collaborate to create and share millions of web apps. He is a recognized advocate for more ethical tech through his work as an entrepreneur and writer. He serves as a board member for organizations like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the leading nonprofit defending digital privacy and expression, Data & Society Research Institute, which researches the cutting edge of tech's impact on society, and The Markup, the nonprofit investigative newsroom that pushes for tech accountability. Dash was an advisor to the Obama White House's Office of Digital Strategy, served for a decade on the board of Stack Overflow, the world's largest community for coders, and today advises key startups and non-profits including the Lower East Side Girls Club, Medium, The Human Utility, DonorsChoose and Project Include.As a writer and artist, Dash has been a contributing editor and monthly columnist for Wired, written for publications like The Atlantic and Businessweek, co-created one of the first implementations of the blockchain technology now known as NFTs, had his works exhibited in the New Museum of Contemporary Art, and collaborated with Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda on one of the most popular Spotify playlists of 2018. Dash has also been a keynote speaker and guest in a broad range of media ranging from the Obama Foundation Summit to SXSW to Desus and Mero's late-night show.Links: Glitch: https://glitch.com Web.dev: https://web.dev Glitch Twitter: https://twitter.com/glitch Anil Dash Twitter: https://twitter.com/anildash TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is a little bit off the beaten path from the cloud infrastructure types I generally drag, kicking and screaming, onto the show. If we take a look at the ecosystem and where it's going, it's clear that in the future, not everyone who wants to build a business, or a tool, or even an application is going to necessarily spring fully-formed into the world from the forehead of some God, knowing how to code. And oh, “I'm going to go to a boot camp for four months to learn how to do it first,” is increasingly untenable. I don't know if you would call it low-code or not. But that's how it feels. My guest today is Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch. Anil, thank you for joining me.Anil: Thanks so much for having me.Corey: So, let's get the important stuff out of the way first, since I have a long-standing history of mispronouncing the company Twitch as ‘Twetch,' I should probably do the same thing here. So, what is Gletch? And what does it do?Anil: Glitch is, at its simplest, a tool that lets you build a full-stack app in your web browser in about 30 seconds. And, you know, for your community, your audience, it's also this ability to create and deploy code instantly on a full-stack server with no concern for deploy, or DevOps, or provisioning a container, or any of those sort of concerns. And what it is for the users is, honestly, a community. They're like, “I looked at this app that was on Glitch; I thought it was cool; I could do what we call [remixing 00:02:03].” Which is to kind of fork that app, a running app, make a couple edits, and all of a sudden live at a real URL on the web, my app is running with exactly what I built. And that's something that has been—I think, just captured a lot of people's imagination to now where they've built over 12 or 15 million apps on the platform.Corey: You describe it somewhat differently than I would, and given that I tend to assume that people who create and run successful businesses don't generally tend to do it without thought, I'm not quite, I guess, insufferable enough to figure out, “Oh, well, I thought about this for ten seconds, therefore I've solved a business problem that you have been needling at for years.” But when I look at Glitch, I would describe it as something different than the way that you describe it. I would call it a web-based IDE for low-code applications and whatnot, and you never talk about it that way. Everything I can see there describes it talks about friendly creators, and community tied to it. Why is that?Anil: You're not wrong from the conventional technologist's point of view. I—sufficient vintage; I was coding in Visual Basic back in the '90s and if you squint, you can see that influence on Glitch today. And so I don't reject that description, but part of it is about the audience we're speaking to, which is sort of a next generation of creators. And I think importantly, that's not just age, right, but that could be demographic, that can be just sort of culturally, wherever you're at. And what we look at is who's making the most interesting stuff on the internet and in the industry, and they tend to be grounded in broader culture, whether they're on, you know, Instagram, or TikTok, or, you know, whatever kind of influencer, you want to point at—YouTube.And those folks, they think of themselves as creators first and they think of themselves as participating in the community first and then the tool sort of follow. And I think one of the things that's really striking is, if you look at—we'll take YouTube as an example because everyone's pretty familiar with it—they have a YouTube Creator Studio. And it is a very rich and deep tool. It does more than, you know, you would have had iMovie, or Final Cut Pro doing, you know, 10 or 15 years ago, incredibly advanced stuff. And those [unintelligible 00:04:07] use it every day, but nobody goes to YouTube and says, “This is a cloud-based nonlinear editor for video production, and we target cinematographers.” And if they did, they would actually narrow their audience and they would limit what their impact is on the world.And so similarly, I think we look at that for Glitch where the social object, the central thing that people organize around a Glitch is an app, not code. And that's this really kind of deep and profound idea, which is that everybody can understand an app. Everybody has an idea for an app. You know, even the person who's, “Ah, I'm not technical,” or, “I'm not really into technology,” they're like, “But you know what? If I could make an app, I would make this.”And so we think a lot about that creative impulse. And the funny thing is, that is a common thread between somebody that literally just got on the internet for the first time and somebody who has been doing cloud deploys for as long as there's been a cloud to deploy to, or somebody has been coding for decades. No matter who you are, you have that place that is starting from what's the experience I want to build, the app I want to build? And so I think that's where there's that framing. But it's also been really useful, in that if you're trying to make a better IDE in the cloud and a better text editor, and there are multiple trillion-dollar companies that [laugh] are creating products in that category, I don't think you're going to win. On the other hand, if you say, “This is more fun, and cooler, and has a better design, and feels better,” I think we could absolutely win in a walk away compared to trillion-dollar companies trying to be cool.Corey: I think that this is an area that has a few players in it could definitely stand to benefit by having more there. My big fear is not that AWS is going to launch stuff in your space and drive you out of business; I think that is a somewhat naive approach. I'm more concerned that they're going to try to launch something in your space, give it a dumb name, fail that market and appropriately, not understand who it's for and set the entire idea back five years. That is, in some cases, it seems like their modus operandi for an awful lot of new markets.Anil: Yeah, I mean, that's not an uncommon problem in any category that's sort of community driven. So, you know, back in the day, I worked on building blogging tools at the beginning of this, sort of, social media era, and we worried about that a lot. We had built some of the first early tools, Movable Type, and TypePad, and these were what were used to launch, like, Gawker and Huffington Post and all the, sort of, big early sites. And we had been doing it a couple years—and then at that time, major player—AOL came in, and they launched their own AOL blog service, and we were, you know, quaking in our boots. I remember just being kind of like, pit in your stomach, “Oh, my gosh. This is going to devastate the category.”And as it turns out, people were smart, and they have taste, and they can tell. And the domain that we're in is not one that is about raw computing power or raw resources that you can bring to bear so much as it is about can you get people to connect together, collaborate together, and feel like they're in a place where they want to make something and they want to share it with other people? And I mean, we've never done a single bit of advertising for Glitch. There's never been any paid acquisition. There's never done any of those things. And we go up against, broadly in the space, people that have billboards and they buy out all the ads of the airport and, you know, all the other kind of things we see—Corey: And they do the typical enterprise thing where they spend untold millions in acquiring the real estate to advertise on, and then about 50 cents on the message, from the looks of it. It's, wow, you go to all this trouble and expense to get something in front of me, and after all of that to get my attention, you don't have anything interesting to say?Anil: Right.Corey: [crosstalk 00:07:40] inverse of that.Anil: [crosstalk 00:07:41] it doesn't work.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's brand awareness. I love that game. Ugh.Anil: I was a CIO, and not once in my life did I ever make a purchasing decision based on who was sponsoring a golf tournament. It never happened, right? Like, I never made a call on a database platform because of a poster that was up at, you know, San Jose Airport. And so I think that's this thing that developers in particular, have really good BS filters, and you can sort of see through.Corey: What I have heard about the airport advertising space—and I but a humble cloud economist; I don't know if this is necessarily accurate or not—but if you have a company like Accenture, for example, that advertises on airport billboards, they don't even bother to list their website. If you go to their website, it turns out that there's no shopping cart function. I cannot add ‘one consulting' to my cart and make a purchase.Anil: “Ten pounds of consult, please.”Corey: Right? I feel like the primary purpose there might very well be that when someone presents to your board and says, “All right, we've had this conversation with Accenture.” The response is not, “Who?” It's a brand awareness play, on some level. That said, you say you don't do a bunch traditional advertising, but honestly, I feel like you advertise—more successfully—than I do at The Duckbill Group, just by virtue of having a personality running the company, in your case.Now, your platform is for the moment, slightly larger than mine, but that's okay,k I have ambition and a tenuous grasp of reality and I'm absolutely going to get there one of these days. But there is something to be said for someone who has a track record of doing interesting things and saying interesting things, pulling a, “This is what I do and this is how I do it.” It almost becomes a personality-led marketing effort to some degree, doesn't it?Anil: I'm a little mindful of that, right, where I think—so a little bit of context and history: Glitch as a company is actually 20 years old. The product is only a few years old, but we were formerly called Fog Creek Software, co-founded by Joel Spolsky who a lot of folks will know from back in the day as Joel on Software blog, was extremely influential. And that company, under leadership of Joel and his co-founder Michael Pryor spun out Stack Overflow, they spun out Trello. He had created, you know, countless products over the years so, like, their technical and business acumen is off the charts.And you know, I was on the board of Stack Overflow from, really, those first days and until just recently when they sold, and you know, you get this insight into not just how do you build a developer community that is incredibly valuable, but also has a place in the ecosystem that is unique and persists over time. And I think that's something that was very, very instructive. And so when it came in to lead Glitch I, we had already been a company with a, sort of, visible founder. Joel was as well known as a programmer as it got in the world?Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: And my public visibility is different, right? I, you know, I was a working coder for many years, but I don't think that's what people see me on social media has. And so I think, I've been very mindful where, like, I'm thrilled to use the platform I have to amplify what was created on a Glitch. But what I note is it's always, “This person made this thing. This person made this app and it had this impact, and it got these results, or made this difference for them.”And that's such a different thing than—I don't ever talk about, “We added syntax highlighting in the IDE and the editor in the browser.” It's just never it right. And I think there are people that—I love that work. I mean, I love having that conversation with our team, but I think that's sort of the difference is my enthusiasm is, like, people are making stuff and it's cool. And that sort of is my lens on the whole world.You know, somebody makes whatever a great song, a great film, like, these are all things that are exciting. And the Glitch community's creations sort of feel that way. And also, we have other visible people on the team. I think of our sort of Head of Community, Jenn Schiffer, who's a very well known developer and her right. And you know, tons of people have read her writing and seen her talks over the years.And she and I talk about this stuff; I think she sort of feels the same way, which is, she's like, “If I were, you know, being hired by some cloud platform to show the latest primitives that they've deployed behind an API,” she's like, “I'd be miserable. Like, I don't want to do that in the world.” And I sort of feel the same way. But if you say, “This person who never imagined they would make an app that would have this kind of impact.” And they're going to, I think of just, like, the last couple of weeks, some of the apps we've seen where people are—it could be [unintelligible 00:11:53]. It could be like, “We made a Slack bot that finally gets this reporting into the right channel [laugh] inside our company, but it was easy enough that I could do it myself without asking somebody to create it even though I'm not technically an engineer.” Like, that's incredible.The other extreme, we have people that are PhDs working on machine learning that are like, “At the end of the day, I don't want to be responsible for managing and deploying. [laugh]. I go home, and so the fact that I can do this in create is really great.” I think that energy, I mean, I feel the same way. I still build stuff all the time, and I think that's something where, like, you can't fake that and also, it's bigger than any one person or one public persona or social media profile, or whatever. I think there's this bigger idea. And I mean, to that point, there are millions of developers on Glitch and they've created well over ten million apps. I am not a humble person, but very clearly, that's not me, you know? [laugh].Corey: I have the same challenge to it's, effectively, I have now a 12 employee company and about that again contractors for various specialized functions, and the common perception, I think, is that mostly I do all the stuff that we talk about in public, and the other 11 folks sort of sit around and clap as I do it. Yeah, that is only four of those people's jobs as it turns out. There are more people doing work here. It's challenging, on some level, to get away from the myth of the founder who is the person who has the grand vision and does all the work and sees all these things.Anil: This industry loves the myth of the great man, or the solo legend, or the person in their bedroom is a genius, the lone genius, and it's a lie. It's a lie every time. And I think one of the things that we can do, especially in the work at Glitch, but I think just in my work overall with my whole career is to dismantle that myth. I think that would be incredibly valuable. It just would do a service for everybody.But I mean, that's why Glitch is the way it is. It's a collaboration platform. Our reference points are, you know, we look at Visual Studio and what have you, but we also look at Google Docs. Why is it that people love to just send a link to somebody and say, “Let's edit this thing together and knock out a, you know, a memo together or whatever.” I think that idea we're going to collaborate together, you know, we saw that—like, I think of Figma, which is a tool that I love. You know, I knew Dylan when he was a teenager and watching him build that company has been so inspiring, not least because design was always supposed to be collaborative.And then you think about we're all collaborating together in design every day. We're all collaborating together and writing in Google Docs—or whatever we use—every day. And then coding is still this kind of single-player game. Maybe at best, you throw something over the wall with a pull request, but for the most part, it doesn't feel like you're in there with somebody. Certainly doesn't feel like you're creating together in the same way that when you're jamming on these other creative tools does. And so I think that's what's been liberating for a lot of people is to feel like it's nice to have company when you're making something.Corey: Periodically, I'll talk to people in the AWS ecosystem who for some reason appear to believe that Jeff Barr builds a lot of these services himself then writes blog posts about them. And it's, Amazon does not break out how many of its 1.2 million or so employees work at AWS, but I'm guessing it's more than five people. So yeah, Jeff probably only wrote a dozen of those services himself; the rest are—Anil: That's right. Yeah.Corey: —done by service teams and the rest. It's easy to condense this stuff and I'm as guilty of it as anyone. To my mind, a big company is one that has 200 people in it. That is not apparently something the world agrees with.Anil: Yeah, it's impossible to fathom an organization of hundreds of thousands or a million-plus people, right? Like, our brains just aren't wired to do it. And I think so we reduce things to any given Jeff, whether that's Barr or Bezos, whoever you want to point to.Corey: At one point, I think they had something like more men named Jeff on their board than they did women, which—Anil: Yeah. Mm-hm.Corey: —all right, cool. They've fixed that and now they have a Dave problem.Anil: Yeah [unintelligible 00:15:37] say that my entire career has been trying to weave out of that dynamic, whether it was a Dave, a Mike, or a Jeff. But I think that broader sort of challenge is this—that is related to the idea of there being this lone genius. And I think if we can sort of say, well, creation always happens in community. It always happens influenced by other things. It is always—I mean, this is why we talk about it in Glitch.When you make an app, you don't start from a blank slate, you start from a working app that's already on the platform and you're remix it. And there was a little bit of a ego resistance by some devs years ago when they first encountered that because [unintelligible 00:16:14] like, “No, no, no, I need a blank page, you know, because I have this brilliant idea that nobody's ever thought of before.” And I'm like, “You know, the odds are you'll probably start from something pretty close to something that's built before.” And that enabler of, “There's nothing new under the sun, and you're probably remixing somebody else's thoughts,” I think that sort of changed the tenor of the community. And I think that's something where like, I just see that across the industry.When people are open, collaborative, like even today, a great example is web browsers. The folks making web browsers at Google, Apple, Mozilla are pretty collaborative. They actually do share ideas together. I mean, I get a window into that because they actually all use Glitch to do test cases on different bugs and stuff for them, but you see, one Glitch project will add in folks from Mozilla and folks from Apple and folks from the Chrome team and Google, and they're like working together and you're, like—you kind of let down the pretense of there being this secret genius that's only in this one organization, this one group of people, and you're able to make something great, and the web is greater than all of them. And the proof, you know, for us is that Glitch is not a new idea. Heroku wanted to do what we're doing, you know, a dozen years ago.Corey: Yeah, everyone wants to build Heroku except the company that acquired Heroku, and here we are. And now it's—I was waiting for the next step and it just seemed like it never happened.Anil: But you know when I talked to those folks, they were like, “Well, we didn't have Docker, and we didn't have containerization, and on the client side, we didn't have modern browsers that could do this kind of editing experience, all this kind of thing.” So, they let their editor go by the wayside and became mostly deploy platform. And—but people forget, for the first year or two Heroku had an in-browser editor, and an IDE and, you know, was constrained by the tech at the time. And I think that's something where I'm like, we look at that history, we look at, also, like I said, these browser manufacturers working together were able to get us to a point where we can make something better.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I do have a question for you about the nuts and bolts behind the scenes of Glitch and how it works. If I want to remix something on Glitch, I click the button, a couple seconds later it's there and ready for me to start kicking the tires on, which tells me a few things. One, it is certainly not using CloudFormation to provision it because I didn't have time to go and grab a quick snack and take a six hour nap. So, it apparently is running on computers somewhere. I have it on good authority that this is not just run by people who are very fast at assembling packets by hand. What does the infrastructure look like?Anil: It's on AWS. Our first year-plus of prototyping while we were sort of in beta and early stages of Glitch was getting that time to remix to be acceptable. We still wish it were faster; I mean, that's always the way but, you know, when we started, it was like, yeah, you did sit there for a minute and watch your cursor spin. I mean, what's happening behind the scenes, we're provisioning a new container, standing up a full stack, bringing over the code from the Git repo on the previous project, like, we're doing a lot of work, lift behind the scenes, and we went through every possible permutation of what could make that experience be good enough. So, when we start talking about prototyping, we're at five-plus, almost six years ago when we started building the early versions of what became Glitch, and at that time, we were fairly far along in maturity with Docker, but there was not a clear answer about the use case that we're building for.So, we experimented with Docker Swarm. We went pretty far down that road; we spent a good bit of time there, it failed in ways that were both painful and slow to fix. So, that was great. I don't recommend that. In fairness, we have a very unusual use case, right? So, Glitch now, if you talk about ten million containers on Glitch, no two of those apps are the same and nobody builds an orchestration infrastructure assuming that every single machine is a unique snowflake.Corey: Yeah, massively multi-tenant is not really a thing that people know.Anil: No. And also from a security posture Glitch—if you look at it as a security expert—it is a platform allowing anonymous users to execute arbitrary code at scale. That's what we do. That's our job. And so [laugh], you know, so your threat model is very different. It's very different.I mean, literally, like, you can go to Glitch and build an app, running a full-stack app, without even logging in. And the reason we enable that is because we see kids in classrooms, they're learning to code for the first time, they want to be able to remix a project and they don't even have an email address. And so that was about enabling something different, right? And then, similarly, you know, we explored Kubernetes—because of course you do; it's the default choice here—and some of the optimizations, again, if you go back several years ago, being able to suspend a project and then quickly sort of rehydrate it off disk into a running app was not a common use case, and so it was not optimized. And so we couldn't offer that experience because what we do with Glitch is, if you haven't used an app in five minutes, and you're not a paid member, who put that app to sleep. And that's just a reasonable—Corey: Uh, “Put the app to sleep,” as in toddler, or, “Put the app to sleep,” as an ill puppy.Anil: [laugh]. Hopefully, the former, but when we were at our worst and scaling the ladder. But that is that thing; it's like we had that moment that everybody does, which is that, “Oh, no. This worked.” That was a really scary moment where we started seeing app creation ramping up, and number of edits that people were making in those apps, you know, ramping up, which meant deploys for us ramping up because we automatically deploy as you edit on Glitch. And so, you know, we had that moment where just—well, as a startup, you always hope things go up into the right, and then they do and then you're not sleeping for a long time. And we've been able to get it back under control.Corey: Like, “Oh, no, I'm not succeeding.” Followed immediately by, “Oh, no, I'm succeeding.” And it's a good problem to have.Anil: Exactly. Right, right, right. The only thing worse than failing is succeeding sometimes, in terms of stress levels. And organizationally, you go through so much; technically, you go through so much. You know, we were very fortunate to have such thoughtful technical staff to navigate these things.But it was not obvious, and it was not a sort of this is what you do off the shelf. And our architecture was very different because people had looked at—like, I look at one of our inspirations was CodePen, which is a great platform and the community love them. And their front end developers are, you know, always showing off, “Here's this cool CSS thing I figured out, and it's there.” But for the most part, they're publishing static content, so architecturally, they look almost more like a content management system than an app-running platform. And so we couldn't learn anything from them about our scaling our architecture.We could learn from them on community, and they've been an inspiration there, but I think that's been very, very different. And then, conversely, if we looked at the Herokus of the world, or all those sort of easy deploy, I think Amazon has half a dozen different, like, “This will be easier,” kind of deploy tools. And we looked at those, and they were code-centric not app-centric. And that led to fundamentally different assumptions in user experience and optimization.And so, you know, we had to chart our own path and I think it was really only the last year or so that we were able to sort of turn the corner and have high degree of confidence about, we know what people build on Glitch and we know how to support and scale it. And that unlocked this, sort of, wave of creativity where there are things that people want to create on the internet but it had become too hard to do so. And the canonical example I think I was—those of us are old enough to remember FTPing up a website—Corey: Oh, yes.Anil: —right—to Geocities, or whatever your shared web host was, we remember how easy that was and how much creativity was enabled by that.Corey: Yes, “How easy it was,” quote-unquote, for those of us who spent years trying to figure out passive versus active versus ‘what is going on?' As far as FTP transfers. And it turns out that we found ways to solve for that, mostly, but it became something a bit different and a bit weird. But here we are.Anil: Yeah, there was definitely an adjustment period, but at some point, if you'd made an HTML page in notepad on your computer, and you could, you know, hurl it at a server somewhere, it would kind of run. And when you realize, you look at the coding boot camps, or even just to, like, teach kids to code efforts, and they're like, “Day three. Now, you've gotten VS Code and GitHub configured. We can start to make something.” And you're like, “The whole magic of this thing getting it to light up. You put it in your web browser, you're like, ‘That's me. I made this.'” you know, north star for us was almost, like, you go from zero to hello world in a minute. That's huge.Corey: I started participating one of those boot camps a while back to help. Like, the first thing I changed about the curriculum was, “Yeah, we're not spending time teaching people how to use VI in, at that point, the 2010s.” It was, that was a fun bit of hazing for those of us who were becoming Unix admins and knew that wherever we'd go, we'd find VI on a server, but here in the real world, there are better options for that.Anil: This is rank cruelty.Corey: Yeah, I mean, I still use it because 20 years of muscle memory doesn't go away overnight, but I don't inflict that on others.Anil: Yeah. Well, we saw the contrast. Like, we worked with, there's a group called Mouse here in New York City that creates the computer science curriculum for the public schools in the City of New York. And there's a million kids in public school in New York City, right, and they all go through at least some of this CS education. [unintelligible 00:24:49] saw a lot of work, a lot of folks in the tech community here did. It was fantastic.And yet they were still doing this sort of very conceptual, theoretical. Here's how a professional developer would set up their environment. Quote-unquote, “Professional.” And I'm like, you know what really sparks kids' interests? If you tell them, “You can make a page and it'll be live and you can send it to your friend. And you can do it right now.”And once you've sparked that creative impulse, you can't stop them from doing the rest. And I think what was wild was kids followed down that path. Some of the more advanced kids got to high school and realized they want to experiment with, like, AI and ML, right? And they started playing with TensorFlow. And, you know, there's collaboration features in Glitch where you can do real-time editing and a code with this. And they went in the forum and they were asking questions, that kind of stuff. And the people answering their questions were the TensorFlow team at Google. [laugh]. Right?Corey: I remember those days back when everything seemed smaller and more compact, [unintelligible 00:25:42] but almost felt like a balkanization of community—Anil: Yeah.Corey: —where now it's oh, have you joined that Slack team, and I'm looking at this and my machine is screaming for more RAM. It's, like, well, it has 128 gigs in it. Shouldn't that be enough? Not for Slack.Anil: Not for chat. No, no, no. Chat is demanding.Corey: Oh, yeah, that and Chrome are basically trying to out-ram each other. But if you remember the days of volunteering as network staff on Freenode when you could basically gather everyone for a given project in the entire stack on the same IRC network. And that doesn't happen anymore.Anil: And there's something magic about that, right? It's like now the conversations are closed off in a Slack or Discord or what have you, but to have a sort of open forum where people can talk about this stuff, what's wild about that is, for a beginner, a teenage creator who's learning this stuff, the idea that the people who made the AI, I can talk to, they're alive still, you know what I mean? Like, yeah, they're not even that old. But [laugh]. They think of this is something that's been carved in stone for 100 years.And so it's so inspiring to them. And then conversely, talking to the TensorFlow team, they made these JavaScript examples, like, tensorflow.js was so accessible, you know? And they're like, “This is the most heartwarming thing. Like, we think about all these enterprise use cases or whatever. But like, kids wanting to make stuff, like recognize their friends' photo, and all the vision stuff they're doing around [unintelligible 00:26:54] out there,” like, “We didn't know this is why we do it until we saw this is why we do it.”And that part about connecting the creative impulse from both, like, the most experienced, advanced coders at the most august tech companies that exist, as well as the most rank beginners in public schools, who might not even have a computer at home, saying that's there—if you put those two things together, and both of those are saying, “I'm a coder; I'm able to create; I can make something on the internet, and I can share it with somebody and be inspired by it,” like, that is… that's as good as it gets.Corey: There's something magic in being able to reach out to people who built this stuff. And honestly—you shouldn't feel this way, but you do—when I was talking to the folks who wrote the things I was working on, it really inspires you to ask better questions. Like when I'm talking to Dr. Venema, the author of Postfix and I'm trying to figure out how this thing works, well, I know for a fact that I will not be smarter than he is at basically anything in that entire universe, and maybe most beyond that, as well, however, I still want to ask a question in such a way that doesn't make me sound like a colossal dumbass. So, it really inspires you—Anil: It motivates you.Corey: Oh, yeah. It inspires you to raise your question bar up a bit, of, “I am trying to do x. I expect y to happen. Instead, z is happening as opposed to what I find the documentation that”—oh, as I read the documentation, discover exactly what I messed up, and then I delete the whole email. It's amazing how many of those things you never send because when constructing a question the right way, you can help yourself.Anil: Rubber ducking against your heroes.Corey: Exactly.Anil: I mean, early in my career, I'd gone through sort of licensing mishap on a project that later became open-source, and sort of stepped it in and as you do, and unprompted, I got an advice email from Dan Bricklin, who invented the spreadsheet, he invented VisiCalc, and he had advice and he was right. And it was… it was unreal. I was like, this guy's one of my heroes. I grew up reading about his work, and not only is he, like, a living, breathing person, he's somebody that can have the kindness to reach out and say, “Yeah, you know, have you tried this? This might work.”And it's, this isn't, like, a guy who made an app. This is the guy who made the app for which the phrase killer app was invented, right? And, you know, we've since become friends and I think a lot of his inspiration and his work. And I think it's one of the things it's like, again, if you tell somebody starting out, the people who invented the fundamental tools of the digital era, are still active, still building stuff, still have advice to share, and you can connect with them, it feels like a cheat code. It feels like a superpower, right? It feels like this impossible thing.And I think about like, even for me, the early days of the web, view source, which is still buried in our browser somewhere. And you can see the code that makes the page, it felt like getting away with something. “You mean, I can just look under the hood and see how they made this page and then I can do it too?” I think we forget how radical that is—[unintelligible 00:29:48] radical open-source in general is—and you see it when, like, you talk to young creators. I think—you know, I mean, Glitch obviously is used every day by, like, people at Microsoft and Google and the New York Timesor whatever, like, you know, the most down-the-road, enterprise developers, but I think a lot about the new creators and the people who are learning, and what they tell me a lot is the, like, “Oh, so I made this app, but what do I have to do to put it on the internet?”I'm like, “It already is.” Like, as soon as you create it, that URL was live, it all works. And their, like, “But isn't there, like, an app store I have to ask? Isn't there somebody I have to get permission to publish this from? Doesn't somebody have to approve it?”And you realize they've grown up with whether it was the app stores on their phones, or the cartridges in their Nintendo or, you know, whatever it was, they had always had this constraint on technology. It wasn't something you make; it's something that is given to you, you know, handed down from on high. And I think that's the part that animates me and the whole team, the community, is this idea of, like, I geek out about our infrastructure. I love that we're doing deploys constantly, so fast, all the time, and I love that we've taken the complexity away, but the end of the day, the reason why we do it, is you can have somebody just sort of saying, I didn't realize there was a place I could just make something put it in front of, maybe, millions of people all over the world and I don't have to ask anybody permission and my idea can matter as much as the thing that's made by the trillion-dollar company.Corey: It's really neat to see, I guess, the sense of spirit and soul that arises from a smaller, more, shall we say, soulful company. No disparagement meant toward my friends at AWS and other places. It's just, there's something that you lose when you get to a certain point of scale. Like, I don't ever have to have a meeting internally and discuss things, like, “Well, does this thing that we're toying with doing violate antitrust law?” That is never been on my roadmap of things I have to even give the slightest crap about.Anil: Right, right? You know, “What does the investor relations person at a retirement fund think about the feature that we shipped?” Is not a question that we have to answer. There's this joy in also having community that sort of has come along with us, right? So, we talk a lot internally about, like, how do we make sure Glitch stays weird? And, you know, the community sort of supports that.Like, there's no reason logically that our logo should be the emoji of two fish. But that kind of stuff of just, like, it just is. We don't question it anymore. I think that we're very lucky. But also that we are part of an ecosystem. I also am very grateful where, like… yeah, that folks at Google use Glitch as part of their daily work when they're explaining a new feature in Chrome.Like, if you go to web.dev and their dev portal teaches devs how to code, all the embedded examples go to these Glitch apps that are running, showing running code is incredible. When we see the Stripe team building examples of, like, “Do you want to use this new payment API that we made? Well, we have a Glitch for you.” And literally every day, they ship one that sort of goes and says, “Well, if you just want to use this new Stripe feature, you just remix this thing and it's instantly running on Glitch.”I mean, those things are incredible. So like, I'm very grateful that the biggest companies and most influential companies in the industry have embraced it. So, I don't—yeah, I don't disparage them at all, but I think that ability to connect to the person who'd be like, “I just want to do payments. I've never heard of Stripe.”Corey: Oh yeah.Anil: And we have this every day. They come into Glitch, and they're just like, I just wanted to take credit cards. I didn't know there's a tool to do that.Corey: “I was going to build it myself,” and everyone shrieks, “No, no. Don't do that. My God.” Yeah. Use one of their competitors, fine,k but building it yourself is something a lunatic would do.Anil: Exactly. Right, right. And I think we forget that there's only so much attention people can pay, there's only so much knowledge they have.Corey: Everything we say is new to someone. That's why I always go back to assuming no one's ever heard of me, and explain the basics of what I do and how I do it, periodically. It's, no one has done all the mandatory reading. Who knew?Anil: And it's such a healthy exercise to, right, because I think we always have that kind of beginner's mindset about what Glitch is. And in fairness, I understand why. Like, there have been very experienced developers that have said, “Well, Glitch looks too colorful. It looks like a toy.” And that we made a very intentional choice at masking—like, we're doing the work under the hood.And you can drop down into a terminal and you can do—you can run whatever build script you want. You can do all that stuff on Glitch, but that's not what we put up front and I think that's this philosophy about the role of the technology versus the people in the ecosystem.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to, I guess, explain what Glitch is and how you view it. If people want to learn more about it, about your opinions, et cetera. Where can they find you?Anil: Sure. glitch.com is easiest place, and hopefully that's a something you can go and a minute later, you'll have a new app that you built that you want to share. And, you know, we're pretty active on all social media, you know, Twitter especially with Glitch: @glitch. I'm on as @anildash.And one of the things I love is I get to talk to folks like you and learn from the community, and as often as not, that's where most of the inspiration comes from is just sort of being out in all the various channels, talking to people. It's wild to be 20-plus years into this and still never get tired of that.Corey: It's why I love this podcast. Every time I talk to someone, I learn something new. It's hard to remain too ignorant after you have enough people who've shared wisdom with you as long as you can retain it.Anil: That's right.Corey: Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Anil: So, glad to be here.Corey: Anil Dash, CEO of Gletch—or Glitch as he insists on calling it. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me how your small team at AWS is going to crush Glitch into the dirt just as soon as they find a name that's dumb enough for the service.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

That's my JAMstack
S3E1 - Sean C. Davis on the Jamstack philosophy, NextJS, and more

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:14 Hello, and welcome back to season three of That's My Jamstack. It's amazing that we've been going this long. I know it's been quite a bit since our last episode, but to jog your memories, That's My Jamstack is the podcast asks that time honored and tested question. What is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson and we've got a lot of great guests lined up for this season. So without further ado, let's dive in. On today's episode, we talk with Sean C. Davis. Sean is a passionate tinkerer and teacher. He's currently working as a developer experience engineer at stack bit. Bryan Robinson 1:04 All right, Shawn. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show and talking with us today. Sean C. Davis 1:07 Thanks for having me, Brian. Excited to be here. Bryan Robinson 1:09 Awesome. So first and foremost, tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun outside of work Sean C. Davis 1:15 For for work, I am currently the developer experience engineer for stack bit. I've been in the web development space for about a decade or so the first nine years, were all in agency space building agency freelancing, building websites for folks. And just this last year, took a shift into the product space and spending some time with stack bid. And that's that's been so that's super exciting. That's what I've been doing every day. And I'm sure we'll we'll dig into that a bit. For fun on the side. Well, I feel like I'm the I'm the classic developer in the sense that there's always some, there's always some technical thing that's happening on the side. Right now that thing is, it's it's my personal site I've had, I've had a couple of different blogs that I've maintained over the years. And within the last two years or so I've been trying to focus that content, bringing it all into my personal site. But right now, it's still kind of just like a, it's just a, it's a blog, most of most folks who come there, Googled some problem, they get the solution, and it serves those folks really well. But I'm in this transition of trying to make it more of a learning hub. So that's, it's kind of a side project now. But that's but it's still like it's fun, but it's still I don't know, it's where it could still be in a developer. I'm so like, the the other part of me, I've got two little kids at home and like a lot of folks when the pandemic hits kind of focused a lot of energy and attention into the home. So it's various projects around the house or like like many people I am part of the reason you couldn't find flour at the grocery store because I got really into baking for a while and still doing that a little bit to some like some gardening kind of just fun fun stuff around the house. Bryan Robinson 3:06 In your in your baking exploits. Are we talking like bread, baking, pastry baking, but what kind of baking Sean C. Davis 3:13 where I spend most of my time and still doing a little bit today is the classic sourdough loaf. So mostly bread, mostly bread, at least I'm better at the bread. I've done a bit of the Sweet Treats and trying to learn a little bit about the decorating but it's just the presentation isn't my strong suit. So the flavor might be there. I've got a ways to go in the inner desert department. Bryan Robinson 3:37 Yeah, I've got I've got my own sourdough starter and all that. So I definitely feel I actually, I like a time I can be a hipster about something. And so when my son was born, actually so that was six years ago now. So pre pandemic, my wife my birthday that year, two months after he was born he got me a sourdough starter from King Arthur baking and amazing. I lapsed right because obviously like infant and all that and I baked for a little bit but yeah, then started back up during the pandemic as well. Because who, who doesn't want to do that? We're gonna do Yeah, exactly. You got something to focus on. Anyway, I actually love your site. I'm sure that when we do shout outs at the end, we'll talk about that Sean C. Davis calm but one things that came up on the little repeating thing on your homepage is you're afraid of bears and Bs. Is that Is that a thing? Or is that just a funny thing? Sean C. Davis 4:21 Oh, yeah, it's a it's a funny thing. I mean, I I I love both of them, but also am terrified of both that I do. I do. I guess I didn't mention this in the fun thing. I really enjoy hiking and camping. haven't done much camping since having little kids. We're gonna eventually get them out there. But we do a fair amount of hiking. And so yeah, I've had a number of run ins with both bears and bees. And it's terrifying every time but I also very much appreciate and respect them for what they do for us. Yes. Bryan Robinson 4:54 All right. So let's talk a little bit about the Jamstack. So what was your entry point into this space? It seems this idea of Jamstack or static sites or whatever it was at the time. Sean C. Davis 5:03 It that's an interesting question. Because Okay, so if you say, Yeah, entry point into Jamstack, or static sites, if you broke that apart and said, What's your entry point into Jamstack? And what's your entry point into static sites? I have two different answers. So I'll tell you a little bit about the the journey from one to the other. It's, I find it kind of interesting. So it static sites were was the first thing before I knew anything about Jamstack. In fact, before Jamstack was coined, because the gens Jamstack term comes from I think, later in 2015, I believe. So the first agency job, I had built a few sites with middleman, they were originally a PHP shop, and about the time I joined, were transitioning into becoming a Rails shop. And so Ruby was the bread and butter programming language. And there were a few clients that would come on, who didn't want to pay for a CMS or just like they needed something real quick, and it could be static and totally fine. And so we, we were building middleman sites, but deploying, deploying them to like a digital ocean or equivalent, it's still running on a web server still serving up these pages in real time, even though they're just HTML files city like kind of silly, but But there weren't great solid patterns at that time. And about that time, 2013 or so is also when I started building custom content management systems. I built it, I evolved, and I iterated on it. And I think I was looking at this recently, I believe there were four major, different versions that I built over the series, or course of about three or four years in there. And so I'll come back to that. But as I was, so set, this first agency working on middleman, I built a few middleman sites is when I switched to freelancing. And then at this at the last Agency, also, a few middleman sites like middleman kept kept popping up when I was when I was freelancing there. Actually, that's when I built the fourth and final version of that CMS. And at that time, this is probably I think we're talking about 2016, maybe 20. Yeah, I think that seems right 2016. And so the Jamstack term exists, the term headless CMS exists, but I had no idea that these things were things that people were doing. But I had this need, where I had a client who wanted a mobile native application, and a, also a website. And it seemed like a lot of the content was going to overlap. And I was like, Well, I'm building this next version of a CMS, what should it look like? Maybe it should be able to serve both of these. And so I was like, Oh, brilliant, decoupled architecture like this is this is gonna be great. And so that that last CMS I built was API driven. And, and I believe, I believe the website was a middleman site, it, it may have been some other framework, but it was like this Jamstack pattern, but again, still deployed, still using a web server to serve every request. So like missing that, that final piece that that Netlify gives us in the CDN in that instant cache invalidation. So fast forward to this last agency, and we're also a rail shop Sean C. Davis 8:40 and built a few middleman sites. But what happened was, why I think that the 2017, I believe, the the CTO, late 2017, early 2018, our CTO gets wind of the Jamstack. And so this is pre Jamstack. Conference, still really small kind of tight knit community. And we're like, and everything just kind of aligned because we won this work. For a company where it was going to be building them a new marketing website, it was gonna be a fairly big site. But this company also had a product and an internal product team. And that team had already switched to building that product with React. And so and we had heard a little bit about Jamstack. We heard about Gatsby and we're like, Oh, perfect, perfect time. Gatsby is the cool kid in town. Like we can jump all in on the Jamstack we think we can reduce development costs over time. You know, all the all the classic Jamstack benefits like we can get those and so we took a leap. We jumped all in and so that was like that was the real introduction to Jamstack and I find it I find it kind of funny looking back on it now because I spent all those years with Jamstack like patterns and using tool and middleman was part of all of those and then we're like, oh Jamstack, but also switched to JavaScript based frameworks at the same time, which I think a lot of folks went through that pattern. But I don't know if funny to reflect on. Bryan Robinson 10:11 Yeah, definitely. And like that that kind of journey is really interesting. Like in that agency world, the fact that, like you were having defined these patterns on your own, and then this community kind of sprang up next to what you were doing, and then look like we can do those things, maybe even slightly better than than kind of where we are now that we see kind of this broader scope, and there are products out there. That's really, really interesting. And it kind of mirrors on my own journey. I was at an agency when I discovered all this as well and never really implemented at the agency that we had a customer we had a full fledge, like custom content management system that like the agency had built, so never got a big we Sean C. Davis 10:49 did we did too, I don't it was like it was a compelling enough idea to our CTO, that he's like, we're throat, like we're throwing it all out where we're, I, we had a lot of, I mean, you know, there's issues with you, you have to maintain your own software. And it's it's another piece of the stack. And he's like that we were just getting bogged down with this site went down. And there's a bug in this CMS. And I think the crux was, there was one site where we didn't protect the slash admin route, like, should have done that. And we're like, Okay, well, let's, this is a way to never make that mistake. Again. I'm not Bryan Robinson 11:27 gonna speak for you on this. But my advice to anyone listening out there is if you think you should build a content management system, don't just don't do it. Sean C. Davis 11:38 Yes, yes. I don't know if I may have written a post about this at one point, or maybe it was just an idea in my head, but it was gonna be ashes, I should see if I can find it. The idea was, here's how you can build a content management system and my journey and exactly why you shouldn't do it. Like it's, it's, I think the the lesson I have baked in there is, it can be a really powerful experience for learning about content schemas and know how to organize pages and components and like structured data. But it's also just not a good idea to do it. Because there's there are how many dozens or hundreds of companies that are focusing on that problem every single day. Bryan Robinson 12:20 And let's be fair to our past selves, right, like in 2012 2013 weren't as many companies do, and they weren't as fully featured as they are today. I think it's kind of the same thing. A lot of people have probably created their own, like, custom static site generator in the past, like, Oh, I just made a couple include stuff like that. Let's just, oh, but we have them now. From from the middleman and Jekyll times all the way through to all the fancy ones today. Let's fast forward to now. How are you using Jamstack philosophies professionally? And personally? And obviously, you're at stack bet. So probably quite a bit professionally nowadays. Sean C. Davis 12:54 Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. So Stackbit is, I mean, if the Netlify is the Jamstack tool, but also when you think stack bit like stack bit is, exists, because the Jamstack exists. And it's, I know, the, the Jamstack pattern was really powerful and felt like a great entry point for newer developers. But it, it turned out that it was it was kind of difficult, because it's like you could get started really, really kind of simple to get started. Really difficult to go to the next level, which requires stitching together all of these decoupled services. And so stack bit pops up originally three years ago, as a solution to basically say, well, your start, here's the starting point. And it's Netlify and Jekyll and some markdown files or you know, in some styles, something like that, and it has evolved and now as a full fledge visual editor, what's, what's interesting is, we're in a transition where we're just about to release a new version, or the beta version of a new version. And it's still largely following that pattern. It's a really powerful visual editing experience. But the the Jamstack I feel like Jamstack is kind of in this identity crisis sort of mode or, or maybe not like figuring out where they where they fit. You know, what Jamstack actually means and knowing that the web is going to continue to evolve. And so if you, depending when, when this episode gets released, it's like what we, if we look before this release, and what happens after it right now you go to the website, so pre pre release, and like Jamstack is plastered all over it real big, top of the homepage. And I I'm seeing that this, this language is going to shift a little bit and so we're still very much Jamstack tool. Websites are going to get deployed. They're going to be built with next they're going to be static by default. They're going to be deployed To Netlify using Marco. So it's like still, it's still very much Jamstack pattern. But I think how we, how we talk about that might change a little bit. That's, that's professionally and personally, I mentioned, the, the project I'm spending most of time on now is my personal site, that site is built with eleventy. and deploy to Netlify. And using Mark, just local markdown for content. I, I've been thinking a lot about like, well, what's the future of this? For me, if I really want to make this a hub, and I want to make it a content engine? And I'm thinking well, okay, well, eventually, I'm going to have to go to like a next or something like that. But honestly, I every change that I make, I say, Well, okay, well, can I get this done with eleventy? And I consistently finding that the answer is yes, like it has, there's probably a limit to this some point in my future. But right now, I'm in love with, but eleventy is giving me and so I've kind of have this classic Jamstack pattern happening on the side and loving that Bryan Robinson 16:08 perfectly. And then I mean, I can go on and on about love. And it is it is kind of where I'm at in the last of two and Zach Leatherman, the creator of 11. D, recently just even showed like gated content with 11, D serverless. And so like the, the line is blurring about what 11 D can and can't do, it used to be pretty solid, like there was a pretty solid point where like 11 D didn't serve you anymore. Little little iffy. Now, Sean C. Davis 16:30 I think that the big question for me was, oh, there were two. So one is that I'm I built my own kind of component system using nunchucks shortcodes in and so like, you have this smart transformers that make it nice and easy to work with. But it's I mean, it's still a little clunky, I would love to be able to use something like reactors felt and then hydrate them on the fly as needed. And fortunately, we have been homes and slinky, working on that exact problem. So that's really exciting to follow that. And then the second question I had, and second hurdle I thought I was going to run into was authentication, I don't need it now. But my plan is to start to build out some courses, and some of them will be free, and you don't have to track them. And other ones, you know, I feel like well down the road, I'm going to want people to people are gonna want to sign in, they're gonna want to track their progress, maybe some of them are paid. And just this last week, a video came out where Zach was going through the process of showing authentication with 11. D. And now I'm like I, I mean, I feel like the wall I'm going to hit now has less to do with features, and is probably going to have more to do with how many files can we read from the file system? And but I also think that it's getting smarter in terms of incremental builds. And so maybe I don't hit that. Well, I don't know. I'm gonna keep pushing it. We'll see what happens. Bryan Robinson 17:58 Yeah, that wall becomes smaller and further and smaller and further. Yeah, that's right. That's right. All right. So we've talked about a few technologies. We've talked about a few methodologies. But what would you say currently? Is your jam in the Jamstack? What's your favorite service? Maybe its stack, but are your favorite framework or philosophy? What what makes you love working in the Jamstack? Sean C. Davis 18:19 Yeah, talk philosophically for a minute, I suppose. Yeah. So what I really loved about the Jamstack, especially in the early days of me discovering it, I'm thinking pre NextJs. JS blowing up. So like 2019. And before? Is that it? To me, it was it's, well, it's still very much this way like you. It's a methodology. It's not a prescription say this all the time. And there's something really powerful in that in that if here's a pattern that we think is a really strong way to build websites that it's it improves the developer experience, and delivers great experience for end users. But you can use whatever tool you think is best for your particular project. And I what I've realized is as the web continues to evolve, is that the there were more kind of guardrails on what Jamstack is than I originally thought, like there, there are more opinions baked in than I originally was, was seeing. However, it's still within within those guardrails and within that pattern, very open and, and not not prescriptive in terms of tooling. And I think what that has led to that even though the community is led by a product in in Netlify, that it's very open in talking about what tools you can use in the space. It's really everyone's really respectful in that space and empowering and so just like the My Favorite I'd love to philosophy itself, the community that came out of that philosophy. It's is like a really, really great thing to be involved in. But I think in terms of tooling, yeah, I can't. I mean, I love stack. But that's why it's why I'm at stack, but I think it's a, it's a great, I do think it's a great entry point into the Jamstack. space. And it it's, it's a such a unique tool that it can serve. The personal blogger, especially someone who isn't super technically savvy, wants to learn a little development. But it can also serve a serve enterprises that have hundreds 1000s of pages, but are storing those in Contentful, or Sanity, some other headless CMS. But really, I keep coming back to eleventy. Especially, there was some news in the last couple of weeks where Rich Harris, the creator of spelt joined, we joined Vercel. Right, so so it's he gets to work on it full time. It's still community driven, but it still also kind of feels a little bit like funding from Vercel. And with that, I, I don't Okay, I don't know if this is entirely accurate. But it's, I think of the group of static site generators or front end frameworks, popular front end frameworks today. The vast majority of them are funded by or have some ulterior motive for where they're there. The people are working for some particular company. And so even though they're open source, they're, I mean, I don't I'm not saying that they've done their communities to services in any way. But eleventy what I love about eleventy is that it is it for now. I mean, today, it's all about the community it is it is very much driven by the community. And it is. And I just I love the way that Zach leads that project. It's, it's really exciting. And similar to what I said about a stack bit and what we just mentioned about eleventy, it's, it's great, because you can get started and know if you know HTML, like you can, you're good, you can build a website, and you can just you can fly. And then you can you can piece together things a little bit at a time, like learn a little bit of nunchucks. Or eventually if we have if when slinky gets to version one, and maybe it's like maybe you just dip your toes into React and, and, but that it also seems like it's going to it's scaling well for a handful of folks. And so it's not like you learn it as an entry level tool. I think that's that's where it was for a while, like a great entry level tool. And then our I don't want to build a serious site. So I'm going to go get a serious framework. It's starting to become a serious framework, and, but without necessarily raising the barrier to entry. And I think that's, that's really cool. So that's, yeah, I just, I feel like I'm just gonna keep talking about stack bid and 11. D all day. Bryan Robinson 23:07 Yeah, no, that doesn't that that's a great combo. Anyway. Um, I also think it's entering you said, like, you know, rich, rich chains go into Vercel. And, I mean, Zack Letterman's at Netlify. But he's building sites for Netlify. And so I think the interesting thing that's happened there is that he's learned what a company the size of Netlify needs out of some of what it's doing. And that's what's been kind of powering is not that Netlify has been prescribing what he needs. But Zack as a developer using 11. D to build sites for an enterprise level company now knows more about what what 11 D needs for that area. I think that's an interesting bit of information that he's kind of feeding back into the the 11 D framework. That's Sean C. Davis 23:51 a great point. Absolutely. Bryan Robinson 23:53 All right, so let's shift gears a little bit. Let's go away from technology and let's let's find out what is your actual jam right now? What's your favorite song or musician? Or what are you listening to day in day out? Sean C. Davis 24:04 Alright, so I had I had to look this up because I'm I am all over the board in terms of music and I haven't hadn't been listening to as much recently as I have in the past it you know, excluding like, all the all the Disney soundtracks that are on all the time, kids. Okay, so just to tell you how weird my, my taste in music is. I was like, alright, well, what are what are a few of the what are a few of the albums that have been on in the last week or two? Okay, so I've had gone all the way back to the Beatles revolver. I love that one. Okay, then what I'm almost like chronologically What have I done? I put on I put on Jay Z's Black Album. I had. I forget what it's called is Sturgill. Simpson. He released a couple blue grass albums, I think I think they're called cutting grass. Maybe not. Do you know? I do not know. Okay. Blue Grass. And then what did I have? I've had the newer Lord and Taylor Swift albums on as well. So I'm like, all over all over the place all over the Bryan Robinson 25:18 place. Yeah. That's awesome. That's I mean, it's variety is the spice of life, right? Sure. Yes. Yes. I love that. Now, it's kind of open forum, right? Is there anything that you that you are doing right now you stack that whomever that you want to promote and get out into the Jamstack. Community. Sean C. Davis 25:34 I mentioned a little bit earlier, this this idea of the the Jamstack identity crisis. And I try to talk about this without sounding disparaging or critical, because I actually think it's a good thing. And I think there's a lot to come in come from being from the community being introspective and figuring out who we are. And so I had, I've had lots of conversations around this topic throughout the year. And in, in doing so what a few of us realized is that the, it? You know, I think we all kind of have a little bit of different opinion of like, well, where's the line? What exactly does Jamstack mean, but maybe it doesn't, maybe it doesn't totally matter. But it's still, like, like we talked about earlier, like, there's still a there's still that the the guardrail is in a sense, like, there, there is an established pattern, in a way to build websites, the web is going to continue to evolve, and it won't necessarily be the cool thing on the cool kid on the block forever. But that, that that community can still exist. So what what a few of us have done is we said, Okay, well, what if we step outside of that? And to say, What if we created a space where folks could talk about all sorts of different patterns and ways to build websites, and Jamstack and all of the tools and variations within within that community is part of that discussion, but it's not the only part of that discussion. So there's also folks who are building rail sites and are choosing rails for a good reason or choosing full stack WordPress for for a good reason. I'm sure there's a good reason in there somewhere. Maybe. And so it's it's goofy, and it's brand new, but it's called good websites club. And it's at you can visit the bare bones website. It's good websites dot club. And so we're there's, it's just a tiny discord community with a little bit of chatter now, but there are there are some grand visions for it. There's someone who's talking about conference and 20, to 23, maybe some, maybe some various meetups throughout there. Personally, I am starting a show that I'm calling the the good websites show, and I don't know exactly what it's gonna be, it's gonna, it'll evolve. But it's, it's gonna start as a live just like a live interview show. And in kind of, we'll talk about, yeah, grab various folks from around different communities and talk about problems they have solved on the web, all kind of in a way to help inform developers or even marketers, content editors just have different different patterns, different ideas that are out there, and kind of kind of help them hone in on what exactly they are. They're going after, and I think we'll see, my prediction is we're gonna see it largely be, there's, there's gonna be this huge fear to draw a Venn diagram, like a lot of overlap with Jamstack in the beginning, and maybe it evolves, I don't really know. But that's, I'm kind of excited to see where that goes, while also being really heavily invested in Jamstack. And seeing how that evolves, because this, this recent announcement of Netlify got got their next series of funding, and they're gonna pump $10 million investing in the Jamstack. And that is really exciting. I cannot wait to see what that means for the community. So that's, I'm working on Yeah, like, websites club, but but, but also really excited for the Jamstack at same time, Bryan Robinson 29:25 absolutely cool. I'm now a member of the discord as of two months ago. So I'm really excited to see that everyone else listening should go go sign up as well. And then keep an eye out for Shawn doing good websites show in the future as well. So Shawn, thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. And we look forward to seeing more amazing stuff you in the future. Sean C. Davis 29:46 Alright, thanks for having me, Bryan. Bryan Robinson 29:48 Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review rating star heart favorite whatever it is in your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Extreme Health Radio
Dr. Mark Sircus – Using Sodium Bicarbonate, Magnesium & Iodine To Prevent & Reverse Diseases

Extreme Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 61:26


[include file=get-in-itunes.html]If you're suffering from cancer, heart disease, skin issues, diabetes or a host of any other ailments this is a great show to listen to. Dr. Mark Sircus is truly a wonderful man doing amazing work. At the heart of his protocols are magnesium, sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and iodine. Did you know that you can prevent just about all major diseases for just dollars a day using his cutting edge therapies and protocols? He's on the cutting edge and we love to support people like him. Please listen to this interview and pass it on to your friends! Please "Like" it on Facebook and do whatever you can to help spread the message of hope to people! I would be very grateful. :) After you listen, comment below and tell us what you think! We discuss the following and so much more: How hemp oil/cannabis can help people heal & how to LEGALLY get some! What specific brands of magnesium, sodium bicarbonate and iodine to use Specific ways to use each of these different substances for your particular situation How a lack of key nutrients is at the cause of diseases A special announcement about his upcoming books and brand new website! Prevent and reverse disease for pennies per day. Learn what & where to buy these natural substances. - Click to tweet this! - Get Notified:[ois skin="Show Page2"] - Please Subscribe: Subscribe To Our Radio Show For Updates! - Other Shows:[include file=show-links.html] | All Shows With This Guest - Show Date:10/24/2012 - Show Guest:Dr. Mark Sircus - Guest Info:Dr. Mark Sircus, one of the most prolific writers in medicine, holds the honorary title of doctor of Oriental medicine and was one of the first nationally certified acupuncturists in the United States. He was trained in acupuncture and oriental medicine at the Institute of Traditional Medicine in Santa Fe, N.M., and in the School of Traditional Medicine of New England in Boston. He served at the Central Public Hospital of Pochutla, in Mexico. Dr. Sircus is the director of the International Medical Veritas Association (IMVA), which is advocating radical changes in orthodox medicine. Read More... - Topic:Cancer, Heart Disease, Sodium Bicarbonate, Iodine, Magnesium, Natural Healing - Guest Website(s): http://www.imva.info http://blog.imva.info/ http://publications.imva.info http://www.drsircus.com (Coming soon!) (Guest Social Links Below. Please Follow Them!) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/drsircus https://www.facebook.com/InternationalMedicalVeritasAssociation Twitter https://twitter.com/drmarksircus Youtube http://www.youtube.com/IMVAPublications - Guest Product(s):Click Below To Checkout The Products While Listening! :) - Items Mentioned: Rick Simpson - Phoenix Tears - Hemp Oil/Cancer Breathing Machine For Breath Work Legal Cannabis Products High Quality Nebulizers - Connect:Discuss This Episode With Others - Duration/Size:01:01:26 / 56.25 MB - Rate: Rate This Guest! - Rate This Show:[ratings] - Download:Right Click To Download - Donate: (Opens in a new window - Every bit helps us to keep delivering even better shows that help you heal & thrive!) - Support & Share :) Copy and paste the following HTML code into any web page. Or you can grab a badge! Interview with Dr. Mark Sircus on natural healing protocols - Video Version:Full Youtube Interview (Opens in a new window) Youtube Time - Follow Us!:Please consider ReTweeting the following update to share this episode...Learn how to treat, prevent and overcome almost all disease with controversial info from Dr. Mark Sircus!extremehealthradio.com/26— Extreme Health Radio (@ehrshow) October 24, 2012 -

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 813. New speculation on M2. More on 48MP iPhone Camera. HomePod reaches double digit marketshare. Philly gets updated Apple Maps. Debate on 27-inch iMac display. Dutch say Apple must offer alternate in-app payments. Home Sharing bug fixed. A lower cost Apple Display. Colored text in iPad NotesThing of the Moment: SIP. Special thanks to our sponsors: Smile - Check out TextExpander Hunter Douglas BetterHelp Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

LIFT Your Story
LIFT Your Story with Maxwell Ivey The Blind Blogger, Host of the What's Your Excuse Podcast and Inspirational Speaker

LIFT Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 36:23


What an enjoyable conversation with Maxwell.  We chatted about having a podcast and Maxwell says it's not always fun.  We can attest to that.  He says some people ask him how he does it as a blind man.  He went through the various things that are involved that many don't realize are a part of the process.  He also shared some of the platforms he uses that help people who are blind, specifically Blueberry.  Maxwell spoke about how the bar has been lowered, with some podcasts having noises in the background, such as dogs barking, however, the entertainment value is still there.Maxwell also spoke to being an Eagle Scout.  Very inspiring story.  He said it took him four years, and with a lot of support from great people.Listen as well about his earlier days of being in the Carnival business!We truly enjoyed having Maxwell as our guest.You can learn more about Maxwell by visiting his website https://www.theblindblogger.net/store and make sure you listen to his Podcast What's Your Excuse.  If you want to email him, you can do so at  justask@theblindblogger.net.  You can also find his network at www.wyexcuse.comMore about Maxwell:Maxwell Ivey grew up in a family of carnival owners. He started losing his vision to retinitis pigmentosa at an early age becoming legally blind by junior high school and totally blind by the time he graduated from college. He did graduate from traditional schools, achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, and worked in the family business until his dad's death forced the closure of their small show. Needing something new he started helping people sell surplus rides. He had to learn so much including how to hand-code HTML, recruit clients, set fees, build an email list, manage social media, and more. People were inspired by his willingness to take on difficult challenges and encouraged him to share more about being a blind entrepreneur. That led to a second site as the blind blogger, with three books out so far and a fourth due any time. He's promoted himself through podcast interviews appearing on over 200 shows as well as public speaking where he has shared his inspiring story with local organizations and national conferences. He helps other creative entrepreneurs grow their brands through online interviews. He loves to sing, travel, and find new adventures. If you have questions, just ask.    Free Book with any $20+ Podcast Support Make Up Not Required - How to Brand the TRUE You by LaurieAnn & Contribution by Roy MillerMaono Fairy Lite Multi-Functional USB Microphone. Great for Podcasters! Portable and affordable.BE A GUEST/FIND A GUEST Start for Free! PODMATCH is innovative, provides easy communication and dashboard scheduling! My pick of the month!Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://paypal.me/iamthatgal)

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Do you enjoy the "final 2 questions" I always ask at the end of the show? I think it's a great way to track the currents of the Python community. This episode focuses in on one of those questions: "What notable PyPI package have you come across recently? Not necessarily the most popular one but something that delighted you and people should know about?" Our guest, Antonio Andrade put together a GitHub repository cataloging guests' response to this question over the past couple of years. So I invited him to come share the packages covered there. We touch on over 40 packages during this episode so I'm sure you'll learn a few new gems to incorporate into your workflow. Links from the show Antonio on Twitter: @AntonioAndrade Notable PyPI Package Repo: github.com/xandrade/talkpython.fm-notable-packages Antonio's recommended packages from this episode: Sumy: Extract summary from HTML pages or plain texts: github.com gTTS (Google Text-to-Speech): github.com Packages discussed during the episode 1. FastAPI - A-W-E-S-O-M-E web framework for building APIs: fastapi.tiangolo.com 2. Pythonic - Graphical automation tool: github.com 3. umap-learn - Uniform Manifold Approximation and Projection: readthedocs.io 4. Tortoise ORM - Easy async ORM for python, built with relations in mind: tortoise.github.io 5. Beanie - Asynchronous Python ODM for MongoDB: github.com 6. Hathi - SQL host scanner and dictionary attack tool: github.com 7. Plotext - Plots data directly on terminal: github.com 8. Dynaconf - Configuration Management for Python: dynaconf.com 9. Objexplore - Interactive Python Object Explorer: github.com 10. AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK): docs.aws.amazon.com 11. Luigi - Workflow mgmt + task scheduling + dependency resolution: github.com 12. Seaborn - Statistical Data Visualization: pydata.org 13. CuPy - NumPy & SciPy for GPU: cupy.dev 14. Stevedore - Manage dynamic plugins for Python applications: docs.openstack.org 15. Pydantic - Data validation and settings management: github.com 16. pipx - Install and Run Python Applications in Isolated Environments: pypa.github.io 17. openpyxl - A Python library to read/write Excel 2010 xlsx/xlsm files: readthedocs.io 18. HttpPy - More comfortable requests with python: github.com 19. rich - Render rich text, tables, progress bars, syntax highlighting, markdown and more to the terminal: readthedocs.io 20. PyO3 - Using Python from Rust: pyo3.rs 21. fastai - Making neural nets uncool again: fast.ai 22. Numba - Accelerate Python Functions by compiling Python code using LLVM: numba.pydata.org 23. NetworkML - Device Functional Role ID via Machine Learning and Network Traffic Analysis: github.com 24. Flask-SQLAlchemy - Adds SQLAlchemy support to your Flask application: palletsprojects.com 25. AutoInvent - Libraries for generating GraphQL API and UI from data: autoinvent.dev 26. trio - A friendly Python library for async concurrency and I/O: readthedocs.io 27. Flake8-docstrings - Extension for flake8 which uses pydocstyle to check docstrings: github.com 28. Hotwire-django - Integrate Hotwire in your Django app: github.com 29. Starlette - The little ASGI library that shines: github.com 30. tenacity - Retry code until it succeeds: readthedocs.io 31. pySerial - Python Serial Port Extension: github.com 32. Click - Composable command line interface toolkit: palletsprojects.com 33. Pytest - Simple powerful testing with Python: docs.pytest.org 34. testcontainers-python - Test almost anything that can run in a Docker container: github.com 35. cibuildwheel - Build Python wheels on CI with minimal configuration: readthedocs.io 36. async-rediscache - An easy to use asynchronous Redis cache: github.com 37. seinfeld - Query a Seinfeld quote database: github.com 38. notebook - A web-based notebook environment for interactive computing: readthedocs.io 39. dagster - A data orchestrator for machine learning, analytics, and ETL: dagster.io 40. bleach - An easy safelist-based HTML-sanitizing tool: github.com 41. flynt - string formatting converter: github.com   Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Coiled TopTal AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
494: WYSIWYG Follow Up, Open Source Maintenance, Micro-Frontends, and Fleet vs GitHub Copilot vs VS Code

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 66:09


Dave's got some WYSIWYG follow up, thoughts on maintaining open source projects, what role do you assign clients in WordPress, what are micro-frontends, using HTML to author web components, an update on Coil, and Fleet vs GitHub Copilot vs VS Code.

Revolution and Ideology
Albert Camus – The Rebel – Part 3

Revolution and Ideology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 86:10


Become a Patron https://youtu.be/Z2IR15lDtTg We discuss Part 3 of Albert Camus' "The Rebel", Historical Rebellion. This is the section in which Camus provides his critique of totalitarianism, fascism, and Marxism. Other Resources: ✔CrimetInc. Against the Logic of the Guillotine: https://crimethinc.com/2019/04/08/against-the-logic-of-the-guillotine-why-the-paris-commune-burned-the-guillotine-and-we-should-too ✔The Fire These Times - Against the Logic of the Guillotine: https://thefirethisti.me/2020/03/25/againstguillotine/ Other Videos Subscribe on YouTube Twitter @RevAndIdeology Reddit r/RevolutionAndIdeology Discord Facebook Become a Patron! Subscribe! #mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; } /* Add your own Mailchimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block. We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */ Subscribe to our Newsletter * indicates required Email Address *

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 812. Apple's latest OS updates arrive. 27-inch iMac update in "Spring". Apple TV+ gets first Russian-language show. Mega-MP upgrade coming to iPhone 14?. Archive, the "other" backup. Use case for AR/VR headset. Thing of the Moment: Merlin Bird ID. TOTM Bonus: Notchmeister. Special thanks to our sponsors: LinkedIn Jobs Coinbase BetterHelp Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Successfully Bootstrap Your Way Into a Thriving Agency

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 13:20


Would you like to successfully bootstrap your way into a thriving agency? Rich Kahn has been fascinated by the internet since its very beginning in the 90's. He started a newsletter to talk about new internet developments and grew his audience to a point where he got offers to advertise products. He realized with a relatively small investment in hardware and his home internet connection he could make profits of thousands of dollars. From that point, he made sure every little success in his business could lead to further success by testing his ideas small and not going over budget. In his conversation with Jason, they talked about his formula for bootstrapping a business into success, why a bootstrapper should always be willing to learn everything they can about a business, and the importance of differentiating between profit and profit margin. 3 Golden Nuggets Bootstrap from success to success. The internet has been a passion for Rich from day one and led him to start his first business, a newsletter. He quickly grew his following and started advertising on it. He did this with a very small investment, some hardware and the internet connection he already had. So he turned a couple hundred dollars into thousands in earnings. “That's how I've always done it,” he explains. “You just kind of take one success and roll it into the next.” When he gets a new idea, he tests the waters small to see if there's approvability. Then he runs a bigger test and, if that works, he just keeps growing that and scaling that as fast as you can with budget you have. Learn as much as you can. If you're planning to bootstrap a company, you should try to minimize costs wherever you can. Of course, at some point it may be better to look for investors, but at the very beginning, when you're first figuring out your business model, margins, and everything else, you have to be a sponge and be willing to learn. For his first company, Rich took a week off from work to learn everything he could about HTML and web design and started making websites for his clients. “You gotta be working 70, 80, 90 hours a week to learn everything and do everything that needs to get done because you can't afford to bring in a high-end CFO to help you manage funds,” he insists. Profit vs. profit margins. Something he always makes sure his team and clients understand is the difference between profit and profit margin. A lot of times people get hung up with trying to make 70 or 80% margin on a campaign that at margin level there will be not enough room to scale it. In the end, you may have a killer margin but are making $2 on a campaign. It's important to try to maintain a balance between the profit and the profit margin. Although it's hard to talk in general terms when there are so many business models and variables, Rich recommends proving something that works and find the scaling point and always keep in mind that you pay the bills with the profit, not with the profit margin. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Be Willing To Learn Something New and Bootstrap Your Way Into a Thriving Agency {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, everybody? Jason Swenk here. And I have an amazing guest where we're going to talk about bootstrapping your agency and how to grow it. I'm excited to get into it. So let's jump into the show. Hey, Rich. Welcome to the show. Rich: [00:00:18] Hey, thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:20] Yeah, man, excited to have you on. How have you been able to bootstrap a lot of these companies? So let's talk about some of the companies that you've done and how you bootstrapped them and grew them over the years. Rich: [00:00:32] I guess bootstrapping is done regardless of the business. So we've done everything from email newsletter, right? And email marketing, basically back in the nineties, early nineties, like 93. I ran an ISP out of my house with 300 phone lines coming in. I've ran click networks, I've ran contests search engines, and now an ad fraud solution. And the bootstrapping technique for me has always been the same. Take what little resources you have, and most of my companies have had just a couple thousand bucks to get started, and really do as much of the work as you possibly can yourself. Even if it comes to web design, learn it yourself, or you hire some people that can do it very inexpensively because you've got to protect that what little budget you have. And get the company started, right? As I've started to see a little bit of success in small pockets of each of the different companies and each company's a little different. But when you start making a little bit of profit from something that I zero in on that, to make sure it's actually profitable and it's not just a fluke and slowly start to scale that up. As I was able to scale up stuff like that, go back to 93, my email newsletter. I was writing a newsletter because… it actually, it wasn't for profit. It was just fun. I was thrilled with the internet. It was launched in 91 for public consumption, I think it was September 1st of 91. 93 I got started and I started writing articles on all the new things that were happening and what was making it… Because I knew this was going to change the world. I just, I was hooked day one. And so I started with just writing a letter because I thought like a newsletter that I thought it was interesting. And I thought people would be interested in it. Back then with a couple of months I had over 20,000 subscribers, which back then was a lot, considering the makeup of the network and everything, there was more… Jason: [00:02:14] Were they all AOL email addresses? Rich: [00:02:17] Yes. Yes. What ended up happening was I was a big chatter in the AOL chat rooms and I would jump to the chat room, just say, hey, I've got a newsletter talking about the changing internet. If anybody's interested, sign up here. And that's all I did. And I ended up getting 20,000 subscribers that way all up. Back then they didn't call it opt in, but it was all opt in. I just started writing because it was something that I found interesting. And I'm not a writer by any stretch of the imagination, but it was something that I wanted to do. And probably once I broke about 10,000 subscribers, somebody said, hey, can I advertise in your, in your newsletter? I thought, sure, why not? And so I tested it on one article. I wrote in, I had one person advertise in it and obviously it was all profit, cause it was, there was no cost to my part. I was just my internet connection. And that was pretty much my total overhead for the month. And it made money. I'm like, wow, this is pretty cool. And as I'm analyzing saying, wow, this might be a business model, because the Ms model didn't really exist back then. Also, after the first article opposed I got three or four more people said, hey, can I advertise in your newsletter? So, again, I started the company buying some software to help me manage the list. I had my AOL connection, my normal internet connection, some hardware upgrades that I needed to do. So that was my initial cost. Put a couple hundred bucks into it, nothing crazy. And before you knew what I was making a couple thousand a week, just from people wanting to advertise in the newsletter. That started the growth from there. And then what was interesting, again, bootstrapping the whole way. Somebody again said, hey, you know, the worldwide web is out now. Maybe you can start a mall. I'd be happy to sign up and have a store in your mall. Cause that was kind of the thing back then. So I put a newsletter, I put a newsletter out, said, hey, we're going to put together a web mall. I'm going to basically build your website, give you three pages, do all the design work, host it for X number of dollars. If you're interested, you know, send me money. It was, it was that poor of a campaign and I got something like in the first week I got like eight or 10 grand. So it took a week off from work, because of course it was still working full-time, and read 2000 pages of HTML and then graphic design and put together the whole mall, wrote all the 50 or 60 websites, whatever it was. When it was all said and done, I finished it up in a week and the mall was launched and we were up and running. And that, that's how I bootstrapped into that. And all of a sudden we started growing a web development business. Then the next thing was people like, hey, I see that you guys do web development services. Do you offer a way to connect to the internet? I'm like, all right, I'm sure I could figure this out. So I, I ordered a couple hundred phone lines into my house from Verizon, got a T1 routed to my house. There was a big story behind that, but. You, just kind of take one success and roll it into the next. And that's how I've always done my stuff. So if I came up with the idea and not all the, not all my ideas were successful. But you came up with an idea, you test the waters small. And if there's approvability, then run a bigger test and that, that if continues to prove itself, just keep growing that and scaling that as fast as you can with budget you have naturally, you know. You don't want to start taking loans and bringing on partners. I have not had any luck, you know, going after funding and stuff like that. That's, I've always had to bootstrap and you just continue to parlay your success into the next success, until the next success. Until next thing you know, we end up selling that company. So, again, I'll start bootstrapping. You know, one of my more successful companies, we started with five grand and just took a while to parlay each little success into the next and trying to find out what campaigns worked until the next thing you know, you're doing really well. You know, you're winning 500 awards, you know, winning Ernst & Young awards. I mean, you start winning all this other stuff and people recognizing what you're doing. And it all started with $5,000 investment. So you can definitely bootstrap your way to big money, but you gotta be very careful with how you do it. It's always just testing the wins and like, I'll remember the first one, I'll give you an example. I ran a campaign that I was testing and I made 10 cents and I was flipping out. I was like, this is great. My wife's like you made 10 cents, big deal. I'm like, but you don't understand. I only spent two and a half cents to make that 10 cents. Now, if I could multiply that by a factor of a hundred thousand or a million, we could make some money, but this looks like a scalable... And like, she couldn't understand like initially why I was jumping up and down about seven and a half cents profit. But when it's 75% profit and you start doing the math and you start, and then you start proving that it is a scalable solution, things get a lot more exciting. But again, testing something as simple as, as a 10 cent campaign. You know, with a seven and a half cent win. To me, I get excited about as a bootstrapper Jason: [00:07:11] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients? You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients using revenue growth platforms. SharpSpring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now, for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with SharpSpring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smartagency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smartagency. That leads me to kind of think about, because… Yeah, I mean, in the early days, I'd be like, well, yeah, who cares about the couple of cents. But how are you able to kind of multiply that by a million? Rich: [00:08:15] That's the trick. Whenever I talk to clients from an agency voice, I always, I explained to them, there's two things. There's your profit margin. And then there's profit, right? You pay your bills with profit, not with margin. So a lot of times people are so hung up with trying to kill the margin and make, you know, 60, 70, 80% margin on a campaign that at that campaign, at that margin level, there's just not enough room to scale it. So maybe you're making two bucks on that campaign for the month. You can't do any with two bucks, even though you have a killer margin. So what I was trying to talk to my agency guys about, and the buyers is there's a good balance between your margin and your profit. You pay bills with profits. So I would rather have give up margin so I can scale it versus focusing on killing the margin and not being able to scale it. So depending on the campaign, depending on the business model, there's a lot you have to contend with. And again, each there, you know, it's hard to talk in generalities because there's just so many different business model types, but you got to prove something that works and find, find the scaling point. Like, don't worry so much about the margin. Worry more about how much cash you're going to put in your pocket that month. Because that's how you pay your bills and that's how you make money. Jason: [00:09:29] I always tell everybody it's like… When you're scaling, you don't have to worry about that as much. Like, there'll be like, oh, if we dip below this certain percentage, then you know, hey, we're in the red, but you're doing this for the longterm. And you know you're investing in the number one resource, you, that you can rather than putting it in the stock market or putting it somewhere else. So I'm like, hey man, go do it. So this has all been amazing, Rich. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience listening in? Rich: [00:10:04] Uh, you know, I've seen lots of companies do very well with bootstrapping. I've seen lots of companies do very well with investors getting, you know, raising capital. And I always point to like if you have a really good, unique idea, that's hard to enter into the marketplace because you've got some unique IT, IP or something like that. Sometimes going after funding is the right way to go. Like look at the big companies that we all know how many of them bootstrapped? Very few, right? They always got to a certain inflection point where they said, okay, now it's time to bring it. And there's a certain point where it makes sense to bring on outside money so that you can really scale something fast. If Facebook didn't bring on investors, we may not have heard about it. They may not have been as big as it is. They blew up once they brought on their investors who had, you know, different relationships, different ideas, different experience in managing a company at that level. So for a bootstrapper, you know, in the very beginning, when you're first figuring out your business model, first, figuring out your margins and everything else, you gotta be a sponge and you gotta be willing. It's not like, hey, I own a business. I can sit back and work the hours I want. That doesn't work with bootstrapping. You got to bust your ass. You gotta be working 70, 80, 90 hours a week to learn everything and do everything that needs to get done because you can't afford to bring in a high-end CFO to help you manage funds. Can't afford to do that. You have to do that yourself. Maybe you have that skill, maybe you don't, but you have to sit back and learn as much of the areas that you don't know about. Maybe you don't know about content marketing, maybe don't know about SEO. You need to learn it, because you can't afford to pay someone else to… The only thing you do have is time and you don't have a lot of money to invest as a bootstrapper. Well, most bootstrappers don't have a lot of money to invest, so you really have to focus on learning everything you don't know. And the more you learn, the more you realize you don't know anything. So you've got to really spend the time a good chunk of your time, learning every aspect of your business in order to how to grow it. Podcasts like this are awesome because... When I was growing up in the business, there were no podcasts, there were no… People that you can turn to, you couldn't connect with people who knew the space very well easily. Unless you knew their phone number, you weren't getting in touch with them. So today's, you know, entrepreneurs that are coming up in this space that are bootstrapping have access to all this great content, you know, tidbits like this, you know, 10, 12-minute podcasts they can absorb and pick up some information from experts who've done it for years. That is invaluable information. And you really gotta get plugged into the right places to learn as much as you can about the areas that you don't know. So you can grow your business without having to go hire somebody to do it. Jason: [00:12:28] Love it. What's a website, or how can people get in touch with you if they want to chat with you? Rich: [00:12:33] I'm on LinkedIn. I got a huge following and I post almost on a daily basis on LinkedIn, just Rich Kahn. Or you can find me all the contactinformation@anura.io, which is the current company that I'm growing. Jason: [00:12:45] Awesome. Well, everyone go check that out and, Rich, thanks so much for coming on the show. If you guys enjoyed this episode and you want to fast-track your agency a little bit more, and you want to know some of the systems, some of the framework that's working for agencies that's worked for me and what I would actually use again, I want you guys to go to jasonswenk.com/playbook and request an invite and check out all the systems that we have. That's jasonswenk.com/playbook. And until next time have a Swenk day.

IT Career Energizer
323: Invest In Yourself With A Growth Mind-Set and Understand The Value Of The Knowledge You Gain with Ben Hong

IT Career Energizer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 19:22


In this week's show, Phil talks to Ben Hong, a Vue.js Core Team Member and a Staff Developer Experience Engineer at Netlify as well as a Google Developer Expert in Web Technologies & Map Platforms. He has spoken, taught and Emc'ed around the world at events such as VueConfUS, Vue Toronto and O'Reilly's Fluent Conf. He is also a lead instructor at Vue Mastery, one of the premier learning platforms for the Vue.js community. Ben discusses the value in investing in yourself with a growth mind-set. He also talks about why we should always appreciate our personal career path, and the experiences that make it unique.   KEY TAKEAWAYS:   TOP CAREER TIP Always invest in yourself with a growth mind-set. Look for methods and ways to improve and develop in your own time, as every time your move forward, you add value to your career as a whole.   WORST CAREER MOMENT After completing a project, Ben was suddenly asked about which direction he wished to go next, and could not answer. This taught him the value in focusing on specific skills and directions.   CAREER HIGHLIGHT Getting the opportunity to join his current development team. For a long time, Ben had wished to reintroduce UX design to his portfolio, and this gave him the opportunity to do so.   THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN I.T Ben is excited about the popularity of open source, and the wealth of ideas happening right now on the web. The possibilities are seemingly endless.   THE REVEAL What first attracted you to a career in I.T.? – Ben read an HTML book when young, and was instantly excited by the possibilities. What's the best career advice you received? – Listen, learn, and then become the person that people come to with questions. What's the worst career advice you received? – That his dream career path was not possible. What would you do if you started your career now? – Ben would have taken much better notes! What are your current career objectives? Content generation, and empowering others to build incredible things. What's your number one non-technical skill? – Relationship building. How do you keep your own career energized? – Ben ensures that he associates with communities who understand the burnout that can blight many IT careers. What do you do away from technology? – Playing the ukulele.   FINAL CAREER TIP Never hesitate to invest in yourself, as no one can ever take away the knowledge you gain or the experiences you have.   BEST MOMENTS (4:19) – Ben - “You are getting the compound interest from skills at a much faster pace. This is key to long term sustainability when it comes to a career in IT” (10:24) – Ben - “That cluster of ideas, discussions and debates – that is what excites me. There's a lot to come and it's far from over” (12:49) – Ben – “By building relationships with people so they trust you, it does a lot for the impact and influence that you can have” (15:51) – Ben – “Coding problems aren't hard. People problems are hard”   ABOUT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil Burgess is an independent IT consultant who has spent the last 20 years helping organizations to design, develop, and implement software solutions.  Phil has always had an interest in helping others to develop and advance their careers.  And in 2017 Phil started the I.T. Career Energizer podcast to try to help as many people as possible to learn from the career advice and experiences of those that have been, and still are, on that same career journey.   CONTACT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/_PhilBurgess LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/philburgess Instagram: https://instagram.com/_philburgess Website: https://itcareerenergizer.com/contact Phil is also reachable by email at phil@itcareerenergizer.com and via the podcast's website, https://itcareerenergizer.com Join the I.T. Career Energizer Community on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ITCareerEnergizer   ABOUT THE GUEST – BEN HONG Ben Hong is a Vue.js Core Team Member and a Staff Developer Experience Engineer at Netlify as well as a Google Developer Expert in Web Technologies & Map Platforms. He has spoken, taught and Emc'ed around the world at events such as VueConfUS, Vue Toronto and O'Reilly's Fluent Conf. He is also a lead instructor at Vue Mastery, one of the premier learning platforms for the Vue.js community.   CONTACT THE GUEST – BEN HONG Ben Hong can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/bencodezen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bencodezen/ Website: https://www.bencodezen.io/

Changelog Master Feed
Frontend Feud: React Advanced Edition (JS Party #206)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:58


Jerod, Nick, and a node_modules-worthy collection of JS friends played an intense game of Frontend Feud at React Advanced London's after-party back in October. Today, you get to play along with us!

JS Party
Frontend Feud: React Advanced Edition

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:58


Jerod, Nick, and a node_modules-worthy collection of JS friends played an intense game of Frontend Feud at React Advanced London's after-party back in October. Today, you get to play along with us!

Podland News
Fake it until you make it, unless you buy it. Spotify's Megaphone buys Whooshkaa but still no date for exclusive podcasts, HiFi sound or transcriptions? SiriusXM we can't read you? Comments are live on Podverse and Buzzsprout supports the Person T

Podland News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 100:36


GUEST: Larry Rosin, the co-founder and President of Edison Research Spotify buys Whooshkaa! Congratulations Rob  Loewenthal.  A great guy and a great team.  SiriusXM is being sued for failing to provide podcast transcripts for deaf users by the National Association for the Deaf and the Disability Rights Advocates.  As we researched in June 2020, transcripts can offer significant SEO benefits.  The podcast:transcript tag is an open standard, supported by a number of podcasts and offers both static transcripts (in HTML or text) or real-time captions (in the SRT format). Widely supported by many modern podcast hosts including Captivate, Transistor, Buzzsprout, Omny Studio and others, a number of podcast apps display these transcripts, including the popular Android app Podcast Addict. Amazon Music has a proprietary solution for transcripts.Spotify added the right to transcribe using their own proprietary solution in May 2020, and a limited beta in May 2021. There is no mechanism for publishers to supply their own transcripts.Google offers live captions within every Android app on Pixel phones; that live caption tool is also available on desktop Chrome .  The company doesn't support the podcast:transcript tag.Apple surprisingly doesn't offer any live captioning.  The company doesn't support the podcast:transcript tag.With the exception of Podcast Addict,  no major podcast app supports transcripts. In terms of podcasts to test things on, Podland contains live captions and transcripts using the transcript tag. Also using that tag, the Podnews podcast contains a transcript only.Comments are live on Podverse! Podverse has added episode comments to their new website using ActivityPub Protocol.Buzzsprout now supports the podcast:person tag for hosts and co-hosts. It's available to everyone (and added to Podland).

Citizen Cosmos
Interchain ETH special: open-source, mass adoption, DAO's & web3

Citizen Cosmos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:44


In this interchain special episode of Citizen Cosmos we talk with 4 projects: Trading Strategy, Gnosis, Radicle & Gitcoin, in 4 short interviews during Liscon 2021. Trading Atrategy is an algorithmic trading protocol for decentralized markets. It is a decentralized protocol for the next generation quantitative finance. Decentralized automated trading strategies allow investing with more profit and lower risk, as investors get direct access to high quality investing strategies and real-time control over their assets. Gnosis builds new market mechanisms for decentralized finance. Our three interoperable product lines allow you to securely create, trade, and hold digital assets on Ethereum. Radicle adopts the Scuttlebutt social overlay paradigm by establishing a peer-to-peer replication layer on top of distributed version control systems, starting with git. User accounts and login is replaced by public key cryptography, hosted issue trackers are replaced by local peer replication, and the idea of a single canonical upstream is replaced by a patch-based peer-to-peer or "bazaar" model. Gitocin is a platform where you get paid to work on open source software in Python, Rust, Ruby, JavaScript, Solidity, HTML, CSS, Design, and more. Gitcoin is the community of builders, creators, and protocols at the center of open web ecosystems. Mikko's Twitter (https://twitter.com/moo9000) Richard's Twitter (https://twitter.com/rimeissner) Lukas's Twitter (https://twitter.com/SchorLukas) Abbey's Twitter (https://twitter.com/abbey_titcomb) Kevin's Twitter (https://twitter.com/owocki) We spoke to our guests about web3, and: Crypto Twitter Communication Open source tech Centralization and decentralization Hedge funds and greed Efficiency and mass adoption Product market fit DAO's and tools for the people Software and control Ordinary citizens and the blockchain The projects and people that have been mentioned in this episode: | Ethereum (https://www.ethereum.org/) | Trading Strategy (https://tradingstrategy.ai/) | Gnosis (https://gnosis.io/) | Radicle (https://radicle.xyz/) | GitHub (https://github.com/) | Gitcoin (https://gitcoin.co/) | Gnosis safe (https://gnosis.io/safe/) | If you like what we do at Citizen Cosmos: Stake with Citizen Cosmos validator (https://www.citizencosmos.space/staking) Help support the project via Gitcoin Grants (https://gitcoin.co/grants/1113/citizen-cosmos-podcast) Listen to the YouTube version (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19ZSB8-5y_8) Read our blog (https://citizen-cosmos.github.io/blog/) Check out our GitHub (https://github.com/citizen-cosmos/Citizen-Cosmos) Join our Telegram (https://t.me/citizen_cosmos) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/cosmos_voice) Sign up to the RSS feed (https://www.citizencosmos.space/rss) Special Guests: Abbey Titcomb, Kevin Owocki, Lukas Schor, Mikko Ohtamaa, and Richard Meissner.

Spill The Soju Kpop Podcast
Ep. 34- The “T” Networks: Tumblr for Kpop Stans

Spill The Soju Kpop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 63:55


Before Twitter, Tiktok, and Carrd became all the rage, we pay homage to a short-form multimedia sharing and microblogging platform that catered to our fandom needs almost a decade ago—TUMBLR. For the last episode of 2021, we put on our tita jackets and play the throwback card once again as we reminisce those youthful days of fandom imagines, gif reblogging, and HTML coding escapades. Happy Holidays everyone! We'll be back to spill more soju in 2022~! If you enjoyed this episode, make sure to follow, leave a comment, rate, and review our podcast! It will mean so much to us. Let us know what you want us to talk about by messaging us on our following platforms Instagram: instagram.com/spillthesojupodcast Twitter: twitter.com/stspodph Facebook: http://facebook.com/spillthesojupodcast E-mail: spillthesoju@gmail.com Website: msha.ke/spillthesoju Shopee Link: https://shp.ee/scbzgbi --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spill-the-soju/message

Kurzerklärt - Der Jurapodcast
Examenskurs zum Anhören: Kommunalverfassungsstreit, Saarheimer Fälle - #52

Kurzerklärt - Der Jurapodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 52:18


In der heutigen Folge geben wir euch das Grundgerüst für einen Kommunalverfassungsstreit an die Hand.NEU: Wir haben jetzt in den Show Notes noch weiterführende Links, die euch bei der Wiederholung unterstützen sollen.Da  Prof. Dr. Stelkens wieder auf unserer Couch Platz nimmt, werden wir also auch wieder mit Tipps und Anmerkungen zu Problemen des Falles unterstützt. Weiterhin sind für euch auch der Sachverhalt  und die Lösung des Falles kostenlos online einsehbar. Urteile und weiterführende Links sind ebenfalls in der Lösung vorhanden. Arbeitet den Fall also gerne vor oder nach der auditiven Beschallung durch. Den Sachverhalt werden wir immer etwas verkürzt darstellen, damit wir schneller in die Fallbearbeitung springen können. Und nun wünschen wir euch viel Spaß mit dem Fall "Zeitfragen" und lasst euch von uns berieseln.NEU  Weiterführende Links NEUWeiterführendes Urteil zum Fall:OVG Saarlouis, 1 R 35/91 v. 22.4.1993 = DÖV 1993, 964 ff.Verwaltungsaktsbegriff:U. Stelkens, in:  Stelkens/Bonk/Sachs, § 35 Rn. 12 und 15Kommunalverfassungsstreit:BVerwG, 10 C 2.17 v. 28.3.2018, Abs. 15 = BVerwGE 161, 323 Abs. 15VG Arnsberg, 12 K 127/07 v. 24.8.2007, Abs. 20 ff. = NWVBl. 2008, 113BVerwG, 10 CN 1/17 v. 27.6.2018 Abs. 24 ff. = BVerwGE 162, 284 Abs. 24 ff.OVG Saarlouis, 1 R 35/91 v. 22.4.1993, Abs. 31 = DÖV 1993, 964, 965, s. ferner Deubert, BayVBl. 2016, 585 ff.Fall zur Prozessführungsbefugnis:Saalbaubau-FallKapitelmarken:Einleitung 0:00 - 01:45Sachverhalt  01:45 - 05:10Zusammenfassung des Sachverhalts 05:10 - 05:38Vorüberlegungen 05:38 - 08:15Fallbesprechung 08:15 - EndeSachverhalt:https://www.saarheim.de/Faelle/zeitfrage-fall.htmLösung:https://www.saarheim.de/Faelle/zeitfrage-loesung.htmSaarheimer Fälle:http://www.saarheim.de/klausur.htm#InhaltWir freuen uns, wenn ihr den Podcast bei Apple Podcasts rezensiert oder bewertet.Außerdem freuen wir uns immer, wenn ihr euren Freund*Innen, Kolleg*Innen oder Mitstudierenden von uns erzählt.Viel Spaß beim Anhören.              Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/kurzerklaert)

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 811. Apple expecting 2022 iPhone bounce. M1 helps Mac growth in enterprise. Apple invested $275 million in China. Apple TV+ picks up Theranos biopic. macOS 12.1 RC brings SharePlay. Apple plans for next headset. More on next Apple products. Apps not linking to alternative payment options. Yet. Feel the classical music. A more open HomeKit. Apple VR events. External recovery on an M1 Mac. M1 doesn't do Windows. Thing of the Moment: Daylite Special thanks to our sponsors: Zocdoc Overland Notion Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

Friday Afternoon Deploy:  A Developer Podcast
Aesthetically Skeuomorphic

Friday Afternoon Deploy: A Developer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 72:22


Tyrel and Casey are joined once more by Chris Allen (Big Chris) as they talk about being NFT-curious, why being software-aware in sales works, and where the idea of mallsoft meets HTMLX. Also, mayonnaise versus Miracle Whip.“And then we get back to that bridge we burned and we'd be like, ‘Well, we better rebuild that bridge now.'”Show Notes:Hindsight in cryptocurrency is 20/20 (02:20)The James Bond Advent calendar: all sorts of awesome (08:33)Defcon movie night: Dune, the Alternate Edition Redux (17:13)/r/WeWantPlates and shovels (34:10)An entire social network that's just people dancing? (37:04)“It's okay to be aspirational in your business. But you need to know who your customer actually is…” (38:23)Mallsoft. (45:16)And now we're full circle (55:02)HTMLX, JSON, Ajax, and a lot of bridges (57:43)I heard you liked HTML: the Xzibit meme (1:07:09)

JS Party
So much Sveltey goodness

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 69:08


Rich Harris joins Amal & Amelia for a Svelte deep-dive! What's it all about? Why might you pick it over React and friends? What up with SvelteKit? Rich is working on it full-time now?! Will even more questions be answered?

Changelog Master Feed
So much Sveltey goodness (JS Party #205)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 69:08


Rich Harris joins Amal & Amelia for a Svelte deep-dive! What's it all about? Why might you pick it over React and friends? What up with SvelteKit? Rich is working on it full-time now?! Will even more questions be answered?

The Money Movement
Ep 42 | The decentralized internet with Dr. Tomicah Tillemann of Andreessen Horowitz

The Money Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 63:27


In the early 1990s, the internet consisted of simple, static HTML pages. These pages did not allow users to change on-screen data; they could only read information. Darci DiNucci, an early web designer named this first stage of the internet: Web 1.0. Then came the late 2000s and the advent of the interaction between users and websites. This stage has since been named Web 2.0, facilitated the rise of centralized social networks and brings us up to the present day. Now… Web 3.0 has arrived, leveraging blockchain technology to enable a more useful, inclusive and open internet. It is a movement towards the decentralization of finance, paving the way for the DeFi and NFT revolutions...   In this episode of The Money Movement, Jeremy is joined by Dr. Tomicah Tillemann, Global Head of Policy and Partner at Andreessen Horowitz.   They cover:  

Real Talk JavaScript
Episode 163: Theme Park Technology

Real Talk JavaScript

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 45:36


Recording date: Nov 19, 2021John Papa @John_PapaWard Bell @WardBellDan Wahlin @DanWahlinCraig Shoemaker @craigshoemakerBrought to you byAG GridIdeaBladeResources:Portion of the world with disabilitiesAriaSemantic HTMLBuilding Websites with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript: Getting StartedHTML5 FundamentalsDisney World Web SiteRise of the ResistanceGeofencingDisney World mobile appCaniuse.comDisney World photopassHarry Potter's Forbidden JourneyUniversal OrlandoGeolocation APIMobile ordering at Be Our GuestTimejumps00:37 Topic introduction01:55 Technology is everywhere at theme parks03:30 E Tickets04:38 What system has the biggest influence on your experience?06:55 Have you ever seen a purple light?07:42 Sponsor: Ag Grid08:44 The Magic bands12:29 It all starts on the web site16:06 Using semantic HTML18:55 Communicating with backend systems21:24 Dealing with edge cases24:38 What about the mobile app?29:20 Sponsor: IdeaBlade30:22 Phones and Watches to unlock31:52 Technology inside the park35:59 Purchasing systems37:01 The poop app39:10 Food and restaurantsPodcast editing on this episode done by Chris Enns of Lemon Productions.

VO BOSS Podcast
Modern Email Marketing

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 29:23


Whether you're working a zero-inbox system or have thousands of unread emails, we're going to teach you how to manage your email marketing like a #VOBOSS. In this episode, Anne & Laya discuss strategies for running successful email campaigns and teach you how to manage your mass communications like a total pro. From concise content creation to developing better reading and writing skills, it's all about strengthening your marketing muscle! >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, along with my amazing special guest co-host Laya Hoffman. Laya: Hey Anne, hey BOSSes. It's great to be back. I've enjoyed our conversations, this entire sequence of modern mindset. I really appreciate being here and all you shared with me. So thanks for having me back. Anne: Yeah, so let's continue, shall we, on our modern mindset? Because our last few episodes we've talked about marketing, social media, and I think an important one to cover as well, in order to evolve, our businesses is email marketing. Laya: Yes. Anne: Like, do you do email marketing? How do you do email marketing well, in a modern way? How do you not become a spam annoying -- Laya: Yeah. Anne: -- person out there? So, yeah, it's very, again, with all the chaos that is out there today, everything digital flying at us, it's hard to know sometimes. Laya: It's a lot of noise. Yeah. Anne: Yeah. How do you cut through the noise? Laya: Exactly. And stay relevant, stay top of mind with your clients without kind of brow beating and being a bit of a nag and being the thing that clogs up their inbox. Because the last thing you want is them to roll their eyes when they see, you know, oh gosh, another Monday morning email from Laya Hoffman that's about her, and not anything I need. You know? I mean, that's where I'm very cognizant of. I think there was a big push maybe a couple of years ago when email marketing was at its height. And it seemed like there's still a lot of talent that subscribe to that train of thought that is like, oh, I must get content out. I must get a direct email to my list. Anne: A newsletter. Laya: I need to cultivate my newsletter. Anne: It was a thing, a newsletter to the list. Laya: And maybe it's still a thing, if you really have important quality content and information to share, that's rich for your client or your audience, like a podcast or a new episode. And you've got buy-in from the people that, that are really connected to that. Anne: Backing up. Buy-in. Laya: Okay. Buy-In. How do you even know? Anne: Let's start there. 'Cause I think, right, before we send email, we have to have a list. And before we have a list, we really honestly should get permission -- Laya: You should. Anne: -- for people to be on that. Laya: It's the law. Anne: It is the law. Laya: That's the thing. Anne: It is to be spam compliant. And I want this to be so important. If you guys get anything out of this episode, let it be that if you have permission for your clients to be on your list, that is really the optimum way of being able to communicate with your clients and your potential clients. And there's so many people out there with cold emails, and it's a lot of discussions going on in the groups and everything. And cold emailing is certainly way. However, I'm going to tell you, how do you feel -- first of all, actually, I won't tell you, I'll ask you. How do you feel when you get an uninvited email from somebody -- Laya: Gross, icky. Anne: -- that's trying to sell SEO or trying to sell, uh, you know, we can develop your web page. I get it. And I look at it and I go, hmm, I didn't ask for that. Laya: You automatically -- yeah. You automatically have a bad taste in your mouth, right? Anne: Yeah, I don't like it. Laya: That's the last thing you want from your clients, for sure. Anne: So cold emailing anything, it's just, it's a tricky, tricky business. So I want to warn people to please just be very, very cognizant of what it is that you're writing in those emails and how you're sending those emails. I tend to get people's permission before I email to them. And there's lots of different ways to do it. It's a little bit more, I would say than an advanced kind of a method to do that instead of just mining Google for production companies or owners of companies. I think that with a little bit of work and a little bit of innovative marketing of yourself, you can get people on your mailing list, and then they're not going to be angry when you email them. Laya: I tell you what I did when I first started my email list. And I dunno, there's a couple of hundred emails on there, and sure, I'm able to get that. You can sign up on my email list on my website, 'cause there's a capture there. Or if you've ever sent me a message on my website -- Anne: But that's a good thing. Right? Laya: -- on my website -- Anne: That's a good thing. Laya: Sure. You know, there's not a lot of people that are signing up on my website because I don't really have a newsletter. It's more of an inquiry -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- taken there. But what I did, I think as I started to cultivate my list of clients, I would send -- and I only send maybe an email once a quarter as mostly about bookout dates or anything, really new and relevant that may be worth sharing and provide value to them. Like, you know, the kickoff of our podcast or this podcast right here. Hey, check this out. You might find value in this. I say at the top of the message always why and how I've secured their email. You know, thank you for being a great client of mine. I've enjoyed working with you in the past. I would like to include you in this message. However, if this doesn't resonate with you, and you'd like me to remove your name in the future, please click here. That's almost like the first thing that I have communicated. And I feel like that may cross the line a little bit, but it's still asking for permission right from the jump. What do you say? Anne: Oh no, I think that's excellent. I think if you did not actually get their permission by, you know, they clicked on that -- because I actually have pop-up windows on all of my websites that say, do you want to be involved or do you want to get on my mailing list? And so there's the terms and policy that is there as well, saying that -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- by clicking this box, you agree to allow marketing, blah, blah, blah, blah. I can't remember the exact verbiage, but it's there. So if they decide to be on my mailing list, they agree that I will be able to market to them, and they will have the option to get off of that mailing list. So that's number one for me. And so for me, because I have three different brands that do three different functions, that helps me to get a lot of people on my list. If you're just doing voice talent, you're right. People are probably not running to your website and clicking, oh, sign me up. Laya: Sure. Anne: But even so the ones that do, which I think are great, anybody that might want to inquire how much it might cost you to do a particular job, and maybe they'll sign up for email. That's great. You've got their permission. And then also if you're going to do that cold email, I love the fact that in the very beginning of you say, hey, you've been a client of mine. If not, you know, if you would like to be taken off this email list, click here or simply reply, remove to this email. And I've seen that on like a, a regular text email. You know, for me, I send out all emails that are HTML enabled and have graphics and that sort of thing. But if you're just writing through Gmail or Apple mail or however, you're communicating with these people, a simple text message that says, this is how I got your email. Please reply remove if you'd like to be removed from this list. Laya: Yeah. Anne: And I think that is the most gracious way to do a cold email. Laya: Exactly. That gives grace and says like, asking permission right off the jump and letting them know how you secured their information because privacy is a big thing. Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: You got to respect that in every aspect we can. And that kind of takes that -- Anne: It's the law. Laya: -- gross feeling off. For sure. It's the law. Anne: It's the law. Laya: Stick to the regulations and follow the rules, people. Anne: It's funny how many people don't -- like you think just sending an email to somebody unsolicited, you know what I mean? It is the law. Laya: Yeah. Anne: I mean, it, I mean, people may not take action, but it is the law. Laya: Well, in the states -- Anne: Exactly. Laya: -- it's less, I think, regulated as bad here, but like, you know, in the European Union -- Anne: Oh my God. Laya: GDPR, Canada. Absolutely. Anne: And California now has their own set of rules. And so -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- it really is. And I think as we progress, and data just becomes increasingly larger and larger and just more and more digital information coming at us, I don't think those laws are going to go away. I think they're going to be more of them coming. And so we need to secure permission in order to email people. And I think that is a very forward thinking, modern mindset, number one. So how do you get people on your list? You must offer them a way to get off of the list if you did not ask for their permission. Absolutely. So that's number one. Laya: That's number one. Yeah. And then frequency in general, I think we touched on this just a moment ago. I have a different kind of routine than you do, but also a very different brand and I'm not offering coaching and products and things like that, but always providing value within that email. And keeping it, for me, I feel like everyone realizes their attention span. Anne: Oh my goodness, yes. Laya: We -- the humankind has the intention span of a gnat these days. You know, if you're still listening right now, a few minutes in, we're grateful for that attention because thank you for being more than a gnat. Anne: Yeah. Laya: But really you, you have to be concise in your message and don't waste the reader's time. Value their time and input and that they gave that much to you. So being concise is key. What is there? There's like a new acronym at the top, TL/DR. Too long didn't read. And that's really to give you the footnotes of what you may say in three paragraphs in three sentences. And so once you write that email, I always take a step back, come back to it a few hours, or you know, even a day later, if I have that opportunity and like cut it down. I mean, you feel like you've got so much to say. Somebody else may only have just, you know, wants the bullets or the, the light version of that. So keep that in mind. Anne: And you, and you mentioned too that you send a quarterly email and say, well, maybe if you're going to book out a certain amount. So very similar to our BOSS Blasts, you know, we do a monthly BOSS Blast that just has bookout dates. It's super simple. It's like a few sentences. Hey, happy summer, you know, nothing that's necessarily too spammy or selly and oh, by the way, here's the new project that I just voiced or whatever that is, a picture of my cat. Again, it could be, you know, something that is not going to be intensely annoying. By the way the BOSS Blasts are -- Laya: Or selly. Anne: Or selly. By the way, the BOSS Blasts are all what I call vetted lists. People have already given permission. So we do a once a month. And in reality, we also know who we're sending to, so agencies or we're sending to in-house production companies. So if they've already agreed to allow us to send them email, they're expecting us to market to them. But again, we still don't want to waste their time. We're very succinct in our body of our text and our email. And hey, these are my bookout dates. Here's a new project, send a link to YouTube channel. If they want to take a look at that, and hey, have a great summer or, you know, hope you're doing well. And that's it. And actually once a month, if you think about it, and I always tell the story, like I subscribe to, I don't know, Old Navy, right? Old Navy three or four times a week sends me email when they have sales on different things. And so I know I'm subscribed, so I'm okay with getting the email from Old Navy. And as it goes through my inbox, I see it. I look at the subject, I look at who it's from. I look at the subject, and if that subject entices me to open it up, like maybe there's a sale. Well, I have -- a sale on shorts. I have a need for a pair of shorts. That's going to make me click it. I click it. And then I see the body of the email. Maybe there's a coupon code or whatever there is. And then if I want to go and buy, I will go to the website and buy. Think of that in terms of your voiceover business. Laya: Yes. Anne: So people may just see who it's coming from and your subject line. And if they don't need you at the time, they may just let it go through your inbox. Especially if they've given you permission, right, to allow you to market to them. It's okay. It's going to stay in my -- or you'll delete it later if you don't need it. But that doesn't mean that you can't email them next month, right? And next month they're like, oh yes, I need a voiceover to do this particular job. Click and buy. Boom. That's it. Laya: Yeah. And a good point of that is, especially if you are including your bookout dates -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- maybe include the -- as your subject line. So if they don't read, and they're like, oh shit, she's out of town next week. Anne: Yup. Laya: I was just thinking I needed a voice talent. And you know what? I want to pick up the phone now so I can lock her in for, you know, before this time she's given us, a couple of weeks. How far out, just speaking of bookout dates -- I don't want to digress from this. This topic is so key -- but how far out do you give your clients notice on bookout dates? Anne: Well, I do a monthly blast. So it's anything within the month. Laya: Okay, so wherever that falls. Anne: Yup. Laya: Got it. Curious about that. Like how far is too long? I think two weeks' notice is always good because inevitably you get the call like the day before you leave town. Anne: Exactly. Laya: That's a whole other conversation. Anne: Don't you always get the most work when you leave town? Always, right. Laya: When you're out of town. Yes. But I have a hard habit of actually traveling with my rig. Which I don't mind. Anne: That's another episode. Laya: That's another conversation, for sure, for sure. But getting back to this, I got to ask you two questions, which email marketing platform do you use? I use MailChimp. I was curious what you use. Anne: I use -- well, for my BOSS Blast, I use Active Campaign because I have a number of contacts. Laya: Okay. Anne: And usually the mail servers or the mail campaigns, they have a limit to the number of contacts or you pay based on the amount of contacts that you have. Laya: Pay over. Yeah. Anne: I used to use MailChimp. And now I just, because I went to a bigger platform with the BOSS Blast because I need to support a whole lot more contacts -- Laya: Yeah, they charge you per, right. Anne: -- I need to support like 90,000 contexts. So I'm using Active Campaign. Laya: Go girl. Yeah. Anne: So. Laya: Yeah, I'm on MailChimp because under 1000 is free. Anne: Yup, yup. Laya: And I really like the interface and the kind of the user experience, the UX on that is really flawless -- Anne: Oh yeah, I love MailChimp. Laya: -- for someone that does and doesn't know, plus they're Atlanta based, shout out, MailChimp. So that's kind of become my CRM, which leads me to my next question, to CRM or not? Anne Ganguzza, what's your take? Anne: Well, the CRM, I've often thought -- I tried Nimble back in the day, and Nimble had a problem with the amount of email that I had in Gmail. So, and I may be very untypical, and I'll just kind of, I digress just a little bit. Right now, if I look at my inbox -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- I have, uh, where does it tell me -- I have 949,367 unread emails. So, so what that means is -- Laya: Oh my gosh! Hold, can we have a moment for my zero inbox anxiety that just had a heart -- Anne: I know! Laya: -- palpitation? Anne: Most people have that. Most people have that. Laya: Anne, I have a zero inbox threshold. It's the Virgo in me and also the highly control freak. And I don't know, I don't know what that is, but you're -- you just gave me a heart palpitation. Anne: I know. Well, okay. So very few people know this about me, but the people that do know me, they know me so well. So I signed on to Gmail back in the day when it first started. I want to say it was 1990-something. And so Google is a search engine. So for me, I just never deleted my email because I can search my mail. Laya: Sure. Anne: And it's a really good search engine, by the way, if you've ever used Google at all. Laya: Yes, it is. Anne: The Gmail search engine is a great search engine, so I've never had the desire to really delete my mail. So. Yeah. Laya: Oh my gosh, I have a funny story for you really quickly. You know, how on your phone, if you're using an Apple phone, you can accidentally like select all, if you are in your email box? Anne: Oh yeah. Laya: Well, I did that once, recently. I select all and deleted, and I didn't mean to do it, but I did it. And then like after I got over the initial -- luckily this was not my business inbox, but after I got over the initial, like panic that I had just lost all this content, I felt like -- Anne: Free. Laya: -- kind of, yeah, totally free. Meanwhile, you're over there just hoarding. Anne: I know, unread emails do not disturb me -- Laya: It's awesome. Anne: -- because I look at it as a search engine. Laya: Okay. They disturb me. But that's fine. Anne: So Nimble back in the day had a problem. They wanted to charge me based upon the number of emails. And so I was like, well -- Laya: They were gonna get rich on you, wow. Anne: -- I am not paying that. And so in reality before then I had used Gmail believe it or not just to organize all of my contacts and star them and put colors on them. And that became my working folder of contacts. And ultimately, you know, my Active Campaign, which is my mailer. And I had MailChimp for a long time before I ran out of the contacts, and I just had, then I had to go into pricing more of which one was better, and which mail service could do the best for me. So I ended up with Active Campaign because it handled the amount of contacts, but it's also a CRM for me. I have a database of contacts. I know what the last campaign was sent. I know if they opened it. I know if they clicked. I know what links they clicked. And that is my CRM. And I have automations so that if I want to follow back with this particular contact, I can do that. So that's my CRM -- Laya: Yeah, that's awesome. Anne: -- but not -- it's not like a CRM like Nimble or any other, HubSpot or those types of things that you buy specifically a CRM for, but it does everything that I need a CRM to do. Laya: Yeah. And I appreciate you giving us that candid feedback because I feel like there is a little bit of a push, and that's from some really great established voiceover-specific CRMs that have been fabulous for people. I just haven't personally kind of gone down that path yet. I always feel like, you know, is it cart before the horse, chicken before the egg? Like, you don't know, you need a CRM until you need a CRM, and you've got enough contacts, but it's also very hard to start or justify cost when you don't feel like you have a lot of contacts. So I kind of bridged this gap between managing my contacts through -- Anne: Yup, yup. Laya: -- MailChimp, but also used HubSpot and Zapier to really connect those two and extract the emails and the content and the information I needed. There's a free program within those two that, that I was able to leverage. And I don't go back to it on a regular basis. I probably scrub all of my emails through the connection of Zapier and HubSpot maybe twice a year. And I would like to migrate eventually to a CRM because I feel that it can be wildly beneficial, especially as an ex-marketer and a new modern-minded entrepreneur. But I haven't gotten there yet either. And I think that's okay. Anne: Yes. Laya: I still have a thriving business. I feel like I have a flag system as well within Apple mail. And right now it works for me, but I definitely see that in my future too. So it's good to hear your feedback, especially with such an established list like you have. Um, very cool. Thanks for sharing. Anne: I just have never kind of had the need to go more in depth than that. You know? I've got all the information that I need in terms of the contact information, the campaign they last opened, when the campaign was sent. I mean, there's just a ton of information. And if I feel like I need to have something that prompts me to contact them again, I build an automation, and that's, that's really all it is. So. Laya: Yeah. Talk to me a little bit more about automation. I use it in some other scheduling platforms, like in Calendly. I use that there when scheduling for voiceover sessions and things like that. And I definitely think there's a whole conversation around hacks throughout this marketing bubble that can help streamline our workflow and make us more efficiently productive in our VO BOSS businesses. But talk to me about automation and how you use it in email. And do you use it as a one-off to individuals or is it just cyclical? How does it work? Anne: It can be either or. So it really depends on where I'm doing this. So if I'm just working out of Gmail for an individual contact, um, and sometimes this works or not, you know, I have something called Boomerang, which Boomerang allows you to -- Laya: Okay. Anne: -- you kind of put that to rest. It'll reappear in your inbox. And then if you decide you want to schedule an email after that, after you read it, there's lots of different things that you can do. You can schedule an email to go out, you know, the following week or the following month. In my Active Campaign, there is a whole module that you can build automations off of. And I have -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- information on, you know, I can put contacts in a list and contacts that are a part of that list. Every time something happens, every time they open an email, every time I send a campaign or whatever it is, it goes into an automation. And then it's like, you build a flow chart. And so, okay, open this campaign, and then you want to say, okay, they opened the campaign. Then, you know, wait two days and then send them a follow-up email. And then after the follow-up email, we're going to wait maybe a week or maybe a month. And we're going to send up the second follow-up email. And so you can check on the contact and know where they are in that automation. Are they 20% through? Are they, you know, have they reached this? Laya: Did they read the whole thing? They click this link? Right? Very cool. Anne: yeah. Laya: I love how we can leverage that now to make us a little bit more savvy in our marketing -- Anne: Exactly. Laya: -- more personal, but also again, with those light touches of personal connection, like as if, without being Big Brother -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- and like, you know, too heavy in the sell or too creepy in the, in the callouts -- 'cause a lot of people that don't understand marketing or like how was that thing following me? Well, how did it know? At this point I think everyone's onto those automations, but it's also so helpful to streamline your business. So I love seeing that in real-world applications. Anne: Yeah. Absolutely. It's, you know, and it's something you have to put your time into. I know there's so many BOSSes out there -- Laya: Sure. Anne: -- and marketing -- you know, it's interesting. 'Cause I think marketing is the thing that we need the most of as entrepreneurs and business owners. But yet it is the thing that people like the least, or it's also the thing -- and this is, this is straight-up experience in terms of selling classes for years to the voiceover industry -- it is the class that does the worst in terms of sales, meaning they all say they need it. They all say they want it. But yet when it comes time for clicking the buy, right? Most voice talent are going to buy the performance oriented class rather than the marketing class. And it's just the truth there. Laya: Yeah. Because it's scary. Anne: It is. Laya: And it's, there's so much complexity, and then you feel like, you know, you need it, but you can't learn it. Anne: But you can learn it. Laya: Gosh, it's an investment. Anne: That's the thing. Laya: And you absolutely can. Anne: I want people to know that. Laya: These can be baby steps. Yeah. That's why, I'm glad we talked about the CRM. Like I felt so much pressure to invest in the system that I was going to have to learn and apply and et cetera. And I just said, hold on a second. Let me just piece by piece. I know that's on my future roadmap as far as the business owner. However right now this is working for me. And I think it's okay to say that. Anne: You know -- Laya: You know? Anne: You know what's so interesting is that I did not go to school for marketing. Like nowhere in my educational history was there ever a marketing in class ever. And as a matter of fact, I didn't even start to learn how to market until I started becoming an entrepreneur, which is boom, I quit my corporate job. And all of a sudden here I was trying to build up my voiceover business. And so I went from making a salary to making $0, and my own, I'm going to say guilt -- Laya: Same here, girl. Anne: -- guilt maybe of not being able to contribute to the household motivated me to move my butt to figure out how am I going to make money at this? Because I have to, because I want to be a contributor to the household. And it was my own motivation and push that I learned marketing online. I literally, I signed up for mailing lists. I saw how other people marketed. And over the years, I literally just became a marketer myself because I had to. I mean, it was just, and I think that anybody -- look, if I can do it, I mean, honestly I think anybody can learn marketing. It just takes -- Laya: Yeah, truth serum here. I'm right there with you. I went to school for radio broadcasting, not marketing, but then became a VP of marketing -- Anne: Yup. Laya: -- because of learning -- Anne: Exactly. Laya: -- and real-world application and just -- Anne: To survive. Laya: -- paying attention to -- yeah. And to what resonates with you as a person. Right? And that's really all it comes down to. It's like, how would you want to be approached? Anne: Be marketed to. So you know how to market to people. Laya: Exactly. Anne: That's it. Yeah. Laya: Pay attention. That's the modern mindset in marketing. Anne: That's exactly -- I think, you know what? I think that's absolutely how I even learned to like, what is acceptable in terms of email marketing? Right? Well, I'm email marketed to. Sign up for those lists. This is probably why I have 967,000 unread emails, because guess what? I signed up for every type of business email list there was -- Laya: Right. Anne: -- so that I could -- Laya: It's research. Anne: -- yeah. So that I could get those emails, look at them and say, hmm, okay. I see how they're marketing. I like this one. I don't like this one. This one's annoying. And literally, I completely honest, as a matter of fact, I didn't even realize that that's probably why I have all the unread messages, but again, I did open some of them. Right? And I did open enough of them to really kind of learn how to market in my own way that I felt would be effective for my business so everyone can learn. Laya: Yeah. Anne: Everyone can learn. Laya: Absolutely. And what's cool about email marketing, if you are a numbers person or if you kind of, you like to look at stats and see like a real ROI and the real results, so many of these platforms may get really hyper easy for us to understand the analytics behind what you're sending out. And then you can kind of tweak accordingly, you know. MailChimp makes it really user-friendly. I'm able to see how many people, what my open rate was, which really just means how many people from that several hundred actually clicked on my email, actually clicked through to see my latest link or my latest video that I embedded there. Anne: Yeah. Laya: It makes it so easy to drag and drop graphics and blocks. Anne: Sure. Laya: And there's so many new, easy platforms to help you get imagery and borrow content or share a great story. So it really doesn't have to be over complicated, and you might actually surprise yourself in seeing how fun it is to play the numbers game on the back end. Anne: Yeah. Laya: And, and, you know, get your little virtual pat on the back by looking at your analytics and starting to understand those things. And these days, everything from websites, minds -- again, with Squarespace, it makes it super easy on the back end to see those things. Anne: Yeah. Wix -- Laya: Same with like MailChimp -- Anne: -- as well. Laya: -- same with those, all of those, make it super kind of cool to look at -- Anne: Yeah. Laya: -- your new, modern way of marketing again. So it's, it's really interesting to dive in once you do. Anne: And by the way, for those of you that are interested, a 10% open rate is actually very good. And so -- Laya: So good, so good! Anne: -- if you send an email to 100 people, if 10 of them open that email, that's awesome. And if by the way, over 1% click on it, that is awesome. So that -- Laya: It's a win! Anne: -- is a win for you. So it's funny how many people don't realize, you know, it was kind of like when you invite people to a party, right? They say expect 10% to -- well, maybe not a party, but an event, right? Expect 10% to show up. Laya: Oh yeah. Anne: If it's my party, I want 100% of my people to respond. Laya: 100% attendance. Anne: Well, here's the deal. How interesting of a comparison is that? If I have a party and I invite people that I know, and they're my friends and they know me very well, I expect 100% of people to show up. Right? Maybe 90, if there's -- Laya: Or at least respond. Anne: Right? Laya: Sure. Right. Anne: So think about that in terms of your email marketing, right. If you don't know anybody that you're inviting to the party, what are you going to say to get them interested? Right? And how many are actually going to open that invitation, and then how many people are actually going to click and go to the party? So I like to maybe compare it to, to the party. So that 10% open rate and over a 1% click rate is awesome. So. Laya: Don't, don't let that discourage you. Anne: Exactly. Laya: Exactly right. And I think it's okay to, just like we've talked about in past episodes of like, what do I even say? You know, have a purpose, have something to share. Yes. But it's okay to start off with a little bit of kind of candid, you know, human, like -- Anne: Photo of my cat. Laya: -- hey, this is my -- Anne: This is my cat! Laya: -- very first email blast. Thank you for allowing me the space to share. And if you've gotten this far, I appreciate it and hope you're having an awesome day so far, you know. It's okay to be very human in that. In fact, I find that -- Anne: Will help Laya: -- that creates more of -- yeah, connection and more empathy from whoever might be on the other end opening it. So don't let that scare you. Anne: Good stuff, wow. I really feel email marketing is just one of those that I feel the mysteries of the universe for most voice talent. And we hope that we've been able to help you guys at least cut through -- Laya: Yes. Anne: -- some of the mystery and get you thinking in a modern mindset for email marketing for today. Laya: Yes. Thank you for having me, Anne. It's always a pleasure. I'm looking forward to our next conversation. Anne: Me too, me too. Laya: Thanks for having me, BOSSes. Anne: Me too. That's a big shout-out to ipDTL, our sponsor. You too can connect like BOSSes. Find out more at ipdtl.com, and you guys, have an amazing week, and we will both see you next week. Bye-Bye. Laya: Thanks, everybody. Bye-bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Revolution and Ideology
Albert Camus – The Rebel – Part 2

Revolution and Ideology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 57:19


Become a Patron We discuss Part 2 of Albert Camus' "The Rebel" in which he analyses metaphysical rebellion. We cover the Marquis de Sade, Max Stirner, and Friedrich Nietzsche. See Part 1 of our discussion: https://youtu.be/xFj-S_BVK5w Related Videos: ✔ Steve Cutts - Man: https://youtu.be/WfGMYdalClU ✔ The Myth of Sisyphus: https://youtu.be/HKoOeHr7kPE ✔ Nihilism Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4o0Pg6siIo&list=PLTDkb5EgSppMcN8C9iW3PzYo5q6k_Zkxh   Other Videos Subscribe on YouTube Twitter @RevAndIdeology Reddit r/RevolutionAndIdeology Discord Facebook Become a Patron! Subscribe! #mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; } /* Add your own Mailchimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block. We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */ Subscribe to our Newsletter * indicates required Email Address *

eCommerce con Shopify
Meta descripciones con Shopify

eCommerce con Shopify

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 6:59


Meta descripciones con Shopify Mediante una etiqueta HTML  de aproximadamente 150 caracteres tú puedes incluir la información más relevante de tu tienda, producto o marca (que aparecerá debajo de título). Misma que servirá para que cuando un usuario ingrese a los buscadores palabras claves y específicas, pueda encontrarse con tu sitio. Si bien las meta descripciones no son necesariamente un factor de clasificación, resultan bastante útiles y efectivas. En este Podcast de inicio de semana queremos compartirte la importancia de utilizarlas .RecursosAndrés Alvarez, ED DigitalComparte tu opinión.Únete a nuestro grupo de Facebook: eCommerce con Shopify - en Español.No te pierdas ningún episodioSuscríbete en iTunesSíguenos en FacebookAuspiciadoresRewind - Instala el app de Rewind y menciona el podcast eCommerce con Shopify en cualquier de los correos electrónicos que recibirás para que obtengas tu primer mes gratis.AfiliadosShopify - Prueba Shopify gratis por 14 días. Sin riesgos y sin agregar la información de tu tarjeta de crédito.Klaviyo - Prueba Klaviyo gratis hasta 250 contactos.    

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 810. Apple still exploring AirPower. Reports of 16-inch MacBook Pro charging issues. iPhone delays give customers pause. Apple's 2022 lineup shaping up. Thoughts on Apple Glasses. Great recovery story. Backup reminder. Backup in the M-Series age. Special thanks to our sponsors: Nebia Overland Uncommon Goods Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

Sixteen:Nine
Niko Sagiadinos, SMILControl

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 35:06


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT Going back roughly a decade, there were a couple of digital signage vendors talking up and marketing their capabilities for a technology called SMIL. That's short for Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, but you probably knew that. OK, probably not. It's a bit like HTML, in that it is a programming language developed and supported by the same global entity that developed and continues to support and evolve HTML. If you don't know what HTML is, then this podcast edition is one you may want to pass on. It gets a little nerdy. SMIL, going back 10 years, was being touted as a next big thing for signage, but that didn't happen. However, there are companies using SMIL for managing digital signage networks - particularly companies who have some technical chops in-house and want something that's flexible and in their control. I stumbled recently on a little company in Hannover, Germany that has been squarely focused on SMIL. I had a good, albeit technical, chat with Niko Sagiadinos, one of the two partners in a firm called SmilControl. He walked me through what SMIL is all about, and the advantages he says the technology brings to digital signage. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Niko, thank you for joining me. Can you tell me what your company is all about and when it got started?  Niko Sagiadinos: We started in 2011 with a content management system based on SMIL, and I was a developer years before and one day a friend of mine came up with the idea of 101 Signboard and told me that he desperately needs a content management system. So I had at that moment a content management system and I developed two models for this system, one to administer the playlist and one to administer the player, and so it began. I liked SMIL and the open nature of ideas at that time. I often used open source software and that's a concept I personally liked very much and so I stuck with SMIL and I saw that there were a lot of things possible with SMIL, and I liked it and I stayed with it.  So there will be people listening who will already be going, what is he talking about? What is SMIL? Over here, it's sometimes called “smile.” I know it's an acronym for some sort of a language. Can you explain?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes. SMIL is an acronym for synchronized multimedia integration language. You can also call it the HTML for digital signage or multimedia presentations and SMIL makes it possible to create a multimedia presentation, interaction with time synchronization. That's where the first word synchronized comes from, and just like you can build websites with HTML, you can build presentations or digital signage presentations with SMIL.  So I know that SMIL has been around for several years. I can remember a competitor of yours, SignageLive, talking about SMIL and working with ideas over in Taiwan, on their devices as well. They made a fair amount of noise about it, and then it just dropped off, and Jason and his team moved on to other stuff seemingly. What's the distinction between SMIL and HTML5?  Niko Sagiadinos: SMIL is focused on presentations and the arrangement of media, while HTML is more focused on the arrangement of information and the implementation for the media, but SMIL can synchronize them. So you can position a media to play first, then second, then the third, then repeat, go to one and then continue. These are things which are not natively possible with HTML. You can do it with HTML, but you need to program with JavaScript, and that's easier to do with SMIL. SMIL also has some orders to control how a presentation runs and the presentation is not the thing for HTML. With websites, you can do interactions with the website but you cannot synchronize media sequentially, parallelly, or what happens when a special time comes, for example, at 5 o'clock, a video has to run an, and then another playlist starts. There are a lot more complicated things focused on presentation which are better solved by SMIL. So why has the digital signage industry migrated more to HTML5 and those kinds of web services and JavaScript as opposed to SMIL?  Niko Sagiadinos: Now I have two theories. The first is it is easier for most to make a web design and it seems to be easier to make its own thing. This is one, it seems to be easier to make a website, but it has some disadvantages because it's a browser, you need a digital signage player. You can integrate a browser in a digital signage player, but you also need commands to administer this player and this is with the browser a little bit more complicated.  The second thing is that every company wants to do his own thing. So you need to buy a software from company X and you need to buy a digital signage player software or hardware from company X, and this is what we call a window lock in. Every company wants to lock in their customers to use their product and so they have established this connection between an authoring system and the player system, and with SMIL, this connection can break up so you can use any player from any company or even my open source player, and you can write your own SMIL authoring software, if you like, and that's something companies don't want. They want to have it all together and sell a solution, and that's the reason, in my opinion, they stuck more on this product.  In the early days, they tried to establish SMIL as low-cost signage also, but it was a mistake from my point of view, because SMIL can do much more than what they were focused on. They focused on the media player only and said, okay, this is only low cost signage, but you can run a SMIL software even under a mobile and computer, and this is a way to do more high cost signage for example, and there's another reason. Companies don't want to cannibalize their own product. For example, if you get a market leader and they have their own system, and now you come to SMIL, and they have a feature that has low cost signage, because if they said, okay, they can do the same things like our enterprise product with SMIL, they'll lose money.  So your company is SMIL Control. What do you offer? I know that recently you introduced a free software player as well that works with SMIL.  Niko Sagiadinos: We started in 2012 officially with only a content management system and most of our customers used players from IAdea but some of our customers wanted to create their own player. They were not satisfied with the player from IAdea for various reasons, because there was no company, they wanted to have more control, maybe they got some cheaper devices from Asian manufacturers and so they started to write their own SMIL software and that caused some problems. When three or four of our resellers started to write software, and put a lot of resources to develop this player, but they didn't focus on marketing and to make sales, and just focused on developing and in 2015-16, I decided, okay, we have now some success with our content management system, I tried to develop a player for those who want to create their own hardware. And the only target for me is to create an open source player, and this player is the Garlic Player, and now after five years, increasing companies are showing interest in this player to brand it under their name or to use it in their player and to make their own hardware around this player. That's the goal. To be clear, this is the software that plays out the media and there's a hardware player, which is not what we're talking about here?  Niko Sagiadinos: At SMIL Control, our focus is only on software. You can take our software and use it as you want and this is the same with the  . The Garlic Player is a piece of software that you can use on a Windows PC, on a Linux PC or an Android device. You can even name it on Android as X Player, and you can sell it at X Player by making a service out of this, and that's the goal. You can use our software, and the only consistent way to publish the software is to open source the player software so everybody can take part of it.  I apologize, I'm not overly technical. I'm probably more technical than a lot of people, but I have my limits, sometimes severe.  You were describing how IAdea, a great little company from Taiwan. I'm good friends with them, they had a SMIL based hardware player, and I think you mentioned that there are some other companies that also have SMIL based hardware players, but you're saying, your garlic player doesn't need to be on one of those devices, it could run on a Windows or Linux box, or even on an Android box and I think I read that it doesn't even need to be rooted, right?  Niko Sagiadinos: You can use this on an Android together with a launcher, and the launcher is another software which works together with the player and the launcher does not need the device to be rooted. I know this is a little tech focused discussion, but yes, at the end of the day, there's only software running on hardware. Even with IAdea and the other players, there's just software which is running on the hardware, and the goal is that if someone wants to offer his own hardware, they can use our software.  So if I'm an end-user or a solutions provider, I'm listening to this and getting the explanations around the advantages of SMIL over HTML5 and so on. I'm wondering if they're listening and thinking, “This sounds interesting, but I don't know anything about that particular programming language and how much of a curve do I have to get up,” or is if I'm an end-user, is it invisible and you don't need to know anything about it?  Niko Sagiadinos: This is a valid point. Our products are not for end users. They are for resellers who have a technical background and know what they have to do. For example, there are a lot of companies in Germany who want to offer digital signage products and have tech support, but they don't have knowledge in digital signage and have possibly two opportunities.  The first opportunity is to build everything from scratch by themselves, or to get someone who sells them a complete package, a full service but if you are between that, you will have your own hardware maybe, and you want to use your own hardware, but you don't have the software for it. You have knowledge of hardware and PC, but you don't have the software and you need software. That's our customer.  The end users will be totally overwhelmed because they will run into problems because of the technical nature because you have to know a lot of things, but a company which has a technical background, like a solutions provider for PCs or someone else that has this technical background, and so they can work together.  And would there be a lot that they need to learn or would it be pretty straightforward if they're already working with web technologies? Niko Sagiadinos: They won't have much to learn because the software is from us, and the only thing they have to learn is how to control the software. Of course we can offer bandwidth with this. We can offer that you can take it and use it or maybe you can do more things. If you need your own CMS, and you want to use only the player, we can help you, and the two documentation for SMIL and everything is open so there is no need for NDAs and things like that and we'll make the things to learn much easier, so you can learn, but you can only start to use it and install it.  So you could be trained on it. It's just like any other piece of software, you just might need some training?  Niko Sagiadinos: Exactly. We are computer nerds and we can show them how to use this software,  how they can use these concepts. So if this is for our solutions providers/resellers, that sort of thing, I gather something about what you're saying is this gives them the ability to control it, maybe put their own front-end skin on it so it looks like their product, and as you say, you're the nerds, you guys are just sitting in the background. Niko Sagiadinos: It can be digital signage companies too, or companies who want to be digital signage companies, but they don't want to reinvent the wheel and they get used in other industries.  We are something intermediate. You can take a full service provider, that's okay. But if you don't want this full service provider and you don't want to develop everything by yourself, you can use our products. So we are in the middle.  Do you get pushback from companies who say, this sounds really interesting, but I don't know much about this language. I know I asked this already, but this makes me a little nervous in that it's unfamiliar to me. Why wouldn't I just go with something with one of the established products out there that's using more familiar technology?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, of course, we get this feedback, but for me, it's a matter of time. There are customers for this because we get requests and these requests started coming in even a year before I started marketing. The last few years we got some big customers and we didn't even need to get out. So it was a secret. We had no real website and my partner and I know how to get customers and they have commissions for software, and so we started last year to make websites to do marketing. And in this year, the requests began to increase from other companies, and we have started to work with companies in Eastern Europe, for example, who use the Garlic Player and even join the programming and the coding.  To go back to your question, there are companies that say, okay, that's too complicated for us. We want to use some other things. But our goal is to get these companies who want to do these complicated things, because they see more effort to do this, then using something from someone else, which they can't control. And it sounds like what you're saying as well as it could be complicated to people who aren't around programming, don't do coding or anything like that, they are end-users or whatever it may be. If you are a technical company by nature and have software developers within your staffing, this is not complicated. It's just another way of going at it?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes. For example, with a room booking software. If you want to have room booking software, you can develop your own room booking software and implement it transparently in our system via a widget which is a bit technical, but you are able to control and make use of what you have written with our infrastructure. So you can use a software like a media player, for example, and say, okay I will run a playlist from 10 to 3 o'clock, and from 3 o'clock, this room booking software will run on this or any other kind of software, and that's possible because we have these open technical features. So is it a bit like the kind of emerging idea of headless CMSs? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, a little bit. You can compare it to a headless CMS a little bit.  Because you're the control platform and distribution platform, but somebody could write a front end and use their existing room booking tools or whatever and it's going to flow through there? Niko Sagiadinos: Exactly, and another thing to say is that we are at the beginning at the moment. We started to get open, to get published and to imagine the SMIL player, the garlic player which I have written in 2016, the first three years did not even get any interest, because we are a small company in Germany, but we try to make our infrastructure step by step and build a SMIL based ecosystem and this ecosystem will grow.  At first, we had only the content management system. Now we have a player, a launcher, even the proxy, and this ecosystem grows and grows. The next step we have to do is to deliver more information on how to use SMIL?  There is a website from IAdea, but it hasn't been maintained for over six and seven years and so we have to do something to teach people. That's our goal.  Not only we have to teach people how they can use these things for their businesses, and this is a way we have to go. At the moment, we can not give a solution for everything, but we are on a way and time by time we can offer more and more solutions, more and more information, and the product gets “round” so to say in German.  I would imagine it's important to stress that this is not some little side project on GitHub or whatever. SMIL is something that was developed by the world wide web consortium, they are the same people who came up with HTML, right? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, and it is used in industry. The HD-DVD started with SMIL, the MMS also uses SMIL, a new eBook standard also uses SMIL. That's not something we developed with a few students. This is an industry standard. It's no joke. It's global and I'm wondering why IAdea ten years ago didn't put more power to show the world that it's possible to make amazing playlists, produce amazing products with this language, and accept it as low-cost signage and went with that if you want to do real signage, you have to get other products and that's, for me, a reason why SMIL in the last 10 years did not get accepted. And is this a standard that's standing still or is it evolving just in the same way that HTML is evolving?  Niko Sagiadinos: It's now standing still, it's not evolving at the moment. It's stuck on SMIL 3.0, which is from 2008, but I've contacted the inventors of SMIL in the Netherlands, some professors and I contacted them because we need to evolve. There are some features that are missing in SMIL, and we tried to wake them up.  The standard is okay, but since 2008, nothing has happened like HTML, but on the other side there are many things you can do. HTML evolves because a lot of things have to come in, for example, 50 years ago HTML was not able to play video without plug-ins and things changed a lot. Internet Explorer was a market leader for much too long and had blocked the evolution of HTML for years and now with other browsers, Firefox, Chrome and Safari, there's much more moving in the web browser markets. And we are trying the same thing for SMIL. At the moment, it fulfills our needs more than we expected. My partner at first was skeptical too. But when I developed more and more features into the Garlic Player, he was stunned seeing what is possible and what only expensive digital signage systems are able to do, we can do with SMIL. So there is no reason to call it low cost signage.  Okay. What are the business arguments around working with SMIL versus an HTML5 based platform or some other developed platforms. Are they going to be more reliable? Is it gonna be less expensive? Is it gonna last longer? Niko Sagiadinos: Well, you are asking a developer a business question. (Laughter) You gotta sell it down the stream.  Niko Sagiadinos: Selling is more my partner's job, but I will try. The interesting thing is that HTML is okay for what it has to do. SMIL is another part and the web browser is not a digital signage player so as we say in German, we are comparing an apple with a pear and those are two different things. You can do digital signage with HTML, but you can even ride a bicycle to Tokyo. That's possible too.  I think SMIL is much more of a fit for the digital signage age than HTML. The business side is that with SMIL, you don't have any dependencies and HTML won't fulfill the needs of digital signage.  Your company's based in Hanover, Germany, and it's privately held, I assume? You guys own it. You're not owned by a larger company or a venture capital company? Niko Sagiadinos: We are a bootstrapped company, we started as two people and now we are a kind of German limited, GmbH, because we want to expand next year.  How many people work for SMIL Control? Niko Sagiadinos: At the moment, we are two people. My business partner and I so yes, we are a little company, but we also use external developer, and last time I started to work with Bulgarian developers and Greek developers, and because I'm a digital nomad, I'm commuting between Germany and Greece, because I like the weather in Greece much more and the food. You don't like Hanover or Northern Germany in February? Niko Sagiadinos: No, it's extremely cold and to be honest, November and December are the ugliest months because in Germany, everything is gray here and cold and Greece is so much better.  If somebody wants to find out more about your company, where would they find you online now that you have a website? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, we have a website, smil-control.com. But the company name is Camel case. All right, that was terrific. Thank you for spending some time with me and explaining what SMIL is all about.  Niko Sagiadinos: Thank you for allowing me. I hope it was understandable. I know I was a little nervous and that's complicated because I'm not a salesman or a businessman. We are technically focused and I'm very stuck on this technical thing and I have grown up in 30 years of technology. So maybe for one or the other, it was a little bit hard. Sorry!  Oh, that's okay. There's lots of technical people who will be intrigued by this and want to know more, so I'm sure it'll work out. Thanks again.  Niko Sagiadinos: Thank you very much, Dave.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Github Co-pilot is Gonna Take ur Job

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:13


In this Hasty Treat, Wes and Scott talk about their experiences using Github Co-pilot. Show Notes 00:58 Wake up early and let's go 02:19 Sponsor: LogRocket 03:21 Sponsor: Freshbooks 03:56 What is Github Co-Pilot? GitHub Co-Pilot 06:01 Scott is a GitHub Star 07:03 Examples of GitHub Co-Pilot usage 09:43 Writing pseudo code Emmet 12:51 Using it for loop callbacks 13:52 What langauges does GitHub Co-Pilot work with? 14:54 It plays nice with HTML files 15:48 Svelte component example 16:31 Benefits for course creators 17:35 Some scary things 21:04 Could GitHub start charging for this? 22:30 Good at writing types 23:59 Gripes 24:54 Converting code to Parcel 2 Parcel Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 809. Apple Watch still tops, but slips. Drivers License in Apple Wallet delayed. Apple goes on the offensive against state sponsored hacking. Temporary Apple Sales halt in Turkey. What will replace the iPhone. Finding Battery Draining apps. Home Sharing issues. Special thanks to our sponsors: Smile - Check out TextExpander Hunter Douglas SimpliSafe Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
490: Web3, Cryptobucks, HTML is Ok, Tailwind Tokens, and Getting Excited About CSS

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:27


How good is web3 really? And is there money to be made without destroying the environment? Is HTML good enough for the future? And what are we excited about in new stuff for CSS?

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 808. Apple allows ‘self service' repairs. Apple may still see big holiday sales. Apple doesn't “secretly” buy app ads. Qualcomm wants in on the chip war. Some Apple TV+ news. More on Apple's upcoming headset. Apple “SportKit” references. OS updates address bugs. Apple “refocuses” on fully autonomous car. Traveling with AppleTV. macOS memory leak. Gifting Apple Media. Time Machine stuck in time. Monitoring Mac Battery Drain. Special thanks to our sponsors: LinkedIn Jobs Nebia Coinbase Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

Design Details
420: The Pointer Cursor Debate

Design Details

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:49


This week, we discuss the humble cursor and its role in affording interactivity in software design. In The Sidebar, we talk about the long term impact of the features we build, the importance of smart defaults, and the value of time well spent in our products.Sponsor:Patreon is hiring product designers in San Francisco and New York City. Today, Patreon is at the heart of the creator economy. In the last 8 years, the product has grown to support more than 250k creators, who are collectively supported by more than 8 million patrons. So far, Patreon has paid out more than $2.5 billion to creators, and are now on pace to pay out over $100 million every month.Patreon's design team is small, but growing. The opportunity for impact on the product, and on millions of creators and patrons around the world, can't be overstated. The team is dedicated to leveling up the craft of Patreon's products, shipping beautiful experiences, and building the best tools to help anyone make a living on the internet.If you're a designer looking for your next level up, get in touch with Patreon's design team and tell them we sent you!Learn more about Patreon's open rolesThe Second Renaissance Is ComingPatreon's Culture DeckPatreon's teamGolden Ratio Supporters:Patreon — Patreon is hiring product designers in San Francisco and New York City to build the future of the creator economy. Join their small team and level up today.Sympli — Designers and developers working together need control over their assets. Sympli tracks every version of every design: no guessing what changed, no lost files or overwritten work, development-ready specs. Learn more at Sympli.io.Play — Play is the first native iOS design tool made for teams creating mobile products. Design, prototype, and collaborate, directly from your phone. With Play you can experience your design as you create it while taking full advantage of native iOS features not found in other design and prototyping tools. Full access invites available for the first 25 people here!The Sidebar:The Sidebar is an exclusive weekly segment for our Patreon supporters. You can subscribe starting at $1 per month for access to bonus content going forward! Sign up at patreon.com/designdetails.Latest VIP Patrons:Natasha SkovParker GibsonDennis Espino MaravillaYanal TayyemUdochiBenjamin ArteagaMain Topic:This week, we discuss the humble cursor and its role in affording interactivity in software design.Anonymous asks: Hey Brian and Marshall, I'd love to hear your thoughts on the use of the hand pointer cursor icon for clickable elements. Windows, macOS, and HTML seem pretty clear that it is intended only for links which lack the visual affordance that buttons have while Material design and seemingly most web apps embrace the hand for all clickable elements. I haven't found what the official rationale is for using the hand everywhere and I'm also curious what users most expect at this point.The cursor MDN spec.Susan KareWhy is the mouse cursor slightly tilted?Who created the Mac Mickey pointer cursor?Cool Things:Brian shared Mimestream, a native macOS email client for Gmail. It's fast, looks and feels great, and is a worthy replacement for the stock Mail app on macOS.Marshall shared An Evening With Silk Sonic by Bruno Mars, Anderson .Paak, and Silk Sonic. Listen on Apple Music or Spotify.Design Details on the Web:

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 807. Next gen Apple Silicon. Apple TV+ Levy Travel Series. Apple will address iPhone 13 screen hardware lock. More Chinese Music coming to Apple Music. Netflix Games now on iOS. iOS 15.2 beta brings new features. Apple maps updated 3D experience. Shared iCloud Contacts. Improving Apple Maps. Traveling with a Home PodMini. MacOS Monterey Dictation. Photo Memories you don't want. M1 MacBooks and double power. Special thanks to our sponsors: Nebia Hunter Douglas Zocdoc Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 806. Apple's AR/VR headset to support Wi-Fi 6E. AppleTV+ News. Apple cuts back iPads to push iPhones. “Application out of memory” errors. macOS Monterey “bricking” some Macs. Apple shipped a ton of MacBooks. A few follow-up items. Is this thing on?. Missing iCloud Tabs. Not so Apple Geniuses. Family Sharing Albums Special thanks to our sponsors: Nebia Overland BetterHelp Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3