Podcasts about Chief operating officer

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Best podcasts about Chief operating officer

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Latest podcast episodes about Chief operating officer

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
260: What happens when Cryptocurrency meets DAFS? Endaoment

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:51


This week host George Weiner interviews Zach Bronstein, the Chief Operating Officer of Endaoment and DAF built on Ethereum helping people donate cryptocurrency.    About Endaoment Endaoment is a new Community Foundation & public charity offering Donor-Advised Funds (DAFs) built atop the Ethereum blockchain, allowing folks to donate to almost any U.S. nonprofit organization. Our mission is to encourage and manage the charitable giving of cryptocurrency. We're a California Nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation headquartered in San Francisco, federally tax-exempt under IRS revenue code section 501(c)(3). All donations to Endaoment or Endaoment DAFs are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law.  We're focused on making the most secure and easy-to-use giving platform for both Donors and Organizations interested in cryptocurrency. Grants are paid out via ABA bank wire as US dollars or via Ethereum transaction as US dollar coins (USDC - a form of stablecoins, a cryptocurrency)   Resource Links Main Page: app.endaoment.org Documentation site: docs.endaoment.org Org page (all granted to orgs): app.endaoment.org/orgs Etherscan: https://etherscan.io Eth2: https://ethereum.org/en/eth2/

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Mark Korth, Chief Operating Officer at SCL Health

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:50


This episode features Mark Korth, Chief Operating Officer at SCL Health. Here, he discusses his pride in the patient experience SCL offers, the importance of knowing how to execute, and more.

The Stuff Dreams Are Made Of

If the deep dive into the Pulse Rifle wasn't enough, David and Ryan are devoting their latest show to movie guns! Learn what makes a movie gun a movie gun, how movie guns are made, and how to collect them. To help, they are joined by Jason DeBord, Chief Operating Officer of Julien's Auctions. Jason talks about his life as a connoisseur of movie guns and all things Die Hard and the founding of the Original Prop Blog -- the scourge of movie-prop-scammer scum everywhere. They also chat about one of the most infamous gun movie prop auctions of all time and Jason's favorite superhero movie: Mystery Men. Pew pew. Texas Tax rate at 80% of 8.25%

Species Unite
Liza Heavener: The Game Changer

Species Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:52


Species Unite will be back with a brand new season on October 28th.  For now, we are re-sharing one of our favorite episodes, a conversation with Liza Heavener. “There would be some mornings that the indigenous tribal leaders would take us out into virgin rainforest… [I was] like, “no human has ever stood here before.” And it was alive with, I mean, you name the animal… and it was loud full and of life. And they would take us out the very next day and it was just smoldering because it had been slashed and burned illegally in the middle of the night. And it was just completely quiet except for what was left of the fire.  And that that changes you.” -     Liza Heavener Liza's story is one of my favorites.  She spent a decade working in federal politics, grassroots and campaign strategy and with the United States Congress. Liza was a healthcare lobbyist for a large membership organization, running their national advocacy program to engage hundreds of thousands of advocates across the country.  Then, she won a contest to work on a documentary and tv series in Borneo. Liza went there for what she thought would be 100 days, but ended up staying for the next year. While she was there, her world turned upside down. And what came out of it is this force of a woman who has dedicated herself to creating a better planet for everyone who lives on it, not just the humans.  Liza is the Chief Operating Officer at NEXUS Global and she chairs the Nexus Working Group on Animal Welfare and Biodiversity Conservation, which is dedicated to educating, empowering and connecting Next-Gen impact investors, philanthropists, and social entrepreneurs.  She also serves as an Advisor to the Millennial Action Project and as a Vice Chair of the Alumni Council for Eastern Mennonite University. Liza had a feature role in the internationally-acclaimed documentary and tv series, “Rise of the Eco-Warrior,” and has spoken at conferences across the country.

OUTdrive
Supporting Life Without Limitations

OUTdrive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:37


From a young age, we are taught that there are “no limits” to what we can accomplish. For individuals with disabilities, that mantra would be difficult to believe, much less accomplish, without the proper resources from Center for Human Services. CHS provides exceptional services and support for nearly 5,000 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities across 39 Missouri countries. In this episode of OUTdrive, Cliff sits down with the Center's CEO, David Kramer, and discusses how his team continues to encourage each individual they serve to live “Life Without Limitations.” Following a nationwide search earlier this year, David was named CEO of the Center for Human Services, headquartered in Sedalia. David previously served as the Chief Operating Officer at Emmaus Homes in St. Louis. Prior to that, he was a director for Life Skills, an Easter Seals affiliate in Missouri. David began his career as a direct care worker at a Department of Mental Health state facility. David received a degree in psychology from St. Louis University and went on to earn his MBA from Washington University in St. Louis. The founding mission of CHS in 1955 centered around the establishment of programs and services that change the way the community defines and views people with disabilities. While the mission hasn't changed, the need has grown exponentially. Tune into this episode of OUTdrive to learn more about how you can support the CHS services in your community. What you'll learn:  The mission of Center for Human Services and the resources available across 39 counties in Missouri How to contact, connect with, and donate to the Center for Human Services An in-depth look at David's path to becoming CEO of Center for Human Services and how his responsibilities have shifted from his direct care background How David's background led him to working with individuals with disabilities David's explanation of the ongoing struggle to balance resources and the unmet needs at CHS and organizations like it David explains his current role as CEO and the transition from working directly with individuals to the administration side of CHS. Current innovation and industry trends that assist in the services that CHS provides. The steps David and his team are taking to help increase awareness of CHS and marketing their mission in Missouri.

Threading The Needle
Operational Leadership & Building Meaning into Your Business with Orchid Bertelsen

Threading The Needle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:06


In this special episode, Andrew Faris and Taylor Holiday, CEO of Common Thread Collective, talk with Orchid Bertelsen — CTC's new Chief Operating Officer. With six years of experience at Nestle USA, Orchid explains why operational leadership is no long a luxury for DTC ecommerce brands. “The problem isn't that people aren't willing to take hills. They're willing to take hills, but sometimes they take the wrong ones.”

The OKR Podcast
Iterable Captures the Energy of Alignment to Fuel its Exponential Growth

The OKR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:20


Iterable's Chief Operating Officer, Jeff Samuels, and Chief of Staff, Nicole Watkins, join Deidre Paknad in this week's OKR Podcast to share how they are maximizing inflection points at their rapidly scaling company by accelerating lateral and vertical alignment and learning with OKRs and WorkBoard. For Iterable, using the OKR framework has had a significant impact on their ability to operationalize their strategy by providing each team with transparency, a real purpose, and meaning in their everyday work.

HousingWire Daily
Experts on strategies servicers should employ in 2022

HousingWire Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:27


Today's HousingWire Daily features an in-depth roundtable discussion on economic and policy trends impacting servicers as well as a look ahead at strategies they should employ in 2022. During this conversation, CoreLogic's chief economist Frank Nothaft, its senior leader of advanced delivery engines Sapan Bafna and Pete Carroll, the company's executive of public policy and industry relations, join Meg Burns, Executive Vice President of the Housing Policy Council, and Mike Blair, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of LoanCare to also discuss what should be included in every servicer's playbook.HousingWire Daily examines the most compelling articles reported across HW Media. Each afternoon, we provide our listeners with a deeper look into the stories coming across our newsrooms that are helping Move Markets Forward. Hosted by the HW team and produced by Alcynna Lloyd and Elissa Branch.

The Protectors
Season 3 | Eric Frohardt | COO of DEFY | Former Navy SEAL (Episode 90)

The Protectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:23


Eric Frohardt is a former Navy SEAL and now Chief Operating Officer of DEFY.  We talk transition, networking, and a ton more.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/theprotectors)

GGB Magazine Podcast
Nick Khin and Domenico Pastia

GGB Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 33:55


Sr. Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, and Sr. Vice President of Global Product, International Game Technology

Mission Qualfon
The Importance of Mentorship with Doug Wells, Chief Operating Officer – CES

Mission Qualfon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:30


This week, Doug Wells joins Jeremy and Marisol on the Mission Qualfon Podcast. Doug shares the wisdom he's gained after being in the BPO industry for the last 26 years. Doug keys in on the importance of mentorship, how his mentors enhanced his career, and how he actively attempts to match that experience in his role today.

What Are You Sporting About?
Ep. #65-Sports Professionals introduce a new sport emphasizing Diversity & Inclusion with Sivonnia DeBarros, Protector of Athletes

What Are You Sporting About?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:30


Fireball Sport Federation (“FXC”) is a new sport that reimagines equality, diversity, and inclusion. Max Bartoli co-founded FXC with his wife and later, sought the help of Mr. J. Darren Williams through his company, Eraslan Media to support in the promotion and international development of the sport.About Max BartoliMax Bartoli is the Media producer for the World Bank Group in Washington DC and consultant of other private companies in Europe and US. He is the CEO and founder of MaXaM Productions. He has over 20 years' experience in Marketing Communications, Advertising and Entertainment industries producing and directing commercials, corporate videos, shorts, features, documentaries and live events. Also, Bartoli is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of FXC.FXC is the only competitive, inclusive and co-ed team sport that guarantees 100% of gender equality on the court. FXC has been played in Italy, Mexico, Spain, Dominican Republic and most recently the US and has received requests to be played in 11 other countries by end of 2021.Connect with Max Bartoli on Instagram, LinkedInAbout Darren WilliamsDarren Williams is currently the Chief Operating Officer of Eraslan Media. Also, he is the Vice-President of the International Fireball Extreme Challenger (FXC) Organization and member of Team USA. Previously Williams served on marketing teams at SocialIke, 21st Century Fox Entertainment Group, CBS Sports Network and BounceTV.Connect with Darren Williams on Instagram, LinkedInAbout the Host – Sivonnia DeBarrosSivonnia DeBarros – the Protector of Athletes – is a first-generation lawyer and law business owner, woman in business and a former track and field Division-I College athlete. DeBarros is passionate about helping athletes in business protect their brands through collaborative partnerships, education and support necessary to carry them to the next level. DeBarros's practice areas are Business, Employment, Sports, and Entertainment. Learn more about her services at www.prosportlawyer.com and www.sldebarros.com.

Business Innovators Radio
Ep. #65-Sports Professionals introduce a new sport emphasizing Diversity & Inclusion with Sivonnia DeBarros, Protector of Athletes

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:30


Fireball Sport Federation (“FXC”) is a new sport that reimagines equality, diversity, and inclusion. Max Bartoli co-founded FXC with his wife and later, sought the help of Mr. J. Darren Williams through his company, Eraslan Media to support in the promotion and international development of the sport.About Max BartoliMax Bartoli is the Media producer for the World Bank Group in Washington DC and consultant of other private companies in Europe and US. He is the CEO and founder of MaXaM Productions. He has over 20 years' experience in Marketing Communications, Advertising and Entertainment industries producing and directing commercials, corporate videos, shorts, features, documentaries and live events. Also, Bartoli is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of FXC.FXC is the only competitive, inclusive and co-ed team sport that guarantees 100% of gender equality on the court. FXC has been played in Italy, Mexico, Spain, Dominican Republic and most recently the US and has received requests to be played in 11 other countries by end of 2021.Connect with Max Bartoli on Instagram, LinkedIn About Darren WilliamsDarren Williams is currently the Chief Operating Officer of Eraslan Media. Also, he is the Vice-President of the International Fireball Extreme Challenger (FXC) Organization and member of Team USA. Previously Williams served on marketing teams at SocialIke, 21st Century Fox Entertainment Group, CBS Sports Network and BounceTV.Connect with Darren Williams on Instagram, LinkedIn About the Host – Sivonnia DeBarrosSivonnia DeBarros – the Protector of Athletes – is a first-generation lawyer and law business owner, woman in business and a former track and field Division-I College athlete. DeBarros is passionate about helping athletes in business protect their brands through collaborative partnerships, education and support necessary to carry them to the next level. DeBarros's practice areas are Business, Employment, Sports, and Entertainment. Learn more about her services at www.prosportlawyer.com and www.sldebarros.com.What Are You Sporting About?https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/what-are-you-sporting-about/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/ep-65-sports-professionals-introduce-a-new-sport-emphasizing-diversity-inclusion-with-sivonnia-debarros-protector-of-athletes

ELECTRIC PEOPLE PODCAST
E95: Chris Dawson | Sunrun COO | The Future Is Stable

ELECTRIC PEOPLE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:28


Chris has been with Sunrun since 2017, and serves as Sunrun's Chief Operating Officer and leads sales, commercial, operations and lead generation teams, as well as the wholesale and solar mounting solutions business. He spent nearly 20 years with Bombardier Recreational Products Inc., a leading powersports vehicle manufacturer. Tune in as he talks about how he was drawn towards Sunrun and the future that is in store!

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #40 Donnie Dee CEO San Diego Rescue Mission speaks service..

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:28


Ex NFL Player and CEO San Diego Rescue Mission Donnie Dee discusses service as a tool for a good life on the Tools For A Good Life Summit.  Truly inspirational Donnie Dee is literally saving lives.  Helping get homeless people off of the streets and back into a good life.  Careful if you listen…you will want to volunteer. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Donate, support, and check out the San Diego Rescue Mission here: https://www.sdrescue.org/Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:07.1 Mischa Z: Welcome back everybody to the Tools For A Good Life Summit and right now, I would like to introduce to you, Donnie Dee, President and CEO of the San Diego Rescue Mission. Welcome, Donnie.0:00:23.1 Donnie Dee: Well, welcome to you. Thanks for having me.0:00:25.4 Mischa Z: Indeed, indeed. And then before we get started here, I'm gonna read your bio really quick, if that's okay.0:00:30.7 Donnie Dee: Absolutely.0:00:31.6 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic. Donnie Dee joined the San Diego Rescue Mission as President/CEO, mid-July, 2017. Anniversary is coming up or you just hit it?0:00:43.3 Donnie Dee: This week, yeah. Today, as a matter of fact.0:00:46.1 Mischa Z: Oh, wow.0:00:46.6 Donnie Dee: Yeah, four years ago today.0:00:48.5 Mischa Z: Oh, fantastic. Growing up in Kansas City, sports have always been important to Dee. He played football and basketball for Oak Park High School and was a four-year letterman in football at the University of Tulsa, graduating from there in 1988 with a business management degree. He was then drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and played in the NFL for two and a half years for the Colts and Seahawks. And then quick, was that an injury or you just... Go ahead.0:01:22.5 Donnie Dee: I did finish with an injury. I actually played for another team but just never really felt right, and so, yeah, I would say it was an injury that ended my career.0:01:32.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah. And was that a heavy moment?0:01:37.5 Donnie Dee: It was. You dream your whole life about playing a sport like that, and so for it to come down and you did not have a lot of control over how it ends is a little disappointing and a heavy thing to process. You play football your whole life and then for some of us, it just comes to an abrupt ending. It takes a little while to get used to.0:01:56.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And I'm guessing, and we can get into this in a minute, but your faith was not only tested but enriched and really helped you through that time?0:02:06.9 Donnie Dee: 100%. I think you find out what's most important and what you really value. And look, at the end of the day, football's a game, it can't be the most important thing in your life, and it's a game and it's why they call it a game. And so I think I was able to make the transition.0:02:23.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, what a great lesson too and I think what a great thing or analogy, or whatever that... For me, I just hear that and I'm like, "Yeah, how much stuff do I put attachment on where it's just money or it's just this or just that when really... " I think is the lesson there.0:02:42.8 Donnie Dee: Well, yeah, and it's easy to do because what our priorities are end up being the things that we chase and we center our whole life around, but what happens if we have the wrong priorities? Well, then we have established a life that isn't very deep, doesn't have a lot of substance, and those things always... You end up finding that out as time goes on that, "Hey, maybe this isn't as big a deal I thought it was." And that was really my relation with football. I went to University of Tulsa and football was the most important thing in my life. And then I got hurt in college and realized that, "Look, this can give you a lot of opportunities but it can't be the most important thing in your life 'cause it's gonna let you down eventually."0:03:26.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, and I'm thinking too, I bet from that part of the country you grew up in and just... That was probably your destiny to a certain extent. That's the lifestyle...0:03:38.8 Donnie Dee: Well, yeah, I think sports is a really big deal in the Midwest. Football is an enormous thing in Oklahoma. But even for me personally, my father was a professional basketball player for the Indiana Pacers and he won an actual gold medal, which I think is one of the most difficult accomplishments in all of sports, is winning a gold medal in the 1968 Olympics playing basketball. And so, yeah, I would say it was very much my destiny. I wanted to be an athlete, I wanted to accomplish what my dad had accomplished, I wanted to make him proud. I never imagined not being an athlete and I put that pressure on myself.0:04:14.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, I will say too, for anybody younger, back in the day... So when your father went to play basketball in the Olympics, that was amateurs. There was no Michael Jordan, no LeBron James showing up, that was strictly amateur class.0:04:32.6 Donnie Dee: These are all college guys playing against other countries and they were the best in the world, they were the best in the world. It has changed and now we've got pros playing against pros in the Olympics.0:04:42.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think that's cool. I think I'm even more excited now to have you on the summit because I think, to have your identity in sports that much or as a pro football player and to have those cracks start to happen in college and then perhaps ultimately in the NFL, that it's such a powerful testament to what we're offering. How do we make it through those rough parts of life when our identity is shattered a little bit? So anyway, yeah, let me finish up here and thank you for indulging those questions. So here we are. Dee began his career in 1990 with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes in Colorado. Dee went on to become COO or Chief Operating Officer of the FCA for five years before relaunching the Tom Landry Associates, a major donor program at FCA. Again, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Dee is married to his college sweetheart, Jackie, who was also a college athlete. They have two grown children, Johnny, who's now 28 and about to get married, right?0:06:00.7 Donnie Dee: That's correct.0:06:01.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, very exciting, congratulations. And Jennifer, 25, who both played college basketball at USD and UCI, respectively. If I'd quickly touched on a... And again, for any of the younger people, Tom Landry, he was the coach... He was the man in football for a few decades, perhaps.0:06:23.0 Donnie Dee: Very successful coach, went to the playoffs 23 years in a row, still has, I think, that record, and Bill Belichick's about to break it or maybe he was about to break it before last year because I don't think he went to the... I don't think the Patriots went to the playoffs last year, but Tom Landry is a very successful coach. He wasn't our founder but he got involved very early on with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and really put us on the map. I think once he got involved and used FCA as his platform to share his thing, I think our ministry really exploded when I was with FCA, and I'm certainly thankful for his life and his leadership.0:07:01.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, and you had a chance to interact a little bit with Tom Landry?0:07:05.3 Donnie Dee: I did. We had an annual giving campaign that people would give $10,000 or more in a year in honor of Tom Landry and that was used for local field ministry to work with coaches and athletes at the local level.0:07:22.2 Mischa Z: I wanted to touch really quick before we get to the question and the meat of the summit question, to you, is that... Clearly, it's evident to me through your history and what you do that your faith is very important to you and it's been a very powerful part of your life, yeah?0:07:42.1 Donnie Dee: Yeah, it is and it has been, and I think it always will be. I didn't grow up in a Christian home, didn't grow up in the church, and so really just trying to figure out life by myself. I'm from a broken home, my father was an alcoholic, and so I think that, in many ways, I was gonna follow in his footsteps, not only athletically but also socially. I think I was destined to just be an alcoholic and to probably bounce around from relationship to relationship. And it wasn't until I got to college that I saw some other athletes that lived out their faith and that became inspirational for me and interesting to me that I asked questions. I think, in the end, I just began to embrace my faith and allow God to have a role in my life, and to have this daily relationship where I get a chance to strengthen my faith and try to be all that God has called me to be.0:08:39.4 Mischa Z: It's beautiful. So your interest and that nurturing in your college years, that's what led you to, obviously, your work in things like the San Diego Rescue Mission, yes?0:08:55.8 Donnie Dee: 100%. Yeah, I think faith and really beginning to understand the God of the Bible and really what the scripture teaches really compels you to wanna make a difference in the world and to wanna see other people not just as humans at different stages and different statuses in life but to begin to see them as God's creation and that whether you're homeless or whether you have billions that we're really all the same in terms of God's eyes and he calls upon us that have been given much to help those that maybe aren't as privileged or haven't been given as much, and I just think that's a great way to live your life. And I've seen so many that have gone before me that lived their lives that way and it really challenged me to embrace that.0:09:38.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, fantastic. I think my relationship with source or a higher power, or God, as you say, has been more from a recovery lens, like a traditional 12-step, that was my entry point, but I'd love...0:09:55.3 Donnie Dee: That's good.0:09:56.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. I'm excited for your viewpoint. [laughter] And what I wanna touch on here too is service. So you are CEO and President of the San Diego Rescue Mission. So the San Diego Rescue Mission is feet on the street, helping people, yeah?0:10:22.0 Donnie Dee: That's correct. Yeah, we have a large facility downtown. It's an old hospital. I have 366 beds, 60 of those beds are used for emergency shelter use overnight, women and children only, and they stay there one night at a time, two nights at a time. The other 300 beds are used for what I believe to be the number one solution for homelessness and that is rehabilitation. You understand that, you understand the power of a program, you understand the power of accountability and direction, and support 'cause you've obviously overcome some things in your own life. And we have people that come to us that, yes, circumstantially, they may be homeless but there's other things that are going on in their heart that have led them to this lifestyle of homelessness and we're trying to address what's going on in the heart so that they can overcome and really be free from this challenge of living on the streets. So they live with us for a year. We call them students. The first semester is wellness, the second semester is education, the third semester is job placement and housing. And we tell them on day one, "Give us a year, we'll get you off the streets permanently." And we do that through our rehabilitation program.0:11:33.2 Mischa Z: It's beautiful. I love it. Well, good. I think we've laid the framework for service as a tool for a good life. So I have a question that I'm gonna ask you and I'm gonna lay the scenario and basically, if we think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finance, and...0:11:57.9 Donnie Dee: Health.0:12:00.0 Mischa Z: Health. Thank you. [chuckle]0:12:00.3 Donnie Dee: Absolutely. I read the question.0:12:01.9 Mischa Z: That's good. [laughter] I appreciate that, Donnie. Thank you. And then if we think of someone who was successful or is successful and two or three of the legs fall out from under them, so perhaps... So I'll speak for me. I went through divorce, another failed relationship after that, both my parents died in rapid succession, this was all 5 to 10 years ago, career upheaval. And up until that point, success had served me very well. And so pull myself up from my bootstraps, that mentality, that "Fix it. Work your way through it. Sort it out", that was no longer working. [laughter] I needed new tools. [laughter] And so by the grace of God, I got new tools. And so my question to you is, thinking of service to community as a tool, what are the exact next steps you would offer a person like me who is, perhaps, hitting that rough part of life? What are the exact next steps you would offer this person so they know they are headed in the new, right direction that they will have positive momentum towards getting their life back on track?0:13:27.7 Donnie Dee: That's a big question, that's a heavy question, and I don't know that there's an easy answer to that. I can tell you what comes to mind for me and I can tell you what has worked for me. I think the exact next steps really have to do with how you view the world. I think everything starts internally first. I can't be for the world if I'm not first that in myself. I can't impart what I don't possess. And so I think I have to have a philosophy of life. I think I have to have a view of the world that is healthy so that I can begin to see people and see others the way that would allow me to have influence on them.0:14:12.0 Donnie Dee: I think, for me, it starts with gratefulness. I think that so many of us, especially today, in this world feel like we need to play the role of the victim and I think we're losing sight of the amazing Americans that have overcome so much to make a life of themselves and they didn't play the victim. They played the, "I'm gonna get up every day, I'm gonna do the best I can, and I'm grateful for this opportunity." I think thankfulness and having a thankful heart really centers someone to really begin to see their circumstances and to see the world in a way that allows them to take advantage of their opportunities. I think that's the first step, is do you realize how much you have? It's like the guy that said that he was complaining having no shoes until he saw the guy who didn't have any feet. I think you don't have to look far, especially when you live in San Diego, to spend some time in Mexico and you see that it's a whole different world down there.0:15:25.0 Mischa Z: A whole different world, yeah.0:15:26.6 Donnie Dee: We have a lot to be thankful for and I think it starts with that.0:15:32.7 Mischa Z: Let me ask you a question, do you have any sort of things that you do to bring that gratitude forefront in your day?0:15:41.5 Donnie Dee: I do. I start each day in reading and in meditation, specifically reading the Bible and in praying out my faith and just trying to center myself around the opportunities I have for that day. It's easy for me to get out of the bed and to rush into the mission because of the volume of responsibilities that's down here. And we've got 300 people living with us and even during COVID. It's not like we kicked them out. They stayed with us, that's their home for a year. And so just the pressure and the volume of responsibility, and the stress, and the decisions that need to be made. I can't come down to this work everyday without something to give and I gotta have life to give if I'm gonna help somebody that's broken figure out how to take steps in their life. So I can encourage them to be grateful and to be thankful that they've got a place to live even though that in the world's eyes they're probably at the bottom of the...0:16:49.7 Mischa Z: Pecking order.0:16:50.0 Donnie Dee: Probably the bottom of the pecking order. There's a lot to be thankful for. They have a lot to be thankful for. They've got a bed, they've got a safe place, they've got meals. And I can't communicate that to them if I'm not coming from a position of gratefulness and thankfulness. And so, yeah, I think starting each day in just prayer and in reading, and centering myself around what I know to be true is one of the things I practice daily.0:17:14.9 Mischa Z: Fantastic. And I heard you say meditation in there too. Real quick, how much time do you dedicate to that in your morning?0:17:26.0 Donnie Dee: Thirty minutes or so. I read and pray and sometimes I'll listen to a good message but I really just try to carve out before I actually get up. I workout, then I sit out back and read and pray, and then I jump in the shower and grab my stuff, and I hit the road 39 miles south to the San Diego Rescue Mission. So that is in my routine six days a week.0:17:51.8 Mischa Z: Fantastic, thank you. Alright, so number one, start with gratitude, and you gave some great ways to do that. What do we have next? What's after that?0:18:01.6 Donnie Dee: Well, I think the next thing is to look for opportunities to serve. The world is full of need. There is so much suffering in the world and so many that are just challenged by their own circumstances, and you don't have to go far. You don't even have to do anything formally or structurally. You can just look around your neighborhood and see somebody that needs a helping hand, that needs a word of encouragement, that needs somebody to come alongside of them and just put their hand on their shoulder, and say, "It's gonna be okay." I think how we view the world and how we see the world really determines the opportunity, I believe, God gives us to serve the world. There's so many opportunities to serve. I had a friend that is no longer alive, he was a tennis pro at El Camino Country Club, and I would say my best friend ever.0:18:51.8 Mischa Z: Who is your best friend ever?0:18:53.1 Donnie Dee: He was my best friend. He passed away probably 10 years ago. I've got a picture of him up here in my bookshelf. He passed away about 10 years ago of a brain tumor and it really came on fast, and I just watched him go through all of that and really die in an honorable way. And he was just a tennis pro. He'd make a lot of money but then I saw him have an impact on a lot of people. I had a chance to officiate his memorial service. There's probably 500 people standing remotely in this little chapel. But I remember he used to tell his kids... And he's about 10 years older than me, so I kinda looked up to him a little bit. And I remember he told his kids who were a few years older than my kids that if you're having a bad day, go be a blessing to somebody. Go find somebody and be a blessing to them and not only will you make their day a much better day but it'll take your eyes off of what concerns you most. And I think that's a powerful principle that is easy to implement that can change your complete perspective and how you see your circumstances by, one, being grateful and by, two, looking for opportunity to be a blessing to somebody else, formally or informally.0:20:10.3 Mischa Z: I love that a lot. Service, for me, has been so impactful in my life to get me out of my head and all those things that you said, and to find that gratitude in a lot of what I do. My current state in the world, I'm trying to let go of what being of service means. So I have my vision and it usually has lots of accolades. I want to be of service and then the shiny objects but I... So I wanna ask you... Easy to implement. So tell me, give me some easy to implement both, I think you said, official and unofficial.0:20:58.8 Donnie Dee: Yeah, or formally or informally.0:21:00.0 Mischa Z: There we go.0:21:01.0 Donnie Dee: And I would say, formally, there's lots of organizations like the San Diego Rescue Mission. I had 240 volunteers down here last week that get what it means to serve the world, that get what it means to serve the community. They got things going on, they've got kids, little league games, and work, and church responsibilities, and yard work, and all kinds of stuff like the rest of us, but they come down every week, many of them, and they serve meals. They come down every week, many of them, and they help us run the mission; 240 volunteers that showed up last week. Now, some of them were regulars and then some of them came down for their once a month service project but I love that they're committed to this place. And I would say that's one of the ways to serve, is to be consistent, is to find a place that really hits your heart and a place that you wanna make a difference because there's lots of organizations like ours out there that need the help. We don't have enough staff to do all the things that we need to do around here and when volunteers come down and serve, not only does it help us raise our level of leadership but it helps those that we're serving because now we could do it at a much higher level.0:22:18.1 Mischa Z: I love that. I like what you said, and I'm gonna frame it this way, take the time to find some place that inspires you to be consistent. So go to the San Diego Rescue Mission and if that grabs you, awesome, be consistent but if it doesn't, perhaps look again. Keep looking until you can find that thing that maybe resonates, yeah?0:22:45.0 Donnie Dee: Yeah, and I think that we don't have to do everything, but what if all of us at this summit did something? And I'm sure that if you had the ability to find out all of the areas that people at this summit are involved in, we'd probably be impressed and probably be in awe, but there's probably somebody that this really speaks to them. You've been feeling like you need to get involved, you've been feeling like you need to do something, and I would say, find that thing and also, step back and evaluate your own story. What is it that you've been through? What is it that you've been challenged by, either as you grew up or even later in life? And typically, I have found that that ends up being something that you wanna give back too because you've been given so much. Like for you, I can only imagine what it's like for you to sit down with somebody who's struggling with an addiction and the power of that is, is that you know exactly what that's like, you know exactly what that means.0:23:53.4 Donnie Dee: I remember I'm the oldest of four and my parents got divorced when I was in eighth grade, and I always resented it. I was like... I never really understood how difficult and challenging it is to be married till I got married. I'm just a kid and I resented it, and I always wondered why it had to happen, because it was hard on us. It was really hard on us. But it wasn't until I was 25 years old and I took a position in Colorado working with coaches and athletes, and I met a kid whose mom asked me, "Would you meet with him because me and his dad are going through a divorce and he's really struggling?" And I sat down with him at Taco Bell and that divorce that I went through as an eighth grader made sense to me because I could speak to him in a way that I think he listened to me more than he listened to anybody else because I could relate. And I think that's the challenge, is not only to be consistent at that thing that you feel compelled to do but to find something that really resonates with your heart because you've been impacted, you've changed, you've overcome. And I think that puts you in a position to really have an impact on other people that will trust you because you've been there.0:25:08.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's good. That experience, bring that experience to the table and use that as a tool to serve. That's very powerful. How about informally? So we covered formally, tell me some informal.0:25:25.3 Donnie Dee: I think that some of us are more relational than others, and so as I mentioned earlier, just having a world view where you see people as people, not as a hassle or as a distraction, or as a... We've got... I remember when I was a kid, if somebody rang the doorbell, it wasn't uncommon growing up in a neighborhood. We were bouncing around from house to house. Somebody rings my doorbell now, I'm half freaked out. [laughter] What do they want? Am I in trouble? Am I about to get robbed? Why are they ringing my doorbell? We live in a world of garage door openers where we pull our car in and we get out, and walk into the house and we don't connect with anybody, and I just don't think that's... I don't think that's best for society. We are human beings, we are meant to connect, and I think the absolute most fulfilling way to connect is to help others. And so as we began to see in our neighborhoods, as we begin to see in our workplace, as we begin to see at the gym, as we begin to see people at our kids practices, and as we begin to build relationships, I think you find that there's a whole world out there that's waiting to be touched and waiting to be blessed if we'll have the eyes to see that.0:26:45.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, I loved that thought. This is what I hear, a lot of what I hear, is how powerful, when I walk out the door, a smile can be, a generous nod, an open, generous... And when I say generous, meaning... I don't mean literally having to give something to somebody but that... You know what I'm saying when I say generous?0:27:11.9 Donnie Dee: We all know people that when you're around them, they're life-giving, they're so positive, they're so enthusiastic, they're so full of joy. That's actually contagious. And when I see that, not only do I benefit from that but it's also a challenge to me that I wanna be that kind of person. I wanna be that kind of person that when others are around me, it raises their level of influence and leadership capacity.0:27:40.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, and the other thing I heard was, if I'm having... If I see somebody and I go negative and I get judgmental or whatever that could be, they shouldn't have crossed the street in front of me, or the gamut that can go through our brain is literally practiced to be like, "Wait a minute, can I shift how I view that person to a positive attitude or from a positive set of glasses?" or say it however you want.0:28:09.9 Donnie Dee: Yeah, yeah, no, I think it goes back to that way we view the world and we are all pretty selfish and we all are the most very self-centered and self-focused, and self-aware, and if I can begin to see the world from a standpoint of, "Look, it's not about me"... I need to remind myself of that daily. That's almost something I should rehearse in my head over, "It's not about me. This is not about me. This is not about me, my needs, my wants, my desires. What if I begin to make the world about other people?" and I think that's legacy. You start talking about how to make the most of our lives. Well, service is certainly a way to do that and at the end of our lives, what you have in an auditorium, like my friend that I mentioned, is a bunch of people that you've impacted if we dare to see the world in another's focused view. If we see the world in a self-focused view, then at the end of our lives, probably not a whole lot of people are around to celebrate your legacy, right?0:29:20.2 Mischa Z: Right, it's true.0:29:21.3 Donnie Dee: We know that now, so why don't we do something about it? Why don't we do something different?0:29:25.8 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. If we can dare... Say that again, if we can dare to see the world... How did you say that? If we...0:29:33.2 Donnie Dee: Well, if we can dare to see the world others-focused instead of me-focused, then really I think build a legacy that has an impact on lots of people's lives.0:29:45.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's great. So good. Donnie, I love it. I think that that's a great place to stop interview one. So if this interview with Donnie Dee was fantastic and you want to get even more content from Donnie, upgrade to the all access pass for that bonus interview. And I've got some good questions and I know we're gonna have some fun, and I'm gonna give you an opportunity to be vulnerable, so I think that's always really good. Any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover, Donnie?0:30:29.0 Donnie Dee: No, just that I think we should all be mindful that life is short, and so each day's a gift. The Bible teaches that this is the day that the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it. And I think that regardless of your faith orientation, I think we would all agree that life is short and goes by very quickly, and so what we do with these days really determines a successful life. If you want another tip, I think, in terms of how to have an effective life and to be well-rounded and to be well-balanced like that three-legged stool, then we gotta get up every day and make this day count by treating it as a gift.0:31:09.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's good. That's good stuff, Donnie. Thank you so much. You can find out all about what Donnie does as President and CEO of the San Diego Rescue Mission by going to sdrescue.org. Again, sdrescue.org. There's opportunities to donate. I'm sure you would always love donations, donation-supported...0:31:38.2 Donnie Dee: Yeah, we've got a lot of opportunities to serve, a lot of opportunities to give, a lot of opportunities to praise, so yeah, we'd love to have any of your listeners involved in any one of those plans.0:31:48.6 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic, Donnie. And again, everybody click on the all access pass button below so you can get unlimited access to all of our interviews with Donnie and all of the bonus interviews which Donnie and I are going to get into next. I'm gonna hit stop and thank you so much for round one, that was beautiful.0:32:10.5 Donnie Dee: Thank you.

That's Total Mom Sense
AVANI PATEL: Advocating for Black Women + WOC Through Media

That's Total Mom Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 47:02


Avani Patel is the Chief Operating Officer at ESSENCE. In this role, she leads the Technology, Finance, and Human Resources functions. A veteran of the technology & business consulting industry, her career spans product launch, management/operations and consulting across Fortune 500 companies and start-ups. She intends on fulfilling ESSENCE's mission of serving Black Women deeply by a continued focus on the company's digital landscape and business growth. Patel previously led technology at Sundial Brands/Unilever, as well as professional services at Verizon/Totality Corp. Avani is also a PMP (Project Management Professional) and Six Sigma Black Belt. She recently completed the Women in Leadership Program at Oxford University. A true Jersey Girl by heart, Avani was born and raised in Sayreville, NJ and went on to attend Rutgers University. Avani is an award-winning Indian folk-dance choreographer and former television host for a South Asian network. Coming from a large family, Patel learned to be organized and vocal from a young age; these are the skills that became the greatest asset to the launch of her career. She continues to lean on the skills and values inherited from her Gujarati family to help guide her, both personally and professionally. When not strategizing for ESSENCE, Avani travels the world with her children, Lucas, 15 & Lara, 14 with the hope that they will, one day, become model global citizens. Meet My Guest: WEBSITE: AvaniPatel.com INSTAGRAM: @missavani.patel TWITTER: @ FACEBOOK: / LINKEDIN: Avani Patel Mom Haul: MANLUU: Luxurious, unexpected interpretations of Creole culture

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Jeff Marx, President and Chief Operating Officer at Cerapedics

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:05


Jeff Marx, President and Chief Operating Officer at Cerapedics Cerapedics.com

Destination On The Left
Episode 249: Why Disruption Creates Added Value, with Sherrif Karamat

Destination On The Left

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:18


Sherrif Karamat, CAE, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of PCMA. He also serves as President of the PCMA Foundation and Publisher of Convene magazine. As CEO, Sherrif leads the vision, mission, and promise for PCMA's global family of brands. He serves the greater business events industry as a prominent business architect, enabling our community to become a catalyst for economic and social progress, organizational success, and personal and professional development. In his previous role as Chief Operating Officer, Sherrif led the development and implementation of PCMA's new vision: driving global economic and social transformation through business events. In addition to his responsibilities at the executive level, Sherrif also directed streamlining of PCMA's content creation and delivery channels into one organization. He oversaw partnership, business services, membership, business development, and technology teams. As part of PCMA's growth strategy, Sherrif has led a major data intelligence program and played a key role in the 2017 acquisition of Incentive Conference & Event Society Asia Pacific (ICESAP). A leader in the business events industry, Sherrif previously served as Vice President of Business Sales and Services for Toronto Convention & Visitors (Tourism Toronto). He has served on various boards and is currently a director on the Destination International Board of Trustees. Sherrif is a life-long learner, and in addition to completing his bachelor's degree and Masters of Business Administration from York University in Toronto, Canada; he has completed postgraduate certificate programs at Wharton School of Business at The University of Pennsylvania, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. At Harvard Business and Law School, he completed a program on strategic negotiations for senior executives and a program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), one on data intelligence and big data. On this episode of Destination on the Left, I talk with Sherrif Karamat, who I met at the Destinations International annual convention in Baltimore, Maryland, and whose insights I hope will inspire you going forward. Sherrif shares his thoughts on the importance of face-to-face meetings and gives an overarching perspective of the business meetings industry's impacts on a vast range of topics and industries. We discuss why when we meet in person, we solve complex issues faster, how those connections will help form and sustain the meetings industry of the future, and why disruption uncovers new value and brings us into focusing on outcomes rather than outputs. What You Will Learn: Why the events industry has been sadly missed over the last 18 months The critical flashes of brilliance that Sherrif has found during the COVID-19 pandemic Lessons learned on recovery and change and how Sherrif is taking some of them forward How do we create engaging experiences and broaden our reach with technology Sherrif's thoughts on how disruption will shape the future of the travel industry Why it's vital to be centered around the people we serve, so they will want to engage with us Lessons for the Future When humans are faced with roadblocks, we start to innovate — and COVID-19 certainly threw up a few obstacles! Sharrif and I discuss the lessons learned by the travel industry, including how we can leverage technology to broaden our reach and engage with more people. Sharrif also shares why he firmly believes that in-person events will see a resurgence in the future as people seek out opportunities to forge meaningful connections. Purpose Driven Outcomes Disruption can help us uncover added value by challenging the status quo. In the travel industry, we want to center our events and organizations around the customers we serve and how we are solving their issues or creating value for them that makes them want to engage with us. When we rethink that status quo and shift our mindset, we can bring people together and focus on positive outcomes, not merely outputs. Convening Leaders Registration Page: https://conveningleaders.org/ Website: https://www.pcma.org/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sherrif-karamat-822b821/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/pcma_2/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PCMAHQ/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/pcmahq We value your thoughts and feedback and would love to hear from you. Leave us a review on your favorite streaming platform to let us know what you want to hear more of. Here is a quick tutorial on how to leave us a rating and review on iTunes!: https://breaktheicemedia.com/rating-review/  

Engineering Reimagined podcast
Microsoft and the next frontier in space

Engineering Reimagined podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 24:57


Infrastructure opportunities in outer space are endless. Join Lynn McDonald from Microsoft's Azure Space Team and Aurecon's Chief Operating Officer, Lousie Adams, as they talk about exciting business opportunities in the emerging space industry, the importance of diversity and inclusion for engineering and why mentoring is the most important influence when growing your career.  Find us online at aurecongroup.com/podcast or email us at engineeringreimagined@aurecongroup.com.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Rita Hernandez Figi, the Chief Operating Officer, MedHQ

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 10:05


In this episode we are joined by Rita Hernandez Figi, the Chief Operating Officer at MedHQ. Here she discusses the current recruitment and retention landscape in healthcare, focusing on the difficulties hospitals and health systems are experiencing and strategies to mitigate them. Rita also predicts what the recruitment and retention landscape will look like in the next five years. This episode is sponsored by MedHQ.

17Twenty
Jason Evelyn - Building the Extraordinary

17Twenty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 60:32


Jason Evelyn, the Chief Operating Officer at MMC Corp, sits down with the 17Twenty crew this week.  The conversation centers on Jason's career at the MMC Corp companies, starting with MW Builders, and including lessons learned through the climb of the ladder, what COVID-19 taught Jason-about-Jason, implementation of core values, and all things in between. ... also, there's a little weed eater talk tossed in for good measure.Pen.  Paper.  Principles.  #movemountains   // Show Notes //ECHO 25.4 cc Gas 2-Stroke Cycle Straight Shaft Trimmerhttps://thd.co/3AcG4PLMore Than a Season: Building a Championship Culture, by Dayton Moore and Matt Fulkshttps://amzn.to/3F9NdE8

#WorkBold Podcast
Why “Location, Location, Location” No Longer Works

#WorkBold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 32:43


Ian Minor, Chief Operating Office at neospace, joins Bold Founder Caleb Parker for our Season 5 Finale to discuss why hotels are poised to take market share from office buildings. They talk through 2 of the 5 pillars of Space-as-a-Service: hospitality and community, and why they will be the differentiators that will transcend the old “location, location, location” mantra. Ian shares the ingredients for success he learned from his time creating the Hoxton's coworking brand, and he spills the beans on a new Work, Rest and Play upscale Space-as-a-Service brand in Scotland.   Connect with Ian Minor on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/ianminor/  Connect with Caleb Parker on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/calebparker/  If you have any questions or feedback on this episode, email podcast@workbold.co   Value Bombs Can the office become a place people want to go to? I believe the answer is yes, if we create experiences that support good company cultures – Caleb Parker Where you've got the 15 minutes city element, I think it works very well to combine your home life, your leisure life and your work life all in one – Ian Minor I think we will see a lot more hotels taking up elements within the office environment – Ian Minor Across our company we couldn't open up locations fast enough close to where people live, but the hotels are already there. So it just makes sense that they would be able to accommodate some of these workers – Caleb Parker It's quite clear that we need a different way of operating – Ian Minor Why should hospitality not be in the office life? Office life is part of life and I think hospitality coming into that is going to be a crucial. I think it's logical. – Ian Minor You have to become a destination experience now, people have to want to go through the commutes to get somewhere special – Ian Minor You need a hospitality team to deliver hospitality, and that's a more expensive element. So you model a staff-cost percentage against revenue of about 14-15%  – Ian Minor Events sell F&B, F&B helps close deals on desks, desks sell F&B – Caleb Parker I think community is the most crucial thing – Ian Minor It's about building the workplace with the curious kind of people that want to be members – Ian Minor We are in a day in age where become a media driven, content conscious organization is important. – Caleb Parker If we attract fans as members, even if they're on flexible terms, the lifetime value of those members sticks around for a long time. – Caleb Parker How can we give employees the gift of not only a community with their own colleagues, but also a broader ecosystem? – Caleb Parker   It's a dynamic multifunctional space with community at its core – Ian Minor   Resources neospace website www.neo-space.com  Hoxton Coworking Space workingfrom.thehoxton.com Ennismore Hospitality Property Developer www.ennismore.com     Shout Outs  Dave Cairns Dror Poleg Anthony Slumbers Jamie Russo Tushar Agarwal at Hubble Keith Evans Jeff Shapack John Preece at Hub Australia Simon Sinek Infinite Game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vX2iVIJMFQ   About Ian Minor https://www.linkedin.com/in/ianminor/  Ian Minor is Chief Operating Officer for neospace, an upscale Space-as-a-Service brand in Aberdeen Scotland, offering a work, rest and play concept. Ian is a future of work and hospitality specialist who partners with CEOs, enterprises, and start-ups to create inspiring collaborative workspaces and hospitality operations from concept development and design through project management to operation. Committed to developing destination experiences where members can get on with the work that matters, Ian is regarded as a thought leader who develops and operates the very best of collaborative member workspaces.   Sponsors Fortune Favours the Bold Bold merges property management & Space-as-a-Service to drive asset value and help office customers grow faster. Now part of NewFlex (www.workbold.co)    Future Proof Your Portfolio with NewFlex NewFlex delivers and manages a range of branded solutions for every type of building, in every type of location, for every type of occupier. Including the flexibility to develop your own brand. All enabled by flexible management contracts where we are invested in making money for you. (www.newflex.com)   Launch Your Own Podcast A Podcast Company is the leading podcast production company for brands, organizations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right equipment, training, and guidance to ensure you sound amazing. (https://www.apodcastcompany.com)   Subscribe to the #WorkBold Podcast https://workbold.co.uk/podcast/

The INDUStry Show
The INDUStry Show w Karna Chokshi

The INDUStry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 39:22


Karna Chokshi is the Chief Operating Officer of apna - India's largest professional networking and job opportunities platform for the rising workforce. Previously, Karna held various leadership positions in strategy, operations and product at Uber and ITC Limited. He is an inventor with 4 patents and an alum of IIT-Delhi and Stanford University. #networking #jobopportunities #jobopportunities #workforce #bluecollar #bluecollarjobs #employment #hiring #jobs #recruitment #careers #jobsearch #entrepreneuership #theindustryshow #olll #onelinelifelessons --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theindustryshow/support

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief
Ep. 181 – Anaqua COO, Justin Crotty

Second in Command: The Chief Behind the Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 45:05


Our guest today is the Chief Operating Officer of Anaqua, Justin Crotty.  As Chief Operating Officer, Justin handles the execution of Anaqua's growth strategy and day-to-day operations. He joined Anaqua in 2016 as Chief Financial Officer, where he assumed overall leadership for the Global Finance and Accounting team.  In 2018 he was appointed to COO […] The post Ep. 181 – Anaqua COO, Justin Crotty appeared first on COO Alliance.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Tim Braun, Chief Operating Officer at the Carroll County Memorial Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 11:15


This episode features Tim Braun, Chief Operating Officer at the Carroll County Memorial Hospital. Here, he discusses the large new addition to their facility, the differing responsibilities of a COO, and more.

Smart Venture Podcast
#81 Instagram COO Justin Osofsky

Smart Venture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:16


081 Justin Osofsky is the Chief Operating Officer of Instagram, where he leads oversees Instagram's business functions and is responsible for helping the company scale globally.  He is also VP, Global Operations at Facebook.  Prior to these roles, Justin was Vice President at Facebook where he most recently led Global Operations and Corporate Development, working in close partnership with the product and policy organizations with the goal of creating a safe, inclusive community for people, businesses, and developers. Justin also oversaw mergers and acquisitions (M&A), and helped the company successfully integrate acquisitions and develop strategic opportunities across Facebook's family of applications. Check out our brand new YouTube Video Podcast!  https://www.SmartVenturePod.com IG/Twitter/FB @GraceGongGG LinkedIn:@GraceGong YouTube: https://bit.ly/gracegongyoutube Join the SVP fam with your host Grace Gong. In each episode, we are going to have conversations with some of the top investors, super star founders, as well as well known tech executives in the silicon valley. We will have a coffee chat with them to learn their ways of thinking and actionable tips on how to build or invest in a successful company.  

WAM
#171 The Foundations of a Strong Family Business with Bridget Jaeger

WAM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 29:23


Today we get to have an amazing conversation with the Chief Operating Officer of CH Technologies, Bridget Jaeger! The company is dedicated to equipping its clients with a responsive source for cutting-edge inhalation and particle exposure systems, which can be custom-tailored to specific needs. In our chat today, we hear from Bridget about the work that the company has been occupied with since the advent of the pandemic, how COVID-19 has impacted their market, some thoughts on masks and air filtration, and a lot more about their specific products! Bridget also sheds some light on the ins and out of the company, touching on its foundation as a family-run business, and how she likes to keep this ethos alive as COO. She talks about the legacy of her father's leadership style and emphasis on giving and also shares her reflections on how her mother's attitude influenced her mentality as a woman in a male-dominated space. So for all this and more from a wonderful guest, listen in! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Max Bet Podcast
Mavericks of Gaming - Ft. Justin Beltram

Max Bet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:07


In this episode Justin Beltram, Chief Operating Officer at Maverick Gaming joins the boys to discuss what it's like giving up a lucrative and secure job to chase entrepreneurial dreams, what it's like to purchase a casino, and highlights the unexpected challenges of issuing tasers to employees.

Tech Bites
Delivery: Vertically Integrated Dark Kitchen

Tech Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 57:33


Food delivery has never been more popular, nor more essential to people's daily lives. Third-party delivery apps have dominated the space, dictating policies and payments for both home consumers and restaurants. Companies looking to take back control are creating their own platforms and systems. On this episode, Tech Bites host Jenifer Leuzzi talks with Brian Howenstein, Chief Operating Officer of ClusterTruck, a custom-built software platform that vertically integrates delivery-only dark kitchens. Launched in 2015, ClusterTruck has locations in Indiana, Ohio, and Missouri. This episode of Tech Bites is made possible by the generosity of the Tabard Inn. Interested in a deeper look into the current food delivery ecosystem of apps, restaurants, delivery workers, and consumers? Check out Tech Bites episodes 242, 243, and 244 for a look at the real-world costs of delivery and convenience.Photo Courtesy of ClusterTruck.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Tech Bites by becoming a member!Tech Bites is Powered by Simplecast.

Columbia Energy Exchange
The Road Ahead for the Electric Vehicle Market

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 53:14


The transportation sector is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, and there is much excitement today about the road ahead for electric vehicles.  Many automakers have pledged to increase the share of their production by going all battery or fuel cell electric within a decade, but few of the new models meet current buyer preference for larger vehicles with increased utility. But the Ford Motor Company's introduction of the F-150 Lightning, a battery electric version of the best-selling truck in the U.S. for the last 44 years, may signal a tipping point in building the future of zero emissions transportation. This live episode of the podcast, moderated by Host Jason Bordoff, features two key figures in the clean transportation transition: The first is Jim Farley, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ford, a role he took on just about a year ago. He also serves as a member of the company's Board of Directors and was previously Chief Operating Officer. Also in the conversation is Mary Nichols, a long-time environmental champion and  Chair of the California Air Resources Board. She's now a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy.   Jim and Mary discuss the significant changes taking place in the industry's plans and strategies to achieve carbon neutrality and the role of regulation, policy and investments in building demand for battery electric vehicles.  The Climate Group has selected the Columbia Climate School as its University partner for this year's Climate Week NYC. Running Sept. 20-26, Climate Week NYC convened key climate leaders to accelerate climate action and discuss ambitious commitments ahead of the 26th UN Climate Change Conference this fall in Glasgow.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Mary Stewart, Chief Operating Officer at SIU Medicine

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 18:11


This episode features Mary Stewart, Chief Operating Officer at SIU Medicine. Here, she discusses how she believes in leading by example, how they quickly adapted to telehealth at the beginning of the pandemic, and more.

Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey
IoT Strategy: Firing Bullets Instead of Cannonballs

Over the Air — IoT, Connected Devices, & the Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 25:43


You've been tasked with defining an IoT and automation strategy for your company. It's a major initiative that will likely span the next decade or more. Where do you start? What's the right path forward? Craig Salvalaggio, Chief Operating Officer at Applied Manufacturing Technologies, was in your shoes 18 years ago. In this episode, he offers advice on how to get started with an IoT strategy and the pitfalls to avoid along the way. We discuss: - What automation looked like 20 years ago - Tips for getting started with an IoT strategy - How building a team can inform internal culture transformation - How partnerships enable growth Never miss an episode of Over The Air by subscribing wherever you listen to podcasts. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Over the Air in your favorite podcast player.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Managing 2bn in Retail Assets with Christopher Ressa

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 32:22


Get a new real estate perspective!  In today's episode, we're going to dive into them!  Christopher Ressa joined DLC Management Corp. in 2007.  During his 10 years in the company, his relationships, real estate expertise, and leadership led to numerous successful repositioning of assets.  With a track record of consistently beating budgets and increasing NOI, Chris has played a significant role in the overall growth of the organization.  Now, as the Chief Operating Officer, Chris oversees DLC's $2.5 billion asset portfolio and is responsible for all property-level operations including leasing, property management and construction, and marketing on all owned assets.  Despite a hectic work schedule, Chris invests a significant amount of his personal time creating thought-provoking content and sparking great engagement on social media and his presence on LinkedIn is no less impressive as he has over 28,000 followers and often tops the trending board with his retail real estate.[00:01 - 04:50] Opening SegmentLet's get to know today's guest, Christopher RessaA lot of work with a hope of being fruitful Chris shares about his real estate life journeyTenant turned landlord developer [04:51 - 12:46] Managing 2bn in Retail AssetsWhat is retail?Chris talks about the opportunities in retail Retail is not deadScaling retail vs scaling e-commerce[12:47 - 28:39] Retail is on FIRE What are department stores doing?Getting closer to the consumer: Why and How“It's not all lollipops but there are opportunities.”Chris talks about his content[28:40 - 32:22] Final Four SegmentWhat Chris would invest in with only $20,000 Networking and learning real estateHow Chris would help in a real estate mistakeAvoid the bad dealsChris's way to make the world a better placePower savingReach out to our guest - see links below Final wordsTweetable Quotes“The retail landscape is complex.  I find that exciting.” - Christopher Ressa“I think we have too many digital stores in America, way more than we do physical stores.” - Christopher Ressa“If you want to get close to the consumer, retail real estate is where it is.” - Christopher Ressa-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Connect with Christopher Ressa through cressa@dlcmgmt.com and LinkedIn.  Visit his website https://www.dlcmgmt.com/ and listen to his podcast, Retail Retold.Connect with me:I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.  FacebookLinkedInLike, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com 

Lykken on Lending
9-27-2021 Mortgage Compliance

Lykken on Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 86:00


In our Hot Topic this week we have Rick Toma, Chief Operating Officer at The Money Source Inc. The discussion will focus on a Compliance Management System; how to get mortgage quality control assistance…. Compliance is to mortgage servicers what structural integrity is to homes. Without a compliant foundation, servicers' integrity is thrown into doubt, and repairing the problem can happen only at great expense.  Want to know more aboutRick Toma? Read on here for more info on this podcast...  

Feudal Future
The Psychological Impact of the Pandemic

Feudal Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 44:36


On this episode of Feudal Future,  hosts Joel Kotkin and Marshall Toplansky are joined by Ross Elliot, Chairman of the Urban Land Institute of Australia, and Dr. Aaron Kheriaty, Professor of Psychiatry at UC Irvine. This show covered the psychological impact of Covid-19 and how governments are managing it.Ross is the co-founder of Suburban Futures (formerly The Suburban Alliance). He has 30 years' experience in the property and urban development industry, including a number of national leadership roles for the Property Council of Australia as its Executive Director, then Chief Operating Officer and later as National Executive Director for the Residential Development Council. In this time he pioneered a number of policy initiatives for the industry on urban growth and cities policies for Australia. He has both authored and edited a number of monographs on urban development policy, housing and cities policies for Australia.  Ross was also founding CEO of Brisbane Marketing, winning an International Downtown Association's (USA) award for City Marketing in 2003.  A frequent speaker, author and commentator on urban development policy, he was in 2016 invited to be international keynote speaker for the American Planning Association's Utah conference and in 2017 was published in a global joint MIT/Chapman University project “Infinite Suburbia.”Aaron Kheriaty is Professor of Psychiatry at UCI School of Medicine and Director of the Medical Ethics Program at UCI Health. He serves as chairman of the medical ethics committees at UCI Hospital and at the CA Department of State Hospitals. Dr. Kheriaty graduated from the University of Notre Dame in philosophy and pre-medical sciences, earned his MD degree from Georgetown University, and completed residency training in psychiatry at UCI. He has authored books and articles for professional and lay audiences on bioethics, social science, psychiatry, and religion. His work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, Public Discourse, and First Things; he has conducted print, radio, and television interviews on bioethics topics with The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, CNN, Fox, and NPR. On matters of public policy and healthcare he has addressed the California Medical Association and has testified before the California Senate Health Committee.Join the 'Beyond Feudalism' Facebook group to share your story, ask questions and connect with other citizen leaders: https://www.facebook.com/groups/beyondfeudalismTweet thoughts: @joelkotkin, @mtoplansky, #FeudalFuture #BeyondFeudalismLearn more about Joel's book 'The Coming of Neo-Feudalism': https://amzn.to/3a1VV87Sign Up For News & Alerts: http://joelkotkin.com/#subscribeThis show is presented by the Chapman Center for Demographics and Policy, which focuses on research and analysis of global, national and regional demographic trends and explores policies that might produce favorable demographic results over time.

The Innovative Mindset
Norm Snyder, CEO of Reeds, Inc. on Innovating in the Ultra-Competitive Soda Industry

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 74:37


Norm Snyder Discusses Innovating in the Ultra-Competitive Soda Industry This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset Norm Snyder joined Reed's Inc. in September 2019 as the Chief Operating Officer. He was appointed Chief Executive Officer in March 2020. Prior to joining Reed's, Norm served as President and Chief Executive Office for Avitae USA, LLC, an emerging premium new age beverage company that markets and sells a line of ready-to-drink caffeinated waters. Prior to Avitae, he served as the President and Chief Operating Officer for Adina For Life, Inc., President and Chief Executive Officer of High Falls Brewing Company, and Chief Financial Officer, and later Chief Operating Officer of South Beach Beverage Company, known as SoBe. In prior experience, Norm served as Controller for National Football League Properties, Inc., and in various roles at PriceWaterhouse during an eight-year tenure. Norm earned a B.S. in Accounting from the State University of New York at Albany. Connect with Norm https://drinkreeds.com/ Drinkvirgils.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drinkreeds/ Episode Transcript [00:00:00] Norm Snyder: I have one prerequisite for people that come to work for us. You want to be there and it's just not a job, right? You want to be there to make a difference. [00:00:13] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hi, and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. You get my conversations with peak performing thought leaders, creatives, and entrepreneurs. We explore how you can innovate through creativity, compassion, and collaboration. I believe that innovation combined with compassion and creative thinking can save the world and I aim to bring you ways. [00:00:35] You can do it too. If you're enjoying the show, I'd be super grateful. If you could support it by buying me a cup of coffee, you can buy me a cup of@buymeacoffee.com slash Izolda tea. And now let's get on with the show. [00:00:57] Hey there and welcome to the innovative [00:01:00] mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I'm super happy that you're here and I'm so honored and happy to have this week's guest on the show. Check this out. Norm Snyder joined Reed's incorporated in September of 2019 as the chief operating officer. He was appointed chief executive officer in March, 2020 prior to joining Reed's norm norm. [00:01:21] I love that norm served as president and chief executive officer of Avita USA, LLC, and emerging premium new age beverage company that markets and sells a line of ready to drink caffeinated waters prior to a VTA. He served as the president and chief operating officer for Edina for life. He was president and chief executive officer of high falls brewing company and chief financial officer. [00:01:44] And later chief operating officer of south beach beverage company known as Sobe in prior experience. Mr. Snyder, norm served as the controller for the national football league properties that tells us something about norm and in various roles at Pricewaterhouse during an [00:02:00] eight year tenure norm earned a BS in accounting from the state university of New York at Albany. [00:02:05] Wow. You have quite the resume norm. Thank you so much for being on the show. Welcome. [00:02:11] Norm Snyder: Thank you. Good to be [00:02:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: here. I am. First of all, you have such a wide range of experience and you began. As an accountant, which I think is so it's so fascinating because accounting is in many ways, everything, knowing where you are, knowing where you want to go and knowing the sort of the, the numbers behind it is, is incredibly fascinating to me. [00:02:37] And I'm wondering, how did you get from? I started in accounting to, I am the CEO of one of my favorite beverage companies reeds. Cause I love the ginger beer and ginger ale. How did that [00:02:48] Norm Snyder: happen? Well, you know, it kind of goes back to the, before I went to school and, and figuring out what I wanted to do and I, I always had a pension for business [00:03:00] and, but I also thought I wanted to be a lawyer. [00:03:03] And somehow I threw that into a cup and shook it up and threw it out and accounting came out. And I thought, you know, the, the real basic premise behind it was, is it exactly you touched on if I understand the, you know, the numbers guide, every business, I understand where all the numbers are coming from. [00:03:21] It would be a great way to learn. It would be a star. So, you know, I spent the formidable part of my career, really working with big fortune 500 corporations and really got to see a lot how they operated and really use the numbers, how to, how to dig in and understand that. And then when I got on the business side, I loved it even more. [00:03:41] So I knew that, you know, businesses where I really wanted to be and, you know, in an operating role. And as I progressed, I just, I loved it more and more. And then I found at the end of the day, it really gave me a competitive advantage, being a CEO that understood [00:04:00] numbers and how things work. So I always felt like when it came down to financial negotiations, nobody could, nobody could top me. [00:04:06] So it was kind of a stepping, stepping stone or a ladder is how to start and where I wanted to go. Then once I got into that side of the business, I fell in love with it. And I just, you know, I knew that was that's where I wanted to be. And, and that's where I am now. [00:04:24] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, that's fascinating to me, this notion of having a springboard and then you innovated from there and you develop this incredible career from something that is as basic as numbers, but they can be really complicated and. [00:04:40] It's interesting to me because reads is I am going to be very I've. I've been drinking reads since the nineties, when I first heard about it and, and started, it was only available like in the natural health food stores type places, it wasn't widely available and yet you've been innovating and making it so much more [00:05:00] prevalent everywhere. [00:05:00] I would love it for, for those of you listening, who have not heard about reeds, you need to go out and get it's so good if you, especially, if you like ginger, but norm I would love it. If you would talk a little bit about reads where it was when you started and where it is today. And if you could tell just a little bit about what the company is, I would love that. [00:05:19] Norm Snyder: Well, let me just, let me, let me say a couple of things before I answer that. Number one. I started drinking it in the nineties too. So, you know, I've been in, I was a consumer long before I became involved with a company. The other thing too is, you know, throughout your career and I'll, I'll say this to any young people that are looking for advice, I've also had great mentors. [00:05:41] And one of the reasons why I'm here ironically, is a guy that I started working for over 30 years ago in NFL properties, named John bellow. And, and you know, if you look at spots on my resume, there's a lot of spots that he was involved with. And, and he has been very instrumental in my career in terms of [00:06:00] learning and pattering pattern things of him. [00:06:04] So that's important too. Now reads reads is a, a great company. And one of the things that I love about it and this, this is what makes me feel good when I wake up every morning. And I talk about. You know, we just came out with this campaign called Reno reads is real or reads. I got to make sure I get this right. [00:06:25] You know, real real is always better. That's it? And we, if you take a look at our ingredients panel and if you know how we make our products, they are so far superior than any of our competitors by far. And that makes me feel really good because we're offering consumers, you know, the best ginger beer, the best ginger ale, you know, the best craft sodas that we have. [00:06:52] And, you know, Reed's was, it's a 30 year old company started by a gentleman in Southern California named Chris Reed who had this [00:07:00] idea and he loved ginger. And that the world really knew nothing about ginger, except for maybe, you know, in a Chinese food menu. Right. And all the great properties that ginger has. [00:07:13] And created this all natural, better for you drink. And which started because if you go back in 30 years ago, the only, the only, the only channel that would carry such a thing was that were natural stores. Right? And then it morphed into grocery stores because groceries as natural stores became bigger and started stealing business from grocery stores, grocery stores said, wow, we've got to start offering more natural products, right. [00:07:39] And you know, most mainstream grocery stores today have a fairly large section of natural products or have natural products that are interspersed within the regular categories. So we kind of morphed off into that. And you know, we've been growing ever since because obviously [00:08:00] as people become more educated and understand the great properties that a lot of these products have and become more knowledgeable. [00:08:09] And want better for you products. You know, it's the classic supply meets demand scenario, and we've been able to fill that gap. [00:08:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm taking all of that in for a second because it's in many ways looking at it from, from an economics standpoint, that whole idea of supply and demand is it's as old as time. [00:08:32] And yet there are some innovations here that are, that are fascinating to me because the innovation, when Mr. Reed started the company was all natural ingredients as specially focusing on actual ginger instead of this sort of, oh, ginger, if you will. And, and that was different. That was really different. I remember thinking that when I first started drinking it and that, that it tasted like ginger, not [00:09:00] fo ginger, if you will. [00:09:01] And so. How does that work when you're starting something like this. And I know you haven't been with the company all that long, but, but you're still innovating. You're coming out with new campaigns. How does, how does somebody decide, you know what, I'm going to do things in a way that people aren't thinking about like all natural ingredients, actual, fresh ginger in the sodas, instead of fake ginger or whatever, what do you think the mindset has to be of someone who takes that kind of chance? [00:09:32] Norm Snyder: I think they truly believe in and stayed true to their convictions of this is what they want, and this is good. And I'm spin up persevere and educate as many people as possible. And hopefully they'll feel the way I do. I mean, obviously anybody that takes that type of risk, right. And anybody that creates something that sticks for 30 years has done something pretty tremendous my view. [00:09:56] And so one of the things we, we, we, we [00:10:00] haven't deviated. From its founding guiding principle that Chris started. And that's why, you know, it came back to this whole thing. That real is always better than, you know, 30 years we're still doing it the way he did it and his garage or his kitchen. Right. We were still using organic, real ginger that we import from Peru. [00:10:28] And we still make it the same way and we still make it the, what he refers to as the Jamaican inspired recipe, which is fruit juices. So we use pineapple, lemon, lime and honey. Right. And you know, what I've tried to do is just improve the efficiencies of how we put all that together. Right. And not deviate, but as you mentioned, innovate, so. [00:10:53] That's a great next step in you know, what, how we innovate is because if you look at the ginger beer category [00:11:00] relative to other beverage categories, it's, it's, it's kinda small. And, and a lot of competitors saw the successor reads as an up comment and obviously that takes market share. And if you look at, if you look at ginger beer consumers you know, it's kind of a mix and it's, it's, it's used as a mixer, obviously with the popularity of Moscow mules and dark and Stormys, and that's quite frankly how I met reads with overall Moscow over a few Moscow mules [00:11:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: in [00:11:31] Norm Snyder: those special copper cups, but those copper mugs, right. [00:11:34] And then. But you have some folks that like, drink it, like I use the Jamaican inspired recipe. We had to make a woman that worked for us and how everybody makes their own home version. But, you know, they, they drink it like a soda. So it's a mix that, you know, people that drink it like a soda they use it as a mixer, actually, there's people that drink it because of that helps their digestion. [00:11:58] It helps them, they have [00:12:00] nausea. You know, we have a lot of like cancer patients, believe it or not that reach out to us because it helps them. So you know, kind of, that's sort of very limited type of audience. So, you know, one of the things that we thought of, which was kind of a natural is the ginger ale category, which people drink, drink ginger ale the same way. [00:12:21] I mean, my grandmother gave it to me one in an upstairs upset stomach and my mother gave it to. If you go to the hospital, they give it to you. Right. But it's a much broader category. It's not as you know, you don't have quite the ginger burn that you do in ginger beer. But we sent cheese. Why aren't we in the ginger ale cannon? [00:12:39] I mean, and as we peel back the onion a little bit, we found once again, that nobody's really using fresh ginger or real ginger, they're using ginger flavoring, ginger extracts. So we took that formula and applied it to our ginger ale. And again, it's one of our it's, it's probably our fastest growing product right now. [00:12:59] [00:13:00] And you mentioned that you would be drinking your zero calorie, ginger beer. I've been drinking like zero calorie, ginger ELLs, like they're going out of style. Right? I just love the flavor. You know, it's, you know, it's, again, it's a great product. We took the foundation of our ginger beer and created this. [00:13:19] You know, a great way we have innovated. Then we took it a step further and we came up with mocktails. Cause we found out that a lot of folks said, Hey, I want to go out, but I don't want to feel like I have to have an alcoholic drink in my hand. So, you know, and, and if I think in your, in your neck of the woods in Brooklyn, there's been non-alcoholic bars that have popped up, right? [00:13:39] People would go off that want to have fun and socialize, but don't want to feel like they have to drink. So we came up with these ginger rail based mocktails, surely temp on our versions called Shirley tempting and then transfusion, which is you know, which has been a very popular drink. So obviously if you want to mix it with alcohol, you can. [00:13:58] But if you don't, you have a [00:14:00] really great, healthy zero calorie beverage that you can enjoy and, and not feel like you have to have to have consume it with alcohol. So I think that's a great sort of three step, how we've really pivoted and innovative to give folks. A great quality product. It's all natural, but that they can drink at the, at the occasion that they'd feel the most appropriate. [00:14:23] And the reactions then really, really possible. [00:14:27] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And I'm so glad that you said that because I am not a huge drinker and I'm usually the designated driver, you know? So, so it's really nice to be able to go. I would like something that, that is going to taste great. It's going to, this is going to sound a little weird, but it's gonna look good if you see what I mean. [00:14:47] I [00:14:47] Norm Snyder: don't want to feel out of place. Right? You want to feel like you're you're, you're, you're, you're you're you fit in with everybody. And then that's the beauty of these things. And you know, one of the things that I do and I love part of my job is so [00:15:00] I, we have six production facilities across the country. [00:15:03] Every production run that they do, they should product. So my office looks like a collection of bottles, right. And I have a mini refrigerator and I drink, I try and both warm, ambient temperature and cold, but I drink multiple products every day from different locations where they're produced to locate for quality, be for consistency. [00:15:25] But I mean, I want to drink this stuff cause I want to know if a consumer says something, but I can say, look, I had that this is what I believe. Or, you know, do I detect there's an issue because if there's an issue we need to fix it. So I do that every day. I mean, I drink multiple products every day, seven, you know, all the time in the office, but I, but I have a collection of all of our production stuff, so I know what's going on and I know what our consumers are picking up. [00:15:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. I, you know, it's funny going, going into a bar or [00:16:00] pub and ordering something, nonalcoholic feels sometimes I've had people say, oh, you must be in AA. And I'm like, no, just didn't want to drink. And so, so this it's, it's a weird way. It's a weird way of passing actually, because fewer people will talk to you about that sort of thing. [00:16:20] Not that it's any of their business, but yet something that, that is interesting to me about what you just said about making sure that the consumer experience is a positive one. That's, that's one of the, that's one of the results, right? Is that people feel more comfortable drinking it and something else that I would love to ask you about, you said, That you check in as far as whether or not things are going well from all the production facilities. [00:16:49] And I like to say that an innovator is a creative thinker on a mission. And it sounds to me like you're embodying that this notion of checking in, of being very [00:17:00] practical. Can you talk a little bit about what those steps are? How does that, how do you keep innovating while staying very practical in the evaluation and assessment process? [00:17:13] Norm Snyder: Well, because the innovation is the fun part, right? It really, it really is. I mean, you can, you can come up with a wackiest ideas and it's like a release, right? It's like, you can get all this stuff off your chest, off your mind. I mean, I'm like, it's kinda funny. It's ruined me forever being in the beverage business. [00:17:35] Cause I can't go into a store and just buy stuff. I've got to go to the beverage section. I got to go to the coolers. I got to check out what's going on. You know, I look at there's all this scan data. So it's syndicated data that either Nielsen or IRI puts out that shows by category what's selling. [00:17:53] What's not selling by package. I mean I love data too. So it's kind of like, see you assimilate all this stuff that [00:18:00] you're seeing, that you hear people talking about. I have I have three 20 year old children. Well actually I have five but three that are in their twenties and I'll watch what they drink and what their friends drank and what they talk about. [00:18:12] Like I said, when I go into stores, I, no matter what I'm doing, if I'm going on mission a, I always end up in the beverage outlet, check out what's going on. So it's the fun part is the innovation thinking, this is what I think people want. We do a lot of research this based on what the research tells us people want. [00:18:30] So we'll put together a product concept. This is what it becomes a little bit more formal, but a product concept, and then work with our R and D department to create something. And then the fun part is that, that first time that you taste it and does that product really reflect what you're trying to do. [00:18:50] Right. And sometimes you get there very quickly and sometimes it takes a dozen iterations. And sometimes you just say, can't get there. Can't get there. No, [00:19:00] one's gonna, no, one's going to drink this. So that's kind of the fun part. Because it's part science part our, you know, part into it in intuitive and, you know, and I do it with, you know, a lot of people within our organization. [00:19:14] Right. So it's just not me. It's everybody. And it's kind of like free flow. I've got to make sure I said that slowly free flow thinking where people can just kind of like, say what's on there. Right. And you know, you watch trends and you have data and you do other stuff and you try to put it all together and come up with a decision that makes sense. [00:19:35] But you know, we do that on the premise of who we are and what are our, what are our key values, right? It has to be within those because what if we deviate from what our values are then who are we really? Right. So we try to, we try to stay within that sort of bandwidth of who we are and what we want to be. [00:19:56] And, you know, some, like I said, sometimes it just feels really good. It's [00:20:00] like, boy, we nailed this. And sometimes it's like, well, it could be a stretch, but does it work? And sometimes we come back and just say, that's not us. So it's the fun part of the job. And it's the part that's unstructured and very loose and very flowing and it's fun. [00:20:15] And you know, I'm really, I'm really proud that as an organization, we have no shortage of really good ideas. And, and, and like, you know, we, we've got the next two to three years covered, right? Not saying that if we, if something new comes up that we could react quickly, but we have that, we have that many ideas that are, that are good. [00:20:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's fantastic. And I'm, I'm struck by the notion of including everybody that it's not just you making the decisions, it's you working with your team with, with the people who make up the company. And I'm wondering that that's in many ways, an innovative thing. Also, I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about [00:21:00] how you structure that if there is a, you said it's free flowing, but there has to be some sort of a, almost a process when you're doing something iteratively like that. [00:21:10] How do you do that? [00:21:11] Norm Snyder: Yeah, what we we've, we've developed, not that we want to be burdened with structure. But at the same time, it just can't be shooting from the hip. So we develop. Can can you to develop processes once we get to that formal stage of, yeah, let's do this. But so my job is which is hire as many good people as possible. [00:21:33] Right. And let them do the work and let me take the credit. Right. My, my job is to really kind of, I'm almost like the, the conductor in the orchestra and there's different sections and there's people with different strengths and different weaknesses. And after you work with folks, you get to, you get to know what their strengths are. [00:21:53] So, you know, when something comes up like this person or that person, or this group of people are the ones that [00:22:00] I'm going to listen to a little bit more, that's shut other people out because you know, there's been good ideas that come from from people, you know, you don't expect, but, and it's sort of it's, and I'll tell you, it's kind of spontaneous because. [00:22:14] I'll start on one project and it all either be bogged down or something else will come up and then I need a break and I'll just say, all right, let's cut. Let's taste. Right. Let's taste. We've got a bunch of stuff that we've been working on. Let's taste it and we'll sit there and you gotta be careful because you can't, once you taste too much, your taste buds become severely ineffective, as well as your ability to smell. [00:22:40] So you really got to kind of measure yourself, but it could be spontaneous. Like let's do it, or let's talk about this. Or then we, or we schedule, you know, we have we, we have weekly meetings and deal with all these things and a lot of it starts, but then we may say, let's just have a meeting dedicated to this one topic on X date.[00:23:00] [00:23:00] Right? So we, there is a little bit of spontaneity largely because of my schedule, but I think it works well. And sometimes people say, Hey, I've got this. What do you think? And I'm like, let's do it right now. So that, that makes it kind of fun too. But once we get serious, we do have a very documented process and we have people that are responsible for aspects of that development. [00:23:24] And we fine tuned it over the line. We have fine tuned the process over the last year and it's gotten really good, really good. Like we're working on a couple projects right now. And because of that, I think we're ahead of the game ahead of where we, where we should be, because we've done a real good job of tracking ourselves and communicating. [00:23:48] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm sorry. I'm pausing because I'm, I I'm taking all of it. Tracking yourselves and communicating those two are so collaboration to me is, [00:24:00] so it's people say it's a buzzword, but I think it's so important where everybody feels like they can contribute. And also that they're valued and valuable. So, so communicating their ideas, communicating through the process is fantastic. [00:24:13] But tracking that, that to me as, as, as more of a creative thinker, the notion of tracking things like that makes my head explode. Just because it's, it sounds like there potentially so many details. Can you talk a little bit about what the, what the ideas are behind traffic tracking and what it is that you're actually tracking? [00:24:35] Norm Snyder: I think you just answered the question. There's so many details, right? I mean, at the end of the day we build it forward, but I'm going to do it. I'm going to reverse engineer because I think this is easier to explain. Say you, you have this great concept and you know, right now everything's on cycle, right? [00:24:59] So [00:25:00] the, sell it into a channel or, or a retail chain, you know, they have their meetings on X day and then they make changes on Y date. Right. And they're pretty, I mean, think about this. Cause you're dealing with hundreds and hundreds, if not thousands of products and you just can't like do it every day and every week. [00:25:21] So they have these fixed periods. So you know what those are and see your work backwards. And you say, okay, we're going to launch X, Y, Z product at this retailer because this is where we really feel like we have to start. So, you know, the date that you can present, you know, the dates that, that they'll do resets at store. [00:25:41] Then you kind of work backwards and say, okay, what do we have to do to get to that point? Right. What are all the steps? And it's, you know, it's, it's starts at concept. The first thing is the liquid, you know, what's the liquid look and taste like, right. And what do you want that liquid [00:26:00] back to that whole, you know, that whole product brief, what does it represent? [00:26:05] And then you kind of go forward into, okay, when do we, you know, final product approval. And then from there artwork and labeling package configuration, and then you've got to produce it. So you have to have all your, you know, source all your raw materials and just about every piece of raw material, except for the liquid itself is branded. [00:26:28] And then, you know, legal, is it, you know, are we infringing in anybody's intellectual property? If not, is it available? Can we can. And then what sort of campaign are we going to have behind it? And then when are we w you know, when do we go, when do we actually scale up to a full production mode? And when can we have that product in our warehouses and when can we ship it? [00:26:51] So it's, you know, all these various aspects, which involves every department, right? Sales, marketing, [00:27:00] operations, finance. So it's a multi, multi departmental collaboration and meeting where we're tracking and making, checking the box. Do we have that covered? Do we have that covered? Do we have that covered then? [00:27:14] What's the timing? I mean, because depending on the package, if it's a specialized package, we may have to, we may have to put something in at the plant that produces it because they can't produce that package. So, so all these questions, you know, and, and where are you sourcing the ingredients and what's the lead times, right? [00:27:33] So. Yeah, and you want to kind of time it, right? Where you have product packaging, you know, artwork that you can share to sell it in and they can taste it. And then to be able to put a final product on their shelves the day, the day that they want it. And that's the process. And if you don't document it, you're going to miss something. [00:27:57] So, and it, you know, we have someone that [00:28:00] leads to that process that brings everybody together, then holds them accountable as to where do we stand with this? You're supposed to get back to us on that. Where do we stand on this aspect? Where's that aspect. And you know, again, it, it, it, it brings, you know, it brings the organization closer together. [00:28:17] I mean, we're not a big organization and, and you know what, not just, not just brands, make organizations successful it's people and how they, how they play off and interact with, with one another. So, you know, you can understand like what, you know today. I remember when I was a little kid and the Beatles were popular right. [00:28:37] Today, you put on a Beatles record and it sounds contemporary, right? Like they haven't lost anything. And, you know, granted they wrote great music, but together as a unit, what, what just, you know, one plus one plus one plus one was like 24 and I believe it, I believe organizations are the same way where if people click [00:29:00] together intellectually, if they, if they collect together spiritually, if they click together on so many different levels, you're more powerful. [00:29:09] Right. And, and this process really brings out the best in an organization. [00:29:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that you use the Beatles analogy. I mean, I agree the Beatles solo band on the run is a great album, but nothing can compare that they did solo two rubber soul and revolver. So I slightly completely take your point. And, and it's interesting to me how everybody, every person in your organization sounds again like, like they're encouraged to contribute and then also need to contribute. [00:29:43] And that you, someone who is an implementer, someone who is, or maybe an integrator who goes, yes, this is my job to make sure that that everybody is on track. And again, that's one of my challenges I sometimes take on too many projects. Have you ever found that happens [00:30:00] with the course? [00:30:01] Norm Snyder: How do you handle that? [00:30:04] It's difficult. That's that's something that you have to watch very, very carefully, but it's something that C C w. I have one prerequisite for people that come to work for us, you want to be there and it's just not a job, right? You want to be there to make a difference and you could be the guy that mops the floors, but you're going to make a difference. [00:30:26] Right? And I want everyone to feel empowered that they do make a difference in quite frankly, they do, because if one employee doesn't do their job, the whole company suffers. Right? So there's nowhere to hide. And I don't mean that to add pressure to people, but it kind of, it sets the, it sets the bar high, where I want you to be, want to be here. [00:30:49] I want you to want to make a difference and I want you don't want to contribute. And when you have people thinking at that level you get great results and then, but you're right. But then the negative side is [00:31:00] you gotta be careful that people don't take on too much because when they do that's when errors occur and errors, aren't good. [00:31:09] Because obviously it adversely impacts the company, but it adversely impacts that individual. Right. And I, you know, I also believe that look, I've, I'm a hard worker. I've worked hard my entire life. My family accuses me of being a workaholic. And there's been many Fridays when we're supposed to do something to grow some place and dad's still at work or on a phone and everybody's angry with him. [00:31:35] But I also believe that you need time off to refresh your batteries and to have fun and enjoy your family or whatever you want to do during your time off. So I really encourage that as well. But when you're here, I want 150%. Now I want you to want to be here, but you're right. That, that the tough part is I've had several employees. [00:31:56] I've had to, it's kind of funny. I've had to admonish and [00:32:00] say, I don't want you doing that. I want you to doing this. This is where you're the most effective. And I don't want you burnout. Or I had one employee. I told him if I saw an email from him after 11 o'clock at night, I was going to fire him because he was burning the candle at both ends. [00:32:18] And I'm like, I don't want you doing that. So that, that, that's something you have to watch. And then, you know, I never thought about it to you brought that up, but that's something that you definitely have to watch is that people get so caught up in it and they take on too much. And it's, and it's not that a desperation because they want to, and they can. [00:32:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sure, but it doesn't matter does it because they can still burn out. Even if you care about something you can still burn out. So, so balance in all things I think is, is the way to go and something that I, speaking of balance, this is a weird transition, but here it goes. One of the things that I noticed as far as the packaging of reads, and this is because I'm a [00:33:00] artistic type person and I love colors from very early on. [00:33:03] I remember thinking, wow, the ginger ale is more yellow. The ginger beer is more green and then there's always an orange accent. This is yes. I noticed these things in here. It is. So, so I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about the design, how, if, you know, because you weren't at the company yet, but how did that all happen? [00:33:24] What w what were the colors chosen? I know that they're white, yellow, orange, but, but how does that all translate into how you're innovating now with the, with the way the product is presented? [00:33:38] Norm Snyder: I think we've, I mean, obviously we, we like that to sign cause we, we, we, we stay with it. I just think it sort of reflects that whole motif, you know, the Jamaican inspired ginger beer. [00:33:49] I think that's what if I had to put my finger on it, it kind of comes down to that and it sends off that whole sort of tropical image, [00:34:00] which is reflects that, you know, the style of the, of the Jew, our ginger beer, and then something that like, if you look at now, we really use the Palm trees and our ginger ale and our mocktails. [00:34:11] So we've kind of stayed true to that. And it just feels, you know, colors in the, in the whole creative element. Yes, I guess there is a bit of a science to it, but I look at a more of what's appealing to the eye and where, and where does your eye go and what, what does it catch and what does it reflect? [00:34:31] And, you know, obviously there's, you talked to a designer and they're going to tell you, you should paint your kitchen, this color, because it, it creates appetite and, and vibrancy. And this room, you want this color because it creates that and bedrooms, you want this color because you want them to be serene and comfortable. [00:34:48] And I think labels are kind of the same way. Right? And it just stayed on that whole sort of Jamaican slash tropical theme of who we were. And [00:35:00] the roots of it's really in the ginger beer. Right. And again, we haven't, you know, we've made it more contemporary, but we haven't deviated from that basic story. [00:35:13] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, cause it works right. And it's instantly recognizable and that's something, that's something that was great for me again, when I started drinking reeds in the, in the nineties was that you could, oh, I could always find them. And, and I, I don't know how quite it was quite how to say it, but I'm just going to say it, it feels to me like the, the beverage industry is really crowded. [00:35:36] You've got the, the big giant. [00:35:38] Norm Snyder: Oh yes, it is. Yes. You know, you know, let me come back that for a second. The two things that are really haven't talked about is we've sort of dominated the conversation with our reads portfolio, but we also have another perhaps of portfolio called Virgil's. Right. Which is, you know, we bought it in 94, so that's [00:36:00] 27 years. [00:36:00] So it's, you know, it's in the same age group is reads and again, it's, it's. But the same basic premise, all natural non-GMO. And we haven't talked about, you know, this aspect where a lot of consumers now, and the trends are, are no sugar, right? Zero calorie, no sugar. They're keto friendly, certified keto friendly. [00:36:25] You'd mentioned you, you know, you consume the zero sugar, ginger beer. And I talked about the zero sugar ginger ale, but, you know, I drink a lot of I drink all of our stuff, but we've. Well actually reads had it. We brought it back, our doctor better, which is a pepper flavored item, but we have a great, you know, root beer among other flavors. [00:36:47] And you know, we have this proprietary sweetening system, that's all natural that tastes gray and has no aftertaste. So one of the things about [00:37:00] zero sugar items, people tend to plug their nose and they can taste it because it's zero sugar, but it has a bit of an aftertaste. And our son doesn't and we haven't really spent a lot of, and so in terms of innovation now, we're, we're looking for something that has mouth feel and flavor that emulates a full sugar drink, but has no calories and is all natural. [00:37:26] And, you know, again, that's a big part of our innovation. We're seeing a lot of growth at our zero sugar line, both reads and Virgil's, but you know, we think we have the best tasting zero sugar product, you know, on the market. And that's another thing where we've, I think done a really good job job of innovating. [00:37:48] And again, staying true to who we are all natural, but trying to give the best experience to our consumers as possible. And like I said, I drank these every day and sometimes [00:38:00] I drink and I'm like, I have to look at the, I have to look at the label and say, damn, did we do we put sugar in this all of a sudden, because it tastes that good in the muffins that good. [00:38:09] So those are two things, you know, virtuals and the zero sugar line, which we have across our entire portfolio. And we use, which I think gives a far superior taste and a taste. That really is the closest thing in the marketplace in Miami. That you can get to a full sugar equivalent. [00:38:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It's so interesting. [00:38:32] You're talking about mouthfeel. And one of the things I, I, my husband accuses me of being a supertaster because I can taste certain things from a mile away and what I don't like, I definitely don't like if you know what I'm doing, and what's interesting to me about drinking breeds, first of all, I'm vegan. [00:38:50] And so the zeros, I know the other ones aren't vegan, but the zero sugar are vegan. There's no honey in them. And, and that makes me so very happy because now I can [00:39:00] drink reeds and again, and so what, what's fascinating to me about what you're saying this notion of, as I said, mouthfeel, is, is that it is about the experience, not just of drinking the drink, but how you feel after you've drunk it. [00:39:16] And that's a, and maybe because I'm not as familiar with the beverage industry as, as I could be. I didn't think that that was something that a company would be thinking about. I would think that it would be, and this correct me if I'm wrong, that it would be more like, oh, you know, our products, you like our products, you buy our products. [00:39:35] Yay. But mouthfeel is a post experience thing. Can you talk a little bit about what it is that you're trying to, what it is, what mouthfeel is just for clarification and also what it is that you're trying to achieve with the drinking experience for the person who's opened up a bottle of reeds? [00:39:55] Norm Snyder: Well, let me, let me just make a comment about supertasters. [00:39:58] They scare me, but I love [00:40:00] them at the same time, because it's a unique group of people. And I can tell when people comment I'm like, that must be a supertaster because they have the ability to taste things in both positive and imperfections. The vast majority of people don't taste. So that's always good. [00:40:18] And w we actually, we have a couple of supertasters in our office, which I love to bring them in to taste stop, because they can pick up imperfections that most people can't. So that's a great skillset. So mouthfeel the best way to describe it, describe it as like, so take a glass of water and take a chocolate milkshake. [00:40:37] Right. And those are like two extremes and how they're going to feel in your mouth. And it, and a lot of mafia is about what you perceive it to be. Right. So when you think about children and all my kids were really finicky eaters, it wasn't so much about taste. It's how that, that food felt in their mouth. [00:40:58] Right. [00:41:00] So, so if mom feels such an important aspect of it, and again, a lot of it's perception, but so. In a typical beverage and let's go back to before zero sugar diet sodas were, were there the best way to describe it, let me see if I can get this right. So the flavor is the music, right? But the sugar is the amplifier, right? [00:41:30] It takes it up a notch, it makes it loud. It makes it bold and it really gives it that mouthfeel. So you know, if you say you're vegan, I've been on a couple of these podcasts and other things with some other great entrepreneurial people in the food and beverage space. And when they talk about zero sugar for baking fill and mouthfeel are important because that's what you can't use, like Stevia at a banquet. [00:41:57] Right. It just, it's just awful. [00:42:00] So. When you think about sugar, not only gives it that flavor, that amplification of those flavors and makes it pop it gives it that mouthfeel that you expect that again, that you feel like you're like, you could almost chew it, but you don't bite into with it. It tastes that good. [00:42:17] And it's that satisfying? It's not just like, Kool-Aid, it's just not like flavored water. That's the big distinction between, you know, our craft sodas and our ginger beers is that mouthfeel. And when you take sugar out, right, and we use cane sugar. So cane sugar direct to me has better mouth feel than just regular sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, which the mass majority of mainstream beverages use. [00:42:43] You take away that. And with the zero sugar, you can get the flavor, but then it tastes like flavored water. So you need that mouthfeel, that sort of bite to it. Makes it feel like you're drinking a full sugar because it's not just the flavor, it's the feel. [00:43:00] Right. And we've, that's we really taste, you know, mouthfeel when zero sugar, not just flavor, but sweetness and mouthfeel. [00:43:10] It, does it feel light? Does it feel too heavy? Does it feel right? And we spent a lot of time on that and developing our zero sugar because we want it to emulate a full sugar taste. Most consumers have basically said, okay, I'll deal with a compromise on flavor. I'll compromise on mouthfeel. Cause I don't want sugar, make it to overstay. [00:43:35] Say I'm going to pick and choose where I get my calories. I'm going to pick and choose if I want sugar where I'm going to get it from many, say I don't, I want to eliminate sugar entirely from my diet. So we want to give them. That product that they feel like they're having that indulgence. Right, right. [00:43:54] Without the negative things that they're trying to avoid. And why should you have to, why should you have [00:44:00] to plug your notes are chunked down and just say, okay, the zero sugar, I'm going to accept it. Right. And we want to say to our consumers, or to all consumers, you don't have to compromise. You can have your cake and eat it too. [00:44:14] So to speak, right. Zero [00:44:16] Izolda Trakhtenberg: sugar cake. Yeah. [00:44:18] Norm Snyder: Look at, I drink and that's what I drink. Zero sugar. So I'm, you know, personally motivated because I want drink the best thing and I can drink and have the best flavor. So we really take that very serious. And that's what, again, stay true. Who do we are the best tasting, all natural, bold flavors, real as possible. [00:44:40] And when we develop products, that's the goal. And ML feels important because like I said, I've, I've opened a can of something I've drank it, like our black cherry. And I'm like, my God, this tastes so good. And I know what the answer is, but I still look at the back of the can to make sure it doesn't say sugar. [00:44:59] Right. [00:45:00] And that's, I want, you know, and I want to feel that way about all of our products and that's our, that's our goal for, you know, for, for zero sugar products, make them feel like they're full sugar, then there's no compromise in the base. Fabulous. [00:45:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's awesome. And it's interesting to hear you talk about it with, with such passion about, about these products, because otherwise, why do it right if you're not going to, if you're, if you're not going to be really, really in love with, with the work and. And this is something that I, I love the way you described it. [00:45:45] It feels almost like drinking. The drink is a tactile experience in addition to being a taste experience with. Yeah, it is. It really is. It's fascinating. [00:45:55] Norm Snyder: I mean, even like look at our products are carbonated having the right carbonation [00:46:00] because that matters because people that like, I, I drink, I love carbonated products. [00:46:07] I drink sparkling water. Right. I drink our sodas. I love carbonation. And I'm very particular about carbonation. Carbonation is almost like sugar. It's like the tone, right? It's the base of the trouble, the music, if it's right, it makes everything perfect. If it's off it, throws it off and you know, that's another, another element of mouthfeel. [00:46:32] And then the attribute of the product that. We spend a lot of time in like sometimes when we do our samples, our samples lab can't get the carbonation level that we want. So we try to do our best with that, but it just shows you how important that aspect is too. And that we really watch and that's, and that's, you know, the thing I do when I open our product. [00:46:57] Oh, easy. Does that twist open? Does it [00:47:00] make that pop? When I poured in, does it, you know, do we get that? Do I see the level of carbonation and fall? Cause that's another really important attribute of our products. When we develop to make sure that they're in the range of carbonation that we think makes the most sense to really accentuate the flavor. [00:47:18] So it's really, I mean, it is, we are very passionate about it. You're right about it. And it's just not me. It's everybody in the organization. When we taste and we drink our stuff, but those are the things that. At that level and want to make sure that we have an absolutely perfect. So when consumers open that they feel the same way and there's, there's nothing more pleasurable when you get, when you get an email receiving an email from a consumer about your product and how they love it. [00:47:46] But at the same time, there's nothing like a kick to the gut when somebody has a bad experience. And I'll tell you what, when they have a bad experience, they reach us. We reached back out to them to try to make it better, to try to get, you know, get their input, maybe [00:48:00] clarify something, maybe, you know, sometimes somebody misinterprets what a product really is. [00:48:05] And you have to kind of help them get there. But, you know, that's that these are important aspects that we're very customer centric and want and are committed to put in the best quality products. And we take every aspect of those products very soon. [00:48:23] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And that makes sense, right? That, you know, no company has anything without its clients and customers, you vacuum. [00:48:29] So, and that's something that, that brings me to my next question. Cause norm, I'm going to keep you here for the next eight hours. I'm fascinated by the fact that people have their favorites, right? They, they might have their favorite as far as reads. They might have their favorite as far as Pepsi or Coke or whatever. [00:48:44] And REITs has this reputation for being a cut above. But how does that affect the average person who wants to drink are the people who you're serving as a, as an organization, as a company. Are they people who are more discerning in a certain way, or are they people who are [00:49:00] healthier or who want to be healthier? [00:49:02] How does all of that break down when it comes to what we were just mentioned a little while ago, there's pretty crowded beverage industry. [00:49:11] Norm Snyder: Well, I think they're definitely discerning and you know, some are kind of sewers that love our product. You know, we're still, we still have growth with all of our full sugar line in today's day and age, which to me, I find amazing. [00:49:29] I think most people are driven by healthier on natural. And I think that's really probably the mindset of our consumer. They want natural ingredients. They want healthier products. They don't want preservatives. They don't want artificial colors, artificial flavors. They don't want high fructose corn syrup if they're drinking sugar. [00:49:52] So I think those are the things that they clearly read labels are. I think our consumers are label readers, which [00:50:00] I think is great for us because they know what they want and they're not going to compromise. And I think that the trends are going that way. I think those are the you know, Where people want and they, you know, and when they indulge, they want to indulge in something that's good for, you know, that's good. [00:50:16] Not just something that's crap, that's artificial. So I think people are more, more educated obviously, and they know what they want in their diet, but they still, everybody still wants things that tastes good. Right. I mean, that's one thing that hasn't changed. So if you can deliver something that tastes fabulous but it's healthier and it's all natural. [00:50:38] That's, that's our consumer. But in terms of flavors, everyone's taste buds are different. You know, you could taste something and I could taste it and we taste two totally different things. So that's what you have to be careful. That's why I called you. We can't be the empire that listens to the crowd. [00:50:55] No, because the empire in a good day, when he makes 50% of the people happy. Right. [00:51:00] So we can't, you know, you're not going to make everybody happy with every flavor. Sure. People taste things differently and that's how they pick their flavors. But you hope that the flavors that they like that you satisfied it just, you know, the flavor spectrum and how people taste. [00:51:16] It is wild. And even when we do our tasting, how people react to what they pick up on, but I mean, you can't criticize people because that's what they perceive and that's what they taste. Right. And you can't tell them what they taste. So that's always the big challenge. So it's kind of like stick to what you're trying to, what you're trying to produce, whether it's an orange or vanilla cream or a root beer, that's our best. [00:51:40] And you hope that people like it, but you can't be. And then you can't get frustrated because people may have, I mean, cause what if somebody says, Hey, I bought this, this and this, I love this, but didn't like that. Well, you know, maybe you don't, that's not the flavor. Doesn't jive well with your, your, your taste buds.[00:52:00] [00:52:00] So you can't let that discourage you too much because you're never going to have people like everything across the board, as much as we strive to, it's just not going to happen. So you know, we try to whatever flavor it is, this is what, we're one of them. This is what we want to achieve and we're going to make it the best tasting. [00:52:20] So the people that like that will love our stuff, but you know, coming kind of back, I think that's where the trends are going. You know, obviously we talked about the non alcoholic beverage options, which is growing. We talked about all natural. We talked about zero sugar. And I think people just want healthier, better for you products. [00:52:38] And then. And in the case where our ginger beer is where we're using ginger, you know, there's some efficacy with ginger, right? And that's, I think what sets us apart with our ginger rail and our ginger beer is we're getting, you're getting real ginger and those products and real ginger has a lot of great properties that we hear from our [00:53:00] consumers all the time, all the time, why they drink our product and how grateful they are, that it exists. [00:53:06] And that, you know, we used real ginger in those products. [00:53:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. I mean, I love it. When I go on the few occasions, I've had to go sailing in my life. I bring reads, frankly. I know I sound like a commercial for you all, but, but I bring it because to, to stave off being seasick, it's wonderful for that. So, so yeah, absolutely. [00:53:28] I, I understand. And I love what you just said about perception and how. Your perception of what you're tasting is so unique to each individual person. I think that's, I think that's so important and, and you know, to me, something that's good for you and tastes bad is medicine and something is for you and tastes good. [00:53:48] Doesn't necessarily have to be that way. It can be something that you're just enjoying and, and yet, you know, we've just, we're, we're sort of coming out of this pandemic where a lot of people [00:54:00] have had all sorts of obviously obviously big issues and Reed's play has played a role. I'm sure in many people going, okay, I need my comfort and this is, this could be my ginger ale and my ginger beer. [00:54:13] What has gone on if you, if you can talk about it a little bit, what are some of the challenges that Reed's faced during the pandemic and, and the, how have you dealt with them and, and, and where are you going next with respect to this new future that we're going to be living. [00:54:30] Norm Snyder: That's a great question. I was thinking about this. [00:54:31] So I went out and I was at a one of our production locations yesterday. So traveling back, you know, you got a lot of time to think. So I'm thinking about that. And I'm like, man talking about the economy of two worlds. So during the pandemic, we actually benefited because people I think went back to brands, they could trust brands that reflect quality and brands that were healthier. [00:54:59] [00:55:00] And we had a really good year right now. What I didn't really see coming post pandemic. And I don't think anybody did for that matter was what's going on with the supply chain and transportation in this country. There's so much pent up demand. Right. And then with people losing jobs like I was in I was in And Philadelphia last night at the, at the airport and the place was jam packed. [00:55:29] Right. And I'm watching it. And I just, I love, I love seeing stuff happened and I've got a chance to talk to the manager. And you said, our business is up 30% over last year. Our staff has done 40%. I'm thinking, wow, that's, that's gotta be really taxing. So the point is the big challenge this year, which we had some issues that we, we, we, but we worked it [00:56:00] out. [00:56:00] Supply chain is, is just been very difficult to manage. I mean, for example, you can get cans in the United States. Every Ken manufacturer is at capacity. So people are importing cans from all over the world. Well guess what happens with that? There's all the ports of this country are congested. So. [00:56:21] What would normally be a four month lead time could be a seven, eight month lead time because we ordered something from Europe and it sat sad. The Pacific sat in the ocean for two months before it could even get a dock time. And then once you get a dock time to get through customs and get unloaded. So the supply chain it's been probably the most difficult I've seen in my entire career by far transportation. [00:56:47] I talked about the port congestion. I think I read something for every truck. There's 12 loads to go on that truck. Wow. So, you know, it goes back to what I talked about supply versus [00:57:00] demand. Our transportation costs have gone up of double of double. Wow. And it's like, wow, where did this come from? [00:57:09] Now? They're starting to come down and. Things are starting to look like they, by the end of the year, it could become more normal or at least in the first part of next year. But so requires you to plan things out more or you know, which we use for a raps in cardboard for containers have longer lead times. [00:57:31] There's been a shortage of steel for caps to put on your bottles. There's been a shortage of carbonation because the primary supplier carbonation or ethanol plants, and when nobody's driving, no one's using ethanol, right? So the by-product of that. So carbonation is even gone up. What's gone up with pallets that you stack your product now. [00:57:50] So virtually every aspect of our supply chain has been impacted. And we didn't see this during COVID, you know, we saw some tightening [00:58:00] labor is the other aspect to production facilities are having a hard time hiring people. So it's, it's really touched every facet of our business. So postcode, the post COVID year has been believe it, or not much more challenging than during the pandemic, which I thought once we got through the pandemic, the biggest challenge is going to be changing consumer preferences and tastes and how they shop. [00:58:28] And that would be enough to challenge us. That's really been, the supply chain has been turned sideways, right? And so when people ask me what keeps you up at night? That's what keeps me up at night, pasta transportation. And snafoos in our supply chain because as good as our people are, we have to think out longer periods of time to avoid issues. [00:58:56] And we've had a few, we've had a few of them [00:59:00] and it's really unfortunate because it's like, man never had to deal with this before. Not even close, like, as you get older and remember my parents talk about certain parts of life and yeah, I remember that, but we got through it, remember that and we got through it. [00:59:16] But now this is the most unique I've ever seen, but you know what, we'll power through it. I mean, it's not like we're defeated and, or are hanging our heads down and say, we can't do it. We just work twice as hard. And we know that it's going to return to some aspect of normalcy, but it's been a bigger challenge than most people think. [00:59:38] And if you pick up any financial press, it's in the paper every day, right. And look, every head impacts every aspect. I mean the buy cars, you can't buy a car, try renting a car. You can't even rent a car today. Right. Cause there's not available. Right. I tried to buy a steroid receiver. I couldn't find the, the brand and model. [00:59:57] My wife wanted a new washer and dryer, [01:00:00] but we got the last one in the store. The model that she, it, otherwise we had to wait like two months, right? If you want to buy faucets faucets, you must have were out of stock. I mean, so it's impacted virtually every consumer category. There is imaginable this whole supply chain. [01:00:17] So it's, it's been, it's been a struggle. Like I said, we'll power through it and we're not complaining, but it's, it's definitely changed how we, how we do business. [01:00:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, sure. I imagine, I mean, whatever supply surplus there was pre pandemic got used up during the pandemic. And now all of a sudden, if you didn't have a supply surplus to carry you for two years, yeah. [01:00:44] You're going to be short. And, and who did, you know, no one ever thought during, during the pre pandemic or even during the beginning months, no one thought it was going to be this long. And so having to stay agile and having to stay sort of light on your feet[01:01:00] is, has become so important for so many companies. [01:01:03] And moving, as I said, moving into the future, it's going to be fascinating to see how we all do. If, and when something like this ever happens again, how will we plan for it? And, and that sort of leads me to my next question. And I w I promise I will, I have like a bunch more questions, but I will, I will, I will absolutely stop soon. [01:01:24] I, I was just wondering, what's your vision for reeds moving into the future? What is your vision for this company? [01:01:32] Norm Snyder: Well, you know, I, I think we, we've probably talked about this before we w we went on air that the thing that I've seen that I'm really proud of, but it feels good too, is that we're pivoting that we're, we're kind of, you know, the, where we're, we're migrating from, you know, the, what I'll call them all natural ginger beer company that kind of played in one [01:02:00] category to something that's much more. [01:02:04] Resonates with a much larger group of consumers that really satisfies their demand, but stays true to who we are. And it's been a subtle pivot, but you can see it in the products that are ordered. You can see it on what, you know, what's selling and what's not selling can see it in consumer feedback. [01:02:23] So I think, you know, the, the vision is continue to produce great tasting all natural beverages and, you know, that are both ginger base, but also our craft, our craft sodas that are healthier that we have, you know, continued to develop great zero calorie, zero sugar products. But, you know, to really look into maybe additional categories, either in the beverage or the food space, but to be sort of that company. [01:02:57] That really puts out [01:03:00] premium high quality, better for you all natural products. And you know, just like we were able to leverage and successfully grow our business, you know, on the whole premise of ginger, you know, there's other ingredients out there that, Hey, why can't reach, do that too? Right. So, you know, the future is, you know, being that company that really represents that product that consumers can trust that they enjoy drinking and they, they know comes from the finest ingredients source throughout the world. [01:03:37] And, but also that, you know, we, you know, and we've talked about this too, and it's the first time I touch on this that, you know, really looking at as most companies are that have a, a conscience. You know, aspect of our day-to-day living. And part of that's going to be sustainability, you know, that we're looking into in digging deeper, but, you know, just being a company that, [01:04:00] that reflects the times that we live in, that, you know, doesn't just die and go away because they stayed true to what they used to be. [01:04:10] I mean, there's so many great examples of that. So many products and companies when I was growing up that were like the big, big players that are just barely hanging on today. Right. And I don't want to be that company that doesn't recognize what consumers want and what are the current trends, but to be on the forefront of that. [01:04:30] And I think we've really done a good job of pivoting to do that. Right. And that's where I get that sense of what's going on in our company. And I really liked that feeling that we're, we're putting out products that people want and that are happy to have in their hands. But also enjoy tremendously, right. [01:04:49] And that are relevant to today's consumers. And that's what I want to be. I want to continue to be that way and, and, you know, start from this great idea that really was [01:05:00] innovative, ri

Go To Market Grit
COO, Cameo, Brian Frank: From Professional Networks to Celebrity Networks

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 64:09


To say that Brian Frank, Chief Operating Officer of Cameo, comes from a non-traditional background into the career field of sales might be an understatement. Brain's career began in law and he spent nearly a full career there before transitioning to sales in 2008, where he has been exceedingly active. Brian's multifaceted background has given him a wide range of skillsets and a deep wisdom that has become invaluable to the organizations where Brian has worked. His focus on constantly learning through experience, as well as an emphasis on transparency has led him to the hard won successes that allow him to gain these perspectives. In this episode, Brain and Joubin talk about Brian's shift from law, his tenure at LinkedIn, and how experiential learning led to the inspiring story behind Brian's decision to take up the guitar. Brian also goes into the details on Cameo and their meteoric rise, his influence there, and more.In this episode, we cover: Brian talks about his shift from law, to finance, and finally to sales. (1:09) Brian's colorful employment history (which began at age 13) prior to graduating from UC San Diego. (6:41) How Brian approaches outbound opportunities - and how a quick LinkedIn message led to a business partnership. (10:37) What Brian's LinkedIn colleagues have to say about him - and his inspiring anecdote about how he met his guitar instructor, Marty Schwartz. (13:34) The story behind Brian's ban from LinkedIn - and why his experiential learning style works for him. (17:15) All things sales ops: From defining the role to hiring and developing talent. (21:53) ‘What do you value most?': Joubin and Brian rank and discuss career, money, company and manager. (32:17) The lowest points of Brian's LinkedIn ride - and what led him to be more transparent and open with his team. (36:37) What is Cameo? Breaking down Cameo and its fascinating growth. (45:34) How Brian assessed Cameo to determine if he was a fit - and his mindset when joining the company. (51:06) Why most businesses are demand constrained - and more on Cameo's B2B expansion. (54:16) Links: Connect with Brian LinkedIn Cameo Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Next Wave Leadership Podcast
Robert Bagheri, the Founder and CEO at Sakuu Corporation: On The Art of Growing and Scaling Startups, Removing Obstacles, and Creating Space for Others To Shine

Next Wave Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 38:54


Robert Bagheri is a renowned executive leader and the Founder and CEO of Sakuu Corporation. Founded in 2016, Sakuu is a one-of-a-kind 3D printing platform that can create multi-material products. At Sakuu, Robert focuses on networking with high-technology partners for unique innovations as well as training his team to perform at their highest potential. Robert has extensive experience running large companies, having served as the CEO of Telewave, Inc. before founding his own business. He has also directed as the Executive Vice President of Operations at Zenverge and the Chief Operating Officer at EoPlex. In this episode…  How do you lead a brand new company? With an established business, there are always obstacles to hiring the right team, but the infrastructure and expectations have long been set. With a startup, the stakes are higher— it's up to you alone to establish a workplace environment, set up systems, and ensure success. Robert Bagheri has gone through this cycle many times. As an experienced executive leader, Robert has joined countless companies, helped them flourish, and even have members of the team follow him to his next stop. His unique style of leadership leads to results in both financial data and workplace culture. Now, he's here to share some of his advice with you.   In this episode of Next Wave Leadership, Dov Pollack talks with Robert Bagheri, the Founder and CEO of Sakuu Corporation, to learn how to scale a startup and create a better workplace environment. They go through Robert's story, starting as an immigrant and flourishing as an executive leader. The two then cover a variety of topics, from strategies for hiring, to staying motivated, to delegating responsibility across your staff. Stay tuned for more!

Stop Talking, Take Action, Get Results. Business and Personal Growth with Jen Du Plessis
What’s New In The Mortgage Market: What Market Rates Are Going To Look Like In 2022 With Kevin Crichton

Stop Talking, Take Action, Get Results. Business and Personal Growth with Jen Du Plessis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:06


The mortgage market has been slowing down these past years because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Listen to this episode if you want to know what can you expect from the market rates this coming 2022. Join your host Jen Du Plessis and her guest, Kevin Crichton, on the state of the market and the future of his company. Kevin is President and Chief Operating Officer of EMM Loans LLC. Discover the impact COVID had on the mortgage market. Learn why he prefers to wait out on buying investment properties for next year. Find out what Kevin's company is aiming to do next year and more.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Mortgage Lending Mastery Community today:kineticsparkconsulting.comBecome a MLM Gold Member!MLM Membership

The 10 Minute Teacher Podcast
Battling Blended Learning Burnout and Finding Balance

The 10 Minute Teacher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 12:27


Tiffany Wycoff, the co-author of the bestselling book, Blended Learning in Action, talks about the state of blended learning today. She shares how some teachers are battling blended learning burnout but that it is necessary for learning today and how we move forward. https://www.coolcatteacher.com/e763 Sponsor: Screencastify. This year, I introduced the free screencasting tool, Screencastify, the first week of school to all of my students so they could record screencasts.   Screencastify isn't just a screen recorder. You can record, edit, and submit to students quickly as they can to you. The new version of Screencastify has analytics so you can know who is watching and when and more. Head over to screencastify.com today. Tiffany Wycoff - Bio as Submitted After spending many years in the classroom teaching and several as a school principal, Tiffany co-founded LINC and now serves as Chief Operating Officer at LINC. She is the co-author of the bestselling book, Blended Learning in Action, and a prominent speaker on innovative learning and leadership. blinaction.com @TeachOnTheEdge Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Dr. Anders interviews Dr. Iram Fatima, Chief Operating Officer of CareCloud Inc. (NASDAQ: MTBC, formerly known as MTBC). She shares her medical background and story working her way through various roles in medicine to an unlikely transition to the health IT space. They discuss the upcoming implications of the Cures Act and interoperability, the emergence and importance of telehealth in today's changing landscape as well as the necessity for us all to put the patient first, and think like a patient when designing health IT systems. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

Jack Murphy Live
Blake Masters - JML #071

Jack Murphy Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 67:00


Jack Murphy interviews Blake Masters, Chief Operating Officer of Thiel Capital, who recently announced his candidacy for U.S. Senator in Arizona. They discuss how Blake plans to actually implement America First policy, limiting immigration, how to reign in Big Tech, and how to protect our economy from foreign takeover. Blake Masters Chief Operating Officer | Thiel Capital Twitter: @ bgmasters Follow Jack ​Jack Murphy's Book, "Democrat To Deplorable," Now Available On Audiobook: https://adbl.co/3qXvlEY Liminal Order: https://liminal-order.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/jackmurphylive Facebook: https://facebook.com/jackmurphylive Instagram: https://instagram.com/jackmurphylive Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/JackMurphyLive

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
I'm Speaking: Amanda O'Donohue, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Experience Officer at Nyla Technology Solutions.

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 61:00


Trusting Your Gut, Growing, and Being a Leader.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to Amanda O'Donohue, Chief Operating Officer (COO) and Chief Experience Officer (CXO) at Nyla Technology Solutions. Amanda discusses the value of the culture at Nyla and her journey with Shana for the past six years. She also talks about being a leader and the dynamic with her team. We get to hear a good bit of advice on trusting your gut, growing, and getting out of your comfort zone. Lastly, Amanda goes into her regrets, superpowers, and how she got away with shoving a pie in Shana's face! QUOTES “I feel like in business and in life, there's not always a right answer or wrong answer. So, you have to go with what you think is best and be okay with that.”– Amanda O'Donohue [19:36] “I think if you can't experiment and try out new things, you can't grow.”– Amanda O'Donohue [34:25] “I think there's something validating [to knowing] that you following your gut is working. You're making good decisions. I think that's the biggest thing is it's given me a lot more confidence.”– Amanda O'Donohue [54:56]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [02:35] Meet Amanda O'Donohue [03:59] Growing Up Wanting to be a Pharmacist [04:43] Forensic Chemistry and Trying New Things [05:44] Growing Up in Buffalo [07:02] Work During and After College [08:52] Meeting Shana [13:52] Starting at Nyla [15:28] Staying at Nyla [17:34] Before Nyla and Becoming a Leader [19:18] Figuring it Out and Team Dynamic [27:17] Moving Back Home [30:01] Culture and Experience Working at Nyla [34:49] Philanthropy at Nyla [39:03] Shoving Pie in Shana's Face! [40:22] Programs Amanda Found for Nyla [44:26] Getting a Business Coach [47:07] Amanda's Superpowers [49:35] Recruiting [50:59] Regrets and Growing [52:16] Amanda and Shana's Dynamic [54:21] Amanda's Favorite Book [55:09] Wrap Up Questions [60:39] Outro   RESOURCES https://thedailyrecord.com/leading-women/ (The Daily Record Leading Women Award) http://www.buffalo.edu/ (University at Buffalo) https://www.towson.edu/ (Towson University) https://mentholatumointment.com/ (Mentholatum) https://www.sba.gov/federal-contracting/contracting-assistance-programs/hubzone-program (HUBZone) https://disa.mil/ (DISA) https://www.riseliveweekend.com/ (Rachel Hollis Conference) https://k9sforwarriors.org/ (K9s For Warriors) https://www.habitat.org/ (Habitat for Humanity) https://www.google.com/chromebook/ (Chromebook) https://www.baltimorecityschools.org/schools/97 (Collington Square Elementary/Middle School) https://www.linkedin.com/in/joditurnerhume/ (Jodi Hume) on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/edmullin/ (Ed Mullin) on LinkedIn https://www.baltimoreroboticscenter.com/ (Baltimore Robotics Center) https://www.linkedin.com/in/garyabonner/ (Gary Bonner) on LinkedIn https://www.pcsforpeople.org/ (PCs for People) https://www.hiringourheroes.org/ (Hiring Our Heroes (HOH)) https://www.linkedin.com/in/courtney-davis-4a186416a/ (Courtney Davis) on LinkedIn https://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/appr/ (Maryland Apprenticeship and Training Program (MATP)) https://governor.maryland.gov/ (Governor Larry Hogan) https://www.nsa.gov/ (NSA) https://www.amazon.com/21-Irrefutable-Laws-Leadership-Anniversary/dp/0785288376 (The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You) by John C. Maxwell   RELEVANT LINKS https://www.linkedin.com/in/amanda-o-donohue-677a6648/ (Amanda O'Donohue)  on LinkedIn https://nylatechnologysolutions.com/ (Nyla Technology Solutions) I'd love to hear from you -- your feedback is important to me and I read all of it. If you enjoyed the podcast, I hope you'll give us 5 stars. I'll be sure to thank you via email. If not, let me know what you think we should do differently. Don't forget to hit “subscribe” so you'll receive notifications about guest interviews and other topics that drop every Tuesday. Live well,

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Stephen Nalley

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 23:32


Stephen NalleyAs Founder, President & CEO of Black Briar Advisors, Stephen is an American Business Magnate, Entrepreneur, Veteran, Author, Mentor, Motivational Speaker with a 25-year documented track record of success. Black Briar is an elite full-service asset management and hotel consulting firm that distinguishes itself by representing hotel owners/investors interest exclusively. The hospitality industry is a relationship industry that is often compromised by political alignments that benefit the franchises, unions and property management companies to the detriment of the owners and investors profits. Black Briar focuses solely on the owner/investors interest above all else. Black Briar and its principals have asset managed over 200 hotel & resort assets that range from independent to luxury brands such as Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, IHG, Radisson & Red Lion.Prior to founding Black Briar, Stephen served as one of the principle founder's and a managing partner for Inner Circle Management and Inner Circle Capital. Inner Circle is a unique full-service hospitality management company that specializes in the acquisition, management and turnaround of distressed hotel & resort assets across the United States. Inner Circle and its principals were responsible for the direct ownership and management of over $2B of real estate assets.Prior to co-founding Inner Circle, Mr. Nalley was the Chief Operating Officer and Chairman of the Executive Committee for Ocean Waters. Ocean Waters was a multifaceted real estate investment company, which consisted of over 129 separate entities, 79 real estate assets, 45 operating hotels, and various office, retail, and residential components. Mr. Nalley was responsible for the day-to-day leadership and general management of the company. Mr. Nalley assisted Ocean Waters and its Principles in creating over $1 Billion in value by acquiring non-performing Hotel & Resort assets and leading them to profitability.Prior to his civilian career, Stephen Nalley served in the United States Army as a Commando with the Army's Elite 10th Mountain Divisions Special Troops Brigade from 1988 until 1996. He led a Light Infantry Squad and was twice decorated for exceptional military service.Stephen Nalley received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Healthcare Administration from the University of North Florida, and earned his MBA and DBA from the University of Atlanta and a Law Degree from Washington University. He is also a Certified Hotel Administrator through the American Hotel & Lodging Association and received a Graduate Certificate's from Cornell University in Executive Leadership and Hospitality Management.Author, Mentor & Motivational SpeakerIn November 2019, I published “Relentless Pursuit” which was my guide and fundamental principles on how to achieve success. As a part of the process, I also launched a Podcast that focused on the contents of the book. For over 20 years, I have served as a mentor for hundreds of young professionals on a pro-bono basis. Last month I made the decision to become professionally certified as a life coach and create a company around that model. I will still provide pro-bono services to selected veterans, but will launch my for fee business on May 1st of this year.About Relentless Pursuit:Relentless Pursuit describes the secret to success as knowing what you really want and have a compelling reason why you want it and having the discipline to sacrifice what we want right now for what we really want later. We get there by aligning our time and actions with our goals and always being the most prepared person in the room without exception.We prepare day in and day out by continuously growing our knowledge base and becoming a subject matter expert in whatever it is that we set our sights on. Regardless of our chosen profession, we must understand the art of selling ourselves and our ideas, verbal and nonverbal communication, personal financial management and the basis principles of law and most importantly, we must possess the drive and ambition to relentlessly pursue our goals.Success is not only when preparation meets opportunity, but also when our compelling reason why exceeds the adversity that we face along our journey.http://stephennalley.meThe Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

The Truth About Real Estate
Disrupting the Housing Industry with Co-Living - with Co-Living Entrepreneur & Expert, Frank Furman

The Truth About Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 63:59


On this episode, we're talking co-living, the housing crisis, and affordable housing with Chief Operating Officer at PadSplit, Frank Furman!Watch at YouTube.MatthewMa.com!Frank Furman is the Chief Operating Officer at PadSplit, a co-living startup dedicated to solving the affordable housing crisis. Frank is disrupting the affordable housing industry by creating safe, attractive, and respectable co-living environments. A former infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps, he commanded at the platoon and company levels and served two tours in Afghanistan. Reach out to Frank Furman at frank@padsplit.com!Connect:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frank.furman.9LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/frank-furman-4b70b353Website: https://www.padsplit.com/Leave a review on iTunes and let me know what you think !Host: Matthew MaMatthew Ma is an Investor, Syndicator, Founder, Coach, and Podcast Host. He's a Broker Associate with eXp Realty and strives to help agents grow their business with proven, effective methods learned from experience. Through his podcast, The Truth About Real Estate, and Avant University, he educates buyers, sellers, investors, and real estate agents on the current state of the market, how to use innovations in technology, sales, and marketing to build a scalable business. As an investor and syndicator with Avant Asset Management, he's dedicated to client success by building wealth through investments in apartment building syndications. Reach out to Matthew Ma at Matt@MatthewMa.com.

Lykken on Lending
9-20-2021 Proposed regulations on Servicing and CRA for IMBs

Lykken on Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 45:00


In our Hot Topic this week we have Taylor Stork,Certified Mortgage Banker, Chief Operating Officer at Developer's Mortgage Company The discussion will focus on servicing regulations and mortgage environment changes post-covid. Want to know more aboutTaylor Stork? Want to read more about today's podcast click here!!  

Second Life
Stephanie Shepherd: Co-Founder of Future Earth

Second Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 62:38


Chances are you know Stephanie Shepherd as the former Chief Operating Officer of the Kardashian West Brands, but the environmental advocate has pivoted since she left the Kardashian empire into something of her own: Future Earth. Through Future Earth, Shepherd is meeting you wherever you are in your sustainability journey to living a lower-impact lifestyle. With almost 2 million followers, she's dedicated her social platform and influence to inspire global activism. But before Shepherd became an environmental thought leader and changemaker (and even before she helped build the Kardashian West Brands into a burgeoning business), she started her career performing as a dancer and assistant to creative director Mikey Minden and Pussycat Dolls founder Robin Antin. On this episode of Second Life, find out how Shepherd took an unexpected turn that's making a real impact on our environment and mother earth.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Shaping Opinion
Encore: Nashville’s Magical Bluebird Cafe

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 37:27


The COO and General Manager of Nashville's famous Bluebird Café Erika Wollam Nichols joins Tim to talk about the Bluebird, its storied history and how this little place in a strip mall has impacted country music, songwriting and our culture. This encore episode was first released as Episode 81 on August 19, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_Bluebird_Cafe.mp3 If you were to drive down Hillsboro Pike just outside of Downtown, Nashville, you could easily miss it. The Bluebird Café is tucked into a small strip mall, and is as unassuming as it might have been the day it opened in 1982. It's known as a songwriter's performance space. It has only 90 seats but it still plays host to new and upcoming singer-songwriters, and accomplished artists on any given night. The music is acoustic. The genres can range from country and bluegrass, to pop, rock and contemporary Christian music. In addition to Garth Brooks and Taylor Swift, Bluebird audiences have had the chance to listen to Keith Urban, Kathy Mattea, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, Vince Gill, LeAnn Rimes, John Prine, Phil Vassar, and many, many writers who've created songs for the biggest names in music. Amy Kurland founded the Bluebird Café in 1982, and in 2008, she sold it to the Nashville Songwriters Association International. It was more of a donation, than a sale. The Nashville Songwriters Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the craft of songwriting. The Bluebird Café gained even broader attention in 2012 when the hit ABC television drama Nashville featured the Bluebird in its ongoing plotline. Links The Bluebird Cafe Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) ‘Nashville' Made the Bluebird Famous, But Few People Know the Venue's Real Story, Washington Post Taylor Swift Proved She Can Actually Work a Room at Nashville Landmark Bluebird Café, People Magazine Garth Brooks Brings Stories, Friendships to Bluebird Café, The Tennesseean Bluebird Documentary, Review, Variety About this Episode's Guest Erika Wollam Nichols Erika Wollam Nichols is the General Manager and Chief Operating Officer of Nashville's Bluebird Café. A native of Acton, Massachusetts, Erika came to Nashville in 1984 when she went to Belmont University and began working at The Bluebird Café. Since then, she was the Program Director for the Summer Lights Festival, a city-wide event that was 4 days of music, art, dance and theater in downtown Nashville. She handled all the entertainment from folks like Wynonna to the local theater company. The event boasted an attendance of over 150,000 people with talent on up to 8 outdoor stages. She left there in 1996 to run Tin Pan South for the Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) from 1996 to 2000. She then went to the Country Music Hall of Fame as Director of Public Programs, and then VP of Marketing & Community Outreach. She returned to NSAI in 2004 and attended grad school for her MFA. Erika agreed to take the helm of The Bluebird when NSAI purchased it 2008.

Talk Healthy Today
Why Supplements are Key for People Who Eat a SAD Diet

Talk Healthy Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 17:52


Lisa is joined by Max Mikhaylenko Co-Founder & Chief Operating Officer at Snap Supplements. Snap Supplements was founded by three friends who immigrated to the United States from developing countries in the early 1990s. Concepts like nutrition or supplements were foreign to them, for they had been raised on foods that came from their backyard gardens and neighbors' organic farms. They relied on local, natural foods and homegrown herbal remedies crafted with transgenerational wisdom to treat illnesses and nourish their bodies, never having to worry about whether they were getting the nutrients they needed. Not long after arriving in the United States, Snap Supplements Co-Founder Max began noticing how the standard Western diet —full of processed foods and lacking in quality nutrients— was negatively affecting his family's health. As his family experienced weight gain, allergies, and heart diseases so common in the Western world, Max was inspired to begin his journey sharing how food could be used as medicine. Today, the Snap Supplements team continues to leverage Max's food is medicine philosophy to produce the highest quality supplements crafted with the conflation of modern science and ancient wisdom that exists at the root of the company. --  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Science of CX
Hannah Steiman : Insource Vs. Outsource What's the CX

Science of CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 34:59


Hannah Steinman is the Chief Operating Officer at Peak Support, a company that specializes in building and managing dedicated teams of customer service agents to high growth companies in a wide variety of industries.  Including; SaaS, e-commerce, Social Media, Business services, Transport and so much more.  She was the 1st American higher for the company, which was founded by her husband Jonathan in 2015, and they've ever since worked harmoniously together to exponentially grow the company.  In the episode, Hannah and I discuss;  The procedures at peak support which guarantees better customer experience for their clients How to make outsourced agents part and parcel of the inhouse teamCovid 19 and how it's impacted the customer experience worldHow to evaluate an outsourcer. Active management:: Taking responsibility for the power and access that outsourcers have. Key performance indicators and how to hit your goals step by stepTop to bottom participation in customer satisfaction.  Connect with Hannah Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannahsteiman/  Email- hannah@peaksupport.io  Website - https://peaksupport.io/