Podcast appearances and mentions of John Chapman

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Best podcasts about John Chapman

Latest podcast episodes about John Chapman

Believers on SermonAudio
NIne Things Believers Are To Do

Believers on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 39:00


A new MP3 sermon from Bethel Baptist Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: NIne Things Believers Are To Do Speaker: John Chapman Broadcaster: Bethel Baptist Church Event: Midweek Service Date: 9/15/2022 Bible: Psalm 105:1-6 Length: 39 min.

30 Minutes of Football - Live NFL Podcast with Legit Football
NFL Week 2 Preview & Game Picks Against the Spread

30 Minutes of Football - Live NFL Podcast with Legit Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 37:09


September 16, 2022. Brian from Legit Football brings on John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast to preview all of the Week 2 NFL action. They pick all 15 games from Sunday and Monday against the spread and even give a confidence rating for each game.Chiefs-Chargers Recap - 3:07Carolina vs NY Giants - 7:13Pittsburgh vs New England - 9:29Tampa Bay vs New Orleans - 11:27NY Jets vs Cleveland - 13:14Miami vs Baltimore - 14:35Detroit vs Washington - 15:56Indianapolis vs Jacksonville - 20:24Los Angeles vs Atlanta - 21:35Seattle vs San Francisco - 23:30Houston vs Denver - 25:28Las Vegas vs Arizona - 27:07Cincinnati vs Dallas - 28:14Green Bay vs Chicago - 30:42Buffalo vs Tennessee - 33:32

ChipChat
We're on a Manumission to search Mar A Lago

ChipChat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 115:26


After the summer break, we're back! Trump got searched by the FBI, he's selling nuclear secrets, no big deal says all the Republicans. We talk to John Chapman about his historical tours, and learn that the underground railroad passed through the DC area, and Gov Glenn Youngkin visits Maine to prove he's a racist. Also sports, and The Queen Is Dead, God Save The King, because he's gonna need the help.

The Pastor's Heart with Dominic Steele
Sydney's One Special Evangelist John Chapman - with Baden Stace

The Pastor's Heart with Dominic Steele

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 37:35


One man dominated gospel advocacy in the latter part of the twentieth century Sydney.John Chapman was director of Evangelism for the Sydney Anglican Church, and played a significant role in shaping attitudes to preaching, evangelism and a series of controversies. Baden's new work showcases the impact of John Chapman, but also gives a window into issues facing evangelicals in Sydney in the later part of the twentieth century, controversies about preaching, the place of evangelism in church life, social justice, and what role each of us plays in the evangelistic process.Baden Stace is the senior minister of St Stephen's Normanhurst. Link to purchase: https://bit.ly/3TFzSe1Support the show

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers
Trey Sermon Waived, Blake Hance Claimed, Practice Squad Signings

Locked On 49ers - Daily Podcast On The San Francisco 49ers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 41:02 Very Popular


More changes to the San Francisco 49ers 53-man roster with the departure of 2021 third round running back Trey Sermon. Host of 49ers Rush Podcast, John Chapman, joins the show to break down what this means for the running back position going forward, who is OL Blake Hance, practice squad signings, Nate Sudfeld getting claimed by the Detroit Lions and other roster notes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Blue Collar Voices Show
Adam Drewes – Drewes Concrete – EP 029

The Blue Collar Voices Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 54:34


Adam Drewes chats with John Chapman on this episode of the Blue Collar Voices Show about some of his experiences as a business owner, in the area of concrete work. Adam specializes in flat concrete, stamped concrete and dabbles in Nuclear Shelters. The post Adam Drewes – Drewes Concrete – EP 029 first appeared on The Blue Collar Voices Show.

Lessons From The Cockpit
Leave No One Behind with RAZOR 3 pilot Al Mack

Lessons From The Cockpit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 93:50


Welcome to the thirty-fifth episode of the Lessons from the Cockpit podcast! In the fifth part of our series on the Battle of Roberts Ridge we talk with Warrant Officer Al Mack, the pilot of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment MH-47 Chinook callsign RAZOR 3 delivering SEAL Team MAKO 30 to the top of Takur Ghar mountain at 3:30 am Monday morning 4 March 2002. His Chinook comes under heavy fire from enemy forces and SEAL Neil Roberts falls off the back ramp, which begins the desperate search and rescue for him. Al goes into the small details of how this mission unfolded and the lessons learned from the Battle of Roberts Ridge. Numerous changes were made because Al wrote all of his lessons down! There are several documentaries on the Battle of Roberts Ridge with Al Mack and other participants on YouTube. I suggest you watch these three videos on what happened on Takur Ghar here, here, and the CIA Predator UAV video of John Chapman's heroics here. An article on the recovery of MH-47 Chinook RAZOR 3 called From a Great Height is a great read on how the Army recovered Al Mack's wounded helo from the valley his crew crash-landed in. Two great articles on how a candidate becomes a 160th SOAR Night Stalker are found on the Office of the Command Historian webpage. Support from the Lessons from the Cockpit podcast comes from Wall Pilot, aviation art for the walls of your home, office, or hanger. These very detailed images are printed on vinyl and can be peeled off and stuck to any flat surface or just framed. Please share this and previous episodes of the Lesson from the Cockpit podcast with your family and friends  found on my website markhasara.com    

Lessons from the Cockpit
Leave No One Behind (5) with 160th SOAR pilot Al Mack

Lessons from the Cockpit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 93:49


Welcome to the thirty-fifth episode of the Lessons from the Cockpit podcast! In the fifth part of our series on the Battle of Roberts Ridge we talk with Warrant Officer Al Mack, the pilot of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment MH-47 Chinook callsign RAZOR 3 delivering SEAL Team MAKO 30 to the top of Takur Ghar mountain at 3:30 am Monday morning 4 March 2002. His Chinook comes under heavy fire from enemy forces and SEAL Neil Roberts falls off the back ramp, which begins the desperate search and rescue for him. Al goes into the small details of how this mission unfolded and the lessons learned from the Battle of Roberts Ridge. Numerous changes were made because Al wrote all of his lessons down! There are several documentaries on the Battle of Roberts Ridge with Al Mack and other participants on YouTube. I suggest you watch these three videos on what happened on Takur Ghar here, here, and the CIA Predator UAV video of John Chapman's heroics here. An article on the recovery of MH-47 Chinook RAZOR 3 called From a Great Height is a great read on how the Army recovered Al Mack's wounded helo from the valley his crew crash-landed in. Two great articles on how a candidate becomes a 160th SOAR Night Stalker are found on the Office of the Command Historian webpage. Support from the Lessons from the Cockpit podcast comes from Wall Pilot, aviation art for the walls of your home, office, or hanger. These very detailed images are printed on vinyl and can be peeled off and stuck to any flat surface or just framed. Please share this and previous episodes of the Lesson from the Cockpit podcast with your family and friends found on my website markhasara.com

Businesses Start Here
John Chapman

Businesses Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 43:29


In today's episode we talked to John Chapman who recently purchased a franchise.  He shared some of the challenges he has faced, what he is doing to over come them, and a conversation he had with his wife about what to do if the business killed him.

30 Minutes of Football - Live NFL Podcast with Legit Football
7.12.22: Jimmy G, WR value, Lance, Head Coaches, Hurts, Worst Division, NFC

30 Minutes of Football - Live NFL Podcast with Legit Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 35:49


July 12, 2022. Brian welcomes John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast on the show.  Topics include:2:00 - Jimmy G7:54 - WR positional value14:00 - Trey Lance19:22 - Head Coaches24:28 - Jalen Hurts27:30 - Worst Division in the NFL33:55 - Who wins the NFCLegit Football newsletter30 Minutes of Football YouTubeLegit Football Twitter

Red Pill Revolution
Memorial Day: Badass Medal of Honor Recipients

Red Pill Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 89:51


In this episode of Red Pill Revolution, we discuss the unbelievable stories of 5 Medal of Honor recipients. Dakota Meyer, Kyle Carpenter, Salvatore Giunta, John Chapman; All Heros with their own incredible stories that we dive into and discuss. Listen in and pay homage to these remarkable men.   Subscribe and leave a 5-star review today!   Protect your family and support the Red Pill Revolution Podcast with Affordable Life Insurance. This is attached to my license and not a third-party ad!   Go to https://agents.ethoslife.com/invite/3504a now!   Currently available in AZ, MI, MO, LA, NC, OH, IN, TN, WV Email redpillrevolt@protonmail.com if you would like to sign up in a different state   Leave a donation, sign up for our weekly podcast companion newsletter, and follow along with all things Red Pill Revolution by going to our new website: https://redpillrevolution.co   Full Transcription:   Hello, and welcome to red pill revolution. My name is Austin Adams. Thank you so much for listening today. This is episode number 30 of the red pill revolution podcast. And again, thank you so much for listening. Uh, pretty excited about this conversation we're going to have today. It is all surrounding, you know, a little bit in the Memorial day theme here, we are going to be discussing all of, uh, some really incredible stories surrounding some of the medal of honor recipients from our great nation here in the United States of America.   Um, I know we have some people listening abroad, but there's some really incredible stories. Some really incredible people that we're going to highlight to. Uh, so I'm really excited to get into this. A few of the names that we're going to be going over is Kyle Carpenter, Dakota Meyer Salvatore. Gianatta John Chapman, Thomas Paine.   And then we got a sprinkle of some Jocko Willink in here to bowl the, get us into the episode and an outro to the episode. So I think that's the, I don't think you can get any more American than jockowillink. So let's go ahead and jump into this clip here. A little bit of a, some Memorial day United States pride here, here is Jocko Willink   in a country that most people would struggle to find on a map in a compound that few possess the courage to enter men from my previous life. Took the fight to our enemy in that compound, they found men that pray five times a day for your destruction. Those praying men don't know me. They don't know you.   And they don't know America. They don't understand our compassion, our freedoms and our tolerance. I know it may seem as if some of those things are currently missing, but they remain at our core and always will. Those men don't care about your religious beliefs. They don't care about your political opinions.   They don't care if you sit on the left or the right liberal or conservative pacifist or war. They don't care. How much you believe in diversity, equality or freedom of speech. They don't care. Sorry. You've never felt the alarm bells ringing in your body. The combination of fear and adrenaline as you move towards the fight instead of running from it.   Sorry, you've never heard someone cry out for help or cried out for help yourself. Relying on the courage of others to bring you home.   I'm sorry. You've never tasted the salt from your own tears. As you stand at flag draped, coffins bearing men, you were humbled to call your friends.   I don't wish those experiences on you.   But I do wish them had them.   if you had them, it would change the way you act, who would change the way you value. It would change the way you appreciate. You would become quick to open your eyes and slow to open your mouth.   Most will never understand the sacrifice required to keep evil men like those from that distant compound away from our doorstep. But it would not hurt you to try and understand would not hurt you to take a moment to think of the relentless drain on family, friends, and loved ones that are left behind sometimes for weeks, sometimes for months, sometimes for years.   Sometimes forever   ideas are not protected by words, paper and ink may outline the foundation and principles of this nation, but it is blood only blood that protects it   in that dusty compound. A man you have never met, gave everything he had so that you have the freedom to think, speak and act. However you choose.   He went there for all of us, whether you loved or hated what he stood for. He went there to preserve the opportunity and privilege, to believe, to be, and to become what we want.   this country, every single person living inside of its borders and under the banner of its flag. Oh, that man, we owe that man, everything. We owe him the respect that his sacrifice deserves saying, thank you is not enough. We send our best and lose them in the fight against the worst evil this world has to offer.   If you want to respect and honor their sacrifice, it needs to be more than words. You have to live. Take a minute and look around, soak it in the good, the bad and the ugly. You have the choice every day as to which category you want to be in, in which direction you want to move, you have that choice because the best among us, the best we ever had to offer, fought, and bled and died for it.   Don't ever forget that.   Wow. Well, what a way to start the show today? Uh, definitely hit me in my fields, Jocko Willink. They're just kind of outlining what this day is about, right? Th th the Memorial day is, is, you know, shrouded with barbecue grills and, and beach parties with the family and, you know, and all that's amazing and all of that's great.   And I'm sure every soldier who has ever sacrificed his, his life would have wanted it that way. Right? We're, we're, we're celebrating life, not just, you know, being, uh, having sorrow for those that we have lost, but it doesn't take away from the fact that we have to remember what the day's about. You know, we have to remember the reason that we are able to even have this type of weekend and the true reason behind that, which is soldiers who have lost their lives for us to have the freedoms that we have here in the United States.   Now over the last few episodes that, you know, I'm sure it seems like we've had, we've had a tough go here in the United States, you know, the last, the last several months, the last couple of years, even. Um, but I don't think that takes away from, from something that I found pretty powerful in that statement that Jocko Willink just said was that the, the piece of paper is what defines who our country is.   But the blood of the individuals who are willing to defend it is truly what matters in that really rings true. And I think we're going to see that today with a lot of the individuals that we're going to hear their stories and know that they're just everyday people, everyday people just like you and me who decided to go into the military for one reason or another.   Um, but generally, because they're a Patriot because they believe in what our country stands for. And this is something that I've had to wrestle with recently. Right? I am a veteran myself. I am not a combat veteran, so I did not have the experience that these individuals have had. Um, but you know, something that we, we have to remind ourselves during this time is that there is truly a unique individual who's willing to run to the fight.   And every single story that we hear of here is not only the individuals who signed that line, not only the individuals who picked up a weapon and went overseas and left their families, left their children, left their, their, their significant others left everything behind, just so they could S could go and fight for what they believe in.   Right. And that's kind of what I was getting at before, which is that, you know, it's, it's difficult. It's, it's easy to look at all of the flaws that we have in the United States here today. It's easy to look at, you know, the, the political divide in the partisan divides that we have in, in kind of just, uh, you know, diminish what these great men have done for us.   But, but that's, that's such a shallow viewpoint. Right? And, and the reason that these men signed that, that line is not because they believe in the politicians. It's not because they believe. You know, they, they believe in who we are as a nation. They believe in the individuals that are around them. They believe in the, that piece of paper that Jocko Willink just talked about, right.   The constitution, which was written as a, a literal divide between totalitarianism, that we're seeing all across the world right now in almost every so many. So many countries are dealing with, with this totalitarian states, you look at China, you, you look at the way that they're just ripping people off of their streets and like these like home alone, white jumpsuits and, and you know, for how long we've looked at these different countries and thought that just, it could never be like that here.   Well, why is that? Well, that's because of two reasons, two reasons why that is. And the first reason. We have our constitution. Our constitution is, is the founding document of our nation that allows us to have a, a literal defense against individuals who are in the political system, who are trying to take as much power as possible.   The constitution stops us from having people who can go in and become the system. There was already a set system that is out there. There was already a outline of the way that we have to act in the separation of powers and all of these individual things that make it, that, that were pre thought out, knowing that politicians are.   Dirty knowing that politicians are generally corruptible, knowing that people are flawed, right. And that's truly what it is, is people are flawed. And to know that people are flooding and to implement an institution in a piece of paper, a founding document with our constitution, which will allow us to have a literal divide, a literal wall, a defense against those corruptible individuals who seek power in the easiest way to go find it, which is through the political system.   So that is number one. We have our constitution, which is a actual defensive wall against those corruptible individuals on the inside. And that is the number one thing that we have to protect ourselves from. If we're going to remain a free country. Now, number two, which is equally as important is to have, is that what we have the fortune of having here in the United States is the greatest military power in the world.   The greatest military power in the history of. Right. And that doesn't protect us from the inside more than it protects us from the outside. So to allow us to maintain this organization, to maintain this, this ongoing freedom away from other totalitarian individuals who are wanting to come in and push their political agendas, whether they're from, you know, foreign or domestic, right.   Is, is that what you raise your hand? I promise to defend in the country from foreign and domestic enemies, the foreign aspect of that is where the military comes into play. Right. And, and the military is just a broken. A list of individual names who are willing to put themselves, put their lives on the line to make these things happen.   So let's go ahead and let's jump into the very first clip here that we have, which is actually the, so let's do a little bit of background on the, the medal of honor. So all of these individuals that we're highlighting today, our medal of honor recipients. Now it is Memorial day. Some of these individuals, I believe even most of them are not deceased, which is definitely a positive thing.   Um, but just so you know, that. And this is Memorial day, but I am highlighting medal of honor. Right? So the medal of honor is the very first, uh, it was, it was the very first, um, distinguishing factor for the American military  so, uh, Abraham Lincoln implemented the medal of honor, and it's kind of just, it been the most distinguished honor that you can have, uh, being a part of the military.   All right. Now the structure of this with the medal of honor is that you actually have to either get a congressional, um, a Congressman has to put your name down for the medal of honor or your chain of command. So those are two different ways that you can get a medal of honor. So far there's been around 3,500 medal of honor recipients.   Most of those medal of honor recipients were at the very beginning. Like I think it's like 80% of the medal of honor recipients were towards the very, very beginning of when the medal of honor was, uh, was made. And so since then the requirements to receive the medal of honor has gone up and, and become much more, uh, Distinguished in, in there's a lot more, um, I guess, uh, I dunno, there's a lot, there's a lot more, um, specific things that you have to boxes.   You have to check to get the medal of honor, as opposed to what it was like before. So a vast, vast majority came at the very beginning of when the medal of honor was made in the early 18 hundreds. Okay. So there's the background for it now, since then the most recent, uh, requirements change was in 1963, I believe where they began to make these requirements more stringent and you see less and less of these medal of honors today.   So the very first one that we're going to watch here is of Kyle Carpenter. Kyle Carpenter is an incredible story. He's actually the youngest medal of honor recipient ever. Um, it's truly, truly an incredible story. I don't want to take anything away from it for you guys here, so let's go ahead and listen to it.   And then we will discuss.   I joined the Marine Corps because I wanted to devote my life. My body, if need be to something greater than myself or any one individual   in 2010, I deployed with second battalion ninth Marines to Marsha Afghanistan. We were constantly attacked, just like we were every single day for the entire deployment. The fighting was very intense and it wasn't a matter of okay. Is it going to happen, but just a matter of when   myself and amazing friend and fellow Marine, when it scroll up on NICU Fazio, we were on top of that roof together. We were near the end of our four hour post position on top of the roof. When the enemy initiated a daylight attack with hand grenades   I felt like I got hit really hard in the face. My vision was as if I was looking at a TV with no connection, it was just white and gray static. I thought about my family and how devastated they were going to be. Especially my mother that didn't make it home from Afghanistan. And I closed my eyes and I faded out of consciousness for what I thought was going to be my last time on this earth.   my injuries were so severe that still nine years later,   it's hard to comprehend that I survived.   all right. So what it's saying here, I'm going to pause it real quick because it's, it's, it's saying some stuff that's pretty important. Basically. What ended up happening is, uh, Kyle actually jumped on a Brittany. Um, and it says that he has very little recollection of what actually happened during this event.   Um, but according to the information that they had here, he, uh, I'll just read it to, you says, says to this day Kyle's memory of what happened on November 21st, 2010, it remains blurry, but a military review of the incident determined that he had covered the grenade with his body to save the life of corporal Nick, you phrase you on June 19th, 2014, Kyle was awarded the medal of honor.   The nation's highest and most prestigious personal military decoration. All right. I just wanted to read that to you guys. I mean, that's pretty, I mean, literally the, the, um, captain America story right there for you and in a real individual, and, and we feel the need to create false idols, to be able to idolize somebody and think that somebody would have the capabilities or the, the mindfulness or, or the courage to do something during this, in, in that type of situation.   And that's why it's outlined in a movie in captain America, uh, an individual, you know, captain America goes on to jump on the grenade, right? This guy, Kyle Carpenter actually did that in the state of war to save his friends. How truly incredible. And like, you know, it gives me goosebumps just thinking about it.   That's it's amazing. Um, so let's, let's finish this, if there's anything else that comes up, I'll go ahead and read it to you guys. So.   All right. So while one second, while that loads up for us. Um, but yeah, really incredible story. The fact that, you know, that he, this individual actually did, so it says that several grenades were tossed onto the roof where he was at, and one of them, um, would take an enormous toll. It says Kyle was certain that he was going to die when that happened.   Um, it says Kyle is often asked, uh, what the medal of honor means to him. Um, and let's see if we can get this clip going here to discuss what he actually says there for that. Here we go.   We're just here because we're here. No, we got here because of incredible amounts of courage and sacrifice.   the metal represents all whoever raised their right hand and sworn to give their life if called upon for their country, represents those who have never made it home to receive the things and recognition. They deserve. Those who charged the beaches and world war II froze while fighting in Korea. Bled out across the lush fields of Vietnam and those who never made it home because of another deadly blast in the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, those who were tortured for years in prisoner of war camps and those who still rest and just didn't lands forever remaining missing an action.   The metal represents the parents, husbands wives, and loved ones who have heard the dreaded knock on their front doors to find a telegram or service member delivering the unbearable news. This is where the true weight of the metals caring being a medal of honor. Recipient is a beautiful burden, but one, I am honored to carry   all right. And at the end of the video there, what they show is Kyle going ahead and putting on his medal of honor. So, um, really an incredible story, unbelievable story. And one that will, we'll go on in history as the, you know, the, the real captain America courage here with Kyle Carpenter. Um, you know, I almost feel like there should have been his name in the credits of the captain America movie, that they, you know, stole, stole that scene from something that actually happened with a true hero, um, with Kyle Carpenter there.   So what an incredible story. Um, now the next one that we're going to discuss here is going to be a Dakota Meyer. Now Dakota Meyers is a somewhat of a large figure when it comes to combat veterans who have spoken out, he's been on Joe Rogan, I believe once or twice, I think twice where the first time he went on and discussed his story directly in his story is.   A hard one to listen to and in a pretty gruesome one at that. And then, you know, that's kind of the thing that you hear about the differences between war. I don't know, you know, the way that our modern wars are fought is, is a lot of times, you know, you think of a gunfight and you're pressing a button from afar land, or like from, from hundreds of yards away and shooting it, you know, enemy fire zones and, and, you know, you're seeing small areas where you're shooting at and that didn't use to be the case.   Right. You think back to like the way that they fought in, I dunno, think of like, you know, 17 hundreds was like swords and stuff. That's not that far removed from where we are. So there's some really gruesome stories that come out of like older wars and we, we don't have as many hand-to-hand combat stories.   And Dakota Meyer is one of those stories where it really just reminds you of. The real gritty, terrible aspects of even modern war. And, um, we'll hear a little bit more about it when he discusses it here, but he talks about, um, in, in this clip, he not only discusses what he actually went through, what he did.   Um, but Dakota Meyer is an incredible story where I believe he was the only one of his team that made it out of a situation where, um, they basically left them stranded. So I don't want to take away too much of his stories surrounding it. Um, but it's a, it's a really incredible story. That's a little, you know, he, I believe he ends up, um, he gets in the hand-to-hand combat situation with somebody and ends up killing them with a rock man.   Like that's a tear. I can't even imagine what these guys carry around with them. Right. In, in that Kyle Carpenter story, not only the fact that he jumped on a grenade, but the fact that he lived to tell about it, he has very little recollection of what happened. Must be a really difficult thing. To try and wrestle with right.   To try. And you know, how often does that come up in his mind and into not even remember what actually happened? One of the curd must be really, I don't know, I guess a blessing in some ways, but also frustrating because it's such a pivotal moment in your life, right? Like you have how many days of your life that, that, you know, thousands and thousands of days in your life.   And, and to have this one most impactful day, like whether it's with what happened with Kyle Carpenter, where he jumps on that grenade and lives to tell the tale, or whether it's about Dakota Meyer, where he ends up having to take this other man's life. And he talks about not only having to take this man's life, but like the humanity behind it.   And then looking into this man's eyes and knowing that he's just another. Uh, another person just like him, who has a family and kids. And, um, it's, it's, it's tough, but I think it's necessary. We have to know what these people go through to properly be able to memorialize, you know, the other soldiers who actually did fall in these types of situations.   But, um, let's go ahead and listen to the Dakota Meyer story now. Well, I think sometimes people need to hear it from somebody like you, you know, or someone like Jocko or, you know, the, the, the beautiful thing about these podcasts is that you get to hear people's perspective. And a lot of them are eye-opening, you know, they, they they're, they literally can change the world because they changed the way you behave and you interact with people when you listen to it.   Yeah. And that podcast that you did with Jocko, when I was listening to me, it changed my whole day. It changed like how I was going to look at my day. I was, you know, instead of like looking at my day, like up it's a normal day, I was thinking, God damn, I'm lucky. God damn, I'm lucky and goddamn. Imagine.   Experiencing what you, and how old were you at the time? I was 21, 21 years old. And experiencing what you experienced in that insane firefight being locked down. And I mean, how many guys did you wind up engaging with? I don't know. I, you know, I don't know. I mean, everyone that I got an opportunity with.   Right. And it just, you know, it was just, uh, you know, it was so chaotic. I mean, I, you know, I still, I look, I think about all the time, obviously. Um, it's something I could have never experienced. I mean, I trained for war every single day when I was in the Marine Corps. I mean, it was what it was, what my job was and I still could have never imagined that day, the way it was or anything to turn out.   I could've never pictured it. I could've never, and, and I think every day it goes by, I think there's a reckoning of it, right. The way that I seen it that day is not the way I see it today. And, uh, I think that comes with, you know, just, just sharpening and just your body, you know, you change and you, you see different things in perspective, but yeah, I mean, you know, I, I, I, you know, that day, I mean, it's still, I mean, it still is just, you know, just, it's just there and, and, and literally I walked out of there and I, I just think about all the time today.   I just think about all the time of how many generations, just that day were changed. How many generations of, of people's lives were changed? You know, all my teammates died, so don't ever have kids that generations stopped their families forever. So many lives were changed that day by that, that, that piece.   And guess what? And everybody in America had no clue it was going on. Like right now, there are us. Somebody wondering if they're going to be able to come home and see their family again, that's reality, whether you want to ignore it or not like that's reality. And that was me September 8th, 2009. And it was just, um, gosh, it was a chaotic day.   I think that's an important thing to highlight too, is like, you know, what percentage of people that are going into these actual firefight, what is their average age like the, the, the military at that level is primarily made up of, you know,  may be some staff Sergeant like the primary, primary bulk of the individuals who are going in and fighting.   These wars are 18 to 22 year old kids. Right? Like you listen to, uh, you know, all of these conversations around, you know, gun control and, and, you know, should he be able to purchase a gun or not at 18 years old and all this stuff of like the recent events. So the tragic events that have happened. And you don't even remember the fact that worse, our government literally arms 18 olds and sends them to fight on their behalf.   And the 18 year olds that are signing up to go into the military. Don't don't have the big picture in mind. They barely paid attention in government class if like me. Um, and, and they, they really don't even know how our political system works, let alone geopolitics, and what's happening around the world.   And like what's actually going on, um, they're 18 to 22 year old kids who are going to fight the wars of these 85, 70 year old politicians who they don't have a clue what they're actually fighting for other than, you know, what you'll hear a lot in, in these kinds of videos is you'll, they'll hear them talking about who they're with, right.   Their team, um, saving their buddy next to them. That's what they fight for. And the fundamental ideal that they have surrounding what the United States is and what it means to be a Patriot and what the constitution stands for and being the, you know, um, th th the freest country in the world, right? And that's what these 18 year olds, the ideals that they're fighting for in their head at this age, besides the actual, like geopolitical situation of why we're actually going in there, what we're actually doing and why we're doing it, they're kids going into these situations.   And what you'll find is like, this is kind of an interesting conversation. This, you know, he talks about, you know, they were married and they had didn't, weren't old enough yet to have kids, right. They weren't old enough to be able to see what life is actually about when you, when you look at your child's eyes, when they're born, and they didn't get any of that.   And, and not only that, but their, their family lineage has gone. They did, they, they will not reproduce. There will be no duplication of that DNA because of these wars that they were sent to fight at. It's such a young age, And so, you know, to me, it's like these conversations running like is an 18 year old able to carry a gun.   Well, if you're going to allow people to sign up for the military and to go fight on behalf of our government and wars that these 18 year olds don't even understand, yet you gotta, you can't, you can't like have your cake and eat it too. As people say, right? Like you can't not allow an 18 year old to protect his own home because he can't purchase a weapon, but then send him to Afghanistan to go fight the Taliban in the same breath, because you think that it's okay for them to do that under their scenario.   Right. And under your, your reasoning. Right. Because, you know, and that's kind of how you have to look at that gun situation. I guess we'll, we'll take a little skirt side sidetrack here, you know, to me the gun, situation's an interesting one. And especially with the most recent events and things. That, you know, the, if you look at the government from a large standpoint is the government is its own entity, right?   It's its own, uh, household, right? It's a household of 300 million people, and then you break it down to the state level, right? And the state is just a smaller organization of that same family, right? That it breaks down to a smaller number. And inside that you have counties and inside that you have cities and inside that you have subdivisions and inside that you have households, but what the country is, is just its own family entity that has decided that we're on the same team.   Right. And we all live around each other, so we should be kind to each other and we should have some rules and that type of deal. Right. So when you break it down to like the, the household level, the, the, the government in the sense stands when it comes to gun control is basically. The government wants to be able to control weapons for its own personal reasons to defend itself.   Right? As a country, as a country family, it wants to defend its property, right? It wants to be able to do that. And it does that through military action right now, when you break that to the state level, you have sheriffs in the national guard and you have state entities that want to be able to defend itself against its enemies.   And then you have the households, right? You have, you have actual physical subdivisions, you're home in that subdivision, and you need to be able to do what the government does. You need to be able to do what the federal government does, what the state, they all know that they have to do it. It's the same reason.   Joe Biden has a security guard, armed security, all around him at all times. Same thing with celebrities, same thing. You know, all of these people that are preaching gun control are constantly surrounded by their own security who are all. Right, but, but you're, you're the peasant. You don't need that stuff.   You, what do you have to worry about? You're not famous. And like, I am, you're not a political elite. Like me, what do you have to worry about? Right. So they want to strip your right away. But if there's no guns that are allowed, right. If they strip your right to own a handgun or the purchase without, you know, extreme background checks where they get to say whether, you know, you get it or not.   If, if that's allowed, you know, that, that allows them to be, you know, when, when the constitution was written and we're getting on a little bit of a rant here, when the constitution was written, the idea for, for the second amendment was not was, was generally not yet for hunting. Right? Sure. You should be able to have a gun.   Right. But it's also protection of person and protection of property. And it's also protection from a totalitarian government. Right? So, so in the same way that they want to defend themselves against other countries, they want to defend themselves against their enemies. There are people, there are bad individuals, bad countries out there who want to harm.   There are also bad people out there who want to harm the president. There are bad people who want to harm celebrities and there's bad people who want to harm me and you. And so why should it be any different if the government is okay, I can much rather get on the page of the government. If they want to say that nobody gets guns, we don't get guns.   We're going to, we're going to sign a treaty with the UN where everybody just throws all of their weapons in a circle, and we're going to go back to the stone age. And we're just going to beat the shit out of each other with sticks, because that's, you know, we don't like guns anymore. If everybody agrees that we're on the same page and there's no longer going to be gun manufacturers that every single gun that's ever distributed, it has been rightfully returned and checked next to a box so that we know there are zero guns that are out there.   We can have a conversation about that, but if, but if the government wants to be armed, if our president wants armed security, if our celebrities get armed security, if everybody, but the peasants gets to have guns and then they want to take away your rights. No, I'm on, I'm not, I can't buy into that. Right.   Because it, for in the same way as it's, it's, um, it's a microcosm, the family household is a microcosm of what the government is. And so to strip the family of, of their ability to defend themselves, this doesn't work, right. It's the same reason our government will never lay down their arms and just give it to the UN and say, all right, right.   If we're all going to throw in our weapons on an individual level, why don't we do it on the government level? Well, because we all know that there's sneaky ass people out there who want to do you harm there's countries who want to kill American soldiers. Right. We know that we also know that there's individuals out there who are going to break into somebody's house tonight and murder somebody.   It's just, it's just, unfortunately, the side-effect of humanity is there is bad people that are. And that in that you see that in that macro level of our government, our government is not going to just throw their guns into the middle with every other government say, oh, all right, we're all safe. We're going to go back to using sticks, to beat the shit out of each other.   No, they're not going to do that. They know that the power is in the weaponry. The power is in the individual who holds the, the, the most deadly weapon. Right. And so why would we as individuals give that up? All right. Anyways, side note, everybody who goes into the military, if you're going to say 18 is too young to own a weapon to go into a, um, a gun store and purchase an AR to protect yourself, to protect your family, to go hunting, whatever the hell.   Then you have to change the military age. You can't just, you, you can't just allow them to shed blood on your behalf, but not allow them to protect their own home. It makes no sense. So anyway, so let's, let's continue this Dakota Meyer clip. It's amazing how you could have, uh, thousands of days in your life in one day changes the way you look at everything.   One day, it changes the way you look at everything and, you know, and like the further I go on, I look at it different. You know, I always talk about the story of, um, you know, whenever this guy came up behind me and I ended up, I ended up killing him with a rock and I always remember just like, I remember it.   Like I see it every night. Like I remember like I just see his face and I got just, cause there was a point, there was a point that I, I feel like that anybody that when they, whether they're injured or anything, like they realized that. Like they like it. Like, I don't know. I just think there's a point when you look at somebody and they know they're going to die and on there, forget that.   And I, you know, now I look at it and I see it and how we sank that, like   this guy is a son to somebody, his mother and father are gonna miss him. This guy, he believes in his cause as much as I do, he doesn't believe he's wrong. This guy, this guy, he, he could have had a wife or kids that are never going to see their father. Again, just like, you know, my dad, might've never seen me again if it was switched and really, I don't even know.   I don't hate him. I don't even know this guy. We're just here at this place right now, because we were born in two different. When you add a weapons, were you out of, out of him? So my, no, he had came up and he started choking me. Uh, I had shot him once before and he, I was trying to pick my buddy, Donna Lee, my, my, my, one of my closest Afghans daughter.   Lee had been shot. He, he got killed. He had been killed and I came around this terrorist to get him and I was on my knee and this guy came up behind me. And, um, so he didn't have a weapon either. He was, he did, he, he had a weapon and I ended up shooting him from the ground. And I thought he was dead when he fell on the ground.   And I kind of moved down and got down with Donna Lee because I was still getting shot at, from this machine gun up on this hill. And I was trying to make myself small as I could. And, um, this guy ends up coming up with choking me. Like I thought he was, I thought he was dead and he ends up choking me out.   He starts trying to choke me out and eventually led up a little bit and I ended up getting around. And I just got, we were fighting back and forth and I can remember all of us thinking about it was like, don't let his legs to get on me. Like, you know, these guys, their legs are, I mean, they've been crawling up mountains our whole life.   And he was a, he was a pretty big dude. And, um, I just remember getting on top of him, finally got on top of him and I ended up, I was rolling on top of him. He didn't have all the gear on I did. And, um, I ended up, I remember getting on top of him, like, like I was straddling him and I'm just reaching up, trying to grab for anything I can and I'm holding him and I'm holding him down with my throat, with my forearm and I'm just grabbing anything I can.   And finally, I ended up grabbing a rock and I just started beating this dude space in and I started beating and beaten and beaten. And I remember, I remember just like finally, like after hitting him, you know, I don't know, three or four times four or five times, whatever. I remember him, like finally just kind of looking at me and like, just it's it's like, he's like just, I'm just looking at him in the eyes, like obviously closer than me to you right now.   You just see all the, you can tell, like he knows where this is going. And I always think about that, you know, um, obviously I would kill him a million times over again. Right. He, he was the enemy. Like, I don't feel bad about that part of it, but I just think about like, in that moment, if I can find a way to relate to him in that moment, uh, man, I'm taking his life.   We all in America can find a way to connect with each other. If we don't connect with each other because we choose not to, I don't care what your differences are. Like. Don't like find a reason to why we can get along, not why we should not get along. Right. Wow. So that's pretty, um, like I was saying a little, a little intense, right?   That's it's a truly a horrific situation that this man found himself in and how unfortunate to have to be. In a situation where you have to take somebody's life or it's your own. Right. And you said that he said that I would do it a thousand times over if I had to, because he was the enemy. Right. He was going to do that to me.   He came up to me to choke me. There's nothing that I could've done to put, put, put myself out of the situation, besides not go in the military. You know, however many years ago he had been in three years. Um, but, but he was positioned in, in somewhere where he had to defend himself and had to defend the people around him.   And you know, what, what he didn't talk about there was the, what led up to that, but I'm believe none, nobody on his team made it out. It was just him in that situation. And, uh, you know, that's, that's something that's easy to forget too. It's easy to like glorify them. It's easy to like put them on a pedestal because they went off and fought.   But like, man, it's such a mixed emotion. That should be such a powerful thing on Memorial day to like look back at what they actually went through. Right. What, what they actually had to endure both in the, in the moment and then for the rest of their life, after these actions, after defending themselves, after, you know, um, positioning, being positioned in a way where they had to go through this and, and do these things to other people.   And it's probably not very often, well, maybe it is maybe, you know, but, but it's, it's, it's refreshing to hear someone, you know, I guess refreshing and then an interesting to hear somebody go from speaking about. Beating someone's face in with a rock four or five times in, in, in seeing them really just like, decide that they're okay.   Not okay with it, but just decide that like, oh, this might be it right to like, actually have to look at the humanity of an individual in that moment and realize, you know, that maybe this is the end of your life, that you're not going to see your children and, and on both sides of it. Right. It's like the, I don't know.   I think the more developed we get as a world, right? As a consciousness, as an individual, the more we realize that, like these wars, at least from, you know, uh, uh, human aspect, or like just makes no sense to be fought in these manners. Like literally neither of those men knew the geopolitics down to the core of what they were there fighting for.   They were positioned by people in power who had agendas in mind that they wanted to accomplish on the backs of this man losing his life. In this situation where he went to, you know, go choke Dakota Meyer, um, either which way it's like it's a horrific event because he just as easily see whoever picked up that rock first, right?   Whoever was put in a position where they could have walked away alive would have seized that chance. But they were only in that position because of the individuals who put them there. But anyways, let's not take away from that. There were always CISM, heroism, heroism is a word heroic CISM. Let's not take away from their heroism of that individual in that moment who faced their fears and had the courage to fight in this situation.   And, and, and now it, like I said, it's a, it's a mixed emotion. You can't just like throw them up on a pedestal. And you know, you have to have empathy is still right. It's not just like, look at the heroes. It's like, man, what these people had to endure to allow us to. Enjoy our lives, the way that we do allow us to maintain our freedom in our S our sovereignty from other nations and, and how easily it is to forget the horrific actions when just putting them on that pedestal.   When just looking at them as a hero, it's easy to forget everything that they had to go through. And like I said, everything they're going to have to endure from here on out, but it's, it's important to understand how deeply complex these things are, even for an 18 and 19 and 20 year old to have to handle, and to not even be in your head like your adult life, right?   Like you're a 17, 18, 19 years old. You signed that dotted line and then you go off and you have to experience such trauma, and then take that into what you believe to be normal everyday adult life, when you're 24. And you, you have your DD two 14 in your hand, and you're ready to like take on the world.   If you're one of these individuals who went through this, like you don't, you don't have the same lens as everybody. You have such a heavier burden to take into everyday life, to take into your first marriage, to take into your, you know, to, to, to parenting your children. And you have such a different vantage point of what, you know, what it means to, to go into the military and what it means to protect your country and what it means to have a constitution, the way that we do and be willing and able to protect and defend it.   Um, it's heavy, right? Like that, that, that that's a kid 19 years old as a kid. And then they carry that burden into every other year, every other decade, every engagement, every family reunion that whatever it is like to you, you carry that with you. Um, so, you know, it's, it's something that's refreshing too, is looking at all these people and looking at how normal they are, right?   Like every single one of these guys could just be right next to you on a plane. They're, you know, talk to you at the, at the bar or. So, you know, it, it speaks to human resiliency too, right. To be able to experience something that horrific and then to come out and still be able to just leave your house, let alone form a sentence or get on a Joe Rogan interview.   Right. Like man. So the next one we're going to listen to is Salvador. Jiante I hope I'm pronouncing that correctly, but Salvador Gionta um, we will go ahead and listen to this clip and then we will discuss it too. This is a pretty incredible story. I haven't read too deep into it. Um, but I'm, I'm interested to hear it.   So here we go. I grew up in Cedar rapids, Iowa. I'm the oldest of three children. It was the Midwest middle-class sunshine, rainbows green grass. You don't have to lock the door kind of neighborhood. That was where I grew up in Iowa. I was about to graduate high school and I heard a radio commercial come on.   And I said, you know, come on down, see the recruiter. Who doesn't want a free t-shirt I'm working, but I want a free t-shirt of course I want a t-shirt. So I went down and I, uh, I talked to the recruiter and kind of the things that he said started making sense, you know, we're we're country at war. This was 2003.   We just jumped into Iraq. We we've been in Afghanistan since 2001. This is my chance. I can make a difference if this is what I want to do, and I can do it everywhere, but not in Cedar rapids, Iowa. My great grandparents came over from Italy in 1904. No one that I know of in my immediate family served in any sort of military.   This is my chance to say, you know, the juniors are going to go serve. I'm going to do it. Salvatore, Giunta enlisted in the U S army in November of 2003, after excelling in basic training and infantry school, he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2005. And again, in 2000. The second tour would station him at a remote fire base and the deadly Corrine gal valley.   I remember being so excited to go. I wasn't just excited. I was ready. I'm going to go there and kick in doors and solve this, wrap it up. We'll go home. We'll drink some beers and say, you know what? I served in the United States army. I'm proud of that every day. And within three months of being in country, an IED took out a truck and killed four and gunner lost both of his legs.   These are people in their prime of their life. There will never be stronger than they were that day to no longer have it tomorrow. That was when I truly felt that it was in the army. My second deployment was the corn gold valley. It was like nothing that I had never seen in Afghanistan before we were at the bottom of the valley with mountains, just cheer straight, straight up and down on every single side.   And every single place you're going to fight. You are at the bottom and there's no spot you can choose because you don't get to choose a spot. They get to choose the spot. So operation, rock avalanche when he go to, and I guess that's something that's fair to mention too, is they don't even get to pick where they go or like some of the tactical disadvantages that they've been pulled into.   Like, there's a, there's a movie that came out surrounding. Uh, there was a group of Marines who basically did a bunch of home videos, like early in the, you know, like literal, uh, cam corridor mode. Like I think it was like early mid nineties. Uh, there was a group of Marines. I need to think of the name of the movie because it's a true, unbelievably, incredible depiction.   Um, and it really seems like the whole movie that the depiction of it that they ended up doing seemed like a, um, like they took a lot of the scenes of this home movies that they made. And I think there was like four or five medal of honor recipients. I should have clipped that together for you guys too, but really unbelievable.   A movie that, that came out about this specific, it might, it might be this specific area that he's mentioning here where basically there was a big, um, mountain area surrounding the entire, like a full circle mountain. And then down, down in the valley here, um, there was a, uh, a military base that they were put in a forward operating base, right in the middle of these mountains at the very, very bottom where they were at a complete disadvantage from every single point that you could look at, they were at a disadvantage from, and, uh, there was, uh, many, many, uh, soldiers from the U S who died.   Um, and, and every single day in this area that they were, they were fighting. And in this forward operating base, they would receive gunfire just from the mountains and they could barely even see where it was coming. But the vantage point that they were, they were fighting from was just like, imagine, like, I dunno if you've ever seen, like, I guess that's a bad example, but if there's a, there's just a complete circle of mountains around this area, there's a base at the very, very, very circle middle bottom.   So there's nowhere to hide. There's nowhere to run. Um, there's nowhere to, to even cover, to, to, to reload your weapon besides the, you know, the buildings. And so, um, this movie is truly incredible depiction. So I wonder if this is the same base that they were talking about. There is like the, it might've been, um, like he might've said it, but I think it was like they coined it like death valley, um, but a horrific, horrific, uh, tactical disadvantage vantage that these men were in from the beginning.   Like it's not even like they, they, none of them choose to this either like higher up chain of command guy writes a fucking sticky note and hands it to a corporal and says, all right, start a base at the bottom of this mountain without ever actually visiting. And how many people died on the decisions, like on the backs of that decision, how many these young soldiers lives were lost because of this like terrible tactical disadvantage that they were given from the very beginning.   Like they, they didn't even have a chance from the beginning. And, and so whatever this movie is, you gotta find it. It's a, it's a great, it probably one of my favorite military movies of all time. Um, and, and it truly like captures the humanity. Like the essence of what being in the military is, and all the shit-talking and comradery and all the, you know, difficult situations that you find yourself in.   Um, it's a really incredible story. So, um, but if that's not the place that he's talking about, the fact that they're putting our soldiers in these areas over and over again, now I know that there's been like since then, like statements that they came out and said, yeah, there's no, absolutely no reason that we should have actually put a base in this area.   Uh, I dunno, it's crazy, but I'll, I'll find the name of that hopefully before the end of this podcast. And, and, uh, we'll, we'll see if I can give the shout out and let you have a, a good movie to go watch. Cause it's a really, really incredible movie. Um, but let's, let's continue on this clip again. This is Salvador gianatta, um, discussing his, uh, the time that he received the medal of honor for, we had no idea.   Well, we had Intel and there's Intel. It was lots of bad guys. That's what we came here to do.   the first day we got some contact a couple of times, each day, usually small mines, RPGs. There's some bad guys in the shot at us. And we dropped some orders and other things. Apparently there was a lot of people that they deemed innocent that died. Then they're not. We came to help, but now he pissed off everyone.   I'm here still, other than our little areas that we've been watching for the last, you know, day and half, we don't know what's outside of this. We left where we were headed, headed to another village. It's probably only enough, maybe another street kilometers. And we set up for doing listening posts for going in and engaging the villages saying, Hey, you know, what do you need?   What would, what would make your lives better? And how let's let's talk to offer to all of this is to Bravo radio check over. That was a team leader. So I have a radio so I can click over and I can hear what's going on with the other guys. And we started hearing on the radio chaos shooting. Doesn't make chaos to hear chaos from people who'd been doing this restraint.   And we started hearing they're missing people. They're missing things. There's there's Kia's we have, we have Americans killed there. It was bad. We just stayed waiting, listening to a million bad things, happen to our brothers kilometer away. You've never been more ready than you were right there. And we couldn't do anything right over here.   They over overran a scout team position and they overran a gun team. And second tune was going to go into the village. And then we were going to be on one of the side peaks over watching the village. So if anything, anyone started coming from the outside to come and attack them in the village. We already have the high ground above them and we sat there 12 hours, 14 hours just watching and waiting.   And nothing happened. Commander said, we're going to pull out. We'll go back as it was probably two and a half hours. And the sun was down to the moon was big and that moon really does make a, just a huge amount of difference in what you can. And can't see, there was Sergeant Brennan specialist, sack road, the squad leader, staff, Sergeant Gallardo, myself.   Uh, Casey was my solid gunner. And then clarity was my two or three gunner. We went about 200 meters from where we sat. And that was when I I've never seen before or since anything like what, what happened?   The tracers coming, usually one tracer, four balls. So every time you see one that glows, there was four somewhere in between there and absolutely everything. Every single inch of the air in front of us behind you. Was filled with tracers thousands of bullets in the air going both ways at this point, I think within the first five seconds, I think pretty much everyone had been shot somewhere.   Casey and Clary were behind me and Casey had the 2 49 squad. Automatic weapons saw and searched can shoot about a thousand bullets per minute. Clary was shooting is 2 0 3, which shoots a 40 millimeter grenade. But the guys were so close. She couldn't the grenade. He was just making a lot of booms, but it wasn't on them, but he was doing exactly that.   That was a good thing for him to be doing. And so I looked towards my leader, Sergeant Gallardo, I saw Gallardo coming back and I just saw his head Twitch. And it wasn't like a, what was that Twitch? He was like, something just hit his head Twitch and he dropped, sorry. I just ran out and I grabbed, he was kind of flipped over on his back, but he was okay.   So I kind of grabbed him, was pulling him and he was jumping up and we got back and I went to a little bit of desolate. I probably gave us maybe six to eight inches of relief in the ground. And I, we were both there. And when that happened, I got hit Largo's here and I'm here and they're shooting at us from here.   And I just got hit over here, which the people over here can't shoot over here. That is a very serious thing to figure out incredibly quick, why that bullet came from over here, they set up in an L shape, which if we were to do it, we would do it exactly like that. We were trained from from day one in basic training.   It was a battle drill that a near ambush. What do you do if your ambush happens? Well, you charged the line. You're going to win or lose on that, but you're going to win or lose stain where you're at. And if you stay where you're at, you're probably gonna lose. We threw your name. And we ran forward, that road was on the ground and he said, he'd been shot.   Brennan said he was shot as well. He's somewhere up ahead. I can hear this. As I'm running and Garda went for acro Gallardo is the man. I trust the lardo. There's no more grenades. And I was already running forward. So pointless to stop and Gallardo had that growed and chasing and Claire were doing everything they could and they were, they were keeping their heads down.   And when I ran up and I couldn't, I couldn't find Brinton where it should've been   this part haunts my dreams.   Now it's interesting to think in this situation like that, like everything that's going on. You know, all of the intensity of the moment, like gunfire from here, gunfire, from there, you, you like, it's easy to, it's easy to let it escape from, from your mind if you've never been in a situation like that, not I've never been in a situation like that.   So it just, just interesting. The the real time chess match that is happening in a firefight. And so, you know, in, in the stakes are so high. And for him to say that like, you know, in this next moment was one that will stick with me forever, you know, in the intensity of that moment to have a moment that even like within that however many minutes that this firefights happening and you're seeing people drop to your left into your right and to have something significant enough in that moment to, to, to stand out to you and to have to also not only like comprehend everything that's going on around you.   Um, but to, to, to react, analyze strategize, and then take action is like, it, it truly is a special type of individual who can find themselves in a position to gain this medal of honor, because every single one of those decisions has to be correct. Right? The, the, the analyzing the situation, the reaction to the situation, the, you know, calm, cool, and collected, and then the actual action itself, everything had to Evelyn.   You know, perfectly for these men to do what they did. Um, so, you know, just speaks to the intensity of the moment and the intensity of what he's must be talking about coming up here. The fact that there's an individual moment within all of this, that, that sticks with him specifically. So here's that I came out and there was two guys carrying one   crazy. I don't know how anyone else got up here before me. I mean, this all happens like this. I was like a little bit closer. I realized what was going on. I deployed with Berlin before we, the year before we were in Afghanistan for a year. So I'd been with Brendan for maybe four years. He's smarter than me, stronger than me.   He's smaller than me too, but he's faster than me. He's a better shot.   And that's, who's getting carried away June to immediately charged through the persistent enemy fire toward the two insurgents carrying Joshua Brennan. He killed one and wounded. The other Ben carried Brennan to a position of relative safety until medevac helicopters could arrive   25, 2007 30 supportive operation during freedom is unwavering courage. You don't find out if you did the right thing or wrong thing until later. Sometimes maybe if you did the wrong thing, maybe you don't ever find out lardo. My squad came up, I was talking to captain Kearney. He said, you're going to get put in for a middle of,   I said a lot of things, none of which were very happy or, or should be told that. Mendoza had died and Brandon had died. The other guys were going to be okay, they're all in surgery or getting some bullets out. You're going to congratulate me. You're going to pat me on the back and say, thanks stupid the day at the white house.   When the president put around my neck and the front row, I had my family had my wife and my mom and dad and brother and sister. And the second row, I had some aunts and uncles, but the road behind my family was Britain's family. Next to them was windows is family. When, as I felt this light silk ribbon go around my neck, I felt the weight of the sacrifices of those two and the sacrifices of several of the people in that audience.   No one did anything special. I, every single one of us were fighting for our absolute life. If I didn't do that was my. Congratulate and pat it on the back and everyone thinks I'm such a great guy when there's people that will never get a congratulations. Thank you. Or you're the man ever again, or see their family, the mother, the father, the children.   And yet you're gonna congratulate me on the keeper of it stays at my house at night, put it around my neck when I need to, but this is not mine. This is not for me. This represents so much more. This represents not just my boys, not just bringing, not just Mendoza, not, not rugal who died the day before. Not all the guys who, who have been wounded, not all the people who have suffered, not the families that will pay the price for this country.   It's not for any one of those people. It's for all of those people. And if I got to do it, I'm going to do it for them. And there's nothing they wouldn't do for me. So how could I not do this for them?   Yeah, that's heavy. Is he, you know, can't imagine being in that situation, like he said, like getting your metal of honor, while you sit out and watch the families of your friends that didn't have the opportunity to come home, let alone sit there from, in front of the president of the United States being congratulated, right?   Like that, you know, it's like, I'm such a weird, you know, status to obtain because all of the things that came with that, right? Like I wonder how many of those men who have the medal of honor even, you know, look at it in, in a way other than how he looks at it, which is just like, you know, it's not this, like, it's not the Stanley cup, right.   It's not like, it means horrible tragedy happened and you witnessed horrific things in likely your friends or dad and, or seriously wounded. And then too, like. This like celebrity type event where the president is putting a, a necklace around your neck about it. And he can't comprehend the fraction of the agony that you went to, to be standing on that stage, or to look in, to look out and see your friend's parents.   There is cash that's heavy, you know? And, and, and so the Mo the movie I was mentioning earlier was called the outpost. I believe it's, it's, uh, it came out in like 2019. I don't know if this specifically talking about this one place, it might be. Um, I'll have to look deeper into that for you guys, but the corn golf valley is what is where, um, Gionta served, where he got his metal event of a medal of honor.   And so here, here's what it talked about. I was talking about that earlier, like the base at the very like, um, the very bottom of this like mountainous area. And so here's six reasons why the Korengal valley was one of the most dangerous places in Afghanistan. So it says nestled between the high mountains of the Afghan side of the border with Pakistan, the Korengal valley has the most has one of the hardest fought over patches of ground in the war on terror, 54 Americans have been killed in four medal of honors were earned in the valley or its vis immediate vicinity while the case for a fifth is under review.   One of that, um, one was that of the first living recipient of the reward of awards since Vietnam staff, Sergeant Salvatore. That's who we're discussing here today, the American military rarely moves into the valley, but handpicked, Afghan commandos, some trained by the CIA fight constantly with militants there, the Afghan government maintains offices at the Peck river valley, the entryway to Korengal, their police execute raids and patrols, and the continuing attempt to shut down or limit the shadow government operating there.   When the American military was there, they face the same challenges the Afghan forces do today. Some of these dangerous of some of these dangers are common across Afghanistan while others, um, only existed in Korengal valley and the other branches of the pack river valley. So it says the terrain is a nightmare.   Steep mountains, loose shale thick forest is an open patches of land, made the area in nightmare for an occupying force. Command outposts were built in relatively open areas so that defenders could see approaching militias. However, this meant patrol is returning to the base, had to cross the open.   Sometimes under heavy military arms fire from nearby wooded areas and houses, the thick trees in the area allowed fighters to attack us forces from covering concealment. The attack would then hide there. The attackers would then hide their weapons in the forest and return to the civilian population.   The steep hillside allowed snipers to climb above outposts and fire into the bases. As soldiers slept loose rocks on the steep land led to injuries from falls and trips. It says building new bases and keeping them supplied, presented constant challenges, probably just, they show that in the outpost again, I don't know if that's the exact movie.   I'll have to I'll look at that before we're done here, but in the outpost, they showed that like when they would actually go to get supplies, they would drive their Humvees up these mountains. Like right on the cliffs, like horrifying to try, like, you know, you ever drive through like Colorado going up to, uh, like Vail or Breckenridge or something.   And so it's like how I felt, but it's like, not even close to that. It was like this small, small patch of area that yo

Fantasy Feast: NFL Fantasy Football Podcast
2022 QB Dynasty Rookie Rankings with John Chapman

Fantasy Feast: NFL Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 29:35 Very Popular


49ers Rush Podcast Host John Chapman joins Ross & Joe to talk about this year's top Dynasty Rookie Quarterbacks including: Kenny Pickett 8:39 Desmond Ridder 11:33 Malik Willis 16:53 Matt Corral 20:20 Sam Howell 23:52 Download the DraftKings Sports Book App and use code ROSS for a sign up bonus up to $1,000 Connect with the Pod Website -  https://www.rosstucker.com Become A Patron - https://www.patreon.com/RTMedia Podcast Twitter - https://twitter.com/RossTuckerPod Podcast Instagram -  https://www.instagram.com/rosstuckerpod/ Ross Twitter -  https://twitter.com/RossTuckerNFL Ross Instagram -  https://www.instagram.com/rosstuckernfl/ If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hard Core
America's First Apple(s)

Hard Core

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 36:34


North America was home to apples long before Europeans - or cider - reached its shores. Malus fusca, or the Pacific crabapple, is native to the continent and there's a rich history and contemporary culture surrounding the variety to explore. We'll look at how the apple has been and is still used by Indigenous nations and poke holes in the narratives about cider we're all too familiar with. We follow apple seeds and stocks across the continent and through time, visiting a vault, getting to know Midwestern cideries, and embracing the eclectic flavors (and stories) behind American cider.Keep Learning:Learn more about the Pacific crabapple and find out more about Nancy Turner's research.Find out more about the Gitga'at Nation, of which Cameron Hill serves as a councilor.View the books Eveline Feretti describes online as part of the Biodiversity Heritage Library.Read Dan Pucci's book, American Cider: A Modern Guide to a Historic Beverage.Keep Hard Core on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

Prayer on SermonAudio
After This Manner--Pray

Prayer on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 40:00


A new MP3 sermon from Bethel Baptist Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: After This Manner--Pray Speaker: John Chapman Broadcaster: Bethel Baptist Church Event: Sunday Service Date: 5/15/2022 Bible: Matthew 6:9-13 Length: 40 min.

A&A Tall Tales
Legendary Figure - Johnny Appleseed

A&A Tall Tales

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 42:53


You probably learned about him in school, and you might remember some things about John Chapman. The pot that doubled as a hat, the bag of apple seeds, the walking...so much walking. But the things you never learned, or forgot you learned are way more interesting than all that. Like: Was he really a vegetarian? What is his connection to the War of 1812? And seriously...why apples?! This is an episode you wont want to miss. Any questions, comments, or submit your local legend or personal experiences at Anatalltales@gmail.com. Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100074467313758 and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anatalltales/ and Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP46gkhN1x3kjJyikRUDv7Q Don't forget to visit our website for more content! https://anatalltales.wixsite.com/my-site

The Krueg Show
Ep. 70: John Chapman on 49ers Draft

The Krueg Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 45:35


#49ersDraft #kruegshow #nfldraft Larry Krueger & John Chapman from 49er rush podcast. Tune in for very fun segment as we digest the 49ers draft with John Chapman and Larry Krueger. Subscribe to our channel @The Krueg Show

Lei’s Little Golden Books
My Little Golden Book About Johnny Appleseed

Lei’s Little Golden Books

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 6:00


John Chapman loved to walk and plant apple trees. He spread kindness and good will across several states to the settlers who called him Johnny Appleseed. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leilani-hargreaves/support

The Krueg Show
Ep. 62: 49er Mock Draft Larry Krueger & John Chapman

The Krueg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 46:56


49er Mock Draft Larry Krueger & John Chapman from 49er rush podcast. Tune in for very fun segement as we move further into draft week 2022 for the NFL. Let's see how this mock draft plays out between John Chapman and Larry Krueger. Subscribe to our channel

Niner Nate's Nonsense
Bolstering the 49ers Ft. John Chapman

Niner Nate's Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 62:14


This week Niner Nate is joined by John Chapman! The guys discuss the current Deebo Samuel situation as well as Johns's favorite prospects to replace him and the way he personally believes the 49ers can bolster the roster through the draft! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nnnonsense/support

LA Rams Up - An LA Rams Podcast
LA Rams Up: Our own Tom Courts and John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast discuss the Los Angeles Rams' strategy to roster building

LA Rams Up - An LA Rams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 44:45


Our own Tom Courts and John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast discuss the Los Angeles Rams' strategy to roster building If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

49Karats Podcast
49ers draft preview: defensive line

49Karats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 45:58


Steph is joined by John Chapman to discuss potential defensive line draft targets for the 49ers.

Fantasy Football From Up North
Ep.111 2022 Rookie QB Class. Is Desmond Ridder the 2nd best QB in this class?

Fantasy Football From Up North

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 31:56


Clayton is joined by non other than John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast to breakdown this years QB class.You can find John on twitter @JL_Chapmanand for anything 49ers related check out his podcast with the link below.Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/49ers-rush-podcast-with-john-chapman/id1234042936Do Not forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel below and hit the bell for immediate notification on when an episode drops.https://youtube.com/channel/UCVai6iThDfWjUKq70aZF8cA

Your Brain on Facts
Apple of Our Eye (ep. 191)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 34:16


1-star review shirt! and shirt raising money for Ukraine Red Cross. It's another one of those episodes all about a topic that sounds totally mundane and boring!  Where did apples come from?  Was Johnny Appleseed real?  Why does planting apple seeds lead to disappointment?  And why are some apples considered intellectual property?     Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Kevin MacLeod, Tabletop Audio, and Steve Oxen.  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie." Sponsor: Starfleet Leadership Academy   What's more wholesome and iconic than an apple?  In the Bible, Eve ate an apple and now half of us have to have periods and crap.  In fairness to apples, the Bible just says “fruit” and it was Milton's “Paradise Lost” that declared the fruit was an apple because the Latin word for apple, m-a-l-u-s, is also the word for evil.  There's the Greek myth of Atalanta, who would only marry the man who beat her in a footrace, so Aphrodite helped a Melanion cheat by dropping golden apples that she stopped to pick up.  An apple fell on the head of Isaac Newton, leading to the discovery of gravity – prior to that, everyone weighed a lot less.  The record label that gave the world the Beatles and one of the largest consumer electronics companies in the world use an apple as their logo.  [tiktok] Bonus fact: The Apple computer logo has a bite taken out of it so it isn't mistaken for a cherry, which I don't think would really have been so great a danger, and is *not a nod to Alan Turing, the famous mathematician who helped Britain win WWII but was hounded by that same government for being gay and took his own life with a poisoned apple.  Steve Jobs and co repeatedly said they wished it was that clever.   We say something is “as American as apple pie” and even though Ralph Waldo Emerson dubbed apples “the American fruit,” the tasty, sweet malus domestica as you're used to it is about as native to North America as white people.  That's not to say there was nothing of the genus malus in the new world; there was the crabapple, a small, hard, exceedingly tart apple, which is better used for adding the natural thickener pectin to preserves than anything.   The story of apples actually begins in Kazakhstan, in central Asia east of the Caspian Sea.  Malus sieversii is a wild apple, native to Kazakhstan's Tian Shan Mountains, where they have been growing over millions of years and where they can still be found fruiting today.  There's evidence of Paleolithic people harvesting and using native crabapples 750,000 years ago, give or take a week.  The original wild apples grew in ‘apple forests' at the foot of the snow-tipped mountains, full of different shapes,sizes and flavors, most of them bad.  Kazakhstan is hugely proud of its fruity history.  The former capital city of Almaty claimed the honor of ‘birth place of the apple' about 100 years ago.  Seems a suitable sobriquet since the name ‘Almaty' was previously recorded as ‘Alma-Ata' which translates from Kazakh as ‘Father of the Apples,' though in Latin Alma means mother or nurturer, which feels more fitting but that's beside the point.   This origin story was not without controversy, but what am I here for if not to teach the controversy?  In 1929, Russian scientist Nikolai Vavilov first traced the apple genome. He identified the primary ancestor of most cultivars of the domesticated apple to be the ancient apple tree: Malus sieversii. There used to be some controversy over this, but it has since been confirmed, through detailed DNA testing, and a full sequencing of the genome, as recently as 2010.   It was probably birds and traveling mammal species that initially transported apple seeds out of Kazakhstan long before humans started to cultivate them – by eating the apples and then pooping out the seeds.  By 1500 BC apple seeds had been carried throughout Europe by the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans.  Bloody Romans.  What have they ever done for us?  I mean apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans really ever done for us?  Oh yeah, apples.  The Romans discovered apples growing in Syria and were central in dispersing them around the world from there, using the Silk Road as a means of transport from East to West.  Romans were a fair hand at grafting, taking a cutting from one apple variety and attaching it to a rootstock (young roots and trunk) from another tree – more on that later.  As such, the Romans started to grow apples in Europe and Britain that were bigger, sweeter, and tastier than any before.  Let's not forget variety.  There are a whopping 2,170 English cultivars of malus domestica alone.     Apples arrived in the new world first with the Spanish in the warm bits and then with English settlers in the cooler bits, which when I say it sounds like it was done on purpose.  Ask an American child how apples spread across the nascent US and they'll tell you it was Johnny Appleseed.  We tend to learn about him around the time we learn about “tall tales,” i.e. American folklore –stories like the giant lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his blue ox, or John Henry, who could hammer railroad spikes in ahead of a moving train – so it can be a little tricky to be sure if Johnny Appleseed is real or not.  Don't feel bad, a friend of mine just learned that narwhals were real the other year when she wanted to be one in a cryptid-themed burlesque show.    Johnny Appleseed, real name John Chapman, was a real person, though naturally some aspects of his life were mythologized over time.  Details are sparse on his early life, but we know that Chapman was born in Massachusetts in 1774 and planted his first apple tree trees in the Allegheny Valley in Pennsylvania in his mid-twenties.  He then began traveling west through Ohio, planting as he went.  These were frontier times.  We're talking about a good 70 years before the transcontinental railroad, so much of the area he went through did not yet have white settlers in it, but Chapman seems to have a knack for predicting where they would settle and planting nurseries in those spots.  Chapman was also a devout follower of the mystical teachings of Swedish theologian Emanuel Swedenborg, and he tried to spread Swedenborgian doctrine as well.  People were open to some parts of it, like kindness to all animals, even the unpleasant ones.   The apples that Chapman brought to the frontier were completely distinct from the apples available at any modern grocery store or farmers' market, and they weren't primarily used for eating, but for making hard apple cider.  Cider was a mainstay item for the same reason people drank beer at breakfast, because it was safer than the water supply.  This didn't actually apply as much in the not-yet-destroyed frontier as it had back in London, but old habits die hard.    I've often wondered why cider is such a staple beverage in the UK, but only resurfaced in the last 20 or so years here in the States, where we have to specify hard cider” because the word “cider” normally means a glorious, thick, flavorful unfiltered apple juice you only get in the fall.  It's thanks to the colossal failure that was that “noble experiment,” Prohibition, when some people didn't like drinking and told the rest of us we couldn't either.   "Up until Prohibition, an apple grown in America was far less likely to be eaten than to wind up in a barrel of cider," writes Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire. "In rural areas cider took the place of not only wine and beer but of coffee and tea, juice, and even water."  The cider apples are small and unpleasant to eat, so they were really only good for cider-making.  As such, during Prohibition, cider apple trees were often chopped down by FBI agents, effectively erasing cider, along with Chapman's true history, from American life.   But Johnny “Appleseed” Chapman wouldn't know anything about all that.  Within his own lifetime, tales of his activities began to circulate.  Most of these focused on his wilderness skills and his remarkable physical endurance.  Chapman cut an eccentric figure.  He wore a sack with holes for his head and arms rather than a proper shirt and after he'd worn through multiple pairs of shoes, he gave up and went barefoot.  Perhaps his most distinct feature, the one always included in drawings, apart from a bag of apple seeds, is his soup pot, just about his only possession, which he wore on his head like a hat.   Starting in 1792, the Ohio Company of Associates made an offer of 100 acres of land to anyone willing to make a homestead on the wilderness beyond Ohio's first permanent settlement.  These homesteads had to be permanent; no pitching a tent and saying ‘where's my land?'  To prove their homesteads were the real deal, settlers were required to plant 50 apple trees and 20 peach trees in three years.  Since an average apple tree took roughly ten years to bear fruit, you wouldn't bother unless you were in it for the long haul.  He might have looked like a crazy hermit, but Chapman realized that if he could do the difficult work of planting these orchards, he could sell them for a handsome profit to incoming frontiersmen.  “On this week's episode of Frontier Flipper, Johnny plants an orchard…again.”  Wandering from Pennsylvania to Illinois, Chapman would advance just ahead of settlers, cultivating orchards that he would sell them when they arrived, and then head to more undeveloped land.     That was very clever.  What wasn't clever was Chapman growing apples from seed at all.  This is the bit about grafting, in case you were jumping around looking for it.  Statistically, at least one person was really waiting for this part.  Apple trees don't grow “true-to-type,” as WSU tree fruit breeder Kate Evans explains. That means that if you were to plant, for instance, Red Delicious seeds in your backyard, you wouldn't get Red Delicious apples, not that you'd want to, but more on that later.  Boy, what a tease.  Instead, planting and breeding means matching a scion to a rootstock.  The scion is the fruiting part of the tree – most of what you actually see. The rootstock is everything that goes in the ground, as well as the first few inches of the trunk.  Buds from one variety are attached to the rootstock of another and they grow into a tree that will produce apples. But matching up the scion and rootstock isn't enough to grow good apples. You also need a tree to act as a pollinator.  “If you don't have good pollination, you can end up with misshapen or small unattractive fruit,” says Jim McFerson, director of the Wenatchee extension. Up to ten percent of an orchard can be pollinators, and most today are crabapple trees.  Apple trees cannot normally pollinate themselves.  Unlike, say, peaches, which can and do self-pollinate, predictably producing peaches virtually identical to the parents, the viable seeds (or pips) will produce apples which don't resemble the parents.  This requirement for pollination is how there have come to be so many varieties in the world, at least 20k and that's a conservative estimate.   For context, there are only two varieties of commercial banana and just one kiwifruit.    Grafting was an established way of propagating apples and was commonly done in New England, so why didn't Chapman do that?  Apart from the fact that it's easier to travel with just seeds and planting is faster than graftering, as a member of the Swedenborgian Church, Chapman was forbidden from cutting two trees to cobble together a new tree and it was thought to make the plants suffer.  John “Johnny Appleseed” Chapman died in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1845, having planted apple trees as far west as Illinois or Iowa.   A century later, in 1948, Disney solidified his legend with an animated version of his life.  The cartoon emphasized his Christian faith, but conveniently left out all the Swedenborgian stuff. MIDROLL Speaking of varieties, as well we might, what would you guess the most popular apple variety has been for the past, say, 70 years?  The apple whose name is half-lying but unfortunately it's lying about the important half, the Red Delicious.  They are the most iconic apple across most of the world.  Don't believe me, just check emoji packs in other countries.  Their appearance is the whole reason these apples exist, with their deep, even red color and dimpled bottom that look so enticing in the produce department; it's also the reason they suck and are terrible.  They taste of wet cardboard and have the mouthfeel of resentment.  Their flavor and texture were sacrificed for botanical vanity and shippability.   Even apple growers hate them.  Mike Beck, who tends 80 acres of apples at Uncle John's Cider Mill, admits he grows some Red Delicious to add color to some of his ciders, but he won't eat them.    The Red Delicious was first called the Hawkeye, and one Jesse Hiatt found it growing as a random sapling on his Iowa farm around 1870.  The fruit that eventual tree produced was sweet and fruity, but it wasn't red, rather red and yellow-striped, like an heirloom tomato.  Of course, back then, those were just called tomatoes.   It was introduced to the market in 1874 and the rights to the Hawkeye apple were sold to the Stark Brothers Nursery, whose owner thought it was the best apple he'd ever tasted.  By 1914, Stark's renamed the variety Red Delicious, and over time, produced a fruit with less yellow and more red year over year.  It also gained its buxom top-heavy shape and five little feet nubs on the bottom.   As with any product, it took a hefty shovelful of marketing for Red Delicious to gain a following, but gain it did.  Current estimates have Red Delicious being 90% of the apple crop at one point.  That point happened in the 1950s, thanks to that force of nature, changes in buying habits.  PreWWII, people would buy food right from the farm or at farmers markets, then the modern grocery store, with its cold storage, and the refrigerated truck courtesy of Frederick Jones.  Bigger stores need to move more product and a big pyramid of shiny, sports car red apples by the front window will really bring the punters in.  Growers could sell them to packers, who in turn sold them to those grocery store chains, which also fueled a change in their taste.  Orchardists bred and crossbreed the Red Delicious to get that perfect shape and color, uniformity and resilience to handling and shipping; they just left off tiny considerations, very minor concessions really, like taste and texture.   But there's change a-foot again.  People began to realize you can have an apple in your pack lunch or the big bowl at the fancy hotel reception desk that you'd actually want to eat.  Now we're all about those Sweet Tangos, Braseburns, and Honeycrips.  Unwilling or unable to admit defeat, however, the Red Delicious is still out there.  But like a lot of has-beens, its seeing more success abroad than at home, and they're exported to the western Pacific Rim, Mexico and parts of Europe.      Apart from random saplings popping up randomly, new varieties of apples take a lot of people a lot of time and effort, to say nothing of a robust research & development budget.  Take Washington State University Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, for example.  In 1981, now-retired horticulturist Bruce Barritt set out to create an apple bred for flavor and long storage instead of appearance, to compete with the Fuji from Japan and the Gala from New Zealand.  Like breeding animals, you start with two parents with known traits, then selectively breed for the ones you want over the course of several generations.  You have to have the patience of a Buddhist monk, since apple trees take four to five years to bear fruit and you know whether or not it worked.  Barritt needed that patience to eventually create the apple that actually made mainstream, even international, news in 2019 – the Cosmic Crisp.  These are no small potatoes, either.  There's probably a French language joke in there.  The marketing budget alone is $10 million.  A $10mil marketing budget….for an apple.     Cosmic Crisps are mostly a dark-ish red with yellowy speckles reminiscent of stars.  The website, did I mention it has its own website, says [commercial read] “The large, juicy apple has a remarkably firm and crisp texture. Some say it snaps when you bite into it!  The Cosmic Crisp® flavor profile is the perfect balance of sweet and tart, making it ideal for snacking, baking, cooking, juicing or any other way you like to enjoy apples.”  Hire me for voiceovers at moxielabouche.com for lightning-fast voiceovers because I was one time hit by lightning.   The first Cosmic Crisp seed began in 1997 with pollen from a Honeycrisp flower, applied by hand to the stigma of an Enterprise.  Racy stuff.  Honeycrisp as we know are lovely and Enterprise apples were known for disease-resistance and long storage life.  Storage life is important because an apple has to be as good in late spring as it was when it was picked in the fall, as most to all of the apples you buy are.  Yep, all apples are picked at once and sold for months to come.  Holding up in winter storage is one of malus domestica's best features.  If that bothers you on principle, though, don't look up harvesting oranges for juice – it's positively depressing.      After two years of greenhouse germination, the very first Cosmic Crisp trees were planted, and a few years later after that, fruit happened.  That was when, according to Barritt, the real work began.  He'd go through the orchard, randomly picking apples and taking a bite. “Most were terrible, but when I found one with good texture and flavor, I'd pick 10 or 20 of them. Then I put them in cold storage to see how they would hold up after a few months,” he told PopSci in 2018.  Barritt's team would compare the apples for crispness, acidity, firmness, how well it stored, and on and on anon, to determine which trees to cross with which and start the cycle all over again.  They weren't testing only Honeycrisp and Enterprise, but lots of crisp varieties – Honeycrisp is just the one that worked.  It took until 2017, a full 20 years after the first seeds went in the ground, for Cosmic Crisp trees to become available to growers, to say nothing of the fruit reaching the public.  The project actually outlived Barritt's participation, when he retired back in 2008 and turned everything over to WSU horticulture professor Kate Evans.   There's still the question of why, why spend literally hundreds of millions of dollars to create a new apple?  This wasn't about developing a product to sell and make money, it was about saving an entire region's industry.  The pacific northwest farmed Red Delicious apples like there was no tomorrow and in the 90's, tomorrow got real uncertain.  In the last three years of the decade, farmers lost around $760mil with fields full of fruit fewer and fewer folks wanted to fork over their funds for.  That was the problem that Barritt set out to solve.  They needed an apple that had it all - movie star good looks, full of flavor with a crunchy bit.  By the end of 2019, Washington farmers were growing 12,000 acres of Cosmic Crisp trees and there's talk of Cosmic Crisp's having a strong chance at taking over the market.   If you have a bit of land and want to grow your own Cosmic Crisp, you going to have to wait even longer than usual.  It's only available to grower in WA for the first ten years to give the growers an advantage.  Remember, you can't plant seeds and get a tree that gives you fruit like the one you ate to get the seeds.  Don't worry, just five more years.     But you can't, like, own a tree man.  I can but that's because I'm not a penniless hippie.  Sorry, Futurama moment, but the point still stands.  Because this is America and we've never seen a person, place, thing, or idea we didn't want to legally own and monetize.  We're talking about patents and before I go any further, do you have any idea what a pain it is to search for apple patents and *not get results about Apple the company.  According to the US Patent and Trademark Office, “a plant patent is granted …to an inventor … who has invented or discovered and asexually reproduced a distinct and new variety of plant, other than a tuber propagated plant or a plant found in an uncultivated state. The grant, which lasts for 20 years from the date of filing the application, protects the inventor's right to exclude others from asexually reproducing, selling, or using the plant so reproduced.”  So if you make a variety of plant that no one else has ever made, or at least no one has patented, you have ultra-dibs for 20 and no one else is supposed to breed, sell, or do anything else with plants of that variety.   Plant patents became a thing in the early 1930's, a fine time in American agriculture *sough*dustbowl*cough* first granted to Henry Bosenberg for a CLIMBING OR TRAILING ROSE (USPP1 P).  Since then, thousands of plant patents have been granted, and that includes apples.  Apples as intellectual property.  The beloved Honeycrisp was patented in the late 1980's by the University of Minnesota.  The Honeycrisp blossomed in popularity, pun allowed, among consumers, both grocery shoppers and growers.  Nurseries would sell the trees to anyone who called and ordered one, but since it was patented, buuuut growers would have to pay a royalty of one dollar per tree to the University of Minnesota until the patent has expired.  With an average size of 50 acres per orchard and 36 trees per acre, that only comes to $1800, which isn't too, too bad.  A much tighter rein was kept on University of Minnesota's patented MINNEISKA, which produces the SweeTango apple.  Only a small group of apple growers has been given license to grow this variety of apple and they have to pay royalties as well.  UM also has multiple trademarks registered, so anyone who tries to sell an apple under that name or a similar one may find themselves in court.  Now how about them apples?  Hey, at least I waited until the end. Sources: https://historicsites.nc.gov/all-sites/horne-creek-farm/southern-heritage-apple-orchard/apples/apple-history/origins-apples https://www.americanscientist.org/article/the-mysterious-origin-of-the-sweet-apple https://www.theorchardproject.org.uk/blog/where-do-apples-come-from/ https://www.britannica.com/story/was-johnny-appleseed-a-real-person https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/real-johnny-appleseed-brought-applesand-booze-american-frontier-180953263/ https://www.nwpb.org/2017/05/03/want-to-grow-an-apple-tree-dont-start-with-apple-seeds/ https://www.popsci.com/story/diy/cosmic-crisp-apple-guide/ https://www.huffpost.com/entry/red-delicious-apples-suck_n_5b630199e4b0b15abaa061af https://suiter.com/how-do-you-like-them-apples-enough-to-patent-them/ https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/04/30/526069512/paradise-lost-how-the-apple-became-the-forbidden-fruit https://www.businessinsider.com/cosmic-crisp-apple-washington-state-scientists-2020-11 https://suiter.com/how-do-you-like-them-apples-enough-to-patent-them/  

49ers Cutback
49ers War Room Ep. 1: Featuring John Chapman & Jason Aponte!

49ers Cutback

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 86:52


The 49ers Cutback brings you 49ers War Room!!! John Chapman of 49ers Rush Podcast, and 49ers Content Creator Jason Aponte join the 49ers Cutback for the VERY FIRST installment of 49ers War Room. Chat will decide who will begin the episode off as the General Manager for the 49ers. The GM will have final say on the pick, and everyone else will make the case. Who should the 49ers Draft and Why?!! Subscribe to John Chapman here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnChapman49ersRushPodcast 49ers Rush Road Trip Info here: https://www.49ersrushroadtrip.com/ Subscribe to Jason Aponte here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JasonAponte #49ersWarRoom #49erCutbackLive #TCC

LA Rams Up - An LA Rams Podcast
LA Rams Up: In the 3rd of our 3-part series, John Chapman, the host of the 49ersRush podcast, joins us to update Los Angeles Rams fans on what's going on with our rivals to the north

LA Rams Up - An LA Rams Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 35:51


In the 3rd of our 3-part series, John Chapman, the host of the 49ersRush podcast, joins us to update Los Angeles Rams fans on what's going on with our rivals to the north If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NH/NJ/NY/OR/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

Niners Nation: for San Francisco 49ers fans
Oh Hey There! Possible draft targets with John Chapman

Niners Nation: for San Francisco 49ers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 54:39


Leo Luna and Rob "Stats" Guerrera are joined by the 49ers Rush Podcast's John Chapman to break down some of the players that should be on the board for the 49ers when their picks come up. How the hell are people saying Frank Gore isn't a HoFer? (4:04) Leo's personal story about Frank Gore being a genuinely good guy (12:34) What positions should the 49ers target in this draft? (15:43) Who are realistic options to make the interior offensive line better? (19:44) Stats' personal Herm Edwards story (21:28) Why the 49ers might not go after an edge rusher in this draft (22:37) Will Shanahan/Lynch go best player available or draft for need? (28:48) What corners are the best fit for the 49ers? (30:47) Why the 49ers will probably take a WR this year and who fits best (39:13) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Krueg Show
Ep. 27: Larry Krueger & John Chapman have a dueling NFL mock draft and select 49ers draft picks

The Krueg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 51:47


Ep. 27: Larry Krueger & John Chapman have a dueling NFL mock draft and select 49ers draft picks. A former football coach, John Chapman hosts the popular 49er Rush Podcast, which offers “a film-based approach” to football analysis. Subscribe, follow, and tell a friend. Follow John Chapman on Twitter @JL_Chapman Follow Larry Krueger on Twitter @sportslarryk Subscribe to The Krueg Show on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/TheKruegShow

Hot Springs Village Inside Out
KVRE’s John “Chappy” Chapman

Hot Springs Village Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 35:34


  John Chapman moved to Hot Springs Village in 2006 with his wife Celinda. They've enjoyed having four generations of family members living in the Village for several years. John retired to the Village after a 36-year career in video production and sales. He started working at KVRE radio in Hot Springs Village, where he is still employed part-time. An avid cyclist, John enjoys riding on Village roads and trails, as well bike trails around Arkansas and other states. He occasionally rides with the informal Ageless Bikers Club and attends monthly meetings of the American History Club. "Chappy" is also the current Vice President of the Village Employees Benefit Fund, an organization whose mission is thanking Hot Springs Village employees for their hard work and dedication with "a financial tip."   • Join Our Free Email Newsletter • Subscribe To The Podcast Anyway You Want • Subscribe To Our YouTube Channel (click that bell icon, too) • Join Our Facebook Group • Tell Your Friends About Our Show! Thanks to our exclusive media partner, KVRE

The Krueg Show
Ep. 11: Larry Krueger & John Chapman talk 49ers defensive line, the loss of D.J. Jones in free agency, Jimmy G trade options, Trey Lance's future

The Krueg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 67:46


Ep. 11: Larry Krueger & John Chapman talk 49ers defensive line, the loss of D.J Jones in free agency, Jimmy Garoppolo trade options, Trey Lance's future and the 49ers outlook after the first round of free agency. Subscribe, follow, and tell a friend. Follow John Chapman of 49ers Rush Podcast on Twitter @JL_Chapman Follow Larry Krueger on Twitter @sportslarryk Subscribe to The Krueg Show on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/TheKruegShow

The Cohn Zohn
What Deshaun Watson Getting Cleared Of Criminal Charges Means For The 49ers

The Cohn Zohn

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 43:25


Grant Cohn and John Chapman discuss what Deshaun Watson getting cleared of criminal charges means for the San Francisco 49ers, plus much more.

National Day Calendar
March 11, 2022 - National Funeral Director And Mortician Awareness Day | National Johnny Appleseed Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 3:30


Welcome to March 11th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate the circle of life and the seeds of wisdom planted by one man. The Ancient Egyptians developed a system of mummification because they believed very strongly in the afterlife. According to their traditions, the spirit left the body after death. But it would come back shortly thereafter. So bodies had to be well preserved in order to give the spirit a place to come back to. Egyptians also placed their dearly departed in peaceful positions to appeal both to loved ones and the returning spirit. Several of these techniques are still used today, though they have evolved quite a bit over the years. On National Funeral Director & Mortician Recognition Day, we celebrate the people who help us complete the circle of life in a way that honors everyone. There's a theory that the apple was spread across Europe by bears. But here in the United States we give credit to a hero that is a folklore legend. For anyone who has ever eaten an apple from the orchard in Ashland County, Ohio, the story of Johnny Appleseed is all too real. In the years following the American Revolution, John Chapman was seen walking for miles from his Massachusetts home, planting apple seeds and tending orchards in states. He was welcome everywhere for his wisdom and pay it forward attitude. Though it's not actually known if he traveled with a pot on his head, his legacy of kindness can be sampled from a tree that stands to this day. On National Johnny Appleseed Day, take a bite of American folklore and spread kindness wherever you go. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pats Pulpit: for New England Patriots fans
Patriot Nation 156: Defensive prospects and a draft discussion with John Chapman

Pats Pulpit: for New England Patriots fans

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 58:59


The guys welcome John Chapman from The 49ers Rush Podcast on the show to discuss some targets for the Patriots in the early rounds of next months draft. They also discuss Jimmy G and the quarterback situation for the 49ers with Trey Lance. The guys also discuss the hot news around the league, with all the QB's being traded, and then the guys give you their prospects of the week, this week with a defensive focus. Follow us on Twitter! John: @JL_Chapman Spags: @Ryan_Spags Keagan: @KeaganStiefel Pat: @plane_pats Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Niner Nate's Nonsense
Niner Nate's Nonsense: Episode 27-The Great 49ers Season End Roundtable

Niner Nate's Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 257:17


On the final episode of Niner Nates Nonsense, Niner Nate sits down with Vinny Saglimbeni, Jessie Naylor or Last Second Sports, Brian Renick and the Denim Dungeon, Angie Martin or the 49 Karats Podcast, Rob Guerrera or Niners Nation, Vish Kumaran of Mondays with Vish, John Chapman of The 49ers Rush Podcast, David Liechty of All 49ers Si, Amin the Dream, B Amechi of 49x365, Jamal Armstrong of 9ER Talk with Jasper and Jamal, Brad Graham of The SF Niners and Javier Vega of the 4th and Gold Podcast to discuss the 2021 season and the future of the San Francisco 49ers --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nnnonsense/support

Ohio Mysteries
Ep. 165 - Who was Johnny Appleseed?

Ohio Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 32:01


In 1801, a man from New England - barefoot and with a cooking pot on his head - arrived in Ohio, planting apple trees to give sustenance to settlers who were coming to this wild frontier. John Chapman became known as the legendary Johnny Appleseed, but what do we really know about him? www.ohiomysteries.com feedback@ohiomysteries.com www.patreon.com/ohiomysteries www.twitter.com/mysteriesohio www.facebook.com/ohiomysteries Music: Paradise, by Damn the Witch Siren. Find more at https://www.damnthewitchsiren.com Audionautix- The Great Unknown The Great Phospher- Daniel Birch

Poetize the News
Scraping 2021 off your Sneaker

Poetize the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 21:33


Topics include a love affair with a soda can, whitewashing history, and parachuting dolphins. Poems by Kataalyst Alcindor, Molly Sroges, Heidi Williamson, J. Bradley, Juan Holmes, Brenda Moossy, Joanna Solfrian, and Deanna Starshine. Hosted by Deanna Starshine. Booth Announcer Jim Bratton. Music by What Army. First aired on KPSQ 97.3 in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Typewriter effect by Soundbible user TamSKP. Syndicated on Pacifica and podcast at https://www.poetize.xyz/ and on your podcast app. More by the poets: ~ Kataalyst Alcindor: https://www.oldgodsofappalachia.com ~ Molly Sroges: https://www.readingcircletemple.com/podcast ~ Heidi Williamson: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781780375229 ~ J. Bradley: https://whiskeytit.com/product/teenage-wasteland-an-american-love-story/ ~ Joanna Solfrian: https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/the-second-perfect-number-by-joanna-solfrian/ ~ Wednesday Night Poetry: https://www.facebook.com/WednesdayNightPoetry/ ~ Deanna Starshine: https://www.instagram.com/DeannaStarshine/ Big shoutout to our Patrons of the Week: ~ The Viking-blooded lover of math, music, and Universe Ása Jóhannesdóttir; ~ The quirky pun lover and computer network fixer John Chapman; and ~ The painstaking analyzer of galaxy spiral arms, Dr. Benjamin Davis. Thank you! We cannot do this without you. And thank you to all our Patreon supporters: ~ Stephen Smith ~ Brad Fortenberry ~ Zac Slade ~ Ása Jóhannesdóttir ~ Michael Karl Ritchie ~ Kevin W. Lyon ~ Burnetta Hinterture ~ Ezhno Martín ~ Ginny Masullo ~ Molly Sroges ~ Zac Powers ~ John Chapman ~ Ben Davis ~ Kristen Mack ~ Robert Millsop ~ Will Van Laningham ~ Kathleen Pierdon ~ Jasmine Stotts ~ Madeleine Applegate-Gross ~ Christy Pollock ~ Garrett Long ~ Rebecca Davis To receive poetry on poster paper delivered randomly to your home, visit https://www.patreon.com/m/Poetize.

Poetize the News
Scraping 2021 off your Sneaker

Poetize the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 21:34


Topics include a love affair with a soda can, whitewashing history, and parachuting dolphins. Poems by Kataalyst Alcindor, Molly Sroges, Heidi Williamson, J. Bradley, Juan Holmes, Brenda Moossy, Joanna Solfrian, and Deanna Starshine. Hosted by Deanna Starshine. Booth Announcer Jim Bratton. Music by What Army. First aired on KPSQ 97.3 in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Typewriter effect by Soundbible user TamSKP. Syndicated on Pacifica and podcast at https://www.poetize.xyz/ and on your podcast app. More by the poets: ~ Kataalyst Alcindor: https://www.oldgodsofappalachia.com ~ Molly Sroges: https://www.readingcircletemple.com/podcast ~ Heidi Williamson: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781780375229 ~ J. Bradley: https://whiskeytit.com/product/teenage-wasteland-an-american-love-story/ ~ Joanna Solfrian: https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/the-second-perfect-number-by-joanna-solfrian/ ~ Wednesday Night Poetry: https://www.facebook.com/WednesdayNightPoetry/ ~ Deanna Starshine: https://www.instagram.com/DeannaStarshine/ Big shoutout to our Patrons of the Week: ~ The Viking-blooded lover of math, music, and Universe Ása Jóhannesdóttir; ~ The quirky pun lover and computer network fixer John Chapman; and ~ The painstaking analyzer of galaxy spiral arms, Dr. Benjamin Davis. Thank you! We cannot do this without you. And thank you to all our Patreon supporters: ~ Stephen Smith ~ Brad Fortenberry ~ Zac Slade ~ Ása Jóhannesdóttir ~ Michael Karl Ritchie ~ Kevin W. Lyon ~ Burnetta Hinterture ~ Ezhno Martín ~ Ginny Masullo ~ Molly Sroges ~ Zac Powers ~ John Chapman ~ Ben Davis ~ Kristen Mack ~ Robert Millsop ~ Will Van Laningham ~ Kathleen Pierdon ~ Jasmine Stotts ~ Madeleine Applegate-Gross ~ Christy Pollock ~ Garrett Long ~ Rebecca Davis To receive poetry on poster paper delivered randomly to your home, visit https://www.patreon.com/m/Poetize.

GSMC Classics: Best Plays
GSMC Classics: Best Plays Episode 47: The Petrified Forest

GSMC Classics: Best Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 64:17


Hosted by John Chapman, Best Plays was an NBC Radio program that aired from 1952 - 1953. It featured some of the best plays of the time, including both dramatic and comedic offerings. GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

GSMC Classics: Best Plays
GSMC Classics: Best Plays Episode 46: Ethan Frome

GSMC Classics: Best Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 64:29


Hosted by John Chapman, Best Plays was an NBC Radio program that aired from 1952 - 1953. It featured some of the best plays of the time, including both dramatic and comedic offerings. GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

GSMC Classics: Best Plays
GSMC Classics: Best Plays Episode 45: Kiss the Boys Goodbye

GSMC Classics: Best Plays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 63:25


Hosted by John Chapman, Best Plays was an NBC Radio program that aired from 1952 - 1953. It featured some of the best plays of the time, including both dramatic and comedic offerings. GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

On the Rock's Politica
On Apples & Infrastructure

On the Rock's Politica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 66:38


In our episode 'On Apples & Infrastructure', co-host Bruce Chester brings to the OTRP table the story of our local hero, John Chapman, better known to all as Johnny Appleseed. A quintessential American story from the antebellum period. The boys then picked apart the bi-partisan infrastructure bill, passed into law on Monday, November 15 and signed same day by President Joe Biden. Scott & Bruce discussed what they like, what they don't like and how we might benefit or not depending on how the bill is utilized in the decade ahead.

The Sergio Rodriguez Show
Interview with John Chapman

The Sergio Rodriguez Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 25:58


John Chapman of the 49ers Rush Podcast joins Sergio to discuss the 49ers and the NFC West.

The Prather Point.  Uncensored, Unafraid, Outside the Box
AIR FORCE HERO JOHN CHAPMAN | ALONE AT DAWN

The Prather Point. Uncensored, Unafraid, Outside the Box

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 70:39


On Today's Prather Point...Lori Longfritz is the Gold Star Sister of John Chapman!John Chapman earned the Medal of Honor (posthumous)!His heroism above and beyond duty's call are the first ever recorded!Not SEALs, nor Delta, nor Green Berets are the most elite!AFSOC CCTs are First There!==============================DO YOU HAVE ENOUGH FOOD IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY? Jeffrey has teamed up with My Patriot Food Supply to give all prepared Americans access to long-lasting, high-quality, nutrition-rich food when you need it more.Get 25% off a 4-week supply when you visit PratherPrepSupply.com==============================When BIG TECH censors us, make sure we can stay connected.Please join our email list to get show alerts, breaking news and much more.We can all do something to help restore our fallen republic.Bag UpThe Faraday bags are up in the shop. I just held one up the other day and now they're selling off the shelves. And that is great because if you want to have any privacy, you're going to want to bag up. So you can actually talk without big brother listening in on you. (Remember the FBI agent, driving the two ISIS terrorists to Garland, Texas for the draw Mohamed contest. And then the cop shoots them both, and the FBI agent tries to flee!)Sign UpGet your head in the fight and understand what's going on. Sign up with Team America to create an action plan. The Faraday bags will come in real handy and I'll have more stuff to come in that regard. While patriots are not criminals or spies, you are going to have to learn to operate with Tradecraft and OPSEC, operational security, like criminals and spies, do.Hold the LineTo all who are standing up for Team America and Team Canada: You're starting to stand up and get together and figure this out. We will win this. It's not going to be easy. It's not going to be fun. It's going to require great sacrifice, but we will win this together.A secret told isn't.No communications are secure.All security is breachable.All codes are hackable. Concealment is not cover.All cover is temporary.All codes are breakable.Use a one-time pad. One time looking is not seen.Hearing is not listening.Moving is not action.Knowledge is not wisdom.Perseverance beats talent.Power is not force.Hope is not a plan.Plans are useless.Planning is invaluable.Training is essential.The most committed wins.Freedom is never given. It is earned, fought for, won, and taken.TAKE IT!

Nitty Gritty Niners Talk
"The City of Trey"

Nitty Gritty Niners Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 84:12


#TreyLance #49ers #NFL It's Trey Lance Day. OTA's have officially started the in the 49ers camp, it's all about the New Kid on The Block. Welcome to the City of Trey. Special Guest, John Chapman from the 49ers Rush Podcast, will be on to break down Trey Lance like he's never done before. Join WayneBreezie and Peachy as they bring another amazing show. Expect these two to get right down to the Nitty Gritty!

Under Centre Podcast
49ers & Colts Offseason Needs

Under Centre Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 64:06


In this week's episode we continue our offseason series looking at the San Francisco 49ers with John Chapman from the 49ers Rush Podcast and then the Indianapolis Colts with Cody Felger from the Bring the juice Podcast.

Read Stuff for Friends
John Chapman

Read Stuff for Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2021 2:06


by Mary Oliver in American Primitive

A Part Of Everything Podcast
Building an apparel brand with a positive message w/John Chapman (S1E3) | APOE Podcast

A Part Of Everything Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 46:22


This week we're joined by John Chapman, Co-Founder of Lawrence + Larimer. John discusses the never ending journey of being an entrepreneur. Lawrence + Larimer is a prominent apparel brand in Denver Colorado that continues to foster community development in the black community and inspires others to do the same in ways outside of clothing. Listen to his story, and the trials and tribulations of building a brand that transcends your typical streetwear story. Guest: John Chapman Instagram: @lawrenceandlarimer Website: www.lawrenceandlarimer.com Follow us on: https://www.apoepodcast.com/ Instagram - apartofeverythingpodcast https://www.instagram.com/apartofeverythingpodcast/?hl=en Apple podcast - A Part Of Everything Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-part-of-everything-podcast/id1541929835 Spotify - A Part Of Everything Podcast https://open.spotify.com/show/2ZYIS06l0gUgTxM9HoETdD Linkedin - A Part Of Everything Podcast https://www.linkedin.com/company/a-part-of-everything-podcast/about/ Podcast hosted by: Mike Mitchell - mikethecompass https://www.instagram.com/mikethecompass/?hl=en Jevon Taylor - @jevontaylor21 https://www.instagram.com/jevontaylor21/?hl=en Miguel - @migueliswriting https://www.instagram.com/migueliswriting/?hl=en Produced by: Shane - @Nativexshane https://www.instagram.com/nativexshane/?hl=en Music by www.epidemicsounds.com

Medal of Honor Podcast
Rerun: John Chapman

Medal of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2020 3:45


John Chapman, the first airman since Vietnam to be awarded the medal, earned his Medal of Honor during Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan.

Medal of Honor Podcast
John Chapman

Medal of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2020 3:45


John Chapman, the first airman since Vietnam to be awarded the medal, earned his Medal of Honor during Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan.