Podcasts about Nigeria

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Federal republic in West Africa

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  • Aug 15, 2022LATEST
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    Latest podcast episodes about Nigeria

    The More Sibyl Podcast
    나이지리아에서 캐나다로| The One With Lamide - From Nigeria to Canada and Other Stories: Episode 19 (2022)

    The More Sibyl Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 93:28


    The More Sibyl Podcast Presents: 나이지리아에서 캐나다로| The One With Lamide - From Nigeria to Canada and Other Stories: Episode 19 (2022)Hi everyone! Welcome to this episode. Today, I have a returning guest and a special one at that - Lamide! She was on the podcast some years ago. She is someone who, despite all she has been through, still chooses to be joyful. She is a dentist, entrepreneur, event planner, and newbie tech sis whom we met in Nigeria in medical school and are currently in different countries. She lives in Canada with her family, and it's been a good experience for her. How has she been settling in, making friends, building a reliable and supportive community, and her career? How was she able to move to Canada during the pandemic? How has she been dealing with loneliness, moving from a sociable environment to a more independent one? Or the type of loneliness that came from the pandemic? How did she deal with the step down moving from Nigeria to Canada? Lamide has been through a lot - losing her parents being the most painful of all, and she shared how she's been able to rise above everything and what keeps her going.

    Was jetzt?
    Ukraine-Spezial: "Von meinem alten Leben ist nichts mehr übrig"

    Was jetzt?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 39:05


    Seit etwa sechs Monaten führt Russland einen Angriffskrieg gegen die Ukraine. In dieser Sonderausgabe unseres Nachrichtenpodcasts "Was Jetzt?" kommen vier Menschen aus der Ukraine zu Wort, die in und mit dem Krieg leben müssen. Sie erzählen von ihren Erfahrungen an der Front, vom Kiewer Alltag und ihrer Suche nach einem neuen Leben. Timur ist Mitte 20 und hat bis zum Kriegsausbruch elektronische Musik produziert. Er hatte sich freiwillig als Soldat gemeldet, ist aber nach Monaten im Krieg müde und enttäuscht. Blossom ist für ihr Studium vor anderthalb Jahren aus Nigeria nach Kiew gezogen. Dieses Studium war Blossoms Weg zu einem Uniabschluss, doch jetzt scheint der kaum erreichbar. Sie berichtet von der Ungewissheit, ihr Studium fortsetzen zu können, warum sie Deutschland verlassen musste und wie sie auf ihrer Flucht immer wieder rassistische Anfeindungen erlebt hat. Dmytro erklärt, wie er sich an den Krieg gewöhnt hat und welche Momente plötzlich eine größere Bedeutung im Leben einnehmen. Er hat in den ersten Kriegswochen noch versucht, eine Lieferkette für Medikamente aufzubauen. Mittlerweile arbeitet er wieder als Filmemacher. Und schließlich Irina, eine pensionierte Buchhalterin. Sie erzählt von den früher belebten Plätzen in ihrer Heimatstadt, den Cafés und Parks in Kramatorsk. Aber das war einmal. Die Stadt liegt seit Monaten mitten im Kriegsgebiet. Ihre Nachbarinnen und Nachbarn sind geflohen, sie ist geblieben. Was hält Irina in ihrer Stadt? Timur, Dmytro und Blossom kennen sie bereits aus unserer ersten Sonderfolge, in der sie uns mit ihren Geschichten einen Einblick in die ersten dreieinhalb Wochen des Krieges gegeben haben. Timur, Dmytro und Blossom kennen sie bereits aus unserer ersten Sonderfolge, in der sie uns mit ihren Geschichten einen Einblick in die ersten dreieinhalb Wochen des Krieges gegeben haben. Moderation und Produktion: Constanze Kainz Redaktion: Pia Rauschenberger Mitarbeit: Elisabeth Bauer, Andrea Backhaus und Malcolm Ohanwe Fragen, Kritik, Anregungen? Sie erreichen uns unter wasjetzt@zeit.de Weitere Links zur Folge: Ukraine: Krieg in Europa (https://www.zeit.de/thema/krieg-in-ukraine) Krieg gegen die Ukraine: "Das ist meine War-Life-Balance" (https://www.zeit.de/politik/2022-03/russland-ukraine-krieg-flucht-nachrichtenpodcast)

    It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
    Russia's long played with U.S. racial politics. Brittney Griner is the latest example

    It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:47


    What does Brittney Griner's hypervisibility as a tall, queer, Black woman have to do with her 9-year sentence in a Russian prison? A lot, according to historian Kimberly St. Julian-Varnon, who studies race and Blackness in Russia. She chats with guest host Tracie Hunte about what Griner's detainment means for Black queer folks who travel and the antagonism surrounding the case.Then, Tracie talks about the big moment Nigerian pop culture is having in the U.S. She is joined by Nigerian American filmmaker and artist Amarachi Nwosu to discuss why this is happening now and how Nigeria's success might impact pop culture from other African nations. Plus, we play Who Said That! Tracie connects with NPR's B. A. Parker and Juana Summers to test their pop culture knowledge.You can follow us on Twitter @npritsbeenamin and email us at ibam@npr.org.

    Hella Black Podcast
    EP 131: Afrika Trip

    Hella Black Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 42:18


    On this episode of Hella Black we talk about our recent trip to Ghana, South Afrika, and Nigeria.. tap in!

    Canary Cry News Talk
    TRUMP AND DUMP

    Canary Cry News Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 201:38


    Canary Cry News Talk #520 - 08.10.2022 - Recorded Live to Tape! TRUMP AND DUMP - FBI Raid, AI Trumper, New World Warfare, Backdoor Breathing Podcast = T - 2:18 Timestamp by Jade Bouncerson HELLO, RUN DOWN HOOK 5:23 V / 3:05 P Called it: Marine general takes over Africa Command (AP) Sun Africa LLC - FL based company → Nigeria to Seek US EXIM Loan for Solar Project With Sun Africa (Bloomberg)   DAY/PERSONAL/EXEC 14:10 V / 11:52 P   FLIPPY UPDATE 29:27 V / 27:09 P ‘He Is Better Than Biden': Meta's New AI Chatbot Thinks Biden Stole Election (DailyCaller)   TRUMP 44:44 V / 42:26 P Background: FBI executes search warrant at Trump's Mar-a-Lago in doc investigation (CNN)  Latest: Trump pleads the fifth, NY attorney general (NY Times) Mole on the Trump Team, FBI informer (Newsweek) Next move will be assassination, says NY Police Commissioner (DailyCaller) → Judge who approved FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago once linked to Jeffrey Epstein (NY Post) → FL judge who approved FBI raid on Trump represented Jeffrey Epstein's employees (Fox News)   BREAK 1: TREASURE 1  1:20:04 V / 1:17:46 P   RUSSIA/UKRAINE 1:29:36 V / 1:27:18 P Russia suspends US inspections of its nuclear arsenal (France24)   CHINA 1:36:21 V / 1:34:03 P CNN, CNBC, AP Met With Chinese Communist Party Propagandists in July (National Pulse)   BREAK 2: TREASURE 2 1:53:40 V / 1:51:22 P   MONEY 2:05:37 V / 2:03:19 P Biden says ‘inflation' bill funds healthcare, ‘God knows what else' in bizarre speech (NY Post)  → Clip: Biden says inflation is down   HUNGRY 2:14:24 V / 2:12:06 P 3D-printing insects mixed with veges could help prevent food crisis (Interesting Engineering)    BREAK 3: TALENT 2:29:27 V / 2:27:09 P   BEAST SYSTEM 2:49:27 V / 2:47:09 P Humans could breathe out of buttholes like pigs, trials begins this year (Interesting Engineering)   BREAK 4: TIME 3:04:07 V / 3:01:49 P END   This Episode was Produced By:   EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Tom** The Sentinel**   Producers Dame Salty, MORV, Sir JC Knight of the Technosquatch, Runksmash, Puddin22, Sir LX Protocol V2, Gail M, Darrin S, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Veronica D, Sir Casey the Shield Knight   Audio Production Psalm40   Visual Art Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia David C   MICROFICTION Runksmash - Monitoring the comms traffic IRS Agent Brown hears the dark chants from the white desert; acting fast he sends an encrypted message to his higher ups, with a secret BCC to his favorite podcast, then he heads to the armory for his scary assault rifle.   The Sentinel - Round 3 complete. Round 4 done. The competitors have been thinned out. It's time for the semi-finals. Basil is in a one-on-one elimination match with an Alpha-Boi. They battle for points by performing tricks, completing laps, and winning the crowd by any means. Basil leaps in the air and does a 360 spin, sticks the landing, and accelerates to complete a speed lap. The judges award him 2 points. The Alpha-Boi attempts a similar move, but his ankle gives out as he lands, and he stumbles to the side of the rink. The crowd gasps. Basil sees his opportunity to strike. The Alpha-Boi is scrambling to recover. Basil skates by and grabs the Alpha-Boi. It looks like he's about to push off him to perform another trick. The audience watches with suspense. But instead, Basil pulls the Alpha-Boi beside him and helps him get back to skating. The crowd lets out a big “Awww.” With kindness Basil secures his place in the finals. But the Alpha-Bois have different plans…   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin   TIMESTAPERS Jackie U, Jade Bouncerson, Christine C, Pocojoyo   SOCIAL MEDIA DOERS Dame MissG of the OV and deep rivers   LINKS HELP JAM ADDITIONAL STORIES NASA solves mystery of 'spaghetti' found on surface of Mars after wild theories spread (Mirror) US Space Force tests robot dogs to patrol Cape Canaveral (Space) REAL ROBOT ONE IS… REAL (Hackaday) Robot Arms Are Replacing Shelf Stockers in Japan's Stores (Yahoo) I Flirted With Meta's New Chatbot and Things Got Weird (Daily Beast) Republicans who blast FBI's Trump search prepping to snag Joe in a Hunter Biden probe (Politico)  Liz Cheney's Husband Is Partner At Law Firm Representing Hunter Biden (Federalist)  Zelensky calls on West to ban all Russian travelers (WaPo) U.S. to send Ukraine $5.5 billion in new fiscal, military aid (Reuters) (Archive) → $1 Billion in Additional Security Assistance for Ukraine (US DoD) → New Ukraine military package is largest yet, Pentagon says (MSN / WaPo)

    The Drew Mariani Show
    Christians in Nigeria / St. Philomena

    The Drew Mariani Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 51:05


    Hour 1 of The Drew Mariani Show on 8-11-22 Stephen Rasche shares some insight as to why persecution of Christians is ramping up in Nigeria Father Jason Kulczynski brings to life the story of Saint Philomena and the many miracles attributed to her

    Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

    Today on "Catholic Drive Time": Is the Pornhub Pornography Empire is Crumbling? Dawn Hawkins, the CEO of the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, joins us. AND The MASS Exodus From Public Schools... parents make difficult decisions about where to send their kids this year. ALSO – Tito Edwards – BigPulpit.com - Violence in Nigeria Over last weekend, all Senate Democrats voted against an amendment from Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) which affirmed that only women can have babies. Consumer Prices Rose 8.5% in July.... oh wait, did Biden just say it was 0% inflation? An elite women's educational institution in Nashville which was founded nearly 160 years ago may soon accept biological males in an effort to accommodate an "expanded and deepened" concept of gender. Join Email list! GRNonline.com/CDT GRN to 42828 What's Concerning Us – Mass Exodus from public schools The New York Times recently chronicled the trend: “In New York City, the nation's largest school district has lost some 50,000 students over the past two years. In Michigan, enrollment remains more than 50,000 below pre-pandemic levels from big cities to the rural Upper Peninsula. “In the suburbs of Orange County, California, where families have moved for generations to be part of the public school system, enrollment slid for the second consecutive year; statewide, more than a quarter-million public school students have dropped from California's rolls since 2019.” Guest Seg. Dawn Hawkins – CEO - National Center for Sexual Exploitation – Is the Pornhub Pornography Empire is Crumbling? Visa and Pornhub A mass exodus is underway at Pornhub's owner, MindGeek, as the CEO, COO, and a number of staffers (some reports say as many as 70% of employees) What victories? How big is Pornhub? Who are the victims? 2nd Guest Seg. Tito Edwards – BigPulpit.com - Nigeria's Elephant in the Room: Christians are Being Targeted in Widespread Violence Joe Social Media IG: @TheCatholicHack Twitter: @Catholic_Hack Facebook: Joe McClane YouTube: Joe McClane Adrian Social Media IG: @ffonze Twitter: @AdrianFonze Facebook: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Catholic Conversations Rudy Social Media IG: @ydursolrac Youtube: Glad Trad Podcast Visit our website to learn more about us, find a local GRN radio station, a schedule of our programming and so much more. http://grnonline.com/

    New Books in African Studies
    Blake Whitaker, "Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence" (UP of Kansas, 2022)

    New Books in African Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:03


    During the Cold War, the British government oversaw the transition to independence of dozens of colonies. Often the most challenging aspect of this transition was the creation of a national army from colonial forces. In Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence (University Press of Kansas, 2022), Dr. Blake Whitaker examines this process in Kenya and Zambia and how it set the course for the creation of the army in Zimbabwe. He also looks at three themes as they intersect in African military history: British decolonization, race relations, and the Cold War. While the transition to independence was a difficult process in places such as Ghana and Nigeria, it was compounded by the racial tensions in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. All three were settler colonies home to a sizable community of white Europeans who controlled the levers of power and economic prosperity. Built on the Ruins of Empire focuses on the difficulties that arose in creating a cohesive and apolitical military force in these racially charged Cold War environments and demonstrates that the challenges faced by the British training missions in Kenya and Zambia taught London important lessons about the emerging postcolonial world. Dr. Whitaker uniquely analyzes the successes and failures of the British military assistance programs and their quest to solidify British influence while examining how Britain's position and influence in the wider world was fading just as Zimbabwe was achieving independence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

    New Books Network
    Blake Whitaker, "Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence" (UP of Kansas, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:03


    During the Cold War, the British government oversaw the transition to independence of dozens of colonies. Often the most challenging aspect of this transition was the creation of a national army from colonial forces. In Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence (University Press of Kansas, 2022), Dr. Blake Whitaker examines this process in Kenya and Zambia and how it set the course for the creation of the army in Zimbabwe. He also looks at three themes as they intersect in African military history: British decolonization, race relations, and the Cold War. While the transition to independence was a difficult process in places such as Ghana and Nigeria, it was compounded by the racial tensions in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. All three were settler colonies home to a sizable community of white Europeans who controlled the levers of power and economic prosperity. Built on the Ruins of Empire focuses on the difficulties that arose in creating a cohesive and apolitical military force in these racially charged Cold War environments and demonstrates that the challenges faced by the British training missions in Kenya and Zambia taught London important lessons about the emerging postcolonial world. Dr. Whitaker uniquely analyzes the successes and failures of the British military assistance programs and their quest to solidify British influence while examining how Britain's position and influence in the wider world was fading just as Zimbabwe was achieving independence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in History
    Blake Whitaker, "Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence" (UP of Kansas, 2022)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:03


    During the Cold War, the British government oversaw the transition to independence of dozens of colonies. Often the most challenging aspect of this transition was the creation of a national army from colonial forces. In Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence (University Press of Kansas, 2022), Dr. Blake Whitaker examines this process in Kenya and Zambia and how it set the course for the creation of the army in Zimbabwe. He also looks at three themes as they intersect in African military history: British decolonization, race relations, and the Cold War. While the transition to independence was a difficult process in places such as Ghana and Nigeria, it was compounded by the racial tensions in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. All three were settler colonies home to a sizable community of white Europeans who controlled the levers of power and economic prosperity. Built on the Ruins of Empire focuses on the difficulties that arose in creating a cohesive and apolitical military force in these racially charged Cold War environments and demonstrates that the challenges faced by the British training missions in Kenya and Zambia taught London important lessons about the emerging postcolonial world. Dr. Whitaker uniquely analyzes the successes and failures of the British military assistance programs and their quest to solidify British influence while examining how Britain's position and influence in the wider world was fading just as Zimbabwe was achieving independence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    234 Essential
    Queer in Nigeria

    234 Essential

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 96:55


    Brand new episode of 234 with AOT2 and Ugochi. Dig in.For more information on all episode releases and additional information about the hosts, follow 234 Essential on Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to the 234 Essential newsletter here. You can also send fan mail to: fanmail@234essential.com to let Ugochi and Ayo know your burning thoughts and questions.

    Path to Well-Being in Law
    Path to Well-Being in Law - Episode 24: Kori Carew

    Path to Well-Being in Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 57:12


    CHRIS NEWBOLD: Hello, wellbeing friends. Welcome to the Path To Well-Being In Law Podcast, an initiative of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. As you know, my name is Chris Newbold. I serve as executive vice president of ALPS Malpractice Insurance. You know, our goal here on the podcast is to introduce you to thought leaders doing meaningful work in the wellbeing space within the legal profession, and in the process, build and nurture a national network of wellbeing advocates intent on creating a culture shift within the profession. As always, I am joined by my co-host, Bree Buchanan. Bree, how are you doing today? BREE BUCHANAN: I'm doing great, Chris. Great to be here. CHRIS: Good, good. As you all know, Bree is the president of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. Bree, we have some really exciting news to share about the institute and the journey that we're on to engineer this culture shift. Would you maybe give us a clue as to the breaking news that I think that we were so excited about? BREE: Nobody could be more excited than me because you said, you know, Bree is the board president. Well, up until this news, I had two jobs. I was the acting executive director, so I am just delighted to let people know we have hired our first full-time staff person and that is our inaugural executive director. Her name is Jennifer DiSanza. She comes to us with a whole host of experience in wellbeing issues and particularly with the law students. For many reasons, we wanted to bring Jennifer on board, but also strategically, we really realized that's where she's coming from is the future of our profession. And also, aside of where we know there's a lot of behavioral health distress and stress on the youngest members of our profession and the law students. So we're just thrilled to have Jennifer on board. CHRIS: Yeah. See, I had the privilege of serving with you Bree on the hiring committee. Boy, we have a dynamic leader now that will be working day-to-day to think about advancing wellbeing in our profession. You know, there's so much work to be done as you well know. We're actually planning on having Jennifer as our next podcast guest, which will be awesome to be able to just talk about the vision, why she's passionate about this work. It will also happen to be after the conclusion of some strategic planning that we as a board will be doing. So things are just really aligning well with both what has transpired, where we're going, and then focusing on what lies ahead in terms of some big issues that we have to tackle as we think about the wellbeing of lawyers and legal professionals in the profession. With that, today we're going to circle back to, we've spent considerable time in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion. You know, we had anticipated a three part series on this, but sometimes you extend an offer and you get somebody who's so awesome that you sit there and go, we have to expand this even further. Right? BREE: Along came Kori. Yeah. CHRIS: That's right. Along came Kori. And when Kori came along, we're like, okay, we're breaking the rules. We're totally bringing Kori into the mix. And so we were really excited to welcome Kori Carew to the podcast. Bree, would you be so kind to introduce Kori? And again, this is I know a podcast that we've been very excited and looking forward to. BREE: Absolutely. So Kori is a people inclusion strategist, an advocate, a speaker, a writer, a status quo disruptor. Got to love that. Child of God, wife and mother of two curly-haired, wise, energetic, fierce, spitfire daughters. Her family is multi-ethnic, multi-racial, multi-religious and spans multiple nationalities. She brings a fierce love of community and belonging that transcends differences to work, ministry and life. She loves to sing, cook, entertain, dance in the hallways at work, we need a video component of that, and read. Equipping leaders to be inclusive, to interrupt bias and disrupt the status quo. At her day job, she focuses on developing and implementing strategies for individual career and diversity and inclusion success, and helps organizations build bridges across differences and improve inclusion. BREE: When she's not working, she focuses her voice and talent on issues of gender equity and rights, inclusion, and human and civil rights, serving in her church and community, and cherishing her phenomenal tribe and community. She's energized by helping people live their very best lives. Kori was the Director of Strategic Diversity Initiatives for seven years at Shook, Hardy. And then she came over to Seyfarth and is now the Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer there and oversees their really spectacular wellbeing program, Seyfarth Life, and a whole host of other initiatives we're going to hear about. So Kori, welcome to the podcast. CHRIS: Yay. KORI CAREW: Thank you. I appreciate you inviting me to be on this podcast and also very much the work that you are doing. This conversation of wellbeing for attorneys is such an important conversation. It's one that we probably started having too late, and it's one where diversity and inclusion, there's more work to be done than time. I'm super thankful for all that you do and all that you do to help our profession be better, so thank you very much. BREE: You bet. Kori, I'm going to start off. We ask all of our guests a variation of this question. What experiences in your life are drivers behind your passion for work around diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging and wellbeing? KORI: Thank you for that question. And of course, you're causing me to go down a bit of memory lane. You would think this is an easy question, but it actually is not. It's not as easy because it forces you to look in the rear view mirror and try to understand where the dots connected to where you are. Before I do that, I do want to make one small correction. Seyfarth Life is an incredible initiative at Seyfarth that I am super proud of and one of the things that energized me about joining the firm. It has a steering committee that leads it. It's four partners at the firm, all of whom have a connection to wellbeing and mindfulness. My department and my role actually does not oversee Seyfarth Life, but we do work very closely with them. Because as one of the founding members, Laura Maechtlen noted from the very beginning, there's that intersection between inclusion and diversity and belonging and wellbeing, and the two work very closely together. But my department does not oversee Seyfarth Life. So just wanted to make sure I give credit to the right people. BREE: Absolutely, give credit where it's due. KORI: You know, because they're awesome and they do great work. In fact, if I may brag on them, out of the steering committee members, one of them is the chair of the largest department in the firm and an executive committee member and co-chair of the national diversity and inclusion action team. Oh, wait a minute. No, that's not right. Three are office managing partners. They're part of this steering committee, this leadership group, because they actually practice wellbeing and mindfulness and meditation in their own personal lives and allow it to influence how they lead. So I know Seyfarth didn't pay me to do a promotion, but I felt like I needed to shout some guys out. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: Our talent team helps them quite a bit in terms of organizing programs and handling the administrative and logistic things. Okay. So to answer your question, what are the experiences? I often say this and it is true that when I look at my life in the rear view mirror, how I ended up where I am makes a lot more sense as I connect the dots in ways that I probably couldn't have foreseen. For example, I never intended to be a diversity and inclusion professional. I actually never intended to go to law school. I started my university career as an electrical engineering major. When I came to the U.S., I wanted to build planes. That was my thing. I wanted to be an aeronautical engineer. I wanted to build planes. I loved science. I could spend hours in the lab. One of the best gifts I ever got was a lab coat. My dad had a custom drawing board built for me when I was a teenager that I carried with me everywhere because technical drawing, engineering drawing was one of my top subjects. KORI: So a lot of things make sense in hindsight. I look at my family composition and my sisters and I were all born in different countries. We have different passports. We grew up in Nigeria, a country with over 300 different ethnic groups with different languages and traditions and customs, so there's that. My family is multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-national, multi-racial and there's just so much diversity there. You know, in the family tree, there's a granduncle that's a Methodist church bishop, and one that's an Imam. And my grandfather's father was a teacher, was a teacher of the Quran. And so all of that diversity is there in the family, but it probably influenced how my parents raised my sisters and I and how even through childhood, I was always the person who was connecting the dots between similarities between people. And today we would call that cultural fluency, this ability to recognize cultural differences and not judge them but just adapt to them and be able to say, okay, you know what? KORI: It looks to me like person A is looking through a lens that's different than person B, but they're looking at the same thing. So how can I get these two people to be on the same page? So there's that family dynamic. But another thing that happened when I was growing up that I do think influenced me quite a bit. I grew up in Nigeria. Most of my childhood, we had one military dictator after another. So I grew up with coos happening more often than I would prefer. There were times that things broke out into religious violence. You're talking about incidents where a few people are killed or a lot of people are killed and everything goes to standstill, everybody's on edge. You don't leave your home. When the students go on riots because they're protesting something and things get out of hand, you're turning off the lights in your home and sort of huddled together, trying to make sure that you stay together as a family until everything passes over. So that was also something that I grew up around and experiencing. KORI: And then my parents are from Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone is actually my home country. If you ask me where I'm from, I will tell you I was born in Canada, grew up in Nigeria, but I'm from Sierra Leone. Because in my culture, you're where your father's from. So my entire identity has always been that I am from Sierra Leone. In the '90s, Sierra Leone began to experience a very brutal civil war, which calling it a civil war is actually inaccurate. You have a bunch of people with weapons who terrorize the population for 11 years. And it's been one of the most brutal wars that the world has seen at least in recent times. And that impacted my family in the sense that we lost people, in the sense that I hadn't been back to Sierra Leone for a long time. And it kind of started with my mom not feeling it was safe enough for us to go and visit, with grandparents living on the run and being sick and dying and me not seeing them in a long time because of just this state of chaos. KORI: And all of this fueled how I ended up going to law school, wanting to do human rights work, wanting to be a human rights lawyer, feeling as if I learned so much about the American system and the role that the legal profession played in terms of maintaining democracy and freedom and wanting to multiply that. Right. But then I go to law school. I graduate. I fall in love with a boy who I actually started dating in college, and I ended up in Kansas City because I followed a boy. You know, career took a different turn, ended up being a defense lawyer. And then you fast forward to doing an evaluation and me going through a process of saying, okay, I've done a lot of the things I wanted to do. I've achieved a lot of the things I wanted to achieve. I wanted to try cases. I wanted to build this reputation. I wanted to be successful in A, B, C, D. KORI: And I started taking inventory of the things I was passionate about, the skills I developed, the experiences I had and where I was losing time. You know, where was I given my time in community? What were the things that I could lose myself doing in such deep flow that I don't even recognize that time has gone by? And that journey ended up leading me to inclusion and diversity work and I haven't turned back since. There's some aspects of the legal profession I miss. I miss trying cases. I miss solving problems for clients. It may sound like the weirdest thing, but boy, playing around with evidence, rules, and figuring out how to get things in or keep things out is a nerdy love of mine. And so those are just some of the experiences that I would say led me to this love for helping people build bridges and I'm empower people to succeed despite the challenges, and being able to create just a level of cultural fluency amongst groups of people so that we understand how much better we are together as opposed to isolated from one another. So that's a long answer. BREE: Well, what an amazing life you've had to date and an incredible background that informs your work at a depth that I know Chris and I can't even begin to imagine. CHRIS: For sure. Kori, how long have you been more squarely centered on the inclusion and diversity side of things? KORI: I have been for 11 years now full-time diversity. What I realized, you know, somebody asked me a question similar to this, how long have you been doing diversity work, which is different from what I usually hear. I actually did the inventory and realized that, you know, 29 years ago, when I first came to the U.S., that was when I actually started doing presentations. At the time, we called them multiculturalism. We started doing presentations on bridging differences, on being able to understand different cultures and how you navigate it. And so I've been actually teaching on diversity, inclusion, cultural fluency leadership topics now for 29, 30 years. But it being my full-time job, that happened when I left litigation and moved over to Shook, Hardy & Bacon. CHRIS: Okay. I think a good point to maybe start the conversation is, you know, again, your perspective is so unique and informed. For diverse members of the profession, can you talk to our listeners about some of the more challenging aspects of the last couple of years? KORI: Yeah. So the last couple of years have been tough for everyone. This pandemic, it's been brutal and it's impacted us in so many different ways. We've lost our sense of certainty to the extent that we didn't had any. We've lost our ability to have some kind of predictability, something that is a core need, a core need for many of us. Well, not for many of us, for everyone. It's actually a core human need. And so we've been sort of thrown into this whirlwind of uncertainty with no deadline, right? We went from thinking, well, I'll speak for myself. You know, since I'm not a scientist, I foolishly thought, well, maybe in two weeks I'll go back to the office. And then it was a month. And then I thought six weeks. And then I thought for sure by summer 2020 we'd be able to go out and about and things would be quasi under control. And here we are, you know, some 28, 29 months later and we still have COVID. I'm sick right now recovering from COVID after avoiding it for almost 30 months, I get it. KORI: So you have that benchmark that is impacting everyone and the uncertainty that we've seen with everything going on around us. But as with everything, I think people from historically underrepresented and marginalized groups, what happens is the things that... There's this saying that the things, and I'm going to probably say it wrong. And it may be an African American saying, but it's this thing that what gives some people a cold will give others the flu. And so what you've seen then is populations that have been historically marginalized and underrepresented and haven't had access to full equity, had been impacted very differently by the same storm that we're all in. So we're all in the same storm, but we're not in the same boat. We're experiencing it differently. So communities of color, we know got hit by COVID much harder. KORI: And you have that intersection between race, between housing inequity, between education inequity, between healthcare inequity and healthcare access, all of those things coming together to adversely impact some groups more. So if you are someone who is Brown or Black, or from one of these historically marginalized communities, and you are going to work during the pandemic, or you're working from home, you are more likely to have family members who have been directly impacted by COVID, right? You are more likely to have lost family members. You also, generally speaking are more likely to be in a position where you are in an extended family situation where you are responsible for more people than just yourself. You know, one of the things that we know, for example, that impacts generational wealth is that those of us from communities of color oftentimes are responsible not just for ourselves, but for extended family members. KORI: So you have that dynamic playing, then you have the racial pandemic, which has been going on, but in the last two years have come to fevered pitch. And so the daily trauma of dealing with racism and microaggressions then gets compounded by all the incidents, George Floyd, Charles Cooper, and all the other incidents that have been bombarding us from our television screens, from the news reports, from articles. And so now all of a sudden everything is right in your face and you're dealing with all of it at the same time. And so those are some of the things that are professionals from "diverse communities," from underrepresented marginalized communities have been dealing with. And our reserves have been tapped into and overstretched to where for some of us, it feels like it's been just too much. BREE: Absolutely. It's unimaginable just how much to carry on in that space. All of the things that you just described, this litany of horrors is on top of just the day-to-day difficulty as been expressed to me, and reading in my friends of people of color, just the microaggressions and just how hard it is. Just take away pandemic and everything else and the racial reckoning, how hard it can be just to get through the day. I can't even imagine. It is absolutely just too, too much. Kori, there's so much to unpack here. I wanted to kind of pushing us along here talking about diversity, equity, and inclusion and talking about belonging and overlaying that. I mean, when I started looking in the legal profession, we talk about DEI, it was diversity then DEI, and now we're getting into some of the really, to me, needy and interesting stuff around belonging. I know that you created a belonging project at Seyfarth. Could you talk to us about the importance of that, and also about this project that you got started at Seyfarth? KORI: Sure. Let me separate them out. Belonging is a conversation that more and more of us are having, and it is fairly new to the conversation when you're talking about diversity and inclusion. It started with we talked about diversity, and then we started talking about diversity and inclusion, and now we've included equity and belonging. Belonging goes to that sense, that feeling that each of us have when we belong and we feel like we are part of a group and that we belong to something that is bigger than us. It is also a core human need. Brené Brown has this phrase that she says that we have three irreducible needs, and they are to be loved, to connect, and to belong. What we know from the research is that when we don't have belonging, it impacts us. It is wired into our DNA to belong to something. KORI: So we will either have healthy belonging, or we will seek a belonging that may not be healthy and may not be good. This is where you can queue in hate groups and cult because they will do anything to belong. We will also conform to fit in so that we have a quasi sense of belonging. The problem though is that when we don't have belonging, we actually see physiological, physical, spiritual, mental, psychological impact on our wellbeing. It impacts our sense of health. Forget our sense of health. It actually impacts our health, right? We know that exclusion and the lack of belonging actually results in increased depression, increased high blood pressure, increased diabetes. Incidentally, a lot of the same things that racial trauma and microaggressions also causes on the human body. And so if we don't have that sense of belonging, then we are not able to actually actualize that sense of inclusion where everyone is able to be leveraged and their differences and their strengths leveraged so that they can succeed as they want to succeed. KORI: And without belonging, you don't get wellbeing. But conversely, without wellbeing, you can't cultivate that sense of belonging. And so those two things are intertwined as well as this concept of engagement, which also is in the mix, right? You can't create engagement unless you have social connection and belonging. And so all of these things come together. Unfortunately, in many of our organizations, they're treated as separate, right? In many organizations, you have the wellbeing function being managed in a way that it doesn't speak to diversity, doesn't speak to belonging at all. So imagine now we just talked about COVID and we talked about how COVID has impacted everyone. Then imagine you're developing a wellness initiative or a wellbeing initiative and you're not stopping to think, oh, wait a minute, because of diversity, this pandemic has impacted people in different ways. KORI: And so I can't just trot out a wellbeing program without factoring in diversity and how diversity has resulted in different people experiencing this pandemic differently. Similarly, we fail when we try to, for example, have a wellbeing initiative that doesn't stop and think, oh, wow, we're not talking about racial trauma. We're not talking about microaggressions. We're not talking about the impact of implicit bias and exclusion on the psychological and physical wellbeing of the people in our organization. And so what's happening is these concepts are tied together, but in our organizations and most of our organizations, we're not doing DEI and incorporating wellbeing and we're not doing wellbeing incorporating DEIB. Instead, we're acting as if they're completely separate and they're not. CHRIS: I mean, I think it goes without saying, we, I think as human beings, sometimes we compartmentalize of there's this and then there's that. I think that from the infancy of the institute, I think we've emphasized the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion as part of, has to flow through everything, every lens that we look at from the wellbeing perspective. But I have to admit, it's been more challenging than I think, than we've appreciated because sometimes we look a little bit myopically at some of these issues without broadening our lens. That's the perspective that I think that you can bring our listeners that, again, this intersection of diversity, equity, inclusion, belonging with wellbeing, I guess I'd be curious on just, how can we merge? Right? Because again, even the fact that there's organizations that work over here and organizations that work over here, and we really should be just the coalition and the umbrella and the totality of how it all works together is something that I don't know that we appreciate the magnitude of. KORI: Well, and the only way we can appreciate the magnitude is if we have these honest conversations. But we also have to have the conversations around the structural and the cultural underpinnings, right? How do we have conversations about wellbeing that take into consideration differences? That take into consideration, okay, we're telling people, hey, we have therapy or we have EAP, or we have whatever the organization offers. But how do you do that and also acknowledge that for some communities that there is a stigma around maybe going to a therapist? How do you have that conversation with those communities? Or that racial bias and racial aggressions are having an impact on people, but you have an entire generation of Black people, for example, who have survived by plowing through all the challenges that the world has put in front of us. And to sit down and talk about the way in which racism has impacted us is asking us to put our shields down, which means opening up ourselves to attack, which means possibly being accused of playing the race card. Right? KORI: All of things that you may have grown up in a time where we just didn't talk about that in mixed company, we only talked about that with each other. And so there are all these layers, all these layers. I recently listened to a friend of mine, Ratu Basin, and she was talking about how it feels for her as someone of Indian heritage to see how much yoga, for example, has been whitewashed. There's so many conversations to be had even in the wellbeing space, even when we're talking to people about things like self-care. Well, what are you recommending? Because some of the things we tell people to do for self-care, go get a massage, who can afford that? What culture support that kind of self-care? And is that really self-care or is that treating a symptom? Should self-care and wellbeing be about a way of life and a way of working such that we don't need these emergency [inaudible 00:32:26] like solutions to fix the symptoms, right? KORI: And that's the big conversation and that's the conversation I'm hearing some lawyers begin to ask where they say, the organization says they care about wellbeing, but we're getting these other messages that say it's productivity and hours and billables that matter, right? How do we shift the culture and how we're embracing these topics in a way that makes it more meaningful? I just realized, I didn't even answer your second question about the belonging project, but yeah, this is the stuff that to me, I see a lot of potential for us to have really good conversations that can lead to solutions that are more inclusive of a diverse profession. BREE: Kori, you're clearly such a thought leader and a visionary in this space. Can you talk a little bit about how do we get change to occur in a profession, the legal profession that is so reluctant to change? Even more so than general society. Where do you see the bright points of really being able to make some change? KORI: Can you repeat that question? BREE: Yeah. Just about how do we get change to occur in the legal profession? You know, this is a profession that is just so stayed and slow and bound up in tradition. This is the way we do it, that sort of thing. And here you are with these fabulous ideas, working with a very large law firm, having come from another very large law firm so you're in this space. What are your ideas for actually getting real change to occur? Where are the pressure points, I guess? KORI: Well, I think some of the pressure points are actually external. You asked me a question earlier about the last two years, something that I didn't mention that has impacted a lot. It's impacting individuals from underrepresented groups, but it's also impacting our organizations. Is this fake cultural war that is also going on, you know, regardless of what political party you're in, I think we can acknowledge that for the last six years, there has been an attack on everything that we are trying to accomplish in diversity and inclusion. White is now Black, Black is now white. And if we are in a state of being, for example, where I'll use Florida as an example where someone can say, we want to ban any training if it makes someone uncomfortable. What you're essentially saying is let's keep the status quo the way it is, even if the status quo supports white supremacy. KORI: Even if the status quo is inequitable. You would rather keep the status quo than have an uncomfortable conversation. When it comes to the legal profession, in particular, law firms, because of how we are constructed. A law firm essentially has multiple owners. It's not like a corporation that has a board of directors and has shareholders. Let's say you have a law firm of a thousand people and 300 of them are partners. You have 300 people running around who think that everybody should have an equal say in every single decision. It's one of the reasons that law firms function so differently from other companies and why decision making is so different. Everything we do is different. You know, we put people in leadership positions not because they're leaders, but because they're great trial attorneys or they're great business generators or whatever, whatever the criteria is, but rarely is it because someone actually is a good leader. KORI: And so we have this culture that we have built that really makes it difficult for us to have real hard conversations on the things that really matter, on the things that really can make change. So imagine that law firm now sitting in the last six years and even more so in the last three years. I can tell you when it comes to diversity, inclusion, many of us are throwing our hands up and saying, so how in the hell are we supposed to have this conversation then? If you're saying, oh, we can't talk about white privilege because someone says, oh, that offends me. Or we can't talk about systemic racism because someone's going to say, oh, wait a minute, if you say systemic racism is real, then that's anti-American. So we are living in a time where the terms racism, the terms CRT have been completely redefined to where they mean nothing that even resembles what they actually mean. KORI: And then we're over here arguing about these fictitious decisions, these fictitious definitions, and we're not actually doing the hard work that needs to be done, right. Because if you won't even acknowledge that systemic racism is real, then how do we evaluate the systems to see where we may be having inequitable results and then changing those systems? Because if you deny a thing exists, then we can't even address it. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: And so that's probably one of the biggest challenges I see, but also the biggest opportunity. And if anything is going to change when it comes to diversity, we have got to get more courageous about having difficult conversations, but conversations that are worthwhile, they are important. Nothing about creating equity is comfortable and cozy and touchy-feely, it's hard work. It requires us to say some things that we maybe may not have faced before, but we don't get to change what we won't face, what we won't acknowledge, and what we won't be honest about. It's like, you can't write a new end into the story if you won't acknowledge the truth of the story. That's the whirlwind that I think we are in now, not just as a profession, but as a country and a society. BREE: Absolutely. What an incredibly difficult place to be? Yeah, go ahead, Chris. CHRIS: Well, I was just going to say, I want to unpack that more. Let's do this. Let's take a quick break and come back because I mean, my burning question and Kori began to sort of thinking about it, which is what's the pathway to better, more productive, honest conversations, right? Because I think that you're right. The question is, how do we create the environments for ultimately that societal discussion to occur in the most productive way? So let's take a quick break and we'll come right back. — ADVERTISEMENT: Meet VERA, your firm's Virtual Ethics Risk Assessment Guide developed by ALPS. VERA's purpose is to help you uncover risk management blind spots from client intake to calendaring, to cybersecurity, and more. VERA: I require only your honest input to my short series of questions. I will offer you a summary of recommendations to provide course corrections if needed, and to keep your firm on the right path. Generous and discreet, VERA is a free and anonymous risk management guide from ALPS to help firms like yours be their best. Visit VERA at alpsinsurance.com/vera.   — CHRIS: Okay. We are back with Kori Carew, our esteemed guests and the chief inclusion and diversity officer at Seyfarth Shaw. Kori, we were just getting into the, I think the discussion. I feel like we're going deeper than even I had thought we would in the conversation, which I love. You know, as we think now about we need to have the honest conversations, right. And so I would just be curious on your opinion as what's the pathway to get there. If we appreciate that there's a lot of noise and the volume levels are high, and there's a lot of yelling, frankly, on both sides of the equation. What's the pathway toward problem solving, thoughtful discussion, intentional discussion that ultimately advances the dialogue? KORI: Thank you very much for that question. Honestly, it's one I've been thinking a lot about. You know, I did do a TEDx in 2017 and the impetus for that TED really was that question that you just asked, which was, there's a lot of yelling and not enough dialogue that allows us to move into action. Since I gave that TED, I've sort of watched what's been going on in organizations and in the country. I don't think I would change anything about that TED, except that there are a few more things that I would emphasize. One of the first things that we have to do if we truly want to make progress, and I'm going to steal a Nigerian thing, tell the truth and shame the devil. We are avoiding being honest with ourself about so many things. Whether it is just being honest about the experiences people have in the organization, or being honest about where the gaps are, or being honest about what the failures are, or even individual honesty. KORI: That self-awareness to say, you know Kori, you talk a lot about wellbeing and you talk a lot about leadership, but the reason you talk about those things is because you were searching for something that you did not have in the leaders that you grew up under, right? So you were trying to create something for others that you didn't have, but you are also trying to create it for yourself. And there are many days that you totally suck. There are many days that you are making very bad wellbeing decisions. There are days that you are not as inclusive as you would want to be, but it's okay. And the only way you're going to get better is by acknowledging where you're not doing it right. Now, think about that when we're talking about gender or race or LGBT inclusion or disability inclusion. If we as individuals and we as organizations are not willing to be honest about our history, what has happened and what is happening, then we don't even have a starting point. KORI: And the way that we do that is very, very cliché. Getting comfortable with what is uncomfortable. I remember when I first started saying that, when I was at Shook, Hardy & Bacon and it wasn't even a thing many people were saying, and now people say it so often that it has lost its meaning. But it truly is the beginning point. And in too many of our organizations, we are shutting down any discussion or any movement in the name of trying to get consensus, or in trying to water things so much that they're meaningless, right? Or being so hyperworried about future possible hypothetical litigation that somebody may have over something that they don't like that they heard as opposed to possible litigation over people who do not feel like they are being treated equitably. You know, it's like we have to choose our heart. And so it's either the heart of sitting in the discomfort and learning things we may not want to learn, challenging ourselves, reaching deep to say, you know what? I don't really like that. KORI: When you talk to me about Christian privilege, this is a true story. Okay. True story. A [inaudible 00:46:22] of mine talked about Christian privilege. We're talking about something. She said, "Yeah, but there's also Christian privilege and people never talk about that." And can I admit to you that I was like, "Oh, is she for real? We're talking about racism and she's talking about Christian privilege." That was my initial reaction. But I sat with it. You know what? She was right. Because she was Pagan and I'm Christian. I've never had to use PTO for Christmas. My holidays are respected, they are recognized, they are centered, they are prioritized. But other people in this country who are not Christian do not have those privileges. Now that's a benign example because it's not one that makes people get as upset as some of the other topics. KORI: But the first step has to be a commitment to sit through the discomfort, sit through what may rub you wrong, and acknowledge that just because something is uncomfortable or just because something offends you does not mean the thing is wrong or it is offensive. And in many of our organizations, we haven't even gotten past that first part. Then the next part has to be a commitment to learn more. We have to operationalize being able to say to each other, tell me more, and not just, oh, I didn't like that training, or I didn't like what I was learning. But to say to yourself internally, okay, I didn't like that. But rather than projecting how I'm feeling it in this moment, I'm going to put myself in the position of saying, tell me more, help me understand why that bothered you, help me understand why you feel that way. Because until we're willing to do that, we're not going to learn. KORI: And without knowledge, we have no opportunity for growth. Growth comes with new knowledge. Growth comes with practicing new skill sets. Growth comes with trying things that you haven't done before. But if you're more invested in protecting the status quo than you are fighting for change, then the status quo will always win. And the status quo right now, it's not working for a lot of people from a lot of underrepresented and marginalized communities. Those are some of the things that have to happen. Oh, Chris, something else I want to add. Both sides. We got to talk about this both sides thing. Not every opinion and argument is equal, and that's something else that we're not willing to address head on. We've allowed inclusion to be so redefined that some people think it means anything and everything is of equal footing, right. KORI: But someone saying in the workplace, we need to be more inclusive of people with disabilities is not the same as someone saying, I don't think disabled people should have to work here. And sometimes what is crouching in is people want to hide behind inclusion to spew hate or bigotry or an excuse not to make the change and growth that is consistent with the so-called values of our organizations. I'll pause there because you're about [inaudible 00:50:05]. BREE: Yeah. I just want to comment to our listeners Kori's TED Talk, just in your browser, put in Kori Carew and TED Talk. I really encourage people to check it out. It is powerful and profound. So Kori, I'm going to ask you a question here that we also tend to ask this sometimes near the end, if you could look for, I don't know, five years or even a decade. If we can do a decent job around changing hearts and minds and attitudes around diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging and wellbeing too, hopefully, how would the profession be different? What do you want to see? KORI: My goodness, my goodness, my goodness. Excuse me. That cough came up. If we could actually accomplish all these things that we've been talking about for 20 years, we would see leadership teams that are more humble in their approach, leadership teams that are people-centric, organizations that are listening to employees and actually care about what employees want. We would no longer be having conversations as if it's either you focus on the bottom line or you focus on employee happiness. Like we will understand that without happy employees who are engaged and doing fulfilling and meaningful work, we actually don't have a great bottom line to talk about. Right? Our organizations would look like inclusion and wellbeing and belonging, it's just part of the business strategy. It's not this separate siloed thing. It's not this thing that we talk about when we are worried about how the woman or the gays may react. Right. KORI: But it's just something that is operationalized into our values, into our competencies, into how we evaluate people, into how we promote people, and that we are constantly in humility, learning from each other. Right. So that even when somebody who's a chief inclusion and diversity officer, here's a phrase and someone says, "Did you realize that that was ableist?" That I would say, "I didn't. Tell me more." And once you tell me more, I changed my language, because we understand that we're always going to be moving. We're always going to be learning something new and there's always an opportunity to be better. And if we do that, we will also see different representation at all levels. We will actually have critical mass of diversity in our organizations. And then I would be unemployed. CHRIS: I was going to wrap up with this though, Kori, like if I was to serve up to you 500 managing partners, that were, again, I think one of the things that you've already mentioned is every individual in an organization is either additive or perhaps distracts from the culture that you're ultimately trying to create. A lot of the wellbeing discussion is about connecting and emphasizing wellbeing with decision makers and those who set the tone of organizations. And so my question to you is this, if I served up 500 managing partners of all sizes of firms around the country and they came and Kori was the keynote, what would be your message to them? KORI: My message to them would be that they are ridiculously in charge, that things happen in their organizations because they allow it, or they create it. And that by choosing to focus a hundred percent on their inclusive leadership skills and up in their ability to interrupt bias, to be culturally fluent, they could transform their organizations because where the leader goes, everyone else follows. BREE: Right. CHRIS: That's great. That's awesome. Well, again, Kori, you have certainly cultivated my curiosity, which I know is one of the things that you strongly advocate for. Couldn't be prouder to have you on the podcast and the sharing of your perspective. We got to get you more platforms for you to be able to shout loudly about these particular issues, because again, we got a lot of work to do, right. We know that there's a lot to be done in terms of realizing the potential of this profession, to realizing the potential of historically underrepresented and marginalized lawyers within our profession. Bree, I think that we all would agree that even as we pursue our wellbeing mission, that so much more has to be done on the diversity, equity, and inclusion perspective that integrates in the intersection there between those two that lanes need to merge in a much more substantive way. KORI: Thank you. CHRIS: Thank you, Kori. KORI: I appreciate it. I appreciate you having me. I appreciate you allowing Justin to come and hold my hand because she's my blinky today. I appreciate you inviting us to talk about what we're doing at Seyfarth and just my perspective as an individual separate from Seyfarth. Again, I've said this before, the work you're doing is so critically important. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for everything that you do to promote wellbeing in the profession. So important. CHRIS: Awesome. Well, again, thanks for joining us. We will be back with the podcast probably in a couple weeks with our executive director, Jennifer DiSanza, which we are so excited to be having her join us as we talk about the future of where this movement is going. Thanks again, Kori. And to all our friends out there, we will be back in a couple weeks.

    Fault Lines
    Breaking Chains: How the United States Tackles Religious Persecution Abroad

    Fault Lines

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 29:23


    This week, we take a deep dive into the “hot spots” in the world for religious persecution including Nigeria, Burma and Saudi Arabia. Ambassador Samuel Brownback served as the Ambassador-at-large for International Religious Freedom at the U.S. State Department under the Trump Administration. Prior to his service as Ambassador, he served as a Congressman, Senator and Governor of the great state of Kansas. He has a unique perspective of how religious freedom directly relates to our nation's national security and we are thrilled to have him provide his insights on how religious persecution is often a key ingredient to global repression. He discusses how freedom of religion plays into U.S. foreign policy. What mechanisms does the U.S. government have at its disposal to curb religious persecution? What is the impact on U.S. bilateral relations with states who allow don't allow freedom of religion within their borders? How does advocating for this fundamental human right impact our national security? This episode contains descriptions of graphic violence that some listeners may find disturbing. Listener discretion is advised. Like this episode? Be sure to rate, review, and subscribe. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Modern American Diplomacy
    Amb. Harry Thomas: Straight Talk on Crisis Management, Career Progression, at the Joys and Challenges of Diplomatic Service

    Modern American Diplomacy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 45:08


    As Director General of the Foreign Service and ambassador to three countries in three different bureaus (Philippines, Bangladesh, and Zimbabwe), and having served in DC leadership positions on the 7th floor and White House, Amb. Thomas saw U.S. diplomacy from multiple perspectives. He reflects on crisis management, leadership, and career progression. He talks about the blatant discrimination he encountered early in Peru and later in Zimbabwe, his adventures in rural Nigeria, and his time working for Sec. Rice and moments with Pres. Bush after 9/11 – all the while he conveys a sense of humor, dedication and determination. His thoughts on diversity and internal management are unvarnished, and his love for the Foreign Service is on full display.

    Walk With Me Podcast
    Follow Gods Direction- Judd Saul

    Walk With Me Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 8:00


    Mr. Judd Saul is a celebrated film producer and nonprofit President. He is the Executive Producer for Christian film that was released last fall called “Enemies within the Church”. He also is the President of a Christian Non-profit called Equipping the Persecuted, an organization that is committed to assisting persecuted local Christians in Nigeria. He lives in Iowa with his wife and 4 children. Mr. Judd Saul, along with Pastor Cary Gordon and famous anti-communist Trevor Loudon spent 3 years making this film because they saw a communist infiltration within the American Church and culture.     Website: https://enemieswithinthechurch.com/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnemiesWithinTheChurch  

    New Books in Military History
    Blake Whitaker, "Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence" (UP of Kansas, 2022)

    New Books in Military History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 79:03


    During the Cold War, the British government oversaw the transition to independence of dozens of colonies. Often the most challenging aspect of this transition was the creation of a national army from colonial forces. In Built on the Ruins of Empire: British Military Assistance and African Independence (University Press of Kansas, 2022), Dr. Blake Whitaker examines this process in Kenya and Zambia and how it set the course for the creation of the army in Zimbabwe. He also looks at three themes as they intersect in African military history: British decolonization, race relations, and the Cold War. While the transition to independence was a difficult process in places such as Ghana and Nigeria, it was compounded by the racial tensions in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. All three were settler colonies home to a sizable community of white Europeans who controlled the levers of power and economic prosperity. Built on the Ruins of Empire focuses on the difficulties that arose in creating a cohesive and apolitical military force in these racially charged Cold War environments and demonstrates that the challenges faced by the British training missions in Kenya and Zambia taught London important lessons about the emerging postcolonial world. Dr. Whitaker uniquely analyzes the successes and failures of the British military assistance programs and their quest to solidify British influence while examining how Britain's position and influence in the wider world was fading just as Zimbabwe was achieving independence. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

    PRI's The World
    Russian airbase attacked in Crimea

    PRI's The World

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 47:43


    A Russian air base was attacked in Crimea on Tuesday. While it is not yet clear exactly who was behind the attack, it marks an escalation in the nearly six-month conflict between Russia and Ukraine. And the sudden death of author, playwright and filmmaker Biyi Bandele is a monumental loss to Nigeria's film industry. He is being mourned around the world. Also, rain is pummeling South Korea this week. At least nine are dead — and more are missing — in flooding that has put parts of the capital Seoul underwater. Plus, in the 1990s, artists like Ricky Martin, Enrique Iglesias and Shakira became crossover successes by releasing English-language albums. Now, a new crop of artists including Bad Bunny, J Balvin and Ozuna are changing the rules of the game.

    The Dr. Gabrielle Lyon Show
    How to Take Your Destiny Into Your Own Hands | Remi Adeleke

    The Dr. Gabrielle Lyon Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 76:44 Very Popular


    Remi Adeleke was born in Nigeria. Following the death of his father, his family relocated to the Bronx, New York, in 1987. Remi joined the Navy in 2002 and later joined the Navy SEALs, where he specialized in combat medicine and HUMINT (Human Intelligence/tradecraft). Ending his successful naval career in 2016, he was led to pursue careers in film/tv consulting, directing, writing, and acting, including Transformers: The Last Knight, SEAL Team CBS, Ambulance, The Plane, and Terminal List. As a filmmaker and screenwriter, he wrote The Unexpected, Slave Stealers, and The Chameleon, from which he recently signed a three-book deal to create a series. In this episode we discuss: Why the next generation is too soft How to raise strong and capable children The habits and routines that lead to exceptional performance How to take your destiny into your own hands This episode is brought to you by LMNT, InsideTracker, and 1stPhorm https://kejowear.com/ (Kejo Wear Apparel) https://twitter.com/remiadeleke/ (Remi's Twitter) https://www.instagram.com/remiadeleke/ (Remi's Instagram) Mentioned in this episode: Visit 1st Phorm Website for Great Deals http://www.1stphorm.com/drlyon LMNT Sample Pack Get your free LMNT Sample Pack with any purchase: http://www.DrinkLMNT.com/DRLYON Inside Tracker 20% Off Get 20% Off the entire Inside Tracker store: http://www.insidetracker.com/drlyon

    Aid, Evolved
    The Future of Pharmacy with Samuel Okwuada of Remedial Health

    Aid, Evolved

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:59


    In the heart of Nigeria's COVID-19 surge in 2020, Samuel Okwuada started receiving a string of phone calls from local pharmacies who were struggling to get stock during lockdown. They needed Samuel to deliver more essential medicines, in smaller quantities, to more locations, at the same or lower costs. This is an impossible equation for any traditional drug distributor to balance - but when it became clear they had no other choice, Samuel knew it was time to create something new. This is how Samuel Okwuada pivoted his prior venture, a brick-and-mortar wholesale distributor, into a HealthTech startup that is setting new standards for delivery quality meds, reliably and efficiently, to pharmacists across Nigeria. Today's conversation is a case study on how small pharmacies in Nigeria have historically acquired their stock and how this approach is being disrupted with new technologies. While improving health product distribution has a massive potential for impact, it is also a market rife with challenges, politics, and delays. Samuel recalls how, in order to receive regulatory approval for medicines distribution, he needed immense patience and resourcefulness. Patience, to wait the 2 years needed for government licensing, and resourcefulness, because in order to get licensed, he needed to finance an operational warehouse for 2 years with no revenue. Here we see the speed of technological innovation juxtaposed against the pace of brick-and-mortar operations. But Samuel knows there is a better future ahead and is paving the way for that future: one in which Nigerians can rely with confidence on their local pharmacies to provide high-quality meds when and where they are needed. Remedial Health is connected to more than 100 pharmaceutical manufacturers and suppliers, including GSK, Pfizer and Astrazeneca, as well as Nigeria's Orange Drugs, Emzor and Fidson Healthcare. Earlier this year, it was one of the African startups that took part in the prestigious Y Combinator programme, the most successful accelerator program in the world. It also banked US$1 million in pre-seed funding to power its growth. To find out more, access the show notes at https://AidEvolved.com  Let us know what you think of this episode on Twitter (@AidEvolved) or by email (hello@AidEvolved.com)

    Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag
    Ep 96. How does someone's background influence their career?

    Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 55:05


    On this episode of GET TO KNOW YOU, we discuss  another thought-provoking topic; ‘How does someone's background influence their career?'. This week, I'll be sitting down with Kahindo Mateene (IG @kahindomateene)    . She is the founder and creative visionary behind her namesake brand KAHINDO (IG @kahindo_nyc) . Kahindo strives to use her brand as a vehicle to create job opportunities for women and share the heart and soul of Africa with the rest of the world. Kahindo was born in Uganda, educated in Kenya, and has lived in Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Niger. She has showcased her collections at several international fashion shows, including Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Africa and New York Fashion Week at the Harlem Fashion Row. Her work has also been featured in publications like The New York Times, Elle, Essence, and Marie Claire. KAHINDO is a socially responsible womenswear brand that creates wearable art featuring bold colours and custom prints inspired by the designer's Congolese heritage, African upbringing and globe-trotting travels. Designed in New York City and produced by female artisans in Africa using fair trade practices, KAHINDO's statement-making—yet timeless—silhouettes are made to empower the modern woman while having a social impact. Tune in as we discuss African fashion, combining different African materials and creating wearable art with a social impact. Stay tuned to the end of the episode to find out how you can join the conversation on the Get To Know You Cafe.Credits Music- Sara Oliveira Support the show

    The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
    2022.08.08 Favey Faves 2022 (so far)

    The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 131:23


    As broadcast August 8, 2022 with plenty of favorites and hearts to make your stream flutter proper.  Tonight we update our favorites of the year thus far, with tunes both old and new that we found striking thus far in the calendar year, along with some album recommendations from us in the process.  Great tunes from all over the map with highlights from Wet Leg, Just Mustard, Big Thief, and Ibibio Sound Machine amongst two hours of great tunes.#feelthegravityTracklist (ST:RT)Part I (00:00)Wet Leg – Wet DreamWet Leg – Chaise LongueFlorence + The Machine – KingRegina Spektor – Becoming All AloneHurray For The Riff Raff – SAGARobert Glasper – Why We SpeakMonophonics – Sage Motel Part II (36:38)Jacob Banks – Just When I ThoughtIbibio Sound Machine – Afo Ken Doko MienDust In The Sunlight – Former LivesRyan Egan – Soft PowerBlack Country, New Road – Good Will HuntingArcade Fire – The Lightning IArcade Fire – The Lightning II Part III (67:50)Big Thief – Sparrow Angel Olsen – Big TimeAndrew Bird – AtomizedLunar Isles – Balloons KALI – Anybody ElseLaura Rain & The Caesars – Rise AgainThe Sure Fire Soul Ensemble – Love Age Part IV (103:25)Son Lux feat Mitski & David Byrne – This Is A LifeJust Mustard – 23 Khruangbin & Leon Bridges – MariellaBobby Oroza – I Got LoveDreamer Isioma – Sunset DriveKurt Vile – Mount Airy Hill (Way Gone) 

    Terms and Conditions by Pulse
    EP 71: Price of Fame

    Terms and Conditions by Pulse

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 111:59


    On this episode, the gang discusses Kizz Daniel's arrest, Fireboy's album, the meaning of oversharing, Nigeria's medalists and more.

    African dot American
    Ep. 52: The Journey of African Dot Americans to the Motherland

    African dot American

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 44:02


    Naana and Bonkiyo chat with storyteller, writer, and journalist, Itoro Bassey about her journey to Nigeria and her debut novel, Faith, a coming-of-age tale about a first-generation Nigerian-American woman born and raised in the U.S. who resettles in Nigeria. 

    Gargoyles Gang Podcast
    2.34 The Mark of the Panther

    Gargoyles Gang Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 62:03


    Parental/Child tensions abound as the Garg boys travel to Nigeria with with special guest/Gargoyles SUPER FAN Joey Chapla. Portland based comedian and musician duo Jay Flewelling and Michael Langman proudly present The Gargoyles Gang Podcast. This brand new podcast is one gigantic and nostalgic nod to the classic after school animated show Gargoyles. Join us on this epic journey back to the 1990's as we delve deep into each episode with hilarious commentary,  sharp insight, and just plain love for this long lost but never forgotten series.

    Truth in Charity
    Eleven Days in Nigeria

    Truth in Charity

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 40:15


    Bishop just returned from Nigeria and, on this episode, hear how the trip went. His schedule was packed with big liturgies including two Ordination Masses. But Nigeria has been in the news recently because of priest kidnappings and Bishop talks about how local villagers saved his group from a potentially dangerous situation.

    Hey Coach!
    Lineman to Lawyer, Always Looking to Help: Interview with Chima Okoli: S3E25

    Hey Coach!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 36:28


    Lineman to Lawyer, Always Looking to HelpOriginally from Nigeria, raised in Verginia Beach, education was always important in his family. He is the son of Dr. Emeka Okoli and Glayds Okoli. His father is a Fulbright senior scholar and visiting professor, University of Abuja in Nigeria, who is a professor of mass communications and journalism at Norfolk State University. This is why Penn State was where he decided to play football after consideration from many offers.When the NFL didn't pan out, Chima thought hard and decided to go to law school.  He is a graduate of The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law. Chima Okoli worked with Penn State as a representative on the Big Ten Advisory Commission. After more than five years in higher education, Chima launched Marathon Mentors to provide legal consulting to Collegiate Athletic Programs of all sizes and needs. The Marathon Mentors curriculum covers Name Image Likeness, Branding, Disclosures, Contractual Agreements and many other key topics facing programs and student-athletes alike.LinkedIn:(9) Chima Okoli Esq. | LinkedInEric Reyes: Host of Hey Coach! Podcastemail:eric@heycoachreyes.comLinkedIn:Eric Reyes | LinkedInFacebook:(1) Hey Coach | FacebookFacebook Group:(2) Hey Coach! Sports,Life and Business | FacebookInstagram :Hey Coach Podcast (@theheycoachpodcast) • Instagram photos and videos

    Last Week in the Church with John Allen
    Vatican finally comes clean on its finances

    Last Week in the Church with John Allen

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 27:13


    In this episode: Vatican finally comes clean on its financesPope meets with Ukraine's Ambassador to the Holy SeeUK court inserts itself into the Vatican financial trialNicaragua and Nigeria stir up trouble for the VaticanPope to attend the Congress of World and Traditional Religions in KazakhstanSupport the show

    World Business Report
    Semiconductors: Fishing for CHIPS

    World Business Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 26:44


    The US President, Joe Biden, has launched a $280bn boost for America's technology and science industries. A new bill named CHIPS (Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors) is aimed at increasing domestic manufacturing, and upping the country's competitive edge against China. Professor David Yoffie from Harvard Business School joins us on the programme. We're in Ankara, where Hannah Smith reports on how EU diplomats are threatening Turkey with sanctions over its relationship with Russia. We also look at how economies on different sides of the world - Sri Lanka and Nigeria - are struggling to cope with global supply pressures. Joe Saluzzi from Themis Trading has the latest market news ahead of key inflation results in the US.

    The BreakPoint Podcast
    Genocide in Nigeria

    The BreakPoint Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 5:19 Very Popular


    Back in May, 20 Nigerian Christians were brutally martyred by the Islamic militant group ISIS. In June, 40 more Christians died in Owo, Nigeria, in a terrorist attack against a church. Though it is not clear who is responsible for that attack, what is clear is that Christians continue to be severely persecuted in this West African nation. The persecution, which has been ongoing for years, is part of a long history of conflict with Islam.  In 1953, Christians made up only 21.4% of the population in Nigeria. Today, about half of the country's population, about 96 million people, are Christians. To put that number in perspective, Germany, the largest country in Europe, has a total population of less than 84 million. Much of the Christian growth in Nigeria has resulted from education efforts by Western missionaries, though the country has long had a Christian presence.   Nigeria's Christians live primarily in the southern, farming part of the country. They are mostly under attack by Islamists and the Muslim Fulani, who live mostly in the northern herding areas. They also face the threat of Boko Haram, a ruthless Islamist terrorist organization whose name literally means Western learning (boko) is prohibited (haram).  Boko Haram was founded in 2002 to overthrow Nigeria's government and impose strict sharia on the country. The group was relatively quiet until 2009, after which conflicts with police escalated. By December 2010, Boko Haram began a campaign of suicide bombings and attacks on churches and government buildings. In 2014, they began to attack schools. In one attack, 59 school boys were burned alive or shot. In another, 276 school girls were kidnapped. In both cases, the victims were Christians. Boko Haram has also conducted massacres in mosques that do not support their radical ideology.  Also in 2014, Boko Haram pledged loyalty to ISIL. That loyalty ended in 2016, when ISIL ordered Boko Haram to stop attacking Muslims. Currently, there are three Islamist terrorist groups that originated with Boko Haram: Boko Haram proper, the Islamic State West African Province, and Ansaru, an al-Qaeda affiliate. All are engaged in terrorism, not only in Nigeria but also in surrounding countries, with much of it aimed at Christians.  As dangerous as these explicitly Islamist groups are, the Fulani herdsmen are worse. Because the Fulani territory in north Nigeria is suffering from a long-term drought, the Fulani are moving south to access water. In the process, the herdsmen have been raiding and burning villages, slaughtering villagers, destroying crops, and engaging in a host of other atrocities in order to take the land for themselves and drive out Christians.   President Muhammadu Buhari is a Fulani. Though he has attempted to address some of the economic issues that drive Fulani militancy, he has denied that religion plays any role in the conflict. He points out, for example, that Muslim villages have also been raided. Still, the vast majority of attacks have come against Christians, and the Fulani's history of Islamic militancy dates back to the late 17th century.   Though contemporary Fulani militancy reveals a struggle between nomadic herders and farmers going on for millennia, denying the religious dimensions of these attacks is pure propaganda. Christian villages are deliberately targeted, Christian houses and churches are burned, and Christians driven off or slaughtered.   Although up-to-date numbers are hard to come by, between the Fulani and Boko Haram and its offshoots an average of 13 Christians per day were killed in Nigeria last year. That's 372 per month or over 4,450 alone. In the last 12 years, 43,000 Christians have been killed by Islamic radicals in Nigeria. And these numbers do not include those injured, beaten, or driven from their homes.   What has happened to Nigerian Christians meets the established international standards for genocide.  Christians must not forget the spiritual aspects at the root of this conflict. God is moving and the Church is expanding across Africa. In 1900, there were just 9.64 million Christians on the continent; today there are over 692 million. It is not surprising to see Satan counterattacking by inspiring persecution.   For our Nigerian brothers and sisters, we can fight on two fronts. First, we must continue to lobby our government on behalf of suffering Christians, asking our officials to put pressure on Nigeria to take more decisive action against Boko Haram and the Fulani herdsmen. Second, we must lobby Heaven, for both our persecuted brothers and sisters and their persecutors, praying that God's kingdom would advance and win even the jihadis to Jesus. 

    Radio Bullets
    8 agosto 2022 - Notiziario

    Radio Bullets

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 16:05


    Israele e Palestina: Operazione breaking down, morte a Gaza, raggiunta una tregua. Afghanistan: raffica di attentati negli ultimi tre giorni, Radio Bullets diretta a Kabul. Colombia: giura presidente Gustavo Pedro. Stati Uniti: omicidi islamofobi in New Messico. Museo di Londra accetta di restituire 70 opere d'arte alla Nigeria. A Parigi si ricordano i 100 giorni del giornalista ostaggio in Mali. Cile: una dolina diventa abbastanza grande da inghiottire l'Arco di Trionfo francese. Nicaragua: la polizia accusa la Chiesa di voler destabilizzare il governo. Questo e molto altro nel notiziario di Radio Bullets, a cura di Barbara Schiavulli Se vuoi sostenere l'informazione indipendente www.radiobullets.com/sostienici

    The West Live Podcast
    Brit Museum returns STOLEN artefacts to Nigeria

    The West Live Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:31


    British museum agrees to return stolen artefacts to Nigeria.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Church Digital Podcast
    EP228: Anne Bosarge & Digital Discipleship in Africa

    The Church Digital Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 51:20


    HAVE YOU EVER GOTTEN ONE OF THOSE EMAILS WHERE... ...the prince of Nigeria is looking for some money in order to restore his kingdom? All he needs from you is $600,000 wired to one of his accounts, and once restored he will return your loan 10-fold. Well, maybe you're brave enough to try this. I am not. That being said, there are other opportunities coming out of Africa that are worth your attention. HOW DOES A WOMAN FROM GEORGIA CONNECT WITH AFRICANS AND OTHERS GLOBALLY? Meet Anne Bosarge. Anne runs The Chapel Online, a Digital Church that is reaching people globally, including a very strong presence in Africa. So, how does a woman from Georgia connect with Africans and others globally? What does an intercontinental disciple making relationship look like, digitally? Let's dig into how The Chapel Online works, and how effective Anne Bosarge and her team is at discipling people on a global scale through digital methods.  SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHURCH DIGITAL PODCAST If you're enjoying this episode, subscribe for free using your favorite podcast app below: Apple Podcasts | RSS Feed | Anchor | Overcast | Spotify | Pocket Casts | Google Play ON THE SHOW Host: Jeff ReedTHECHURCH.DIGITAL & DigitalChurch.NetworkTwitter // Facebook // Instagram // LinkedIn // YouTube Guest: Anne BosargeTwitter // Facebook // Instagram //LinkedIn  RESOURCES Give to DigitalChurch.Network - --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thechurchdigital/message

    Listed Lagosian
    LISTED LAGOSIAN w/ OBI ASIKA - PT2

    Listed Lagosian

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:42


    When you think of one of the leading creatives in the Nigerian music industry, you think Obi Asika! We are psyched to bring you this week's episode of the Listed Lagosian with Obi Asika. Obi comes from the town of Onitsha in Anambra State, Nigeria.His father, Anthony Ukpabi Asika, was administrator of East Central State, Nigeria during the military regime of General Yakubu Gowon. Obi attended Ekulu Primary School, Enugu from 1974 to 1977, and then proceeded to the United Kingdom where he attended Ashdown House, East Sussex between 1977 and 1982. From Ashdown House, he gained a direct entry into Eton College, having obtained a Distinction in the National Common Entrance Exams in the UK. At Eton College, Obi held several positions, including school prefect, secretary of the Political Society and secretary of the Film Society. Obi was a research assistant at the World Trade Centre of Nigeria between 1986 and 1987. In 1987, he enrolled at the University of Warwick, from which he received an LLB Hons in 1990. At the University of Warwick, Asika was secretary, Nigerian Society; member, Political Society; member, Afro-Caribbean Society; radio host and DJ and events promoter. Between 1987 and 1990, Obi organized successful concerts, charity and entertainment events at university campuses around the UK. He also hosted a weekly radio show at the University of Warwick. He was equally DJ and promoter of over 200 events at universities and clubs in London, using venues such as Legends, Dingwalls, Camden Palace, Brighton Hippodrome, Wall Street, Shaftesbury's and many more. In 1991, Obi founded Storm Productions, a Nigerian entertainment company whose record label arm is notable for ushering in a new generation of Nigerian musical talent, including Naeto C, Ikechukwu, Sasha P, Tosin Martins, Banky W, who changed and developed the Nigerian music landscape. Obi has worked – and continues to work – with The World Bank, international companies, and government at state and Federal levels to shape public policy and create an enabling environment for the creative industries.

    News Express
    Global Airlines Fancy Profits In 2023, But Outlook Gloomy For Nigerian Carriers

    News Express

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 35:14


    Global airlines are expected to post a much lower aggregate loss this 2022, a year already in H2. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) revised the loss down to $9.7 billion, a sharp improvement from an earlier $42.1 billion, with global carriers expected to begin to see profit by 2023. According to IATA, forecast yields, a proxy for airfares, will rise by 5.6 per cent this year globally. However, some aviation industry experts who spoke with Business A.M. are doubtful if the expected global positive scenario will rub off on Nigerian carriers, who are highly indebted and struggling with cost pressures from workers' salaries, rising fuel prices –Jet A1–, rising aircraft maintenance costs, amid the worst inflation in many years, and a depreciated naira.

    Daily News Brief by TRT World

    *) Ceasefire takes effect between Israel, Palestinian group An Egyptian-brokered ceasefire in Gaza between Israel and the Palestinian group Islamic Jihad has taken effect late on Sunday. The ceasefire agreement came after three days of Israeli air strikes on Gaza. The attacks left at least 44 Palestinians, including 15 children dead and over 360 others injured, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry. Egyptian state news agency MENA reported that Egypt was exerting efforts to release Palestinian prisoners Khalil Awawdeh and Bassam al Saadi. *) Senate Democrats pass $740B 'Inflation Reduction Act' package in US The US Senate has passed a sweeping $430 billion bill intended to fight climate change, lower drug prices and raise some corporate taxes. Amid Republican efforts to derail the package, the Senate approved the legislation known as the Inflation Reduction Act by a 51-50 party line vote. Vice President Kamala Harris cast the tie-breaking ballot. That is a major victory for President Joe Biden that Democrats hope will aid their chances of keeping control of Congress in this year's elections. *) Gustavo Petro sworn in as Colombia's first leftist president Gustavo Petro has taken the oath of office as Colombia's first-ever leftist president. He was sworn in before a crowd of hundreds of thousands of people in Bogota. Petro takes over from the deeply unpopular Ivan Duque for a four-year term during which he will enjoy support from a left-leaning majority in Congress. *) Any attack on a nuclear plant in Ukraine 'suicidal' — UN Any attack on a nuclear plant is "suicidal", United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres has warned. His statement comes after fresh reports suggested shelling hit a huge atomic power complex in southern Ukraine. The fighting on Friday at the plant has prompted the UN's nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency to warn of "the very real risk of a nuclear disaster". Guterres said "any attack to a nuclear plant is a suicidal thing,” adding that he hopes the “attacks will end." And finally… *) UK museum agrees to return looted Benin Bronzes to Nigeria A London museum has agreed to return a collection of Benin Bronzes looted in the late 19th century from what is now Nigeria. The decision comes after Nigeria's National Commission for Museums and Monuments formally asked for the artefacts to be returned earlier this year. Since then, cultural institutions throughout Britain have come under pressure to repatriate artefacts acquired during the colonial era.

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Brazilian Jiu Jitsu great Leandro Lo shot in head in Sao Paulo club The newborns fighting for survival in Afghanistan Climate change US takes step closer to passing historic bill Israel Gaza Hopes as Gaza ceasefire comes into effect Ukraine war Four more grain ships leave Ukraine as hopes grow for export stability Pharma company Eli Lilly expanding outside of Indiana over states abortion law Horniman Museum to return 72 artefacts to Nigeria Biden stands with Muslims after horrific killings in New Mexico Multiple people injured in Cincinnati shooting GMA ABC News Israel Gaza Talks under way to broker ceasefire in Gaza Sanya Covid lockdown strands tourists on Chinas Hawaii Heres how the Inflation Reduction Acts rebates and tax credits for heat pumps and solar can lower your energy bill Republicans block cap on insulin costs for many Americans from Democratic deal What the Alex Jones trial means for the future of conspiracy culture I cant do it again Can Appalachia blunt the devastating impacts of more flooding, climate change Five Decades in the Making Why It Took Congress So Long to Act on Climate Flash flooding swamps Californias Death Valley France whale Lost mammal stuck in River Seine to get vitamin boost Race to rescue trapped miners in Mexico U.S. Senate approves bill to fight climate change, cut drug costs in win for Biden