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US Navy special operations force

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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about navy seals

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Latest podcast episodes about navy seals

Dave and Jeb Aren't Mean
114 - Four Weddings and a Sour Bro

Dave and Jeb Aren't Mean

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 72:19


We're carbo-loading for a WEDDING EVERY WEEKEND (2020) but we're breaking down on the: The Smelts-to-Dealts Pipeline … "I'm a sourdough guy" …  THEME: "Fuck You If You Don't Like Christmas," from Crudbump, by Drew Fairweather PART ONE  "Four Weddings and a [Car] Restoration" ... Pure, high-concept Hallmark ... Joel McHale + Weezer = Joel Campbell ... Recalling Episode 019 - The Quotable Gus Van Houten ... Cast Rundown ... Sara Kate fan service ... Signed, Sealed, Delivered Appreciation Station ... Let Geoff Gustafson cook ... The Expositional Challenge ... Plot Mop-Up: Change your businesses; classic quit ... Reverse horn ... Chekhov's rehearsal dinner ... Lost: Husband, storyteller ... Peak Hallmark Quit ...  Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART TWO   Spot the Angel: Greg and Ginny vs. It Takes a Village ... It's YOUR rehearsal dinner! ... Eat Your Heart Out: Procure some rosemary; cheers with giant buns; brunch welsher; hors d'oeuvres montage; pizza shooters, jalapeño poppers; wedding taco bar ...     Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART THREE  The Hallmark Expanded Universe: A convergence of all weddings; the fakest Portland yet; Navy SEAL training in the PNW ... Overdetermined: Let's mess with our friends and make the scene out of the joke describing it; do or do not, there is no try; tough material; Ryan Reynolds-esque distancing ... Crossover: The Godfather wedding; physical therapists fixing cars ... Medical tape product placement ... BS knee medicine ... The Mud Bowl ... Grinding Tape: QB1 lasers a pick-6; Daniel Jones; Mike Glennon Appreciation Station ... Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART FOUR  The Hallmark Bechdel Test: The Summer of Brooke? ... The Hallmark Voight-Kampff Test: Norman Dorman Labor Bot; James, the Orthopedic Surgeon; Dr. Colin, a pineapple; time to find your ham ... Who's the Real Villain: It's not weddings ... Kiss 'Em All ... Title/Sequel: Minimum delivery; contempt title; "Next Weekend," It Follows; scrompin' every morning ... Rating: 2 ... "Perfect Day" sensory deprivation ...       Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood PART FIVE The Leftovers: IMDB Dive ... Wine Clown-Sour Bro Axis ... Did we watch it? ... Post-breakup with the softest people ever ... Too bad you can't do a retro-mod on your heart ... Misunderstanding the obnoxious hipster shithead ... Active bears in the area ... Mazel tov! ... I can't believe you have other friends! ... Merry Christmas Break: Original music by Chris Collingwood All other music by Chris Collingwood of Look Park and Fountains of Wayne, except: "Orchestral Sports Theme" by Chris Collingwood and Rick Murnane and "A Punchup at a Wedding," by Radiohead. Art by Caitlin Fitz Gerald. Buy her wonderful book here.

Finding Gravitas Podcast
Did you hear the news?

Finding Gravitas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:22


Stellantis reverses controversial changes in contract terms for suppliershttps://www.autonews.com/automakers-suppliers/why-stellantis-retreated-burdensome-contract-term-changes-suppliers?utm_medium=social&utm_term=automotive+news&adobe_mc=MCMID%3D40406725175085922120783321951674270084%7CMCORGID%3D138FFF2554E6E7220A4C98C6%2540AdobeOrg%7CTS%3D1652783462&utm_source=linkedin&utm_content=b4cab056-abaf-49ae-ad28-abb93e712549&CSAuthResp=1%3A%3A903981%3A20957%3A24%3Asuccess%3AF8F49C6B8914C7F1DC82E4AA454D36C6 (Here's the Automotive News article) Good move but what's next? how will Stellantis rebuild supplier trust? We're taking a break, recording from Wales, and changing habits and routines. Time to challenge your thinking and listen to an episode outside of your industry silo. Try one of these:- https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-nick-norris-navy-seal (Episode #12, Nick Norris, Navy SEAL) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-clint-bruce-former-navy-special-warfare-officer-nfl-player-and-entrepreneur (Episode #29, Clint Bruce, Former Navy Special Warfare Officer) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-aled-miles-president-ceo-of-sauce-labs (Episode #33, Aled Miles, President & CEO of Sauce Labs) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-david-chislett-chief-activator-weapon-of-mass-creation (Episode #35, David Chislett, Chief Activator & Weapon of Mass Creation ) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-the-generation-z-ceo-michael-chime-ceo-of-prepared (Episode #18, Michael Chime, Generation Z CEO) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-kristy-fercho-head-of-home-lending-at-wells-fargo-chair-of-mortgage-bankers-association (Episode #08, Kristy Fercho, Head of home lending at Wells Fargo & Chair of Mortgage Bankers Association) https://findinggravitas.com/episode/meet-laura-lawson-chief-people-officer-united-wholesale-mortgage (Episode #03, Laura Lawson, Chief People Officer - United Wholesale Mortgage)

Attack Life, Not Others
Ep 224 - The Slow Horse Ultimately Wins

Attack Life, Not Others

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 13:19


Bob Vidoni joins Tim and Steve to discuss one of his favorite profound excerpts from Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind — the book of teachings by the late Shunryu Suzuki. We should always strive to be the best we can be, however, "the best" is relative. If you think you're always going to "win" simply because you're the best, you'll be mistaken. Overcome the pain and grow through facing obstacles There's always going to be something that knocks us back Slow down and don't worry about being the "first to get there" “Slow is smooth, smooth is fast” — Navy SEALs

The Champion Forum Podcast with Jeff Hancher
Leadership Perspective from Navy Seal, Larry Yatch

The Champion Forum Podcast with Jeff Hancher

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 54:45


Thank you for listening to The Champion Forum Podcast with Jeff Hancher! In today's episode, I'm excited to welcome 10-year veteran of the U.S. Navy SEALs and entrepreneur Larry Yatch. Larry's proven success in the SEALs inspired him to translate some of their best techniques to the business world so that leaders like you can more effectively coordinate their teams, increase their revenue, and succeed in life and business. Today, we're talking about the power of self-regulation, what it means to be a manager, and how to put aside your ego for the good of the team.

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
Awakening on the Spiritual Path with Mark Divine

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 85:17


The Walled Garden is a podcast and community of independent philosophers and seekers who are dedicated to the pursuit of truth, wisdom, virtue, and the divine. Led by Australian poet, philosopher, and musician Simon Drew, American philosopher, author, and speaker Sharon Lebell, and British philosopher and researcher Kai Whiting, The Walled Garden hosts regular live events and meetups with fascinating philosophers, theologians, artists, leaders, and seekers who can teach us all about how to live a flourishing existence. Visit The Walled Garden: thewalledgarden.com Join our free Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/5TAUzfdCe8 Get one-on-one mentoring with our philosophers: https://thewalledgarden.com/mentors Register for Upcoming Events: https://thewalledgarden.com/events Shop at The Walled Garden: https://thewalledgarden.store/ About Our Guest: Mark Divine is an entrepreneur, New York Times best-selling author, philanthropist, and one of the world's top leadership and coaching experts. After a successful 20 year career as a Navy SEAL and SEAL Commander, Mark was hired by the Navy to create a nationwide coaching and leadership program for the SEALs. The bold goal of this program was to give the SEALs the best leadership and mental-management tools in the world – to help them forge unbeatable SEAL teams that achieve mission success in the most stressful, challenging environments on earth. Divine's leadership and coaching program for the SEALs was so effective that it's now being used outside of the Navy by top CEOs, Fortune 100 companies, USA Olympics, elite universities, major league sports franchises, celebrities, and successful individuals from all over the world. Mark Divine is the author of 5 best-selling books, including his latest book Staring Down The Wolf: 7 Leadership Commitments That Forge Elite Teams. He hosts a #1-ranked podcast on iTunes (Mark Divine's Unbeatable Mind) and he is the founder of 5 successful companies: Unbeatable Mind, SEALFIT, NavySEALs.com, USCrossFit, and the award winning Coronado Brewing Company in California. Divine believes that any individual, team, or company can unlock 20X performance with the right tools and training. His company, Unbeatable Mind, helps millions of people achieve their full potential in life and business through their free training resources and advanced training programs for leaders, corporate teams, coaching professionals, and high-achieving individuals. As a philanthropist, Mark Divine founded the Courage Foundation to help our wounded Veterans who are suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS). Recently Divine and his Courage Foundation team set a world record by completing over 22 million burpees to raise awareness, support, and funding for our Veteran heroes. THE UNBEATABLE MIND: unbeatablemind.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Back in Control Radio
How to Become a High Performer

Back in Control Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 32:00


In this episode, Dr. David Hanscom continues his discussion with bestselling author Dan Coyle.  He shares how repetition, engaging with fear of failure and getting the most out of mistakes are key to the process of Deep Practice. He explains how pausing for reflection and being able to see a new vision of yourself can provide the energy and focus needed to become a high performer (Ignition).  He also discusses how being guided by Master Coaches who understand the skill you are trying to develop and communicate how to improve it effectively creates the environment for achieving high performance. Daniel Coyle is the New York Times bestselling author of The Culture Code, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Bloomberg, BookPal, and Business Insider. Coyle has served as an advisor to many high-performing organizations, including the Navy SEALs, Microsoft, Google, and the Cleveland Guardians. His other books include The Talent Code, The Secret Race, The Little Book of Talent, and Hardball: A Season in the Projects, which was made into a movie starring Keanu Reeves. Coyle was raised in Anchorage, Alaska, and now lives in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, during the school year and in Homer, Alaska, during the summer with his wife Jenny, and their four children. For more information, visit: https://www.danielcoyle.com.

Send Me
44: MGySgt Cory Paskvan "Swift, Silent, Deadly"

Send Me

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 62:16


On this episode of the "Send Me" Podcast by SOCOM Athlete, host Jason Sweet is joined by Force Reconnaissance Marine MGySgt Cory Paskvan, one of the most elite & fittest Marines in the entire Marine Corps; currently serving over 27 years in active duty. MGySgt Paskvan supervises & oversees all the training that goes into becoming a Recon Marine; the senior enlisted member of the USMC RTC (Reconnaissance Training Company) where BRC (Basic Reconnaissance Course) is accomplished., Marines & Navy SARC/SOIDC candidates must graduate BRC in order to officially earn the elite title of "Reconnaissance Marines." With multiple combat deployments all over the globe, as well as counter piracy operations, MGySgt Paskvan has earned combat medals to include: Meritorious Service, 2 Combat Action Medals, 2 Navy Commendation Medals with Valor, and more.  In addition to his years of instructor experience training Reconnaissance Marines, he was also an instructor at the United States Army's Military Freefall School, and is a tandem/barrel qualified jumpmaster & master combat diver/SCUBA supervisor. MGySgt Paskvan has joined SOCOM Athlete as a Hell Day instructor & mentor over the last 3 years, and is a huge asset to the SOCOM Athlete community. We're honored to interview him in today's episode as he discusses physical fitness, mental toughness, and what it takes to become a United States Reconnaissance Marine; "Swift, Silent, Deadly!"• Become a Patreon Donor to support us & keep the podcast going: https://www.patreon.com/socomathlete• Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/socomathlete/• Website: https://www.socomathlete.com/• Subscribe to our YouTube Channel:(With One Click!): http://www.youtube.com/c/SOCOMAthlete?sub_confirmation=1• Listen to our new Podcast on any platform: https://sendme.buzzsprout.com/• Check out our Reviews on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/socomathlete/reviews/SOCOM Athlete LLC is America's #1 resource in Special Operations career preparation. A combat-veteran owned, nationwide program, the SOCOM Athlete platform has a vast online & in-person community of individuals aspiring to become Special Operators in the United States military. Conducting over 50 nationwide “Hell Day” events in 12 states since 2018, SOCOM Athlete has trained over 1,000 of America's top special operations candidates varying from ages 15 to 39. Training Chats utilize a messaging app & feature free membership access. With over 1,400 members training for Special Operations in 35 locations across the United States, members have the ability to train & bond with a team of like-minded individuals in their city/state. Hundreds of former SOCOM Athlete students have graduated special operations training to become Navy SEALs, Combat Controllers, Army Rangers, Green Berets, Recon Marines, Navy SARC, USAF PJ, TACP, and more. Got what it takes for a career in Special Operations? We'll see..."Send Me!"

Business Stories for Small Business
Christian Dadulak CFC Talks About His Success In Franchise Development with Clienttether

Business Stories for Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:25


Christian Dadulak may be young, but his experience in franchise development far surpasses his years. Christian helps anyone seeking new opportunities find success and a more improved life with franchise ownership.  If you're tired of being an employee, bored, or open to new opportunities due to some life changes, Christian may be the one to speak to.  He also talks about his experience with the Clienttether system and how happy is with the automation, support, and success it is bringing him and his team.  Find Christian on Linkedin here.  We also talk about our shared interest in Jocko Willink, author and former Navy Seal. 

Book Club with Michael Smerconish
Tom Manion: "Brothers Forever"

Book Club with Michael Smerconish

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 22:42


Michael speaks with Tom Manion, co-author of "Brothers Forever: The Enduring Bond between a Marine and a Navy SEAL that Transcended Their Ultimate Sacrifice." Original air date 20 May 2014. The book was published on 13 May 2014.

UnInfluenced
Navy SEALs fight on Air | Episode 72 Uninfluenced

UnInfluenced

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 66:36


Ask.Uninfluenced@gmail.comOn today's episode of Uninfluenced we have a special guest Shawn Ryan from Vigilance Elite & The Shawn Ryan Show. Matt and Mike start off asking Shawn if he is into cars or bikes then get into guns and different optics which Mike and Shawn can't agree on almost getting into a smack down on the air. Once things cool down Matt touches on a few more topics and we get into a few questions and answers. This is an episode you don't want to miss. If you have questions remember to send them to Ask.Uninfluenced@gmail.com----------Time Stamps:0:00 - Intro1:20 - Are you into Cars, Bikes, Etc.4:30 - Random questions 34:13 - Q&A1:05:05 - Outro-----------Support Shawn Ryan:https://www.vigilanceelite.com/blogs/the-shawn-ryan-showInstagram - shawnryan762https://www.youtube.com/c/vigilanceelite------------Subscribe for more Uninfluenced: www.youtube.com/UninfluencedCheck out Mike Drop for more from Mike Ritland: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNZR15cy3w1fzGXgI5oy5aA ---------Support the Show:► Support Uninfluenced on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Uninfluenced► Official Uninfluenced Merch: https://www.bonfire.com/store/uninflu...----------Support Mike Ritland:► Dog Treats, Training, & More at Fueled by Team Dog: www.mikeritlandco.com----------Our Sponsors:Mint Mobile:New wireless plan just 15 bucks a month, and get the plan shipped to your door for FREE.Cut your wireless to 15 bucks a month at Mintmobile.com/Uninfluenced Stay Connected: Follow Matt Holden: www.facebook.com/realtalkwithmattFollow Mike Ritland: www.facebook.com/mikeritlandco

33voices | Startups & Venture Capital | Women Entrepreneurs | Management & Leadership | Mindset | Hiring & Culture | Branding

Having worked with admired leaders and well-established organizations for 33+ years, one thing I've learned {about individual & organizational excellence} is that there's a fundamental difference between what it takes to be a good company and what it takes to be a great company. And, an even greater disparity between what it takes to be a great company and one considered amongst the world's best. The latter prioritize people and design the type of workplace environments where greatness can flourish, meaning can be multiplied, and the powerful forces that cause human beings to retreat to the comfortable and conventional can be eliminated.  Daniel Coyle has built a magnificent career thinking about, writing and contributing to many high-performing organizations; including Google, Microsoft, the Navy SEALS, and MLB's Cleveland Guardians. His two bestselling books - The Culture Code and The Talent Code - have had great influence on how I approach talent evaluation and culture design; particularly when it comes to team building. Our latest conversation will highlight the key insights from Dan's latest book - The Culture Playbook:  60 Highly Effective Actions To Help Your Group Succeed - and will go behind the scenes with the leaders of the San Antonio Spurs, The Cleveland Guardians, The Navy SEALS, and Pixar to understand how their leadership embodies the culture that powers their respective organizations.  

All the Hacks
Living a Life of Excellence, Agility and Meaning with Navy SEAL Mike Hayes

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:52


#57: Former Navy SEAL Commanding Officer Mike Hayes joins Chris to discuss leadership principles, strategies for successful communication, building confidence, and the most important lessons that he learned while serving in the Navy SEALs.Mike Hayes (@thisis.mikehayes) is a 20-year veteran of the Navy SEALs, where he last served as Commanding Officer of SEAL Team TWO, overseeing a 2,000 person Special Operations Task Force in southeastern Afghanistan. He is also the former Director of Defense Policy and Strategy at the National Security Council, Chief Digital Transformation Officer at VMWare, and author of Never Enough: A Navy SEAL Commander on Living a Life of Excellence, Agility, and Meaning. Full show notes at: https://www.allthehacks.com/purpose-meaning-mike-hayes Partner DealsVuori: 20% off the most comfortable performance apparel I've ever wornInside Tracker: 20% off personalized wellness & nutrition plans backed by sciencePoint.me: $1 trial w/ this link (and the code ALLTHEHACKS)Riverside.fm: Sign up here and get 15% off with code CHRIS Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Mike Hayes: Instagram | TwitterMike's Book: Never Enough: A Navy SEAL Commander on Living a Life of Excellence, Agility, and MeaningMike's Sunapee, New Hampshire Restaurant Recommendation: The AnchorageThe US National Medal of Honor Museum: https://mohmuseum.orgPodcasts mentionedAll the Hacks podcast #19: Andy Rachleff Become a Better InvestorAll the Hacks podcast #39: David Marquet The Language and Actions of Great LeadersAll the Hacks podcast #47: Arthur Brooks Finding Happiness, Success and Deep PurposeAll the Hacks podcast #52: Liz Moody Hack Your Health (While Still Enjoying Life)Full Show NotesThree principles to aim for in everything you do [1:50]Why Mike's book: Never Enough is relatable regardless of the life path you choose [4:32]Two lessons Mike learned during a near-death situation in Peru [6:01]Using examples of his time with the Navy Seals; Mike explains how debriefing with questions like “What could I have done better?” leads to success [8:54]The importance of delivering a message in a way that maximizes the probability of growth in a professional environment [11:59]As a former Director of Defense Policy and Strategy, Mike explains the exciting and uniquely high-pressure situations that he has experienced in the White House Situation Room [15:43]Strategies for learning from failure, and the value of being confident AND humble [17:14]Manufacturing discomfort, pushing yourself harder to live in the struggle, and stretching yourself beyond your perceived limitation, to increase confidence [19:49]Cost-benefit analysis: simply following the rules versus pushing beyond toward innovation and entrepreneurship [26:38]Focusing on the outcome and using the most efficient method toward achievement, and the four most important verbs to focus on during a meeting [29:22]Chris and Mike share methods they use to politely refocus a meeting [32:53]Mike's perspective on why asking for help is a sign of strength and why hard, intrusive questions must be asked [38:24]Building a positive ecosystem and network through relationships with others [43:48]Technology and tactics to improve presence and focus during conversations [46:12]Lessons learned from high-stakes situations in Iraq about slowing down, staying calm, and maintaining focus [49:19]How the principles described in Mike's book “Never Enough” change in importance throughout a person's life [51:52]Mike speaks of his mission to do great things for others, the purpose of writing “Never Enough”, and why he is passionate about its success [55:57]Advice about getting as much sleep as possible for optimal performance [58:05]Mike's restaurant recommendation in Sunapee, New Hampshire [59:41]Where to find Mike online and ways to support his missions [1:00:44]  Quotes:“We're only excellent if we know we're never excellent enough.” -Mike Hayes SponsorsInsideTrackerInsideTracker provides a personalized plan to improve your metabolism, reduce stress, improve sleep, and optimize your health for the long haul. It's created by leading scientists in aging, genetics, and biometrics. They analyze your blood, DNA, and fitness tracking data to identify where you're optimized—and where you're not. With Inside Tracker you'll get a daily Action Plan with personalized guidance on the right exercise, nutrition, and supplementation for your body.For a limited time, you can get 20% off at allthehacks.com/insidetracker Riverside.fmRiverside.fm is the best platform to record studio quality podcasts or videos from anywhere in the world. I use it for all my remote interviews and it consistently delivers high quality audio and video, because it records everything locally, which means you get uncompressed audio and video that works even with unstable wifi. After recording, you can use Riverside's editor to make ready to publish videos with a few clicks or easily download separate audio and video tracks and edit until your heart's content.To get 15% off your plan, use code CHRIS at allthehacks.com/riverside VuoriVuori is a new and fresh perspective on performance apparel. Perfect if you are sick and tired of traditional, old workout gear. Everything is designed to work out in, but doesn't look or feel like it. The product is incredibly versatile and can be used for just about any activity like running, training, swimming, yoga; but also great for lounging or weekend errands.To get the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet with 20% off your first purchase (plus free shipping on any US order over $75 and free returns) visit allthehacks.com/vuori Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

Morning Fire!
You can't circumvent or hack your way to succes with Wylie McGraw

Morning Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 22:49


On today's podcast, I have special guest, Wylie McGraw Wylie is a former star athlete, competitive bull rider, and 3-tour combat veteran. His work is the proverbial “Navy SEAL Training” equivalent to high performance and leadership development – pushing even the elite beyond their limits so they not only hit their peak but sustain it.Wylie's formal title is Performance Accelerator. He has been named a “secret weapon” by some of the most influential leaders across industries from Wall St., Hollywood, Professional Sports, Fortune 500 companies, Personal Development, and everything in between.Have a listen.Where to connect with Wylie:https://www.wyliemcgraw.com/anti-retreat/www.wyliemcgraw.com

This Is the Author
S7 E25: Scott Hershovitz, Andy Dunn, and Clint Emerson

This Is the Author

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 11:17


S7E25: In this episode, meet professor of law and philosophy Scott Hershovitz, co-founder and former CEO of Bonobos Andy Dunn, and former Navy SEAL and founder of Escape the Wolf Clint Emerson. Tune in to hear what each of these authors is most excited for listeners to hear in their audiobooks. Enjoy! Nasty, Brutish, and Short by Scott Hershovitz: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/639701/nasty-brutish-and-short/ Burn Rate by Andy Dunn: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/653309/burn-rate/ The Rugged Life by Clint Emerson: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/688382/the-rugged-life/

Sheepdog Nation
How a Navy Seal Learned To Battle with Anxiety w/ William Branum

Sheepdog Nation

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 56:34


Meet Navy Seal William Branum- the founder of the CBD company Naked Warrior Recovery! Find him on Instagram here: @nakedwarriorrecovery Check out the Roger Up Event Autumn and William will be speaking at in Chicago in September! Secure your seat in the Can't Be Touched Masterclass HERE! Join Officer Autumn's FB Group For Current and Future Female Cops! Autumn is extremely active on Tik Tok find her at: @officerautumn Watch behind the scenes of Autumn's life on Instagram @officerautumn Autumn will be hosting LIVE Weekly Q&A inside of her Facebook group! Join above! If you are enjoying this podcast- please leave us a review!! Today's show sponsor:  Patriot and Co, a Veteran/LEO owned company supporting our women on the front lines!

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside
JACK CARR | In the Blood

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 75:08


My guests today is friend, former Navy SEAL, and New York Times Bestselling author, Jack Carr. We take so many difference routes in this conversation and all of them worthy of discussion. Of course, we cover his latest book in the James Reece Saga, In the Blood, but we also get into how to eliminate distractions and maintain focus, how to keep yourself from getting tripped up with obstacles on your path to success, leading properly through effective communication, how writing daily can serve as a therapeutic practice, and how to find the perfect flow for projects and life.   SHOW HIGHLIGHTS   Dealing with distractions Lessons from the writing process that relate to life Life will hit you hard, but keep things in perspective Turning mistakes into opportunities Challenges to the First Amendment There is a reason laws are written so broadly The financial side of writing The future of the James Reece series Ghost writing in fiction vs. non-fiction Terminal List coming to TV Its good to be forgiving of mistakes   Want maximum health, wealth, relationships, and abundance in your life? Sign up for our free course, 30 Days to Battle Ready ⠀ Download the NEW Order of Man Twelve-Week Battle Planner App and maximize your week.

Break Things On Purpose
Dan Isla: Astronomical Reliability

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:59


It's time to shoot for the stars with Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia, to talk about everything from astronomical importance of reliability to time zones on Mars. Dan's trajectory has been a propulsion of jobs bordering on the science fiction, with a history at NASA, modernizing cloud computing for them, and loads more. Dan discusses the finite room for risk and failure in space travel with an anecdote from his work on Curiosity. Dan talks about his major take aways from working at Google, his “baby” Selkies, his work at itopia, and the crazy math involved with accounting for time on Mars!In this episode, we cover: Introduction (00:00) Dan's work at JPL (01:58) Razor thin margins for risk (05:40) Transition to Google (09:08)  Selkies and itopia (13:20) Building a reliability community (16:20) What itopia is doing (20:20) Learning, building a “toolbox,” and teams (22:30) Clockdrift (27:36) Links Referenced: itopia: https://itopia.com/ Selkies: https://github.com/danisla/selkies selkies.io: https://selkies.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/danisla LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danisla/ TranscriptDan: I mean, at JPL we had an issue adding a leap second to our system planning software, and that was a fully coordinated, many months of planning, for one second. [laugh]. Because when you're traveling at 15,000 miles per hour, one second off in your guidance algorithms means you missed the planet, right? [laugh]. So, we were very careful. Yeah, our navigation parameters had, like, 15 decimal places, it was crazy.Julie: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about reliability, building things with purpose, and embracing learning. In this episode, we talked to Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia about the importance of reliability, astronomical units, and time zones on Mars.Jason: Welcome to the show, Dan.Dan: Thanks for having me, Jason and Julie.Jason: Awesome. Also, yeah, Julie is here. [laugh].Julie: Yeah. Hi, Dan.Jason: Julie's having internet latency issues. I swear we are not running a Gremlin latency attack on her. Although she might be running one on herself. Have you checked in in the Gremlin control panel?Julie: You know, let me go ahead and do that while you two talk. [laugh]. But no, hi and I hope it's not too problematic here. But I'm really excited to have Dan with us here today because Dan is a Boise native, which is where I'm from as well. So Dan, thanks for being here and chatting with us today about all the things.Dan: You're very welcome. It's great to be here to chat on the podcast.Jason: So, Dan has mentioned working at a few places and I think they're all fascinating and interesting. But probably the most fascinating—being a science and technology nerd—Dan, you worked at JPL.Dan: I did. I was at the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, right, after graduating from Boise State, from 2009 to around 2017. So, it was a quite the adventure, got work on some, literally, out-of-this-world projects. And it was like drinking from a firehose, being kind of fresh out to some degree. I was an intern before that so I had some experience, but working on a Mars rover mission was kind of my primary task. And the Mars rover Curiosity was what I worked on as a systems engineer and flight software test engineer, doing launch operations, and surface operations, pretty much the whole, like, lifecycle of the spacecraft I got to experience. And had some long days and some problems we had to solve, and it was a lot of fun. I learned a lot at JPL, a lot about how government, like, agencies are run, a lot about how spacecraft are built, and then towards the end a lot about how you can modernize systems with cloud computing. That led to my exit [laugh] from there.Jason: I'm curious if you could dive into that, the modernization, right? Because I think that's fascinating. When I went to college, I initially thought I was going to be an aerospace engineer. And so, because of that, they were like, “By the way, you should learn Fortran because everything's written in Fortran and nothing gets updated.” Which I was a little bit dubious about, so correct folks that are potentially looking into jobs in engineering with NASA. Is it all Fortran, or… what [laugh] what do things look like?Dan: That's an interesting observation. Believe it or not, Fortran is still used. Fortran 77 and Fortran—what is it, 95. But it's mostly in the science community. So, a lot of data processing algorithms and things for actually computing science, written by PhDs and postdocs is still in use today, mostly because those were algorithms that, like, people built their entire dissertation around, and to change them added so much risk to the integrity of the science, even just changing the language where you go to language with different levels of precision or computing repeatability, introduced risk to the integrity of the science. So, we just, like, reused the [laugh] same algorithms for decades. It was pretty amazing yeah.Jason: So, you mentioned modernizing; then how do you modernize with systems like that? You just take that codebase, stuff it in a VM or a container and pretend it's okay?Dan: Yeah, so a lot of it is done very carefully. It goes kind of beyond the language down to even some of the hardware that you run on, you know? Hardware computing has different endianness, which means the order of bits in your data structures, as well as different levels of precision, whether it's a RISC system or an AMD64 system. And so, just putting the software in a container and making it run wasn't enough. You had to actually compute it, compare it against the study that was done and the papers that were written on it to make sure you got the same result. So, it was pretty—we had to be very careful when we were containerizing some of these applications in the software.Julie: You know, Dan, one thing that I remember from one of the very first talks I heard of yours back in, I think, 2015 was you actually talked about how we say within DevOps, embrace failure and embrace risk, but when you're talking about space travel, that becomes something that has a completely different connotation. And I'm kind of curious, like, how do you work around that?Dan: Yeah, so failing fast is not really an option when you only have one thing [laugh] that you have built or can build. And so yeah, there's definitely a lot of adverseness to failing. And what happens is it becomes a focus on testing, stress testing—we call it robustness testing—and being able to observe failures and automate repairs. So, one of the tests programs I was involved with at JPL was, during the descent part of the rover's approach to Mars, there was a power descent phase where the rover actually had a rocket-propelled jetpack and it would descend to the surface autonomously and deliver the rover to the surface. And during that phase it's moving so fast that we couldn't actually remote control it, so it had to do everything by itself.And there were two flight computers that are online, pretty much redundant, everything hardware-wise, and so it's kind of up to the software to recover itself. And so, that's called entry descent and landing, and one of my jobs towards the end of the development phase was to ensure that we tested all of the possible breakage points. So, we would do kind of evil Gremlin-like things. We actually—the people in the testbed, we actually call Gremlins. And [laugh] we would—we—they inject faults during the simulation.So, we had copies of the hardware running on a desk, the software was running, and then we'd have Gremlins go and say like, “Hey, flight computer one just went out. You know, what's going to happen?” And you watch the software, kind of, take over and either do the right thing or simulate a crash landing. And we find bugs in the software this way, we'd find, like, hangs in the control loops for recovery, and we had to fix those before we made it to Mars, just in case that ever happened. So, that was like how we, like, really stressed test the hardware, we did the same thing with situational awareness and operations, we had to simulate things that would happen, like, during launch or during the transit from Earth to Mars, and then see how the team itself reacted to those. You know, do our playbooks work? Can we run these in enough time and recover the spacecraft? So, it was a lot of fun. That's I guess that's about as close to, like, actually breaking something I can claim to. [laugh].Julie: Well, I have to say, you've done a good job because according to Wikipedia—which we all know is a very reliable source—as of May 9th, 2022, Curiosity has been active on Mars for 3468 sols or 3563 days, and is still active. Which is really amazing because I don't—was it ever intended to actually be operational that long?Dan: Not really. [laugh]. The hardware was built to last for a very long time, but you know, as with most missions that are funded, they only have a certain amount of number of years that they can be operated, to fund the team, to fund the development and all that. And so, the prime mission was only, like, two years. And so, it just keeps getting extended. As long as the spacecraft is healthy, and, like, doing science and showing results, we usually extend the missions until they just fall apart or die, or be intentionally decommissioned, kind of like the Cassini project. But yeah.Julie: Well, you've heard it here first, folks. In order to keep funding, you just need to be, quote, “Doing science.” [laugh]. But Dan, after JPL, that's when you went over to Google, right?Dan: Yeah, yeah. So, it was kind of that transition from learning how to modernize with cloud. I'd been doing a lot with data, a lot with Amazon's government cloud, which is the only cloud we could use at JPL, and falling in love with these APIs and ways to work with data that were not possible before, and saw this as a great way to, you know, move the needle forward in terms of modernization. Cloud is a safe place to prototype a safe place to get things done quick. And I always wanted to work for a big tech company as well, so that was always another thing I was itching to scratch.And so Google, I interviewed there and finally made it in. It was not easy. I definitely failed my first interview. [laugh]. But then try it again a few years later, and I came in as a cloud solution architect to help customers adopt cloud more quickly, get through roadblocks.My manager used to say the solution architects were the Navy Seals of cloud, they would drop in, drop a bunch of knowledge bombs, and then, like, get out, [laugh] and go to the next customer. It was a lot of fun. I got to build some cool technology and I learned a lot about what it's like working in a big public company.Julie: Well, one of my favorite resources is the Google SRE book, which, as much as I talk about it, I'm just going to admit it here now, to everybody that I have not read the entire thing.Dan: It's okay.Julie: Okay, thank you.Dan: Most people probably haven't.Julie: I also haven't read all of Lord of the Rings either. But that said, you know, when you talk about the learnings, how much of that did you find that you practiced day-to-day at Google?Dan: In cloud—I've mostly worked in cloud sales, so we were kind of post-sales, the experts from the technology side, kind of a bridge to engineering and sales. So, I didn't get to, like, interact with the SREs directly, but we have been definitely encouraged, I had to learn the principles so that we could share them with our customers. And so, like, everyone wanted to do things like Google did, you know? Oh, these SREs are there, and they're to the rescue, and they have amazing skills. And they did, and they were very special at Google to operate Google's what I would call alien technology.And so, you know, from a principles point of view, it was actually kind of reminded me a lot of what I learned at JPL, you know, from redundant systems and automating everything, having the correct level of monitoring. The tools that I encountered at Google, were incredible. The level of detail you could get very quickly, everything was kind of at your fingertips. So, I saw the SREs being very productive. When there was an outage, things were communicated really well and everyone just kind of knew what they were doing.And that was really inspiring, for one, just to see, like, how everything came together. That's kind of what the best part of working at Google was kind of seeing how the sausage was made, you know? I was like, “Oh, this is kind of interesting.” [laugh]. And still had some of its big company problems; it wasn't all roses. But yeah, it was definitely a very interesting adventure.Jason: So, you went from Google, and did you go directly to the company that you helped start, right now?Dan: I did. I did. I made the jump directly. So, while I was at Google, you know, not only seeing how SRE worked, but seeing how software was built in general and by our customers, and by Google, really inspired me to build a new solution around remote productivity. And I've always been a big fan of containers since the birth of Docker and Kubernetes.And I built the solution that let you run, kind of, per-user workloads on Kubernetes and containers. And this proved to be interesting because you could, you know, stand up your own little data processing system and scale it out to your team, as well as, like, build remote code editors, or remote desktop experiences from containers. And I was very excited about this solution. The customers were really starting to adopt it. And as a solution architect, once the stuff we built, we always open-source it.So, I put it on GitHub as a project called Selkies. And so, Selkies is the Kubernetes components and there's also the high performance streaming to a web browser with WebRTC on GitHub. And a small company, itopia, I met at a Google conference, they saw my talk and they loved the technology. They were looking for something like that, to help some of their product line, and they brought me in as VP of Product.So, they said, “We wanted to productize this.” And I'm like, “Well, you're not doing that without me.” [laugh]. Right? So, through the pandemic and work from home and everything, I was like, you know, now is probably a good time to go try something new.This is going to be—and I get to keep working on my baby, which is Selkies. So yeah, I've been itopia since beginning of 2021, building a remote desktop, really just remote developer environments and other remote productivity tools for itopia.Julie: Well and, Dan, that's pretty exciting because you actually talked a little bit about that at DevOpsDays Boise, which if that video is posted by the time of publication of this podcast, we'll put a link to that in the show notes. But you're also giving a talk about this at SCaLE 19x in July, right?Dan: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, so SCaLE is the Southern California Linux Expo, and it's a conference I really enjoy going to get to see people from Southern California and other out of town, a lot of JPLers usually go as well and present. And so, it's a good time to reconnect with folks. But yeah, so SCaLE, you know, they usually want to talk more about Linux and some of the technologies and open-source. And so yeah, really looking forward to sharing more about selfies and kind of how it came to be, how containers can be used for more than just web servers and microservices, but also, you know, maybe, like, streaming video games that have your container with the GPU attached. The DevOpsDays Boise had a little demo of that, so hopefully, that video gets attached. But yeah, I'm looking forward to that talk at the end of July.Jason: Now, I'm really disappointed that I missed your talk at DevOpsDays Boise. So Julie, since that's your domain, please get those videos online quickly.Julie: I am working on it. But Dan, one of the things that you know you talk about is that you are the primary maintainer on this and that you're looking to grow and improve with input from the community. So, tell us, how can the community get involved with this?Dan: Yeah, so Selkies is on GitHub. You can also get to it from selkies.io. And basically, we're looking for people to try it out, run it, to find problems, you know, battle test it. [laugh]. We've been running it in production at itopia, it's powering the products they're building now.So, we are the primary maintainers. I only have a few others, but, you know, we're just trying to build more of an open-source community and level up the, you know, the number of contributors and folks that are using it and making it better. I think it's an interesting technology that has a lot of potential.Jason: I think as we talk about reliability, one of the things that we haven't covered, and maybe it's time for us to actually dive into that with you is reliability around open-source. And particularly, I think one of the problems that always happens with open-source projects like this is, you're the sole maintainer, right? And how do you actually build a reliable community and start to grow this out? Like, what happens if Dan suddenly just decides to rage quit tech and ups and leaves and lives on his own little private island somewhere? What happens to Selkies?Do you have any advice for people who've really done this, right? They have a pet project, they put it on GitHub, it starts to gain some traction, but ultimately, it's still sort of their project. Do you have any advice for how people can take that project and actually build a reliable, growing, thriving community around it?Dan: Honestly, I'm still trying to figure that out [laugh] myself. It's not easy. Having the right people on your team helps a lot. Like, having a developer advocate, developer relations to showcase what it's capable of in order to create interest around the project, I think is a big component of that. The license that you choose is also pretty important to that.You know, there's some software licenses that kind of force the open-sourcing of any derivative of what you build, and so that can kind of keep it open, as well, as you know, move it forward a little bit. So, I think that's a component. And then, you know, just, especially with conferences being not a thing in the last couple of years, it's been really hard to get the word out and generate buzz about some of these newer open-source technologies. One of the things I kind of like really hope comes out of a two-year heads-down time for developers is that we're going to see some, like, crazy, amazing tech on the other side. So, I'm really looking forward to the conferences later this year as they're opening up more to see what people have been building. Yeah, very interested in that.Jason: I think the conversation around open-source licenses is one that's particularly interesting, just because there's a lot involved there. And there's been some controversy over the past couple of years as very popular open-source projects have decided to change licenses, thinking of things like Elastic and MongoDB and some other things.Dan: Yeah. Totally.Jason: You chose, for Selkies, it looks like it's Apache v2.Dan: Yep. That was mostly from a Google legal point of view. When I was open-sourcing it, everything had to be—you know, had to have the right license, and Apache was the one that we published things under. You know, open-source projects change their license frequently. You saw that, like what you said, with Elastic and Mongo.And that's a delicate thing, you know, because you got to make sure you preserve the community. You can definitely alienate a lot of your community if you do it wrong. So, you got to be careful, but you also, you know, as companies build this tech and they're proud of it and they want to turn it into a product, you want to—it's a very delicate process, trying to productize open-source. It can be really helpful because it can give confidence to your customers, meaning that, like, “Hey, you're building this thing; if it goes away, it's okay. There's this open-source piece of it.”So, is instills a little bit of confidence there, but it also gets a little tricky, you know? Like, what features are we adding the add value that people will still pay for versus what they can get for free? Because free is great, but you know, it's a community, and I think there are things that private companies can add. My philosophy is basically around packaging, right? If you can package up an open-source product to make it more easier to consume, easier to deploy, easier to observe and manage, then you know, that's a lot of value that the rest of the free community may not necessarily need.If they're just kind of kicking the tires, or if they have very experienced Kubernetes team on-site, they can run this thing by themselves, go for it, you know? But for those, the majority that may not have that, you know, companies can come in and repackage things to make it easier to run open-source. I think there's a lot of value there.Jason: So, speaking of companies repackaging things, you mentioned that itopia had really sort of acquired you in order to really build on top of Selkies. What are the folks at itopia doing and how are they leveraging the software?Dan: That's a good question. So, itopia's mission is to radically improve work-from-anywhere. And we do that by building software to orchestrate and automate access to remote computing. And that orchestration and automation is a key component to this, like, SaaS-like model for cloud computing.And so, Selkies is a core piece of that technology. It's designed for orchestrating per-user workloads, like, remote environments that you would need to stand up. And so, you know, we're adding on things that make it more consumable for an enterprise, things like VPN peering and single-sign-on, a lot of these things that enterprises need from day one in order to check all the boxes with their security teams. And at the heart of that is really just increasing the amount of the productivity you have through onboarding.Basically, you know, setting up a developer environment can take days or weeks to get all the dependencies set up. And the point of itopia—Spaces is the product I'm working on—is to reduce that amount of time as much as possible. And, you know, this can increase risk. If you have a product that needs to get shipped and you're trying to grow or scale your company and team and they can't do that, you can slip deadlines and introduce problems, and having a environment that's not consistent, introduces reliability problems, right, because now you have developers that, “Hey, works on my machine.” But you know, they may have—they don't have the same machine, same environment as everyone else, and now when it comes to reproducing bugs or even fixing them, that you can introduce more problems to the software supply chain.Julie: I mean, that sounds like a great problem to solve and I'm glad you're working on it. With your background being varied, starting as an intern to now where you personally are being acquired by organizations. What's something that you've really learned or taken from that? Because one thing that you said was that you failed your first Google interview badly? And—Dan: Yes. [laugh].Julie: I find that interesting because that sounds like you know, you've taken that learning from failure, you've embraced the fact that you failed it. Actually, I just kind of want to go back. Tell us, do you know what you did?Dan: It was definitely a failure. I don't know how spectacular it was, but, like, [laugh] google interviews are hard. I mean—and that's just how it is, and it's been—it's notorious for that. And I didn't have enough of the software, core software experience at the time to pass the interview. These are, like, five interviews for a software engineer.And I made it through, like, four of them. The last one was, like, just really, really, really hard and I could not figure it out. You know, because this is, like, back in the day—and I think they still do this, like, where you're, like, coding on a whiteboard, right? Like, okay, right, this C code on a whiteboard, and it has to work. You know, the dude is, like, right, there compiling it, right? Like, “Okay, [unintelligible 00:23:29], boy.” [laugh].So, not only is a high stress, but it has to be right as well. [laugh]. And so, like, it was just a very difficult experience. And what I learned from that was basically, “Okay, I need to, one, get more experience in this style and this domain of programming, as well, as you know, get more comfortable speaking and being in front of people I don't know.” [laugh].So yeah, there's definitely components there of personal growth as well as technical growth. From a technical point of view, like, my philosophy as being an engineer in general, and software developer, is have a really big toolbox and use the tools that are appropriate for the job. This is, like, one of my core philosophies. Like, people ask, you know, ‘what language do you use?' And I'm like, “Whatever language you needed to solve the problem.”Like, if you're writing software, in a—with libraries that are all written in C, then don't try to do that in, like, Java or something, in some other language that doesn't have those language bindings. Don't reinvent the language bindings. You follow the problem and you follow the tech. What language, what tool will best solve this problem? And I'm always working backwards from the problem and then bringing in the right tools to solve it.And that's something that has paid off in dividends because it's very—problem-solving is fun and it's something I always had a passion for, but when you have a toolbox that is full of interesting gadgets and things you can use, you get excited every time you get to use that tool. Like, just like power tools here, I have a—I don't know, but it's like, “Yeah, I get to use the miter saw for this thing. Awesome. I don't have one? Okay, I'm going to go buy one.” [laugh].Julie: That's actually—that's a really good point, one of the talks that I gave was, “You Can't Buy DevOps.” And it was really all about letting developers be part of the process in choosing the tools that they're going to use. Because sometimes I think organizations put too many constraints around that and force you to use these tools that might not be the best for what you're trying to accomplish. So, I like that you bring up having the ability to be excited about your toolbox, or your miter saw. For me, it would be my dremel. Right? But what tool is going to—Dan: [crosstalk 00:25:39] cool.Julie: Yeah, I mean, they really are—what tool is going to be best for the job that you are trying to accomplish? And I think that that's, that's a big thing. So, when you look to bring people onto your team, what kind of questions do you ask them? What are you looking for?Dan: Well, we're just now starting to really grow the company and try and scale it up. And so we're, you know, we're starting to get into more and more interview stuff, I try to tell myself, I don't want to put someone through the Google experience again. And part of that is just because it wasn't pleasant, but also, like, I don't know if it was really that useful [laugh] at the end of the day. And so, you know, there's a lot about culture fit that is really important. People have to be able to communicate and feel comfortable with your team and the pace that your team is working at. And so, that's really important.But you know, technically, you know, I like to see a lot of, you know—you got to be able to show me that you can solve problems. And that can be from, you know, just work that you've done an open-source, you know, having a good resume of projects you've worked on is really important because then we can just talk about tech and story about how you solve the problem. I don't have to—I don't need you to go to the whiteboard and code me something because you have, like, 30 repos on GitHub or something, right? And so, the questions are much more around problem-solving: you know, how would you solve this problem? What technology choices would you use, and why?Sometimes I'll get the fundamentals, like, do you understand how this database works at its core or not? You know, or why is it… why is that good or bad? And so, looking for people who can really think within the toolbox they have—it doesn't have to be a big one, but do they know how to use the tools that they've acquired so far, and really, just really, really critically think through with your problems? So, to me, that's a better skill to have than just, you know, being able to write code on the whiteboard.Julie: Thanks for that, Dan. And earlier, before we started the official recording here, you were talking a little bit about time drift. Do you want to fill everybody in on what you were talking about because I don't think it was Doctor Strange and the Multiverse of Madness?Dan: No. [laugh]. I think there were some—we were talking about um…clocks?Julie: Clocks skew.Dan: Daylight savings time?Julie: Yeah.Dan: Clock skew, clock drift. There was a time at JPL when we were inserting a leap second to the time. This actually happened all throughout the world, where periodically that the clocks will drift far enough because the orbits and the rotation of the planet are not, like, perfectly aligned to 365 days in a year and 24 hours in a day. And so, every so decades, you have to insert these leap seconds in order to catch up and make time more precise. Well, space travel, when you're planning, you have to—you're planning to the position of the stars and the planets and the orbital bodies, and those measurements are done at such a large scale that you have—your precision goes, like, way out, you know, many, many decimal places in order to properly plan to the bodies up big.And with the Mars Rover, one of these leap seconds happened to come in, like, right, before we launched. And it was like, oh my gosh, this is going to be to—change all of our ephemeris files—the data that you use to track positions—and we had to do it, like, synchronize it all, like, right, when the leap second was going in. And we tested this extensively because if you get it wrong with your spacecraft is traveling, like, 15,000 miles an hour towards Mars, and a one-second pointing error from Earth means, like, you missed the whole planet, you won't even get there. [laugh]. We're not talking about, like, missing the landing site of, like, a few kilometers. No, it's like thousands of kilometers in pointing error.So yeah, things are astronomical [laugh] in units. Actually, that's why they're called AU, astronomical units, when you're measuring the distance from the Sun. So yeah, it was a pretty fun time. A little bit nerve-wracking just because the number of systems that had to be updated and changed at the same time. It's kind of like doing a rolling update on a piece of software that just had to go out all at the same time. Yeah.Jason: I think that's really interesting, particularly because, you know, for most of us, I think, as we build things whether that's locally or in the cloud or wherever our servers are at, we're so used to things like NTP, right, where things just automatically sync and I don't have to really think about it and I don't really have to worry about the accuracy because NTP stays pretty tight. Usually, generally.Dan: Mm-hm.Jason: Yeah. So, I'm imagining, obviously, like, on a spacecraft flying 15,000 miles a second or whatever, no NTP out there.Dan: [laugh]. Yeah, no NTP and no GPS. Like, all the things you take for granted, on Mars are just not there. And Mars even has a different time system altogether. Like the days on Mars are about 40 minutes longer because the planet spins slower.And my first 90 sols—or days on Mars—of the mission, the entire planning team on earth that I was a part of, we lived on Mars time. So, we had to synchronize our Earth's schedule with what the rover was doing so that when the rover was asleep, we were planning the next day's activities. And when it woke up, it was ready to go and do work during the day. [laugh]. So, we did this Mars time thing for 90 days. That was mostly inherited from the Mars Exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity because they were only designed to live for, like, 90 days.So, the whole team shifted. And we—and now it's kind of done in spirit of that mission. [laugh]. Our rover, we knew it was going to last a bit longer, but just in case, let's shift everyone to Mars time and see what happened. And it was not good. We had to [laugh] we had to end that after 90 days. People—your brain just gets completely fried after that. But it was bizarre.And there's no time. You have invent your own time system for Mars. Like, there's no, it was called LMST, or Local Mars Standard Time, local mean standard time. But it was all, like, relative to, you know, the equator and where you were on the planet. And so, Mars had his own Mars time that counted at a different rate per second.And so, it was funny, we had these clocks in the Mission Control Room that—there was this giant TV screen that had, like, four different time clocks running. It had, like, Pasadena time, UTC time, Mars time, and, like, whatever time it was at the Space Network. And I was like, “Oh, my gosh.” And so, we were always doing these, like, time conversions in our heads. It was mental. [laugh]. So, can't we just all be on UTC time? [laugh].Jason: So, I'm curious, with that time shift of being on Mars time and 40 minutes longer, that inherently means that by the end of that 90 days, like, suddenly, your 8 a.m. Mars local time is, like, shifted, and is now, like, hours off, right? You're waking—Dan: Yeah.Jason: Up in the middle of the night?Dan: Totally, yeah.Jason: Wow.Dan: Yeah, within, like, two weeks, your schedule will be, like, upside down. It's like, every day, you're coming in 40 minutes later. And yeah, it was… it was brutal. [laugh]. Humans are not supposed to do that.If you're actually living on Mars, you're probably okay, but like, [laugh] trying to synchronize those schedules. I thought you were going from East Coast to West Coast time, working remote was hard. And, like, [laugh] that's really remote.Julie: Dan, that's just astronomical.Dan: [laugh].Julie: I'm so sorry. I had to do it. But with that—[laugh].Jason: [laugh].Dan: [laugh]. [unintelligible 00:33:15].Julie: With that, Dan, I really just want to thank you for your time on Break Things on Purpose with us today. And as promised, if I can find the links to Dan's talks, if they're available before this episode posts, we will put those in the show notes. Otherwise, we'll put the link to the YouTube channel in the show notes to check for updates. And with that, I just want to thank you, Dan, and wish you a wonderful day.Jason: Before we go, Dan, do you have anything that you'd like to plug? Any projects that people should check out, where they can find you on the internet, stuff like that?Dan: Yeah, thank you guys very much for having me. It was a great conversation. Really enjoyed it. Please check out our new product, itopia Spaces, remote developer environments delivered, powered by Selkies. We launched it last fall and we're really trying to ramp that up.And then check out the open-source Selkies project, selkies.io will get you there. And yeah, we're looking for contributors. Beyond that, you can also find me on Twitter, I'm @danisla, or on LinkedIn.Jason: Awesome. Well, thanks again for being a part of the show. It's been fantastic.Dan: You're very welcome. Thanks for having me.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

The Bledsoe Show
Chaos & Order

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 76:51


00:00.00 mikebledsoe Welcome to Monday morning with Mike and max and today we're gonna be talking about order and chaos. You know I think that there's a place for both and society as a whole likes to swing really really hard and me as an individual I do the same thing max. Thanks for joining for another Monday as we discuss topics that seem highly abstract and somehow try to get it to become practical for the listeners. 00:28.90 Max Shank Yeah I think order and chaos could be the name of our show because it's really quite a chaotic ride I think it's an excellent train of thought that gets frequently derailed. But that's part of what makes it fun and interesting and not only do I think order and chaos are ah definitive of each other they define each other i. I think what you said is perfect. We we swing back and forth really hard from more order to more chaos and we try to get tighter control and then more freedom and ah you know more openness or more boundary setting and that back and forth ah can be. Can be really exciting and in societies actually None of the things that's really important about playing and especially wrestling roughhousing that sort of thing is understanding the line between fighting and play fighting and ah. Being able to introduce chaos in a safe environment because the whole purpose of society is to create order reduce chaos as much as possible so you need something to dose you. With chaos. So you don't become um a a sissy and sad. 04:01.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, that and it yeah said I mean the like for me creativity happens after things get shaken up I think about um, no structure is the structure forever. Um, we the human spirit desires for change because we also live in an environment. Ah, ah, ever present change and um, you know we got to if we want to have some stability. We do need to set up structures in society. We need to set up structures in our own life. But we also need to recognize when it's time to assess and reassess these things and I think creating those safe spaces like you're saying where we can't introduce chaos in small amounts or over a short period of time in ah and a confined space. Ah. Really allows us to not have to go through really big societal bits of chaos which I think we're experiencing right now. There's when I think about rites of passage for young men that has been. Ah, regularly conducted over Millennia and it hasn't really happened in american society in the last few generations and so nature comes along and says hey um. Noticed that you guys haven't introduced any of this planned chaos. Ah you know a rite of passage for a man usually involves being out of control and and being needing to submit to the universe and. And usually facing death in some way or the acknowledgement of death and it can feel It's a big pattern interrupt and pattern interrupts tend to be a little chaotic in nature and when a society or an individual. Has been comfortable for too long in their order then nature is going to come along and shake it up because everything's always changing and we may be fighting to keep it the same but at some point the environment's going to break the the individual or the culture. 08:24.35 Max Shank Yes, and you also sacrifice some of the excitement of life if you imagine someone who was born in a castle isolated from most of the world. There's going to be None of order. None exposure to chaos and they may live their whole life in that environment and then have a child of their own that lives in that environment but eventually ah just like the seasons change and ah different. Creatures Rise up and overcome in different parts of the ecosystem. Ah the people in power never stay up there for long and the more you try to create order the more fragile that individual becomes because they're not dosed. With that chaos and that stimulus because our bodies and minds are always adapting via the said principle. So We're always adjusting to what's going on. So if you have no exposure to Chaos. You will be much more fragile. Ah. 10:54.40 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 10:50.13 Max Shank By by definition. 11:18.74 mikebledsoe Yeah I'm listening to a book by Ray Dalio right now I think it's called the rise of the rise of nation rise and fall of nations or something like that and he he he's talking about the 5 cycles through a society and. 11:10.69 Max Shank M. 11:24.51 Max Shank Ah. 11:58.14 mikebledsoe You know if you've read the fourth turning they they identify None cycles. He identifies 5 and these cycles last about 100 years or the the cycles last about 2025 years and there's 4 or 5 of them depending on which expert you ask? and basically what happens is it. Ah, you the society falls into ah each generation becomes more and more chaotic until it's unbearable and that everyone who's like and it usually ends in civil war and external war and then everybody says. Fuck it. We need. We need more order. You know the the economics are broken where everyone's fighting with each other It's it's highly disordered and then what you end up with is a whole yeah a whole generation comes comes along and is like starving for it. So they. 13:04.10 Max Shank The big prick comes in. 13:19.11 Max Shank Yeah, one and it's ah. 13:52.30 mikebledsoe They're wanting I mean that that's basically how Hitler got the power right? Germany was experiencing an incredible amount of chaos and this guy says you know what? if you just do what I say then things will be better and and they were for a while. There's there's there's videos of like. 13:33.19 Max Shank Exactly. 13:52.97 Max Shank And it's frightening. 14:31.72 mikebledsoe The the population gathering and arenas and exercising together. They were like very lockstep and everything was really good for a short period of time until the 1 person who was in charge decided to fucking go nuts and one of the thing. 14:34.17 Max Shank Right? Where there's there's like a line where people are like you know we're really glad that this ah this dick really like got things under control. You know it was a little too chaotic I felt afraid there was pillaging and rioting and then that dictator. Crosses the line and everyone's like whoa, not like that and then and then it goes back to you know, just that did that to that to da today. 15:47.14 mikebledsoe Um, well the the danger is is when you're when you're in ah and a highly ordered society like that the the amount of thinking by the individual is reduced because they don't have to make as many choices and so. They're less likely.. There's that slippery slope they're less likely to catch poor judgment from the top because it's been so good and just one value judgment at a time and next thing you know you're just killing a bunch of people. 16:15.69 Max Shank Yo absolutely and you you can understand why that would attract people I remember watching this series. Excellent series. The dictator's playbook. The episode on Mussolini he's you know, given a speech from some balcony and he goes None italy None decision and everyone goes. Yeah, they are. 17:51.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 17:24.61 Max Shank Onboard They want a so bad like None maybe hundreds. It's so many people and they were so excited that he's like look I will call the shots. You guys don't want to trouble yourselves with these minor details I will take care of everything and. If you've had a good lady or significant other in your life having someone make decisions for you effectively in ah is amazing like there are certain things like some. You have this comparative advantage where someone else now is responsible for stocking the kitchen stocking the bathrooms getting this taken care of like you know you have that division of management basically and it feels amazing. Like if you get the right person to make your decisions you are on Easy Street. It's just ah, absolute power right. 19:55.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I think I think the the happy medium with that because I agree is is you know when you have for instance in the United States you have if you had None person if we had a dictatorship you have None person making the. Decision for 350000000 people. It's not possible for the human mind to be able to grasp the actual impact of the decision on on the individuals and this makes me think about Dunbar's number you know was a. 20:42.37 Max Shank Oh. 21:10.94 mikebledsoe Around None is about as many people as 1 person can keep up with in relationship after that you know people all kind of start looking the same. You don't make as much eye contact. You're not going to remember their names. You're you're not in community and this is why a lot of churches. 21:07.45 Max Shank Oh. 21:49.94 mikebledsoe What they do is they break up after they get to about 150 members and then another church will open up. Ah yeah, and so these like that most churches do that. But in some churches become megachurches and have 10000 members or something like that. 21:37.77 Max Shank It's like setting up little franchises with limits. 21:56.53 Max Shank Yeah. 22:28.92 mikebledsoe And that requires a higher level of leadership and hierarchy hierarchy has to be built into the system in order for that to happen. So when there's and the same thing for Crossfit Gyms all these crossfit gyms sprung up a decade ago and we all watched it happen. It. 22:10.19 Max Shank Right. 23:05.62 mikebledsoe It was a very community driven thing and when it got about 150 members 1 member goes I could do this better. They go open another gym and then they pull some of the gym members away and it's it's just like church and. 22:53.27 Max Shank Ah, crossfits are like church well said I agree there are a lot of similarities there I'm on board. 23:41.28 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, there's a lot of similarities. Yeah, but I think it's a really great demonstration of Dumbbar's number and that the person the person that I'm gonna trust to help. 23:29.31 Max Shank O. 24:13.36 mikebledsoe So make decisions for me right? There's somebody on my team and my company my girlfriend my close group of friends. You know, somebody's organizing a ah ah week long vacation I don't even ask me any questions. They just tell me how much money to throw in the pot and then I show up I'm okay with that. But when we start dealing with people I've never met before and have never met me and now they're making decisions on my behalf I think that becomes problematic. 24:31.63 Max Shank Well, yeah I mean that's that's trust right there I mean who who you choose to trust is a really important choice choosing the right doctor instead of the wrong doctor. Choosing the right trainer instead of the wrong trainer right? Coach instead of the wrong coach and it's not that there it was an absolute good and an absolute bad.. It's just whether or not the resultant partnership or collaboration is gonna be constructive or not because. Some people respond really well to ah stick-based motivation and competitiveness and some people respond way better to carrot-based motivation and creativity and Non-competitiveness. So just finding the right? um. Partnership there like who do you trust with that area of your life is massive. 26:59.62 mikebledsoe Yeah, and going into trust I think one of the reasons we're we're in a massive amount of chaos in our society right now is because there is a lack of trust you know nobody like like the trust of the media is an all time low. 26:43.99 Max Shank Um, well yeah. 27:37.62 mikebledsoe Politicians is an all time low you you ask the average american and they'll just be like yeah the the news and the the politicians are all full of shit. You know there's probably twenty thirty percent think it's still good. But. 27:25.71 Max Shank Which I think is which I think is good I think ah like a skeptical society will actually come up with better solutions but trust saves Calories. Ah the whole Concept. Of a group is built on trust the the whole the whole thing is trust based ah fiat currency all these different things you're trusting that the person in charge is going to do. What's best for You. You're trusting that. Um. You know if you help out with the hunt that you're going to get some of the bounty from that hunt and that we're all going to be part of this unit. We're going to look out for each other.. It's like you scratch my back I'll scratch yours and having those relationships. Is the most powerful thing there is like I think of one of the best survival tools as a radical Rolodex So Just having the right array of people that you can call experts in different fields. But more importantly people that you trust to give you. Real solid Answer. So our whole response to bringing order into chaos bringing order out of chaos is based on faith or Trust. Ah, even if you take it from a religious standpoint. You are putting your faith or trust in a supreme being that we cannot see so it's all it's all trust you could say that? yeah. 31:12.48 mikebledsoe Know or or you could say that that supreme being is everything and everywhere and you see it all the time. But yeah, that's what I say. Ah. 31:13.51 Max Shank I'm pretty sure God is a butterfly. It's the butterfly God Yeah, the other all the other ones are not true I mean I'm pretty religious but it's definitely the butterfly god. 31:45.94 mikebledsoe The Butterfly god. 32:04.78 mikebledsoe There you go. So I I think I think back to like personal experiences with order and chaos and I watch I look at my own life and I watch my own self I'm one of those people that the pendulum swings pretty hard. I Think for some people the pendulum kind of hangs out in the middle for me. It's I go really deep into chaos and then really deep into order and ah, there's not a lot of time spent in the middle. But for me I think that helps with ah. 32:39.39 Max Shank Go. 33:23.50 mikebledsoe More progress is it's definitely not the less least painful way of going about it. But I find it's not for everybody but when I'm but everyone does experience that everyone goes to these cycles of order and chaos and the when I go into. 33:06.10 Max Shank It's not for everybody. 33:59.68 mikebledsoe Times of order what I see is a destruction of the structures. Ah that I had set up in my life previously. Whatever rituals or routines that I had previously were swept away So a really good example of this is I went I sold all my things. 33:32.25 Max Shank Length. 34:39.80 mikebledsoe Got down to two bags and went nomadic for a few years I really didn't have much of anything I left my books with some friends. Yeah yeah, dude I I did some crazy shit Um, during that time it was it. 34:20.60 Max Shank Speaking of a rite of passage right? feels like a rite of passage. 35:15.32 mikebledsoe I destroyed everything like I I left the business I had spent years building I ended up getting divorced I was traveling didn't have a home the level of novelty that was always present was so high that getting making progress on any None thing was. Was close to impossible including taking care of my own health and but it was a really necessary time for me to reestablish a new structure so I needed to I desired a. 35:29.75 Max Shank A. 36:26.78 mikebledsoe New structure so much that I had to I had to really flatten the building I had to rebuild some people are just renovating their house all the time I needed to it was a teardown say my life is a Teardown. Let's just go back down to the slab. Let's go down to the slab and then rethink the floor plan. 36:11.45 Max Shank Ah. 37:05.66 mikebledsoe And everything so the I think I think the reason yeah I think the reason people don't do that is because well when you've been living under 1 structure your whole life going back to the and rebuilding new floor plan. You have no idea what to do so there's there's the lack of. 36:39.21 Max Shank Takes a lot more time to do that. Also. 37:43.52 mikebledsoe Knowledge that can be scary for people to do that demolition plan and then the the knowing that man I I spent say None building this one house and now I'm just going to completely demolish it and start over I know that what I build next is going to be so much better. But. 37:35.91 Max Shank Her. 38:23.36 mikebledsoe That's a lot of work. 37:56.33 Max Shank And absolutely and it's even ah, depending on. Ah how you're wired. It's more like choosing which limb to cut off because it's a part of you is like you're. 38:54.38 mikebledsoe Yeah. 38:30.73 Max Shank Your identity is wrapped up into whatever it is you have going on this marriage this business this habit this thing over here to like strip those away and start coming to the I I think. Crazy shocking realization that most of your like baggage and Bullshit was just thoughtlessly inherited just thoughtlessly and you you weren't like trying to inherit it. It was just Monkey See Monkey Do Bing Bam boom. 39:58.54 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 39:48.63 Max Shank And you're like now I'm this and you get wrapped up into like I'm this and this is good cause I'm good and that's what I'm trying to say all the time. So why would you want to let that go in exchange for something that is unknown right? because that's what really scares people is like I'll take this from. 40:44.56 mikebledsoe Yeah, and. 40:26.73 Max Shank Familiar pain to the unknown that is like I don't know if it's a devil's bargain or a fool's bargain but it doesn't sound like a good deal and yet that's what most of us make is we'll take the familiar pain I'll take familiar pain again. Thank you compared to the unknown. 41:28.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, there's um I think in the landmark education they call it the winning strategy. So it's it's a strategy that you learn at a young age where you go Oh if I behave like this. 41:03.49 Max Shank Ah, no yeah. 41:17.77 Max Shank Oh. 41:29.70 Max Shank Um, ah yeah. 42:04.72 mikebledsoe Then this happens or I get to avoid this by being like this I get to you know my dad got mad at me 1 time for doing this. You know I'll never do anything that resembles that ever again and now you become now that that becomes part of who you are and forms the personality and it becomes a winning strategy and. 41:39.89 Max Shank Totally. 42:15.71 Max Shank Oh man. 42:44.80 mikebledsoe And you end up and you get the reward at a young age and then you start collecting evidence for that being a winning strategy. Yeah, you're like oh and you're unable to see where it's not working because it's the only thing that's present. So this is what creates the blind spots. 42:27.79 Max Shank Um, it's like heroin. Oh my god. 42:45.71 Max Shank Man. 43:23.54 mikebledsoe And the the winning strategy is something that is very difficult to let go because it is usually very responsible for a lot of success in your life like somebody may their winning strategy may be shit talking themselves and that's and they overcome it like the beside Navy Seal's name. 43:21.95 Max Shank Yeah. 44:01.38 mikebledsoe Who are ah David Goggins yeah I mean he's he's highly accomplished but he seems miserable as fuck and so he he seems like it is like like he's a perfect example. David Goggins is a perfect example of somebody who. 43:36.69 Max Shank Goggins. Yeah. 44:41.32 mikebledsoe Has a winning strategy. It's getting him some type of reward. But it's costing him so much in his life that he's completely unaware of and doesn't he doesn't value it because he hasn't touched it yet and yet I've met I mean I went through this myself I went from becoming successful. 44:37.30 Max Shank When. 45:16.80 mikebledsoe Shit talking myself and what I was trying to avoid versus you know, ah talking to myself like I was a how would I talk to a None ar old. Well, that's probably how I should talk to myself and so anyways going back to the the people are afraid to give up that. Winning strategy because they're afraid that if they let go of that piece that that piece of their identity. They're not going to be good at something anymore and being good at something is what's earned them. Love. 45:46.51 Max Shank Oh my God It's like a tool. It's It's like you're setting down your sword before you waltz into the Dragons Den It's like when I was a kid I learned about lying now. Okay, lying is a strategy. 46:30.44 mikebledsoe Yeah. 46:24.11 Max Shank That has almost no limits to it in terms of what you can get for Yourself. You can get out of trouble instantly so I was lying all the time growing up as soon as I was able to get away with it I mean what's a better rush than that and there are all kinds of behaviors like that. That they work so you just keep doing them. 47:34.92 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah, they work and then until they don't right? and this is this is where you know, um when we did when in psychology when when we look at like stages of development and. 47:19.29 Max Shank Until they don't. 48:13.72 mikebledsoe What ends up happening is the the things that that move you into one stage of development will end up being the things that hold you back from the next and in fact, when if you look at say the the model of spiral dynamics for psychology and and human development is you're actually moving from. Um. 47:59.71 Max Shank A. 48:52.36 mikebledsoe More of an eye oriented to a we oriented but there's also a bit of chaos and order on either side of that as well. So it's more of a spiral so you got we and I so some stages are more we oriented some stages more eye oriented but then it's it's not ah, it's not a straight line back and forth. It's ah it's a spiral. 48:40.75 Max Shank Ah. 49:29.10 mikebledsoe And in between the eye and the we is is chaos and when you're making the transition and then you've got to bring the order back and so for people to want that chaos in their life. They usually have to be really unhappy with the way something's going on in their life. People when I think about this I think about ah people that have dysfunctional patterns of behavior and a lot of people I think think about oh I have anxiety or I have like some type of system a symptom that might show up in the Dsm um, Dsm whatever it is the. Psychology playbook of symptoms and diagnoses and they they think oh I've got this I'm suffering from this thing and that's the dysfunction. But it's not the best way to find dys function in your life is to just to see what's not working. What what do you desire to be different in your life but you can't seem to get there that to me that demonstrates that there's some type of dysfunction and usually people believe that there's nothing they can do about it. But once they get a hint. And they're just fucking sick and tired of this thing being true in their life. You're like you know I'm gonna do something about it fuck it and then they start digging deep and there's a lot of work to be done there but that that itself becomes chaotic because as you start making changes in your life. You basically have to start behaving differently for everyone else in your life. And they do not like that because they expect you to behave a certain way and that that creates relational chaos. 52:14.97 Max Shank I Think of it in a very basic way which is you have momentum being a certain way and the easiest thing to do is just continue with that Momentum. That's the most effortless thing you can do. So your pain or discomfort needs to be proportional to the adjustment of your trajectory like you need to be dissatisfied or uncomfortable enough to overcome the momentum of living a certain way. And it's not until that happens that a person takes action. Otherwise why would they? it's pure law of least Action. We're going to do the minimum we can unless ah otherwise authorized from a higher order kind of function. And even that is going to be based on a ah big picture discomfort um with just letting things flow as they may. It's like ah I'm uncomfortable not doing this thing. It's it's too painful to not. Go to Mars anymore. It's too painful to not get a divorce anymore. It's too painful to not start a business anymore. Whatever it is. There's like it's different for everybody different pain threshold for different pain catalyst. 55:40.30 mikebledsoe Everyone's got different rock bottom. Yeah, and that makes me think about our concept I I know I didn't create it. But um, the the feather I don't know where it came from the feather the break the Mac truck and if have I told you about this yet. 55:46.10 Max Shank The feather the brick and the Mac truck. No no I told you this but why don't you go ahead and share it with everybody. 56:28.20 mikebledsoe Are you. 56:34.76 mikebledsoe Pretty out did I hear I didn't hear from you did you or did you are you the originator. 56:15.21 Max Shank Go ahead. Just let let them know what it is. It's fine. Go ahead. 56:55.98 mikebledsoe Um, so yeah, the the the feather the Breakke the mack truck. You always get the message very lightly in the beginning and most people ignore it then it comes a little harder and then it's a fucking mack truck and it runs you over. 56:51.95 Max Shank Here. A e. 57:31.96 mikebledsoe And think that the skill is learning to listen for feathers and so it's a it's a it's a it's about being more sensitive. Yeah. 57:23.75 Max Shank Right? But you don't want to get startled every time you feel the wind either right? when there's nothing there. Yeah, you didn't get that for me for me. It's always been the wind the feather the brick and the Mac truck. 58:04.28 mikebledsoe No, you gotta be you gotta be listening to the right thing. 58:23.54 mikebledsoe The wind the feather oh shit oh shit, did you get it from somebody. Are you reading the same person or did you are you really an originator. Do you even know. 58:12.97 Max Shank Now I just I just made the whole thing up I never heard of it until just now. But I thought it would be fun to ah, just throw that Monkey Wrench in there because because see for me. Ah I think. 59:01.42 mikebledsoe Ah, the wind the fact. Okay, we'll throw in the wind now now we've got 4 levels. 58:52.97 Max Shank It's it's like ah a hypochondriac. The hypochondriac is thinking. Everything is some health disaster and really they were just constipated or something like that and I think the line between Prudence and paranoia is a truly fascinating one. 59:33.18 mikebledsoe Yeah, um. 59:31.55 Max Shank Because everybody has a different idea of what is reasonable preparedness and responsibility like the ability to respond or not so it's It's really the same thing like what's the line between prudence and having like a very deep awareness. 01:00:11.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:00:09.93 Max Shank Of what's going on around you and responding to the slightest stimulus so being a little I don't know hypersensitive versus like hyposensitive. It's ah it's an interesting thing. 01:01:04.60 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:00:41.87 Max Shank So so like to kind of bring us back to that concept of the feather the brick and the Mac truck that what you're saying is change is or or like life. Let's say is giving you signals. 01:01:43.28 mikebledsoe M. 01:01:19.51 Max Shank And if you pay attention to the signal when it's really light. It's not going to cause you much harm. But if you if you wait the feather becomes a brick becomes a mac truck when it eventually just absolutely wrecks you. 01:01:57.20 mikebledsoe Right. 01:02:13.12 mikebledsoe Yeah, becomes more painful but also the amount of change that you're gonna have to make is probably more drastic so it's a double whammy you got extra pain and and additional work to do like I think about say somebody who is a. 01:01:56.33 Max Shank Um, yeah. 01:02:52.68 mikebledsoe A meth at it. You know if they're one weekend and they notice like oh I'm not getting good sleep I'm Jittery I you know I'm not paying attention at work or whatever and they and they go you know what? I've you know I'm gonna check myself into a clinic and I'm gonna kick this thing but then you got the person who's. 01:02:25.25 Max Shank Ah. 01:02:38.41 Max Shank For her. 01:03:31.22 mikebledsoe 10 years in you know they're missing their teeth like for them to be able to get their life back on track and get a job and all that is going to be monumentally more difficult. 01:03:25.91 Max Shank Right? So going past the point of no return basically like how how hard it is. yeah yeah I mean David Goggins is a ah great example of ah. 01:04:07.88 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's a point you cross where you never getting back? Yeah yeah. 01:04:05.55 Max Shank Someone who has just made such an impression on so many people I think you know he he just flipped total extremes right? Big fat guy boom now I'm a Navy seal running millions of miles. Oh my foot's broken. 01:04:55.40 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 01:04:45.43 Max Shank Who Cares stay hard and I think that now that Persona has gotten him speaking of winning strategies. So now even if he did say you know what I think a more gentle form of exercise is really the right choice for most people because. You know, Actually you're going to harm yourself long term by just running through these injuries. Ah, he almost can't do that now because he has got this winning strategy as this character and I think he. 01:05:55.24 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. Well, you know. 01:05:59.77 Max Shank Wants to be that character for himself and for everybody else I think he's got to be thinking. Wow This is an amazing thing that I am doing here and I'm this guy for myself and for these other folks. 01:06:50.50 mikebledsoe Yeah I think a lot of people are attracted to it because they yeah they're they're attracted to it and they want to do it. They want to be like it. But I think it's a it's. 01:06:37.95 Max Shank Superhero shit. Of course it's attractive. 01:07:27.40 mikebledsoe It's immature in a lot of ways you know there's there's somebody who I saw go through a transformation which was a gary banynerchuk and I don't know if he shifted I Never really heard him say hey I had a realization I'm changing the way that I'm speaking now. 01:07:14.71 Max Shank He. 01:08:05.50 mikebledsoe But I watched him shift over like a 5 year period of hustling rind. You know, get out of your mouth and maybe that his audience matured and he needed to shift his his message. 01:07:47.10 Max Shank Ah. 01:08:00.99 Max Shank He. 01:08:33.64 mikebledsoe But it became more of like hey let's work smarter not harder like be kind to yourself all these things Gary Vaynerchuk I mean if you go back and watch videos from ten years ago and him trying to motivate a crowd. He's telling him to like you know, buck up, you know quit being a little bitch and now he's. 01:08:31.53 Max Shank In. 01:09:09.56 mikebledsoe He's found a little more kindness in in his approach. So I think there's a that's something that was working for him but he also was able to to mature beyond that hopefully David Goggins experiences the same thing I mean for his sake because I mean if you got to keep that persona on. 01:08:47.84 Max Shank Right. 01:09:47.38 mikebledsoe For the rest of your life. It's just hard to. 01:09:21.90 Max Shank But maybe that feels like good for him. Maybe that's that's exactly what he's looking for he he won't be happy unless there's a ah, big physical challenge and you know who can imagine what it's like to live that guy's life. 01:10:22.44 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, who knows and there's a place for everybody right? like there's a reason that he's so prolific right now is because there are a lot of soft people that need to hear that message. They're probably sick and tired of being soft or like you know what I'm I'm fat too. 01:09:57.85 Max Shank Is what I say. Ah. 01:10:21.19 Max Shank Yes. 01:11:00.82 mikebledsoe And I don't know what to do about this so you know what? like and I mean I am of the opinion that whatever, whatever the fuck gets you started go but my encouragement is it's never the whole thing get gets you started on being healthier. 01:10:33.47 Max Shank Right. 01:10:55.17 Max Shank Whatever gets you started on anything. Ah. 01:11:40.46 mikebledsoe But you know it got fat shamed Now you're losing weight. Okay, but here's the thing is take it further yeah like take it get up take it further. You know I think people a lot of times. It's It's like. 01:11:22.69 Max Shank You got fat shamed you got fat shamed. 01:12:15.30 mikebledsoe The reason you're fat is not because it's not necessarily because you're not exercising enough or you didn't You're not I mean these are the the behaviors you're not exercising enough and you're and you're eating like shit but like there's an entire lifestyle that goes behind this that that needs to shift that doesn't need to be. Maniacal about food and exercise. 01:12:35.29 Max Shank It's literally just using food as pleasure more than your activity will allow and the reason we do things like that is because we feel like there's something missing and we want to change our state salty sweet fatty cheesy bits. Will will pretty much resolve that immediately. It's not super long lasting but you know Obesity is just a drug addiction that has a really easy to see physical manifestation to it. 01:14:15.22 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:13:47.35 Max Shank Right. Ah, it's It's like a lot of people are addicted to their phones but it doesn't make you £40 heavier. Oh you're you're addicted to your phone but this other person is addicted to ah like hostess cupcakes. That's we're not getting sponsored by them but just because. 01:14:55.26 mikebledsoe Not yet max not yet. 01:14:30.53 Max Shank Just because they're addicted to just God I Hope so sponsored by Twinkie. Ah, but yeah, if someone's addicted to hostess cupcakes instead of the telephone they get fat but it's you're still just. Pulling a pleasure lever to distract from being here and now basically right. 01:15:46.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah I Um, definitely use food as a little bit of entertainment and but you know what I've I've figured out how to use my entertainment food. Like I can get really entertained by my food without it being just outlandishly terrible and that I think that's ah, that's a good like like. For instance I eat like ah, a keto ice cream that doesn't have It's like the cleanest one I could find mammoth It's mostly just fat. With a tiny bit of sweetener supposed to just cream and by the way I mean just eating frozen cream by itself is so good. Yeah, and then and then I put put strawberries on it I put strawberries on it and then I put. 01:16:35.10 Max Shank Don't don't eat that bad sugar. Don't eat that bad sugar fat Only sugar is bad for you. Don't eat sugar Listen there's a killer out there. It's sugar. 01:17:28.34 mikebledsoe Raw honey on it. Yeah yeah, and then that'll usually beat whatever fucking dessert that's sitting on the shelf somewhere or even at a restaurant like it's actually tastier. 01:17:00.87 Max Shank Um, very fancy. 01:17:20.81 Max Shank Well, you know that's great that you have found a strategy that that works for you. Um, for for your mouth pleasure. Although. 01:18:03.82 mikebledsoe Um, yeah I know it's not your your morning cheesecake that you like to start your day with. 01:17:54.75 Max Shank I Do like to start with a cheesecake and mocha in the morning if the opportunity arises I'm definitely going to take it. Absolutely. 01:18:46.22 mikebledsoe Ah, well ordering Chaos I. 01:18:20.35 Max Shank So with the with the food is it about the mouth pleasure like the the flavor the chewing the swallowing the whole thing I mean that's what helped me like get a handle on the the food addiction I mean it's all good right. Is it that I like the flavor while I'm chewing. Is it like some deeper primal thing where I I just feel good that I'm putting stuff in my belly like there's this primal desire. That's like yeah food goes in this tube this way and then that's a good thing. 01:19:52.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I think I think for me it um like I'm a low appetite person. So yeah, yeah. 01:19:39.73 Max Shank How nice someone the other day said to me he goes. Ah I've been trying he was at he was at our gym he goes I've been trying to eat more and the idea of someone who had to try to eat more. 01:20:31.44 mikebledsoe You know? okay. 01:20:17.41 Max Shank Was so foreign to me ah eating more is my absolute default. Ah the concept of eating less food than I need or even just the right amount that I need is insane like every time I'm eating food I Want more. I Want hometown Buffet I want all you can eat sushi I Want a gigantic porter house with mashed potatoes. 01:21:34.54 mikebledsoe Yeah I think I think what may be different between you and I is I've been obsessing over the nutrient density of my food since I was about 14 So it's um. 01:21:28.17 Max Shank A. 01:22:06.66 mikebledsoe Like yeah I'm in this constant search for the highest quality of what I'm what I'm eating now Super dens. It's a superfood and so the yeah. 01:21:46.59 Max Shank That's why I just eat bullying cubes. 01:22:03.33 Max Shank I Think we should try to make that a thing super concentrated beef essence. 01:22:45.88 mikebledsoe Well, it's kind of like kale kale was like being sold as ah like a garnish for these buffets at Wendy's or whatever for for almost nothing and then it was listed as a super food. It was marketed properly and then ah. 01:22:34.83 Max Shank Ah. 01:23:20.12 mikebledsoe The fucking price of it skyrocket. We can do the same thing for Bullyon Cubes I think is somehow you know hate. It's. 01:23:01.79 Max Shank That would be such an exciting thing to get like all these high level athletes just snacking on bullion cubes. Everyone starts carrying around a little beef pouch salty. Yeah. 01:23:43.38 mikebledsoe Yeah I think it's a good hydration. It's more like a hydration tool. Yeah, yeah, yeah, but ah yeah I think for me like I've always all I'm like this this quality freak about food and be and like I don't want it. 01:23:46.70 Max Shank Here. 01:24:21.96 mikebledsoe I could eat like a footlong Subway Club sandwich like I could do that like don't get me wrong I could do it but but it just it just doesn't like um, there's something about it I Just don't I don't feel satisfied in the same way and so. 01:23:59.59 Max Shank That sounds good I like a good submarine sandwich. 01:25:01.60 mikebledsoe When I'm eating higher quality foods like it does seem like it's harder to eat. It's like I get satisfied more quickly So I don't eat as many calories and then I'm also burning through a lot of calories in the day and then if I'm training which I am right now. Are you just the. 01:25:00.83 Max Shank Then. 01:25:40.30 mikebledsoe The appetite just skyrocket. But I don't I won't put down just anything So then I end up eating Keto ice cream with honey and strawberries at night. 01:25:17.83 Max Shank A. 01:25:28.93 Max Shank Yeah I'll I'll eat healthy food I'll just eat 3 times the volume of what I should eat. It's weird I'll be at a restaurant or something and they'll be like. Do you want any dessert and I'll look at the dessert menu. 01:26:12.40 mikebledsoe Yeah I think I just have a small stomach some you know. 01:26:06.89 Max Shank And I'll be like no but I will get another entree instead when it's like roughly this I Really like savory foods so we'll be out. It'll be like sushi or something they'll be like oh you want dessert and I'm looking the desserts I'm go think I'll just have more rice and fish and avocado and that kind of thing. 01:26:59.64 mikebledsoe A ah. 01:26:42.61 Max Shank Um, food Huh How about that. 01:27:13.82 mikebledsoe Yeah, so going back to ordering chaos where we started. Ah I I think that what we're gonna be witnessing moving forward is a lot of people seeking order. There was I was listening ah to. 01:26:55.61 Max Shank Order up. 01:27:16.30 Max Shank A. 01:27:52.76 mikebledsoe Gad sad god sad how do you say his name on Rogan the other day and it was talking about how some of the professors are starting to report that the that the new students in the college in the universities are. Really wanting a more conservative approach to things like they seem to be tired with you know all the the crazy shit around you know like they're being 72 different genders and and all that kind of stuff and so the ah. 01:28:26.15 Max Shank All that shit is just all that shit doesn't matter. It's just about whether or not the discourse is violent or not I think. 01:29:13.46 mikebledsoe Well I think that's part of the problem is it's it. You know it's obviously been violent people certain people aren't allowed to talk at universities because they get shouted out and basically forced out So that's chaos. That's that's people's emotional state. 01:28:57.53 Max Shank Right? wild. 01:29:51.40 mikebledsoe Overtaking their behavior becoming illogical and then are unable to you know have intepit discourse. So I yeah I think I mean if we look at if we look at what Ray Dalio says if we look at the fourth turning. We look at these things that these people who talk about. These cycles that are going on in the world and I think we're pretty getting pretty close to maxing out on chaos I mean I think the only thing that's more chaotic for for for the american public for for the. 01:30:19.51 Max Shank Um, what whoa woa I don't know I'm still listening though but I don't know. 01:31:05.40 mikebledsoe For the American Public's taste for things you think they can take more chaos. We'll see. Um, yeah I could see it going a little bit further I mean but the the only thing that's left is is now and. 01:30:58.23 Max Shank Um I think of anarchy as chaos like anarchy is chaos that I mean that would be soak I Oh my God I think things like I don't think things are being run well. But. 01:31:40.16 mikebledsoe No anarchy is different. So ah. 01:32:01.30 mikebledsoe Boy here. 01:31:36.77 Max Shank My gosh I think a lot of stuff is still running so smoothly so predictably in such an ordered fashion I mean I hope it doesn't get more chaotic and unpredictable. 01:32:22.40 mikebledsoe Well well anarchy anarchy just means without a ruler and so it no without a ruler and so it has to do with. 01:32:06.67 Max Shank Right? Well without without rule isn't it or just without a guy who enforces the rules then. 01:32:59.34 mikebledsoe God. 01:32:36.89 Max Shank No. 01:33:08.42 mikebledsoe Ah, well if you define God by natural law like like gravity like like to me that is the the forces that have put been put in place to create physical order in the world which we don't need. Anyone to be in charge to do that right? like real laws are things that no person has to enforce and so you have natural law and then you have common law which is basically don't fuck with me and I'm not going to fuck with you right. 01:33:47.53 Max Shank Right? But who's enforcing that is the question. That's what I'm saying So it's ah you know I think there would be a lot more people stealing each other shit if they didn't think there was some like repercussion. 01:34:22.64 mikebledsoe Well people ultimately have to enforce it for themselves. Yeah. 01:34:43.68 mikebledsoe Her maybe maybe well here here's wait. There is a reapercussion so here's an example San Francisco has riots how long do they last Minneapolis long fucking time. You know how long they lasted in Miami. 01:34:25.51 Max Shank That the hired guns could lay in a long time. Yeah, not as long. 01:35:20.78 mikebledsoe Yeah, about 36 hours and then it everyone went back to order and it's not because they put more police force out. It's because the the ah the police came out and said hey if you own a store on this street. You might want to come out with your gun. They basically encourage people to protect their own property because that's a state in which they honor property rights right? and then right and then but. 01:35:43.30 Max Shank Which are the only reason we have all these rules in the None place. 01:36:24.58 mikebledsoe But property rights aren't necessarily I don't think they necessarily have to be enforced by an outside entity whereas in California you have government officials that are impeding property rights so in 1 state you've got the encouragement of protecting your own property like we're not even going to do it. You do it. 01:36:19.49 Max Shank Right. 01:36:32.53 Max Shank Right. 01:37:03.90 mikebledsoe And then in San Francisco they're saying whatever you do don't protect your own property or else we're gonna come after you, you know you can't have a gun if you shoot somebody on your property. We're gonna you're gonna be in trouble. So some people would say that San Francisco has got way more order or. 01:36:46.10 Max Shank Right. 01:37:42.64 mikebledsoe Whereas Florida seems a little more anarchist right? where they're encouraging when I think about anarchy it brings it down to there is a ruler and each person has to be their own ruler in which case. So we look at Miami and people would say oh we're just gonna let people kill each other but the the amount of damage that was done and the amount of deaths were really small because what happened was people came out with their guns. A couple writers got shot and killed and then everyone goes. Oh you can't do that or else you might get shot and killed and so they just don't do it anymore. So I think this is a good example of of the order being placed by. You know, an authoritative government is shown to be ineffective. So I think. 01:38:32.51 Max Shank Um, well yeah. 01:39:31.30 mikebledsoe Majority of order that's produced people generally want to be kind to each other people generally want to get along in all the research people avoid conflict. They don't They don't do these things they enter into conflict when they think they can be faceless and nameless and they're wearing a mask and and running through the streets. 01:39:24.49 Max Shank Most people. 01:39:38.77 Max Shank A. 01:40:09.94 mikebledsoe With a thousand other people and they can blend in now they become that's chaos. That's that's that's the mob but that's not anarchy. That's ah anarchy would be everyone. There would be consequences. You're held liable for your personal stuff. 01:39:48.30 Max Shank Um, a mob. 01:40:44.12 mikebledsoe Just because everybody was doing It doesn't mean that you are um that it's okay to do it So There's a level of individual responsibility that I see that happens with anarchy and I think that this I think that anything that's not anarchy is actually a. It's an illusion because if we if we go up so we. 01:40:58.49 Max Shank Well hold up every society is an illusion based on a unify unifying set of beliefs whether it's the tree spirit or an eye for an eye code of hamurabi or hey that guy with the big stick is in charge because he can beat up everyone else. 01:41:50.46 mikebledsoe It's just it's a story. 01:42:02.26 mikebledsoe Well well the big, the big stick guy is usually what people think about anything about anarchy is like it's like oh yeah, it's a power game right? It's like if everyone's just running around and. 01:41:38.50 Max Shank Right? And we just do what he says. That's all. 01:41:56.53 Max Shank Well it it is extra Well if there's no recourse if someone takes your stuff except for your own then everyone is going to have to arm themselves significantly more now I do think that would make a community. 01:43:01.74 mikebledsoe I Think it would be a much more peaceful community as well. 01:42:33.81 Max Shank Much much stronger been to Oklahoma I agree completely. Um, people would respect boundaries a little more I believe and if you think that you may get shot. You're less likely to go try to Rob someone unless it's really really desperate. 01:43:32.78 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 01:43:12.31 Max Shank And even then you're more likely to go ask? What can you do you can beg borrow or steal if someone has something you want. You know you can work you can beg or you can take um so I think it has a lot to do with. 01:43:52.82 mikebledsoe Now. 01:44:05.90 mikebledsoe Or. 01:43:51.67 Max Shank Fact that we can get our needs met relatively smoothly and I think if you had let's say a dis because I'm not a fan of how taxpayer dollars are managed at all because that's all government is it's all all of our pooled resources put to work by a few. Ah. Clever folks. But I think if you were to dissolve that whole system. Ah it would be a really shaky turbulent. Ah very chaotic adjustment period because the whole concept of. dollars and cents and retirements and everything would just completely collapse and all of these agreements based on that old system would also collapse so all of your existing contracts would basically be like I'm gonna just not. 01:46:08.66 mikebledsoe Well, a lot of a lot of these structures are are corporate in nature and so these agreements and so any agreements you have with government I mean it's a corporate. It's an agreement between a corporation and an individual which is technically like unlawful. 01:45:43.21 Max Shank Do that anymore. 01:46:13.47 Max Shank Right? But those ah but those agreements are basically just for if you have to go to a court. 01:46:46.74 mikebledsoe In a way. But. 01:46:56.84 mikebledsoe Yeah there I got a I got a show coming out with Jesse Elder where he covers the whole going to court thing but the which I think will be interesting but I want I want to take this back to the the idea that that do we live. My argument is we already live in anarchy right? And so the I was thinking about this the other day is so there's a war between well I'm about to explain it. So everyone everyone thinks that there's a rule of law right? like the United States is like it's it's not ruled by men. It's ruled by law. 01:47:21.70 Max Shank Why do we live in anarchy. Okay. 01:47:46.37 Max Shank Sometimes. 01:48:14.78 mikebledsoe And so that's that was that's kind of the concept of the United States it's not necessarily how it's resulted, but that's the concept was to to keep us out of trouble. But if we get outside of the United States and we go global. We have global anarchy right? the. 01:47:57.31 Max Shank Right. 01:48:53.24 mikebledsoe There is no. There is no authority that makes the countries behave So some of these. 01:48:32.10 Max Shank Maybe oligarchy maybe more like an oligarchy than total anarchy like I think there's a lot of power centers and unions and allegiances that guide the flow of the world. 01:49:22.52 mikebledsoe There are there are the um that that are a lot less oligarchies. Well depends on the oligarch like what system you're using can be less violent. You mean you could say that like Elon Musk is probably None of the most powerful people on the planet. Not probably He's more powerful than most countries. Ah and ah, but all the interaction with him and his stuff is is voluntary. So it's it's a less. He may be he may be in charge of people's minds in a way because he's deciding you know what? they. 01:49:54.17 Max Shank Which is amazing. Ah, right. 01:50:38.78 mikebledsoe They may be seeing because he controls that way, but it's not.. It's not overtly coercive or or violent. Um, but if we if we extrapolate out and we go what keeps these nations like what supersedes the nation you know and some people might say Nato UN. Ah, have all these different organizations where these countries send representatives and they jerk each other off for a few days and then go back. Ah these that the truth is is the only thing that keeps anyone from fucking with anybody else is the possibility of total destruction. There's an entire global strategy going on by each country On. You have a few powers that are trying to dominate. But there's all these allies that are created and rules and and and they're generating all this stuff but generally like if you I think people. People are under this false premise of there is law and order that's produced by human beings. But it's completely inaccurate because if we keep going to a larger Magnitude. We start seeing that there's nothing other than brute force and power that is. That is in charge and so in which case I say that that's truly just Anarchy. We already exist under it. But the problem is is we suffer under a ah like ah this illusion because people don't ah. Because they put their trust in the illusion. They never take personal responsibility. They never become their own ruler. They never make their own decisions. They never learn to protect themselves feed themselves provide for themselves and so they're putting the trust in something illusory that can change at a moment's notice. And put them out in the cold. 01:54:07.63 Max Shank Um, yeah I I tend to think that all ah Authority matters are resolved that way with the threat of total destruction on a micro level and on a macro level. You know the. 01:55:06.22 mikebledsoe M. 01:54:45.33 Max Shank Way that individuals are ruled the way that countries are ruled the way that countries rule over each other.. It's always the threat of total destruction and you know self-preservation is a very powerful instinct and I think that's probably what drives ah countries more than anything. Is the self-preservation Instinct of the rulers. 01:55:59.64 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, gotta be I mean I think that's just everybody. 01:55:39.27 Max Shank Keep the power get a little bit more keep the power get a little bit more because it never ends it very rarely ends well like the dictator doesn't like ride off into the sunset and be like hey guys I had fun oppressing the shit out of you. Thank you for letting me just go on. 01:56:36.86 mikebledsoe Yeah, well when was the last time there was a dictator that like died of natural causes and everybody all the your country. The country was like oh yeah, ah. 01:56:14.47 Max Shank Down the dusty road dude North Korea North Korea one of my favorite front. None of my favorite stories ever I another plug for dictators playbook. Very good series. The story of ah Kim il-sung. And then ah Kim Jong -il and now kim jong un none generation dictatorship pretty good for the modern era he is repressing the shit out of those people's ability to see information and see what other life is like he's smeared the hell out of the fat americans it's incredible. 01:57:29.64 mikebledsoe Now. Yeah. 01:58:00.28 mikebledsoe I need to I need to watch this. It sounds. 01:57:33.19 Max Shank Ah, anyway, Kim il-sung dot died of natural causes. Kim Jong -il also died of natural causes. Kim Jong un maybe eating himself to death. But that's still a natural cause basically like it's incredible. 01:58:25.98 mikebledsoe Yeah, well what I'm saying yeah but people aren't happy what I'm saying is like has anyone ah as a dictator ever like died and then everyone's like oh genuinely sad. 01:58:17.75 Max Shank There is way less obesity in North Korea than the United States that's a fact that's a fact. 01:58:57.48 mikebledsoe Did you did you listen to that? Ah interview Rogan did with um that North Korean woman who escaped at fucking crazy. Totally worth listening to. 01:58:44.51 Max Shank Um, yeah I did it was wild. Loved it. Dude That's the history of the world is like awful awful stuff like that look at all the like torture shame the the um juxtaposition of. Art and war as ah, vessels for this oscillation between order and chaos is Incredible. We're making these beautiful pieces of art. We're you know, putting together quilts and nice things for people and medicines and then we have like these. Ah. Mechanical suppositories that expand up your anus as torture and you just have these like weird is such ah, an insane level of destruction and violent and then creation and cooperation and you know optimism. I Mean human beings are insane and then a few of them get really insane and are like I will lead these people and then and then I here's what I think happens I don't think this is going to be a very popular take but I think ah. Most of the most of the guys who went and did these insane things. It was really like the whispers of a lady that was driving him. You know what? I mean I think we we cannot. We cannot Blame. Ah. 02:02:04.24 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 02:01:53.57 Max Shank White We We can't make white men the whipping boy of all the evil shit. That's ever been Done. You know ladies men of all colors of all creeds have oppressed people I'm sure that there were Queens who would tease their king about the size of his kingdom. And just nag nag nag him until he conquered the neighbors be like you call this a kingdom This is the tiniest Kingdom. That's what I think yeah. 02:03:07.16 mikebledsoe I think that was like Alexander the great alexander the great. Yeah and what's her name or is it Ashley and I got this conversation the other day which was we we take we take like things that are really hot. Like unstable topics in society and then we debate them in the car and because she grew up in the bay where there's a very she grew up in a very left leaning view. So there's a lot of opportunity for me to ask her questions just had a curiosity is like okay how is. 02:03:38.67 Max Shank Ah. 02:04:22.20 mikebledsoe Okay, this is how I understand this situation. What's the okay, what's going on over there and she tells me I'm like okay have are those people have they considered this so no, okay, cool and so it's like it ends up in a interesting conversation. So one was um, we were listening to a show. They're talking about. Um you know, ah, ah, equity like equity amongst men and women for pay right? who you know men men generally get paid more money than women and so the feminist movement has been. Incredibly focused on money in in regard to things not being fair and so and so that was my that was my so we got in this conversation. so so yeah yeah so Ashley's like you know it's unfair and. 02:05:19.71 Max Shank They already spend all the money. There are so many reasons for there are so many reasons for this I mean. Okay. 02:06:16.72 mikebledsoe And I was like I was like well have we talked about all the contributing factors to why it might be that way and then the number one? Well the None thing that I came up with not came up with but like the None stat that we looked at was ah okay. So men make how much more money on average and women for the same type of work. Okay, well, who spends the money who who spends more money. It's like well the women spend 70% of all the money on. 02:06:44.45 Max Shank But there there are like 10 different reasons that things usually are this way if it was so clear cut as like the Twitter sized argument would have you believe then every smart businessman would just hire women I would save. 02:07:45.74 mikebledsoe Totally. 02:07:24.37 Max Shank I would save 25% on my ah payroll and I would be because if it's the same job for ah 25% less money. You would be a fool not to do it. You would have just factories. You would only have women employees. It would only be women working ah like why wouldn't you why wouldn't you no no, it's it's stupid. It's just another distraction. We have so much more in common. 02:08:32.48 mikebledsoe That's that's a really good point or because of discrimination people are are misogynist What it's It's ah it's a. Well the thing the thing is is people people will they look at the result and then they they that that's the explanation. Oh. There's not this so it must be.. It must be that that person that men are generally bad at you know that are generally misogynistic. 02:08:37.10 Max Shank Ah, then we have different. 02:09:41.72 mikebledsoe So There's this like the proof for a lot of people. The proof is in the the lack of equity versus getting into all the little things that might contribute to that and you make a really good point because you know what? if if I could get away with that I do the same thing and. And then you could like claim to be nobles like oh I I Only hire women and and in the background you know you, you're making more money That's not necessarily I don't see in the conversations I yeah. 02:09:53.91 Max Shank Um, yeah. 02:10:09.43 Max Shank It's just like a different type of sexism I mean I don't think I think more than people being like pro-man or pro lady or anti-man or anti-lady people are just selfish understandably. So. You're the only None living your experience. You're the only one responsible for it if you can get a few extra points of street cred for talking shit. Why wouldn't you I mean we talked about how effective lying is talking shit is so effective I mean do you think Tom Sawyer painted the fence. No. Sweet talked the other kid and said hey wouldn't you like to paint this fence I will trade you the opportunity of painting this fence for that shiny red Apple you got and so he's there eating the Apple while this guy is so happy that he now has the opportunity to build a fence so people are just. Selfish and they realize that they can talk to get attention and energy and that kind of thing instead of work and there are so many I mean my god we could talk all day about this like alleged discrimination between men and women. But um. This is a contest that nobody wins there's no way to win this discussion because it's like hey did you know that men kill themselves 4 times more than women they're like no I didn't know that is like well can you just like fucking eat the quarter and like. Not worry I mean we're dying 4 times as much at our own hand like is it really? So amazing. Yeah. 02:13:43.26 mikebledsoe Well 98% of workplace deaths are men as well like I it's like is what. 02:13:27.69 Max Shank But but that's that's the whole point is like people just do what they want to do that's all and quite frankly, you know if you're a lady you can just get really hot and nice. But if you're a fella I mean I guess you could do that too like you could be a cabana boy. Type of ah life strategy I've considered it I've done the entrepreneurship thing for a while but I've also considered what if I put the same amount of dedication to being like a really like goodlooking Kabana boy right? and just like teach yoga classes by the pool of some like rich lady. And my whole responsibility is just like oh a little more suntann for you I'll whip up a little ah sandwich for you there like that's totally a strategy and maybe I would earn more doing that than what I'm currently doing so. It's fine, but it's just that usually the way that a guy shows. 02:15:33.80 mikebledsoe Maybe maybe. 02:15:21.39 Max Shank Ah, dominance in the hierarchy is by making lots of money That's usually how it is and then if you like get the gender roles confused sometimes you have people chasing things that don't even feel good to them. They just do it because they think they're supposed to and that's. 02:15:54.00 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 02:16:21.18 mikebledsoe Yeah. 02:15:59.83 Max Shank I think that is ah actually really scary sp

SPYCRAFT 101
Finding Che Guevara: Clandestine in the Congo with Jim Hawes

SPYCRAFT 101

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:47


This week Justin chats with author and former Navy SEAL and CIA contractor Jim Hawes. Jim served in Vietnam and worked with the CIA in the Congo to counter the spread of communist  ideals and anti-western rebel activities. Today, Jim tells his story and shares details of his experiences, from becoming a SEAL early in the life of the program to his role in the Gulf of Tonkin incident and finally locating Che Guevara, among several intelligence feats. Connect with Jim:Check out his book, Cold War Navy SEAL, here.https://www.amazon.com/Cold-War-Navy-SEAL-Communist/dp/151073418XConnect with Spycraft 101:Check out Justin's latest release, Covert Arms, here.spycraft101.comIG: @spycraft101Shop: spycraft-101.myshopify.comPatreon: Spycraft 101Find Justin's first book, Spyshots: Volume One, here.Download the free eBook, The Clandestine Operative's Sidearm of Choice, here.Support the show

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black
What Should I Major In?

PrepWell Podcast with Phil Black

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 19:57


Show Notes: In this episode, I lay out a decision tree (with "if-then" statements) that dictates how you should think about your major. Should you care about your major? What should influence your choice of major? Are there any hard and fast rules with respect to choosing a major? How to avoid the double-whammy. If you are a high school student or a senior on your way to college, listen to this podcast before making a decision on what to major in.    0:01:35 Stop and think   0:01:55 The single biggest factor   0:02:40 Debt?   0:04:43 Modest debt   0:06:37 Crushing debt   0:08:30 The double-whammy   0:09:22 STEM majors   0:10:12 Tripling down   0:10:50 Options   0:11:54 5 Alternatives   0:17:30 What to do (5 Steps)   Follow us: Enroll in PrepWell Academy Follow on Instagram Follow on Facebook   If you want to support the show, here are three immediate steps to take.   Subscribe to the podcast where ever you listen to podcasts Follow me on Instagram or Facebook Give us a review Share this episode with a friend Join our mailing list Enroll your 9th or 10th grader in the program  Podcast Host: PrepWell Academy's Founder, Phil Black, has spent a lifetime cracking the code on the world's most competitive programs: Yale University, Harvard Business School, Navy SEALs, Goldman Sachs, Entrepreneurship, Shark Tank (2X), etc.   Inside PrepWell Academy, Black teaches students everything they need to know about the college admissions process in a series of expertly-timed, 3-5-minute, weekly training videos starting in 9th grade and continuing through 12th grade [Note: this program can only be joined in 9th or 10th grade]. My specialties include military service academies, ROTC scholarships, Ivy League, and student-athletes.

Albuquerque Business Podcast
The Top Quality Every Leader Should Develop

Albuquerque Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 15:42


How do you harness your ego to work for you? What does humility genuinely look like? Why is it essential to create honesty in feedback? In today's episode, we will get into self-assessing yourself and when you should use humility in leadership situations.  Here is the book I talked about today Get it now here.  In Extreme Ownership, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin share hard-hitting, Navy SEAL combat stories that translate into lessons for business and life. Jocko and Leif served together in SEAL Task Unit Bruiser, the most highly decorated Special Operations unit from the war in Iraq. Through those difficult months of sustained combat, Jocko, Leif and their SEAL brothers learned that leadership - at every level - is the most important thing on the battlefield. Now they teach these same leadership principles to companies throughout the business world that want to build their own high-performance, winning teams. Extreme Ownership explains the SEAL leadership concepts crucial to accomplishing the most difficult missions in combat and how to apply them to any group, team, or organization. It provides the reader with Jocko and Leif's formula for success: the mindset and guiding principles that enable SEAL combat units to achieve extraordinary results. It demonstrates how to apply these directly to business and life to likewise achieve victory. Take Extreme Ownership. Lead and win. This is the ABQ Business Podcast with your host Jason Rigby and Alexander McCaig. Each week we interview leading business leaders to inspire the vision and the spirit that is in every entrepreneur. We discuss strengths, weaknesses, strategies, systems, and the problems we can all solve together to fulfill a shared vision of a new future for ABQ Business.    Please go to www.abqpodcast.com where you can get show notes, resources, and links to everything we talked about today to help you navigate your journey as an entrepreneur and business owner in ABQ. Follow me on Instagram at @abqjasonrigby or Alexander McCaig on LinkedIn here also sign up for our email list where I drop business & marketing secrets to help your ABQ Business!

Talking Beards with The Beardcaster
Sommer Hibbler and Digi talking beards!

Talking Beards with The Beardcaster

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 61:19


The 2nd Annual Beard of Thrones Competition benefiting the Carry the Load Foundation presented by Kindom Kutz Barber Shop. The event will be held in the Kindom Kutz parking lot from 4-7 12258 Farm to Market Rd 730 S, Azle, TX 76020 http://kingdomkutzbarbershop.com/ Carry the Load- http://carrytheload.org/ Founded by Veteran U.S. Navy SEALs, Clint Bruce and Stephen Holley, Carry The Load started as a mission to restore the true meaning of Memorial Day. Today, it has grown to include more than just our military heroes and more than just the one holiday. Carry The Load works to bring all Americans together to participate in honoring our nation's heroes every day. Sommer Hibbler was a judge at last years inaugural event and is returning this year to be the emcee! Sommer is the Vice President for Beard Mobb North Texas as well as Vice President for The Craft Whisker Club and co-host of The Craft Whisker Show on Talking Beards Network, Monday Nights. Registration Fee $20. Categories: full beard over 8" full beard under 8" freestyle partial beard moustache for more info on the event please visit- https://www.facebook.com/events/552408082760343 or- https://www.facebook.com/events/529038038569952 Bearded Prom with Digi Date and time Sat, May 21, 2022 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM EDT Location Trace Brewing 4312 Main Street Pittsburgh, PA 15224 A Bearded Prom to benefit Hello Bully! hellobully.org -Hello Bully's mission is to rescue and rehabilitate canine survivors of dogfighting, cruelty, neglect, and natural and man-made disasters; and to provide assistance to all companion animals of underserved communities with a goal of reducing overpopulation and preserving the human–animal bond. Admission will be $25 for individuals or $40 for couples. YOU MUST REGISTER & BUY TICKETS BEFORE EVENT. Space is limited so only 75 tickets available! www.eventbrite.com/e/306472376127 Enjoy the company of friends old & new, dance, get raffle tickets and even possibly be on Beard Prom court! *keep an eye out our Facebook event page for room blocks and more info! https://www.facebook.com/events/4911951622251282   Talking Beards website www.talkingbeards.com   The Beard Calendar https://thebeardcalendar.com/   Please check out our friends at Honest Amish and try one of the best selling beard brands available!!! Honest Amish- use promo code "talkingbeards" to save 15% https://www.honestamish.com   Grooming Emporium https://www.thegroomingemporium.org/   SUBSCRIBE to the Talking Beards podcast by going to- www.thebeardcaster.com/subscribe   Talking Beards Store https://teespring.com/…/talking-beards-3   BS Buttons Beard Bulletin Board- let us know about something you want to promote https://www.facebook.com/groups/407082256748940   BS Buttons on Facebook-order your buttons through this link- https://www.facebook.com/groups/872390072895713/   Aaron D. Johnston- Aaron D Johnston- Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aaron.d.johnston1 Aaron D. Johnston-Instagram https://www.instagram.com/aarondjohnston   Scott Sykora Scott Sykora- Facebook https://www.facebook.com/scottsykora Scott Sykora- Instagram https://www.instagram.com/scottsykora/   Check out our other great shows on Talking Beards-The Network www.talkingbeards.com/the-network   Talking Beards is available of the KPNL Network-go check out other various “strange” shows- KPNL RADIO http://www.kpnl-db.com/   THE NEW HOME OF THE TALKING BEARDS NETWORK https://www.youtube.com/c/TalkingBeards/featured

The Rich Outdoors
Ep 551: Jack Carr on Creative Process

The Rich Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 56:06


This week I am joined by thee one and only Jack Carr, author, Navy Seal commander and outdoorsman. Jack is a such a down to earth good guy. On a professional level Jack is a tremendous author and has an amazing series out that starts with the book, The Terminal List and will suck you in […] The post Ep 551: Jack Carr on Creative Process appeared first on The Rich Outdoors.

El Club de Inversionistas con Hyenuk Chu
Confesiones de un Trader XLI. Los 3 pilares de una mentalidad fuerte en el trading.

El Club de Inversionistas con Hyenuk Chu

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:22


Bienvenido a Confesiones de un Trader. ¿Qué pasa por tu mente de trader cuando tienes al frente muchos stops o te enfrentas a una racha perdedora? Así como lo hace un Navy Seal, debes fortalecer tu mente para poder concentrarte en la solución del problema que tienes a mano y evitar que factores externos --que tú no controlas-- te afecten, como el movimiento del mercado. En el episodio de hoy vas a descubrir cuáles son los 3 pilares de una mentalidad fuerte que te van a ayudar a silenciar el ruido y enfocarte en tus objetivos. ¡Dale play ahora!

The Art of Accomplishment
Will Chesney — Reintegrating as a Combat Veteran, Surviving a Traumatic Brain Injury and Transcending an Old Identity

The Art of Accomplishment

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 43:19


Will Chesney found identity and purpose as a Navy SEAL, one of the military's most elite teams, where he was required to perform calmly and effectively under the most extreme circumstances. However, years of neurological and psychological trauma left Will in a very dark place. Unable to do what he loved most or connect effectively with others, he turned to drinking and isolation. After hitting rock bottom, a friend reached out and invited Will to join him on a journey of self-discovery that allowed him to tap into his resilience and get himself back on his feet. Tune in as we learn what Will did to find healing and meaning in life after war.Will served in the U.S. Naval Special Warfare Development Group as an operator and a dog handler in the Osama Bin Laden raid. He was awarded a Silver Star and Purple Heart for his bravery."I woke up and it was me again at one point during the weekend. I know I was a SEAL and everybody always says, “Oh, we can't relate to what you've gone through.” But everybody has trauma. Every life is good but life's hard sometimes. Everybody deals with trauma no matter what." What We Discuss in Episode 51:02:41   The challenges of reintegrating into civilian life as a combat veteran.05:51   The mindset and techniques that Navy SEALs use to remain calm and effective in any situation.13:25   Navigating the depression and hardships that come with losing a core identity.20:26   How humility is essential for executing any successful mission.24:44   The reflection that put Will firmly on the path to recovery. **Full transcript coming soon! Check back HERE for the link.**Follow us on Instagram at @artofaccomplishment to learn more about our guests and share your own experiences.

Mike Drop
Navy SEAL'S Jason Bourne with Clint Emerson | Mike Ritland Podcast Episode 94 | Mike Ritland Podcast Episode 94

Mike Drop

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 127:45


Shop https://www.mikeritlandco.com for Performance Dog Food, Treats, Apparel & more! Bestselling Author, and the guy James Bond wishes he could be returns to the show for his third time. Clint discusses his new book The Rugged Life. 10 chapters teaching you self-reliance, how to live off the land, and be prepared for the unexpected in this modern guide to self-sufficiency and homesteading. Need more than survival? An episode with Mike & Clint wouldn't be complete with some stories back when they were in the Teams. You'll love this episode so much, you may #chokeyourself1:00 - Intro 2:00 - Breaking down Clint's new book 40:00 - Lightning Round 1:06:00 - The disguise game 1:34:00 - Surveillance1:34:41 - Foreign Policy 2:03:20 - ClosingMike Drop is a meeting ground for heroes and fascinating people. Hosted by former Navy SEAL, bestselling author, and K9 Trainer Mike Ritland.Sponsored by https://mikeritlandco.com & https://teamdog.pet----------Support: Clint Emerson https://clintemerson.com/https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsLniDWUQDHHmh0XuEOJfDw----------Support Sponsors:We love GhostBed.... They have been a loyal sponsor with Drinkin Bros over the past 5 years and everyone raves about them. They have super comfortable mattresses that last forever, and they're made in the USA.Right now GhostBed is offering 40% off GhostBed Bundles where you get a Mattress & Adjustable base.Or 30% off everything if you use the code - MIKEDROP at Ghostbed.com/MIKEDROP$35 a month and $0 down, 0% financing plan for up to 60 months.--------------Raycon is easy to use and don't cost a fortune. Wireless headphones, Bluetooth and half the price then the other brands out there. They have 32 hours of standby time and 8 hours of playtime. Mike Drop listeners get 15% off by going to BuyRaycon.com/MIKEDROP --------------EuroOptic is an online retailer of optics, firearms, hunting apparel, and outdoor gear. They carry all the major brands we know and love - like Vortex, Swarovski, Night force just to name a few. They have faster shipping than anyone else. With their RED shipping, you will get your purchase shipped the same day and it'll be on your doorstep in 1-2 days, FOR FREE. Head over to EuroOptic.com/MIKEDROP to see everything they have to offer. https://www.eurooptic.com/MIKEDROP Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1-year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/MIKEDROP----------Fueled by TeamDog | www.mikeritlandco.com | @Teamdog.petALL THINGS MIKE RITLAND:SHOP for Fueled By Team Dog Performance Dog Food, Treats, Apparel, Accessories, and Protection dogs- MikeRitlandCo.comTeam Dog Online dog training- TeamDog.pet

The Third Wave
Amber & Marcus Capone - Finding Purpose After War: Healing with Ibogaine, 5-MeO-DMT, & Community

The Third Wave

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 77:13


Marcus and Amber Capone are the founders of the US-based non-profit organization, VETS. After 13 years and numerous combat deployments as a Navy Seal, Marcus's post-military transition challenges became seemingly insurmountable when all other treatment options failed. As a result, the couple pursued ibogaine therapy as a last-ditch effort and found it incredibly successful. They've now helped more than 400 veterans to date by providing resources, research, and advocacy for veterans seeking psychedelic-assisted therapy with a special emphasis on ibogaine. In this episode of the Third Wave podcast, Marcus and Amber talk with Paul F. Austin about Marcus's experience in the military, the difficulties he faced in civilian life, the role of psychedelic-assisted therapy in his healing, and how Marcus and Aubrey are helping veterans pursue similar treatment today.

Bulletproof Radio
Discover Your Attributes & Get More Out of Yourself – Rich Diviney : 937

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 78:13


WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Control Blood Glucose: https://pendulumlife.com, sign up for membership to get monthly supply delivery, use code DAVE20 to save $20 on your first shipmentTasty Keto Bread & Chips: https://www.uprisingfood.com/DAVE, use code DAVE to get $10 off the starter bundleBusiness Growth With SEO: https://www.stephanspencer.com, get a FREE consultationIN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE™...… you'll learn why developing your attributes may be more important than skills when it comes to getting more out of yourself. Attributes are wired into your internal circuitry, always running in the background, says Rich Diviney. You're born with attributes. They're elemental and considered innate traits—not to be confused with personality traits.Rich, a retired Navy SEAL commander, bestselling author, and leadership and human performance expert, explains how attributes determine how you absorb, process, and respond to the world around you. By knowing this, you'll be able to assess your own attributes and put them into action with SMART steps.In his book, “The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance,” Rich shows you how mindset, optimism and becoming uniquely resilient to stress can help you become a better human. His approach identifies core attributes needed for success in personal or professional tasks.His ability to choose the right people to be in elite performance groups—like the U.S. Navy SEALs—could be considered a superpower. As the officer in charge of training for a specialized command, Rich was part of the SEAL selection process. He pared down a group of exceptional candidates to a small cadre of the most elite optimal performers. How did he do it? By looking at attributes.It's Rich's belief that SEALs are not born extraordinary. Instead, they've mastered their own mindset to get the most out of their innate abilities to make themselves extraordinary. He believes we all have the power to do this.In “The Attributes,” you'll find examples of attributes within five distinct categories plus a couple more that don't fit so neatly: Grit, Mental Acuity, Drive, Leadership and Teamability. So, what are attributes and how are they different than skills? “A lot of times we get seduced by skills, and we don't think about attributes,” Rich says. “And the reason is very simple: skills are not inherent to our nature. They're very visible, which means they're very easy to assess, measure and test and you can put scores around them and stats around them. … Attributes are inherent to our nature. We're all born with levels of adaptability and situational awareness and resilience. Attributes don't dictate our behavior or director behavior; they inform our behavior.” See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Zeitgeist with Zack Geist
The Driven Personality w. Dr. Doug Brackmann

Zeitgeist with Zack Geist

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 73:45


In this episode Dr. Doug Brackmann and I go into what it means to be Driven. There are genetic differences among this population, which leaves them often, confused, successful, addicted or controlled by shame.    We go into the reasons that nature might have caused this expression in certain individuals in a tribe and how these tendencies can wreak havoc on personal relationships and on the body itself.    We go into why the Driven Person may be looked at as a sociopath or psychopath and why they are drawn to behaviors that are considered to be very antisocial or self serving to others and what to do about it.    We also go into what to do in a world that doesn't have much need for someone with this level of compulsive drive for survival, and what to do if you are driven to stay healthy and to cultivate deep relationships with those who don't share that same drive, and much more.   Dr. Doug has two PhDs in Psychology and has worked with high entrepreneurs and special forces and has written the book "Driven" with a Navy Seal. You can find out more about Doug's work at Iamdriven.com

Reborn with Ashley Horner
Clint Emerson: How to Be Self-Reliant

Reborn with Ashley Horner

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 37:18


Clint Emerson is a New York Times bestselling author of the new book The Rugged Life: The Modern Guide to Self-Reliance, which released this May. The book is a practical guide to self-sufficiency, homesteading, and survival skills. Clint is a podcaster, defense expert and is the only SEAL ever to be inducted into the International Spy Museum. He is a retired Navy SEAL who served more than 20 years in the SEAL Teams.   He is also the author of the books, The Right Kind of Crazy: My Life as a Navy SEAL, Covert Operative, Boy Scout from Hell and the 100 Deadly Skills series. Clint hosts the show Can You Survive This Podcast? and is the founder of the security consulting company Escape the Wolf and the survival-orientiened online store violentnomad.com.  You can follow him on Instagram @100deadlyskills. On today's episode of Reborn, Ashley and Clint talk about the importance of becoming self-reliant, being creative with what you have, gardening, the pandemic, and a lot more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Every Damn Thing
92. Cops, Strips Clubs That Serve Food, Forest Bathing (w/ Chon Travis)

Every Damn Thing

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:27


Phil & Jake are joined by dear old pal Chon Travis (from Love Equals Death) to rank cops, strip clubs that serve food, and the activity known as forest bathing on the List of Every Damn Thing.Find Chon on Instagram (@therealchontravis) and Facebook (chon.travis), and check out his band Love Equals Death (follow that link to find out their show dates)!If you have something to add to the list, email it to list@everydamnthing.net (or get at us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).SHOW NOTES: The Cops television show was a reality TV show in which a camera crew followed police around. The police departments got final approval of what was included in the show but it was educational to see what police thought made them look good.  District Attorneys are adjacent to cops, but aren't exactly cops. Training Day is a movie about Denzel Washington as a bad cop. Columbo is TV good cop who is completely non-violent and walks around being an unassuming disheveled genius and catching rich people who do murders. Lethal Weapon is a movie about two cops, one of whom is a "Lethal Weapon" because he's suicidal. Die Hard is a movie about an off-duty cop and an on-duty cop (who shot a child while on duty) learning to trust each other. Beverly Hills Cop a movie about a cop from Detroit who goes to Beverly Hills and puts a banana in the tailpipe of cops there. Movie cops are always good or at least necessary. England is a country where cops don't carry guns. We discuss gun ownership. In the USA, 3 in 10 adults say they own a gun. It's something like 40% of men and 20% of women. RoboCop is another movie about cops in which the police force has been privatized. It's fantastic and Ronny Cox from Beverly Hills Cop is fantastic in it as Dick Jones. The Pinkertons were founded as a sort of private police force to crush labor. Rod Lavers shoes are Adidas sneakers named for the great Australian tennis star Rodney Laver. The Australian Open is played in an arena named for him as well. They're fantastic shoes but the best ones are white and it's hard to keep them clean. Firefighters are people who fight fire. When Phil imagined a fire that hated firefighters he was thinking of a little stinker like this guy. Clowns are people trying to make other people laugh. Commandos are special military units. Theodore Roosevelt was a US President and an extremely colorful character who's personally responsible for a lot of death and pain.  The Last Starfighter was a nice little movie that's somehow never been remade. It's about a kid in a trailer park who, by virtue of being good at video games, gets recruited into an interstellar war. Howard the Duck is a movie about a duck who falls in love with Lea Thompson. Capitalism is the system we live in that makes ethical consumption impossible. Middle school is a necessary evil, a place to put young teens. Gambit is a fictional character, a superhero and member of the X-men. He wears a long trench coat and a weird thing on his head. Hoarders is a TV show in which the pain and mental illness of real people is mined for cheap thrills.  Steven Seagal is a movie star who's been credibly accused of sexual assault and has incredibly accused himself of being a yogi, a holy man, a secret agent, a Navy SEAL & a martial arts master. The British Royal Family are pretty bad. Jon Voigt had been really good in a lot of films. He's as low as he is almost entirely because he said some stuff Phil & Jake didn't agree with. Phil even liked his accent in Anaconda. Jenny McCarthy is pretty low on the list because she has some trash opinions. 48 Hrs. was followed by a sequel, Another 48 Hours. The second sequel, 127 Hours, is a big departure for the franchise. Flashdance is probably underrated by us. Karina Longworth went into why in a recent episode of You Must Remember This. ALSO DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:Insane Clown Posse * speed limits * Hank Williams, Jr. * jorts * Bell Biv Devoe * mini-trucks * Warner Brothers large-graphic cartoon t-shirts * water parks * “Mambo No. 5 (A Little Bit of…)” by Lou Bega * Spinderella * Bend, OR * Mendocino County * moongazing * meditation * backpacking * Spice Girls * Pee-Wee Herman * Donald Duck * goatsBelow are the Top Ten and Bottom Top items on List of Every Damn Thing as of this episode (for the complete up-to-date list, go here).TOP TEN: Dolly Parton - person interspecies animal friends - idea sex - idea bicycles - tool coffee - beverage Clement Street in San Francisco - location Prince - person It's-It - food Doctor Doom - fictional character Cher - person BOTTOM TEN:283. cops - people284. British Royal Family - institution285. Steven Seagal - person286. McRib - food287. Hoarders - TV show288. death - idea289. war - idea290. cigarettes - drug291. QAnon - idea292. transphobia - ideaTheme song by Jade Puget. Graphic design by Jason Mann. This episode was produced & edited by Jake MacLachlan. Show notes by Jake MacLachlan & Phil Green.Our website is everydamnthing.net and we're also on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Email us at list@everydamnthing.net.