Podcasts about Chapman

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  • 2,475PODCASTS
  • 4,323EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Chapman

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Latest podcast episodes about Chapman

Fiddly Dicking
Wanker

Fiddly Dicking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 9:43


Tom Brady is 5 times better than Nickelback......He's a quarterback Sure its a little late, but Happy New Year to all of you from the Fiddly Dickers. This is the first time we have gotten togther in the 2022. Jammed packed with the giggles that you have come to love and expect out of us. Have a great day everyone! Support Fiddly Dicking Merch Store - fiddlyshop.com (https://www.fiddlyshop.com) Tip Jar - Donate Today (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=MJJXJ895WU3NY) Twitter: @fdicking (https://twitter.com/FDicking) Facebook: Fiddly Dicking Facebook Page (https://www.facebook.com/fiddlydicking/) Instagram: Fiddly Dicking Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/fiddlydicking/)

Background Briefing with Ian Masters
January 18, 2022 - Christopher Chivvis | Paul Glastris | Valeria Sinclair-Chapman

Background Briefing with Ian Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:08


A War Between Russia and Ukraine Will Likely Break Out Within Weeks | Biden's First Year in Office at a Time His Domestic Agenda is Stalled and Poll Numbers Are Sinking | The Apparently Futile Senate Debate to Change the Filibuster Rules backgroundbriefing.org/donate twitter.com/ianmastersmedia facebook.com/ianmastersmedia

Join The Ranks
Episode 26: 2022 Third Base Dyno Ranks

Join The Ranks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 68:27


Taylor (@TCasesLoaded) and Joe (@joegarino) invite Shawn Losier (@ILoveShawn5000) on to the pod to discuss TDG's consensus third basemen rankings heading into 2022. They talk takeaways from the consensus rankings, the state of the position over the next few years, any hot takes that showed up in the individual rankings, and risky top-15 players.

Fiddly Dicking
Sticky And Smelly Situations

Fiddly Dicking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:18


Why do Canadian cowboys have sticky feet......Maple Stirrups. Nothing better then ringing in the weekend with some Fiddly Dicking. Today we dive deep into some sticky objects and smelly smells . We have the answers you are looking for. Enough to make you want to bong a beer. Have a great day everyone. Support Fiddly Dicking Merch Store - fiddlyshop.com (https://www.fiddlyshop.com) Tip Jar - Donate Today (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=MJJXJ895WU3NY) Twitter: @fdicking (https://twitter.com/FDicking) Facebook: Fiddly Dicking Facebook Page (https://www.facebook.com/fiddlydicking/) Instagram: Fiddly Dicking Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/fiddlydicking/)

Partnering Leadership
Secrets Of Navy SEAL Performance and Attributes as Drivers of Optimal Human Performance with Ex-Navy SEAL Commander Rich Diviney |Partnering Leadership Global Thought Leader

Partnering Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 47:18


In this episode of Partnering Leadership, Mahan Tavakoli speaks with Rich Diviney, author of The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance. Rich Diviney is a retired Navy SEAL commander with 20+ years of experience as a Navy SEAL Officer, having completed more than thirteen overseas deployments, including serving as the officer in charge of training for a specialized command. During his service, Rich Diviney was intimately involved in the highly specialized SEAL selection process and spearheaded the creation of a directorate that fused physical, mental, and emotional disciplines. Since his retirement, Rich Diviney has worked as a speaker, facilitator, and consultant with the Chapman & Co. Leadership Institute and Simon Sinek Inc., teaching leadership and optimal performance for teams and organizations. Some highlights:- Rich Diviney explained the role of mindset matters and how it helped him during his Navy SEAL Trainings- How to effectively deal with uncertainty, change, challenge and stress- The difference between attributes and skills - Why understanding attributes is essential in the hiring process and putting together a high performing team- Rich Diviney on how to determine attributes in the hiring process- The role humor plays in high performing teams- Rich Diviney on how leaders and teams can nurture trust and teamwork- The concept of dynamic subordination and its importance to leadership excellence - Rich Diviney talks about Resilience vs. AntifragilityAlso mentioned in this episode:- Simon Sinek, author- Bob Johansen, renowned futurist and author (Listen to Bob's episode on Partnering Leadership Podcast)Book Recommendations:The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance by Rich DivineyEverybody Matters: The Extraordinary Power of Caring for Your People Like Family by  Bob Chapman and Raj Sisodia Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas TalebThe Talent Code: Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How by Daniel Coyles Connect with Rich Diviney:The Attributes Official WebsiteRich Diviney on LinkedInRich Diviney on InstagramRich Diviney on TwitterConnect with Mahan Tavakoli:MahanTavakoli.comMore information and resources available at the Partnering Leadership Podcast website: PartneringLeadership.com

Beautification of Communication - The Communification Podcast
12. "We enjoy seeing other people fail, more than we enjoy winning ourselves," with Lyssa Chapman from Dog the Bounty Hunter

Beautification of Communication - The Communification Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 32:18


1. How aggression feeds into our digital addiction 2. Are we being used as pawns? 3. Where is the line between activism and cyberbullying? 4. Using the rules of publishing, social media tools to navigate this 5. Parenting and cyberbullying - what's the plan? Show Notes: MalikaDudley.com/show-notes

Fiddly Dicking
Out With The Boys

Fiddly Dicking

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 11:22


*What is Snoop Dogg's favorite weather condition.....Drizzle! * Holy cow, its been way too long. Yes we are still alive and we are ready to go in the 2022. What a better way to kick things back into gear then a deep dive on musicians that we would like to paint the town with. Have a great day everyone! Support Fiddly Dicking Merch Store - fiddlyshop.com (https://www.fiddlyshop.com) Tip Jar - Donate Today (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=MJJXJ895WU3NY) Twitter: @fdicking (https://twitter.com/FDicking) Facebook: Fiddly Dicking Facebook Page (https://www.facebook.com/fiddlydicking/) Instagram: Fiddly Dicking Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/fiddlydicking/)

The Snowboard Project
Beyond Ropes: US Grand Prix Olympic Qualifiers Live & Behind the Scenes

The Snowboard Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 42:10


Olympic Qualifiers Almost Live & Behind the Scenes In this episode we take you one a behind the scenes look at The US Grand Prix at Mammoth, which wrapped up 12 hours ago. The Grand Prix serves as the qualification events for the US Olympic Snowboard scene.  This is an experimental episode - so let us know what you think - email mark@thesnowboardproject.com   Featuring: Stuart Clark @stuartseeclark Jonas Brewer @foto_ghoulag Matt 'Slip Matt' Chapman @djslipmatt Brad Jay @bradjaymc Sarah Welliver Jonathan 'DC' Oketen  @djdcearth David Wise @mrdavidwise Today's episode brought to you by Artilect http://artilect.studio Cardiff Snowcraft http://cardiffsnow.com Baldface Lodge http://baldface.com Tow Pro Lifts http://towpro-lifts.com Owner Operator HTTP://owneroperator.us United Shapes  http://unitedshapes.us 686 Outerwear http://686.com Electrovoice Microphones http://electrovoice.com SUPPORT THE SNOWBOARD PROECT http://patreon.com/thesnowboardproject

Cinematic Underdogs
46. Untold: Malice at the Palace w/ Aaron White

Cinematic Underdogs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 70:29


We have finally finished our Summer Olympics Sports Movie marathon and are excited to begin our much anticipated deep dive into Untold, a riveting Netflix Docuseries created by Chapman and Maclain Way. To kick off this riveting docuseries, we welcome the consummate podcast maestro and perennially insightful Aaron White of Feelin' Film for an in-depth discussion of Malice at the Palace. The first entry of Untold, Malice at the Palace explores infamous Pistons-Pacers brawl that occurred on the fateful night of November 19th, 2004. Deconstructing the monolithic media narrative that vilified Ron Artest & his Pacers teammates (Jermaine O'Neal, Stephen Jackson) for becoming embroiled in a chaotic melee after a fan threw a beer at Artest, this documentary reminds the viewer that there are multiple sides to every story. Hopefully, after watching this episode and listening to our podcast, you'll be a little less eager to jump to conclusions and a little less certain about who is truly at fault for what the Associated Press deems to be "the most infamous brawl in NBA history." We certainly are.

Star Wars Spelt Out
Episode 144: The Book of Boba Fett: Chapter 2 “Throw Boba from the Train”  with Eli Chapman

Star Wars Spelt Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 35:18


Book of Boba Fett chapter 2 is with us and we grab cousin Eli again to go over what our eyes have just seen. Now with more Billy Crystal references.    We have Merch!!! Buy our awesome T-shirts at https://www.teepublic.com/user/starwarsspeltout   Follow us on twitter: @starwarsspelt Follow us on instagram: @starwarsspeltout Drop us a nice email: starwarsspeltout@gmail.com Subscribe to our Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsgw0WcCmz2UT1tSpZnGmpA   Theme music by Cam Chapman: @gullychaps Follow Josh Chapman: @chapmanjosh www.starwarsspeltout.com

Cracked Interviews
Todd Chapman (NCAA): Kansas Women's Tennis HC [2022 Preseason Series]

Cracked Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 81:34


As part of our preview of the 2022 College Tennis season, Kansas Women's Tennis HC Todd Chapman joins the show to preview his team's 2022 season. Coach Chapman reflects on his team's 2021 results, discusses the strengths of his team's roster entering the new year, offers his thoughts on some of the biggest discussions happening in college tennis, and so much more!! Check out all the interviews by clicking here. Don't forget to give a 5 star review with your twitter/instagram handle for a chance to win some FREE CR gear!! This episode brought to you by: Tennis Point Discounted Tennis Apparel, Tennis Racquets, Tennis Shoes & Equipment from Nike, adidas, Babolat, Wilson & More! Visit their store today and use the code "CR15" at checkout to save 15% off Sale items. Some Exclusions (MAP Exceptions) apply and code will not work on those items. This code will add 1 FREE CAN of WILSON Balls to the cart at checkout.  Tennis Channel Podcast Network Visit https://www.tennis.com/pro-game/podcasts/ to stay current on the latest tennis news and trends and enjoy in-depth analysis and dynamic debates. Find Cracked Racquets Website: https://www.crackedracquets.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/crackedracquets Twitter: https://twitter.com/crackedracquets Facebook: https://Facebook.com/crackedracquets YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC12ZE3jU0n52JkeWV1TB21A Email Newsletter: https://www.crackedracquet Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Growth Marriage
The 3 Questions That Led To The 5 Love Languages

Growth Marriage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 9:24


BD4
BD4 | Yanks 2021-22 Offseason Update (Episode 299)

BD4

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 41:44


It's been a minute since we discussed Yankees. In this episode we just go over a few offseason rumors spanning from Correa to the rumors in Oakland on Chapman & Olson. We also briefly talk about the Yankees' philosophy needing a change and more. NYY-NYK Question of the Day: This power hitter played for the Yankees from 1983 through 1985, taking home two Silver Slugger awards. Who was he? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bd4robcarbone/support

The Real Estate Raw Show
The Real Estate Raw Show: Sterling Chapman and Joe Mendoza

The Real Estate Raw Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 22:17


SterlingToday on The Real Estate Raw Show Sterling Chapman talks about his investor journey. About Joe: Mr. Mendoza has a long track record of success. 100's of millions of dollars of real estate transactions. Hundreds of people mentored, coached, and trained. He's been on television, radio, and multiple publications. Are you looking for a trusted advisor in real estate? Perhaps help to get to the next level in business or life? Joe is the MAN! Buy Joe's NEW book "Flex With A Plex" on Amazon: https://amzn.to/30VHBus Looking for a new broker, real estate company, brokerage? Join me and EXP Realty now! We are in ALL 50 states, Canada, Australia, and United Kingdom (UK) http://becomearepro.com/ Add "Joe Mendoza" is my sponsor. Find the deals! http://findhiddendeals.com/ Hire someone else to answer your phones! http://myvahack.com/ Having trouble with your real estate calculations? http://bestdarncalculator.com/ Need an app while looking for deals: http://letsdrivefordollars.com/ Ready to make some calls to leads? (Caution: Use your discretion and be aware of local and federal laws) http://ineedphonenumbers.com/ Keep watching, subscribe, or reach out to Mr. Mendoza today for a private consultation, training, or speaking engagements. Joe Mendoza - California Broker DRE #01234540 Entrepreneur. Investor. Author. 100 E. San Marcos Boulevard, Suite 400 San Marcos, CA 92069 Office (877) 794-5227 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/therealestaterawshow/support

FPC's Podcast
Episode 521: Jan 2nd 2022 PM Pastor Billy Chapman "Sheep - Goats - Wolves"

FPC's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 50:31


http://trcgastonia.com

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
453: Dr. Gary Chapman - The 5 Love Languages, Resolving Conflict, & Building Trust

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 45:38


Read my new book, The Pursuit Of Excellence https://bit.ly/thepursuitofexcellence Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Text Hawk to 66866 for "Mindful Monday" This episode starts with a short review of 2021 and I share my goals for 2022. Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Gary Chapman, PhD, is the author of the bestselling The 5 Love Languages® series, which has sold more than 20 million worldwide and has been translated into 50 languages. Dr. Chapman travels the world presenting seminars on marriage, family, and relationships, and his radio programs air on more than 400 stations.  Notes: The Five Love Languages: Words of Affirmation - Words of affirmation is about expressing affection through spoken words, praise, or appreciation. When this is someone's primary love language, they enjoy kind words and encouragement. Quality Time - For those who identify with quality time as their love language, love and affection are expressed through undivided attention. This means putting down the cell phone, turning off the tablet, making eye contact, and actively listening. Physical Touch - A person with this love language feels loved through physical affection. Acts of Service - For acts of service, a person feels loved and appreciated when someone does nice things for them, such as helping with the dishes, running errands, vacuuming, or putting gas in the car. Receiving Gifts - Gift-giving is symbolic of love and affection for someone with this love language. They treasure not only the gift itself but also the time and effort the gift-giver put into it. My personal Love Language assessment results: Quality Time: 37% Words of Affirmation: 33% Acts of Service: 20% Physical Touch: 10% Receiving Gifts: 0% We all express and receive love differently. Consequently, understanding those differences can make a serious impact on your relationship. According to Dr. Chapman, this exercise is one of the simplest ways to improve your relationships. Here are some ways that understanding love languages can improve your relationship: Promotes selflessness - When you are committed to learning someone else's love language, you are focused on their needs rather than your own. Creates empathy - As someone learns more about how their partner experiences love, they learn to empathize with them. Maintains intimacy - If couples regularly talk about what keeps their love tanks full, this creates more understanding in their relationship. Aids personal growth - When someone is focused on something or someone outside of themselves, it can lead to personal growth. Shares love in meaningful ways - When couples start speaking one another's love language, the things they do for their partners not only become more intentional but also become more meaningful. It's not a feeling. The “in love” feeling wears off after about 2 years. It's an attitude to love someone. “I want to do anything I can to enrich your life.” There is a thought process and intention behind it. Keys to being a better listener: Start with the intention to understand THEIR perspective Do not interrupt the other person Wait until they are completely done speaking How to earn back trust? Forgiveness is not a feeling, it's a choice. You have to make the choice to forgive someone. Thank you to Verywellmind.com for help preparing for this conversation

Star Wars Spelt Out
Episode 143: The Book of Boba Fett: Chapter 1 with Catherine Kneen, Dale Williams & Eli Chapman

Star Wars Spelt Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 19:11


Book of Boba Fett has dropped! Catch our roundtable discussion before heading into the premiere screening of chapter one in Melbourne, there's a quick reaction at the end but for the full breakdown check out the SteeleWars podcast where you can find a long form discussion!    We have Merch!!! Buy our awesome T-shirts at https://www.teepublic.com/user/starwarsspeltout   Follow us on twitter: @starwarsspelt Follow us on instagram: @starwarsspeltout Drop us a nice email: starwarsspeltout@gmail.com Subscribe to our Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsgw0WcCmz2UT1tSpZnGmpA   Theme music by Cam Chapman: @gullychaps   Follow Josh Chapman: @chapmanjosh www.starwarsspeltout.com

Labyrinths
The Fungus Effect Part 3: Mental Health, Politics, & Mushrooms (Eckert & Chapman)

Labyrinths

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 49:45


In 2020, Oregon didn't just decriminalize drugs, it legalized a framework for safe and equitable psilocybin therapy. In part three of our miniseries, we look at the politics of psychedelics and the activists who, in the midst of celebrating this unexpected political triumph, were met with personal tragedy.

Made To Reign
078 | Former Navy SEAL on Traits That Attract Success

Made To Reign

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 47:29


On this episode of The Becoming Men Podcast, Ray De La Nuez is joined by Former Navy SEAL commander Rich Diviney. Rich is the author of the book, "The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance." He draws from 20+ years of experience as a Navy SEAL Officer where he completed more than 13 overseas deployments – 11 of which were to Iraq and Afghanistan. Throughout his career, he has achieved multiple leadership positions – including the Commanding Officer of a Navy SEAL Command. Since retirement in early 2017, Rich has worked as a speaker, facilitator, and consultant with the Chapman & Co. Leadership Institute and Simon Sinek Inc. During his twenty years as a Navy SEAL, Commander Rich was intimately involved in the world-renowned SEAL selection process, which whittles exceptional candidates down to a small cadre of the most elite optimal performers. Through years of observation, he learned to identify a successful recruit's core Attributes, the innate traits for how a person performs. That same methodology can be used by you to help you identify the attributes you need to further develop to become the man that you long to be. You can get the first chapter of Rich's book, The Attributes for FREE HERE! Want to meet with me One-on-One on a FREE coaching call. Click here to book our Zoom Call! Make sure you connect with me on Instagram @raydelanuez. Consider becoming a financial partner of this podcast. head over to TheBecomingMen.com/Partner. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/becomingmen/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/becomingmen/support

Green and Bold
A's hand the reins to Mark Kotsay; Joe reveals his Hall of Fame ballot

Green and Bold

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 61:35


https://www.bigheadsmedia.com/green-and-bold/

Random Fit Powered by NASM
Five Love Languages of Fitness

Random Fit Powered by NASM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:08


Are you an effective communicator? We all know about the importance of communication and how everyone interprets information differently. If you have ever read the book by Gary Chapman titled, The 5 Love Languages, then you know exactly what we are talking about. In this “Random Fit,” hosts Wendy Batts and Ken Miller detail the 5 Love Languages of FITNESS and how Chapman's theories can apply to more than just our loved ones. People respond differently to different things and that includes fitness and how you interact and adapt to your clients' wants and needs. Did you hear? The most trusted name in fitness is now the most trusted name in sports performance nutrition. Become an NASM Certified Sports Nutrition Coach and optimize performance and recovery. https://bit.ly/3yJm1Jm

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg
12/22/21 Best of 2021: Fern Schumer Chapman

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 44:24


Here's another of our favorite Morning Show interviews from 2021: Fern Schumer Chapman, talking about her latest book- "Brothers, Sisters, Strangers: Sibling Estrangement and the Road to Reconciliation."

Mindful Multi Family Show
Mindful Multi Family Show #197 with Chris Salerno Replay(Sterling Chapman is in Baton Rouge Louisiana where he sits as a Regional Sales Director at a world leading Telco Company)

Mindful Multi Family Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 17:20


Sterling Chapman is in Baton Rouge Louisiana where he sits as a Regional Sales Director at a world leading Telco Company, President of Crestworth Capital and the host of The Rent Roll Radio Show. Mr. Chapman hold a B.S. in Finance from Louisiana State University and a and Master of Business Administration from LSU Shreveport. His current real estate holdings include nearly $13.5 Million of Assets Under Management, $5 Million of that being his personal portfolio of 60+ rental units in South Louisiana that cash flow over $120K a year. While single handedly building this portfolio over the last 3 years he has also interviewed over 110 successful real estate investors on his podcast which has been downloaded nearly 13,000 times.

Radio MuleSoft
APIs Unplugged - S2 E15 - Designing Inclusive APIs with Shanae Chapman

Radio MuleSoft

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 40:18


In this episode, Shanae Chapman--CEO and Founder of Nerdy Diva--joins Mike and Matt to discuss the importance of designing inclusion and representation into APIs and API teams.

The Emma Guns Show
Feel-Good Habits Reloaded | Nicole Chapman

The Emma Guns Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 54:16


This episode was originally published in Oct 2020.Nicola Chapman returns to the podcast to share her unmissable #feelgoodhabits.Nic's insta home/family account is @hasteshouseTo join the closed Facebook group for the podcast click here >> The Emma Guns Show Forum.To follow me on social media >> Twitter | Instagram.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/emmagunavardhana. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Story time for Kids
Story Time For Kids: Grumpy Badger's Christmas by Paul Bright and Jane Chapman

Story time for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 6:41


Story Time For Kids: Grumpy Badger's Christmas by Paul Bright and Jane Chapman --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/story83/support

FPC's Podcast
Episode 514: Dec 19th 2021 AM Pastor Billy Chapman "The Secrets I've Learned From Ketchup"

FPC's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 44:52


http://trcgastonia.com

Q York
Putting the "X" back in Christmas - Anth Chapman - Saturday 18th December 2021

Q York

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 18:02


To get the full context of these talks, check out the blog at https://www.qyork.co.uk/post/putting-the-x-back-in-christmas-christmas-at-our-house-2021

HistoryPod
19th December 1843: Charles Dickens' novella A Christmas Carol published in London by Chapman & Hall

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021


A Christmas Carol has never been out of print since but, despite the first run selling out within 6 days, high production costs due to his very specific requirements meant that the profits were smaller than Dickens had hoped ...

Sneaky Dragon
Sneaky Dragon Episode 524

Sneaky Dragon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 154:16


This week: this week is dirt; calendarically speaking; don't party with strangers; gravity, entropy, sriracha with mayo; you can do it; beetles and pythons; the Chapman report; Gilliamesque; the first time; my favourite Martin; Goon squad; use the clapper; to Halifax and back; people love an explosion; an upside-down “O”; TV vets again; the farrier […]

Pet Candy Radio
Sing-a-log with Shayna Chapman

Pet Candy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 47:54


On this episode of B's and Queens with Caitlin Palmer, we meet the amazing Shayna Chapman. You may know her from her TikTok page where she shares her life and passion for horses.  Caitlin and Shay talk about her new cooking show on Pet Candy TV, Cooking with Shay, her lifelong love of animals, and her cute horse, Rocket, who's like a real life version of Spirit the horse!  And, we also ring in the season with some sing-a-longs!   This show is brought to you by Petzey!   Petzey is a free app that you can download in the app store and it is amazing. For only $20, you can connect with a veterinary professional instantly twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week- and from any of the 50 states.  When you have questions about your pet's health, just Petzey it!!  Download the app today at the app store!   Get Petzey for FREE today ▸ https://petzey.app.link/petcandy Petzey gives you instant access to veterinary professionals 24/7 with one click.   ▷ LET'S BECOME FRIENDS!! Subscribe to our YouTube channel : https://tinyurl.com/zctkzy8 Join the Pet Candy Circle at https://www.mypetcandy.com​/circle Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/mypetcandy​ Follow us on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/mypetcandy​ Get our merch!! 100% proceeds go to charity!   #pets #horses #funny #petlovers   

Beautification of Communication - The Communification Podcast
11. "This girl was drama," navigating cyberbullying with Lyssa Chapman

Beautification of Communication - The Communification Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 30:22


1. Our “mean girl” experiences were a sign of the times 2. Malika's defense mechanism for trauma 3. Balancing freedom of speech, exposure to tech, and safety 4. Lyssa fell into a bad crowd because they accepted her & didn't judge 5. The internet is the wild, wild west Show notes: malikadudley.com/show-notes Mahalo for listening! Please share your thoughts on what you've learned in the review section!  For podcast updates, communication tips + resources, and more... sign up for my NEWSLETTER To support the pod, you can shop with our partners, sponsors and affiliates (10% of proceeds go to the Maui Food Bank):  Noho Home - Code: MALIKA for 15% off Mindvalley Personal Development Courses: FREE "Lifebook" Master Class Primally Pure Non-toxic Skincare - Code: MALIKA10 for 10% off your first purchase Pacific Pearls - 10% off with Code: SS58USA Angelina Hills Maui Photography Art Towels - 20% off with Code: Malika Goli Gummy Vitamins - Code: MALIKADUDLEY for 10% off Maui Jim Sunglasses 3-months of FREE Amazon Music Unlimited  

The Allan McKay Podcast
329 -- VFX Legend Richard Edlund -- The History of STAR WARS

The Allan McKay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 55:39


Richard Edlund is a four-time Academy Award visual effects winner for Star Wars: A New Hope, Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. He is VFX Supervisor, Producer and Cinematographer. Richard was also nominated for Poltergeist, 2010, Ghostbusters, Poltergeist II: The Other Side, Die Hard and Alien 3. He's won three Academy Technical Awards, the British Academy Award for Poltergeist and Return of the Jedi. He earned an Emmy for creating the visual effects for the original television miniseries Battlestar Galactica and another nomination for Mike Nichols' Angels in America. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences honored him with their John A. Bonner Medal of Commendation in recognition of his contributions to the Academy. And the ASC (American Society of Cinematographers) presented him with their esteemed Presidents Award in 2008. He has also received top accolades from the Visual Effects Society, Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, and numerous other organizations. In 1975, Richard was one of the first visual effects artists to join fellow VFX enthusiast, John Dykstra for a startup he called Industrial Light and Magic (ILM). This team of filmmakers began their work on a movie called Star Wars. When the new technology and Star Wars franchise clicked, Richard moved to Marin County to supervise visual effects for the next two episodes of Star Wars, as well as Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark and Poltergeist.  In 1984, he took over the equipment amassed by Doug Trumbull's Entertainment Effects Group and retooled the 65mm visual effects company, renaming it Boss Film Studios. Boss Films became a star in the visual effects world, when company simultaneously produced the comedic visual effects for Ghostbusters, created a hybrid technology integrating NASA's digital images of Jupiter into a key sequence in 2010. Boss's pioneering VFX technology went on to create stunning imagery for over 40 features, including Die Hard, Ghost, Poltergeist 2, Alien3, Species, Multiplicity, Air Force One. Masters of the Universe, Cliffhanger, Batman Returns, The Last Action Hero, Waterworld, Heat, Starship Troopers and a slew of other high profile projects, including pioneering Bud Light Superbowl spots. The company achieved ten Academy Award nominations over a fourteen-year period. Richard is a twenty-two year Governor of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, founding member of the AMPAS visual effects branch and is chair of the Branch Executive Committee, also chairman of the Academy's Science and Technology Council. He also serves as a board member of the VES and on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Cinematographers.  Richard is a frequent lecturer at industry organizations and universities across the world including USC and Chapman film schools. His 1977 Oscar for Star Wars is currently on display at the newly opened Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. In this Episode, legendary Oscar-winning VFX Supervisor, Producer and Cinematographer Richard Edlund talks about being one of the first artists to join ILM -- to work on the 1977 film Star Wars -- his work on Return of the Jedi and Ghostbusters, as well as gives some insight on being a pioneer in the visual effects industry. For more show notes, visit www.allanmckay.com/329/.

UncotorreoconTanoyRay
#100 Hugo Fresan | Estudio Chapman

UncotorreoconTanoyRay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 75:56


Estudio Chapman es un estudio multidisciplinario de diseño y producción gráfica. Nuestro podcast cumple #100 episodios y hoy cotorreamos con Hugo sobre su estudio, ayahuasca, Nueva Tijuana y mucho más.

Brave New Work
What web3 means for the future of work w/ Chase Chapman

Brave New Work

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 64:13


Maybe you're already deep into crypto, NFTs (or non-fungible tokens), and DAOs (or decentralized autonomous organizations). And maybe you only know what web3 is because your cousin can't stop talking about it. Whichever end of the spectrum you fall on, there's much more for all of us to learn about this novel digital landscape being built before our eyes. But here's something we do know: web3 and DAOs represent a new frontier in democratizing our digital spaces and giving people true ownership over the content they make—and that has radical implications for the future of work. In this episode, we talk to Chase Chapman, a DAO contributor and host of the “On the Other Side” podcast, about this exciting new territory's building blocks; what DAOs actually are and how they function; and why all of this stuff meaningfully intersects with self-management and systems design. Learn more about Chase and her work here: https://twitter.com/chaserchapman & https://www.othersidepod.xyz/ Apply to work at The Ready: In the United States: http://theready.com/team In Europe: http://theready.com/team Our book is available now at bravenewwork.com We want to hear from you. Send your thoughts and feedback to podcast@theready.com Looking for some help with your own transformation? Visit theready.com

StarkCast
Stephanie Chapman

StarkCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 136:50


Welcome to Episode 95 of StarkCast! I talk with my friend and fellow podcaster Stephanie Chapman. Stephanie writes movie and TV reviews for both Pop Culture Leftovers and Scene-It Cast. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starkcastpod Twitter: @TheTubbyNinja Email: starkcastpod@gmail.com Website: https://media.zencast.fm/starkcast StarkCast Intro & Outro Music by James Wetzel This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Atlanta Sports Guys: Falcons' Offensive Line Troubles, Touki Toussaint's Braves Future and Hawks Getting Healthy With Max Marcovitch and Garrett Chapman

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 51:05


Outsider and Blue Wire's Chase Thomas is joined by fellow Atlanta Sports Guys Max Marcovitch and Garrett Chapman to talk about the Falcons' loss to the Bucs, why the offense is so bad, Matt Ryan's season thus far, the Braves' future at catcher, Touki's future in the rotation, and the Hawks' imbalance on offense and defense. Host: Chase Thomas Guests: Max Marcovitch and Garrett Chapman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Diva Behavior
SATC "And Just Like That" episode 1; Tristan Thompson's third baby mama; Josh Duggar court case; Molly Gaebe and Tawd Chapman' abortion protests and arrests

Diva Behavior

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 92:20


For the first 30 mins or so, we discuss the watershed cultural moment of "And Just Like That," the new "Sex and the City" revival! Then we talk to real American hero Molly Gaebe, who was arrested on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, protesting for abortion rights! This is not a drill!! Her distant cousin Tawd Chapman also joins to talk about the bro-life movement, which... might be a drill. An adult hockey drill, to be exact. Tawd also explains why Tristan Thompson offering his baby mama $75,000 to have an abortion via Snapchat is God's plan. As is Josh Duggar's court case.Shop our merch! https://www.etsy.com/shop/SPACETRASHpodcastFollow Molly Gaebe: https://www.instagram.com/mollygaebe/Follow Molly Mulshine: https://www.instagram.com/mollymulshine/Follow Sara Armour: https://www.instagram.com/saraarmour/Follow The Moonual: https://www.instagram.com/themoonual/& Subscribe & Leave a Review Thank you, Trashlings! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

GBFPC
Bro. Billy Chapman - "Project Thirty-Nine"

GBFPC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 13:24


Bro. Billy Chapman - "Project Thirty-Nine" by GBFPC

Restaurant Rockstars Podcast
273. Fryer Oil is Skyrocketing …. Here's a Savings Solution - Jeremiah Chapman

Restaurant Rockstars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 33:32


Supply chain shortages and rising costs are on everyone's mind, and its critical to find solutions to maintain already slim margins. One of the biggest cost increases is for fryer oil, something most restaurants can't operate without. Over the past few months, we've seen oil prices double and even triple! What to do? Well in this week's episode of the Restaurant Rockstars Podcast, I'm speaking with Jeremiah Chapman, a chemical engineer by trade who invented a product that can save your restaurant up to 25% on your Frying Costs. It's an environmentally friendly plant-based “pod” that you simply put in your fryer baskets overnight. Listen as we learn: - How the Pod extends the life and clarity of your oil by up to 4 days - The greater efficiency, cleanliness and simplicity of pods vs. fryer filtration systems - Improved taste and flavor of your fried foods - Labor hours saved - Why pods are also sustainable and environmentally friendly There's also a Savings Calculator feature at www.freshfry.me Simply enter the price you're currently paying for fryer oil, the number of fryers you are using and the frequency you change your oil. The calculator will show you how much your operation can save. Now go out there, save some money and ROCK your Restaurant! Roger The Restaurant Rockstars Academy – The Ultimate Start-up & Management Courses. Everything you need to know to crush it in the restaurant business: https://restaurantrockstars.com/pricing/ Thank you to our sponsors: Sysco - https://www.sysco.com/ 7shifts – Get 3 Months of Industry Leading Labor Management for FREE: https://www.7shifts.com/restaurantrockstars

Limitless Spirit
Episode 74: Four most important social skills your teen must learn right now

Limitless Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 37:26


The transition from childhood to adulthood is always hard and filled with countless ups and downs. But even though the teenage years are turbulent, there is a way for parents to help their children become mature adults.  In this week's episode of the Limitless Spirit Podcast, our host Helen Todd speaks with Gary Chapman; Gary is an author, pastor, and counselor best known for his book “The 5 Love Languages”.  In Helen's conversation with Gary, you'll hear about his latest book, “Things I Wish I'd Known Before My Child Became a Teenager”, which shows parents how to help their kids navigate the teenage years and become a mature adult. We talk about necessary social skills to develop in teenagers, how to help them cope with fluctuating emotions, and how parents can model Christ-like behavior to their teenagers. 5:15 - Technology's effect on teenagers8:25 - Important social skill #1: expressing gratitude12:15 - What's happening in the brain of teenagers15:05 - How to help teenagers deal with fluctuating emotions20:00 - Reaffirming your authority over your teenagers with being authoritarian23:00 - Important social skill #2: asking questions26:00 - Important social skill #3: listening28:25 - Important social skill #4: expressing kindness32:35 - How to help teenagers develop a personal relationship with Christ To check out Dr. Chapman's website please visit: 5lovelanguages.comTo participate in a giveaway of the book, email podcast@rfwma.orgYou can purchase  “Things I Wish I'd Known Before My Child Became a Teenager” by Gary Chapman on Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/Things-Known-Before-Became-Teenager/dp/0802425070/ref=asc_df_0802425070/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=533525922227&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1143820047275512174&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9017520&hvtargid=pla-1428766533102&psc=1After you listen to this episode, go to our host website: www.rfwma.org and find out how World Missions Alliance can help you connect to your greater purpose. If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the Limitless Spirit Podcast, click below:Support the show (https://rfwma.org/give)            Email us your questions and comments at podcast@rfwma.orgWMA is 501(c)(3), donations are tax deductibleSupport the show (https://rfwma.org/give)

Citation Needed
The Murder of John Lennon

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 36:11


On the evening of 8 December 1980, English musician John Lennon, formerly of the Beatles, was shot and fatally wounded in the archway of The Dakota, his residence in New York City. His killer was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan who was incensed by Lennon's lavish lifestyle and his 1966 comment that the Beatles were "more popular than Jesus". Chapman said he was inspired by the fictional character Holden Caulfield from J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, a "phony-killer" who despises hypocrisy.

Citation Needed
The Murder of John Lennon

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 36:11


On the evening of 8 December 1980, English musician John Lennon, formerly of the Beatles, was shot and fatally wounded in the archway of The Dakota, his residence in New York City. His killer was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan who was incensed by Lennon's lavish lifestyle and his 1966 comment that the Beatles were "more popular than Jesus". Chapman said he was inspired by the fictional character Holden Caulfield from J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, a "phony-killer" who despises hypocrisy.

Your Brain on Facts
From Panto to Python (do-over, ep. 174)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 38:16


From music hall to Red Dwarf, pantomime to Absolutely Fabulous, we look at the history of British comedy, the names, shows, and historical events that made it what it is today. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.  . Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website. Podchaser: Moxie got me through 2,500 miles. I listened to every episode regardless of audio quality from the vault. I got my fix of facts with a personality that kept me entertained the entire time. I shared it with everyone I knew that would appreciate the facts, wit and hilariously subtle segues. Profile avatar 2 months ago byBoredatwork23 Book: David Nowlin 5.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to be amazed at what you needed know, but did not. Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2021 Great book. Read it cover to cover, but am planning to reread it again and again. It is so full of such wonderful pieces of information that I use to interject conversations whenever I can. Thank you Moxie for such a wonderful gift, and the book is great too Gift and merch “The story so far: In the beginning the Universe was created.  This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”  Thus begins Douglas Adams' Restaurant at the End of the Universe, sequel to his culture touchstone The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.  That's the book that gave us the answer to life, the universe and everything, though not the question.  Welcome to episode number 42, which I have decided to devote to [drumroll] the history of British comedy.  That means we're going to try to cram hundreds of years, thousands of performers, and a dozen mediums into a half-hour show.  But don't panic.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.    British comedy history is measured in centuries, from chase scenes and beatings into Shakespeare's comedies to the misadventures of Mr. Bean.  Even as times, tastes, and technologies changes, some themes are eternal.  Innuendo, for example, has been a staple in the literature as far back as Beowulf and Chaucer, and is prevalent in many British folk songs.  King Charles II was such a fan of innuendo that he encouraged it to the point that Restoration comedy became not only its own genre, but an explicit one at that.  The repressive Victorian period gave us burlesque, though not in the same form as the shows you can see today - more vaudeville than striptease.  Absurdism and the surreal had always been an undercurrent, which firmly took root in the 1950's, leading Red Dwarf, The Mighty Boosh, and Count Duckula.  Though the British Empire successfully conquered ¼ of the globe, but its individual people struggled and suffered.  Plagues, wars, poverty, class oppression, and filthy cities gave rise to, and a need for, black humor, in which topics and events that are usually treated seriously are treated in a humorous or satirical manner.  The class system, especially class tensions between characters, with pompous or dim-witted members of the upper/middle classes or embarrassingly blatant social climbers, has always provided ample material, which we can see in modern shows like Absolutely Fabulous, Keeping Up Appearances, and Blackadder.  The British also value finding humor in everyday life, which we see in shows like Father Ted, The IT Crowd, and Spaced, which also incorporates a fair amount of absurdity.   But there's nothing the Brits do better than satire and nobody does it better than the Brits.  “The British, being cynical and sarcastic by nature do have a natural flair for satire,” says BBCAmerica.com writer Fraser McAlpine.  “There's a history of holding up a mirror to society and accentuating its least attractive qualities that goes back hundreds of years...Sometimes the satire is biting and cold, sometimes it's warm and encouraging, but if you want someone who can say a thing that isn't true, but also somehow IS true in a really profound way. You need look no further.”  There are three principal forms of satire.  Menippean satire uses fantasy realms that reflect back on modern society.  Everything from Alice in Wonderland to the works of Terry Pratchett fit here, as would Dr. Who.  Horatian satire skewers cultural moments of silliness using parodic humor.  These are the kind of thing you tend to see most of in comedy TV shows, like The Office.  We're laughing at people being inept and harassed, but not evil.  Juvenalian satire skewers everything with abrasive, often bleak, wit.  If there's an element of horror at the topic being discussed, that's a clue that it's Juvenalian.  John Oliver is a fair hand with Juvenalian satire.  Most political cartoon and black humor fall under this heading.   Though comedy is as old as laughter, we're going to begin today's time travel with the music hall.  (FYI, the narrative today is going to overall linear, but there will be a fair amount of bouncing around.)  Music halls sprang up as an answer to proper theater, which was at the time heavily monitored and censored by the government.  It took place in humble venues like the backs of pubs and coffee houses.  By the 1830s taverns had rooms devoted to musical clubs. They presented Saturday evening Sing-songs and “Free and Easies”. These became so popular that entertainment was put on two or three times a week.  Music in the form of humorous songs was a key element because dialogue was forbidden.  Dialogue was for the theater and if you had speaking parts, you'd be subject to censorship.  The Theatrical Licensing Act of 1737 empowered the Lord Chamberlain's Office to censor plays; this act would be in force until 1968. So, no speaking parts, less, though still some censorship.  Music halls also allowed drinking and smoking, which legitimate theaters didn't.  As the shows became more popular, they moved from the pubs into venues of their own.  Tavern owners, therefore, often annexed buildings adjoining their premises as music halls.  The usual show consisted of six to eight acts, possibly including a comedy skit (low comedy to appeal to the working class), a juggling act, a magic act, a mime, acrobats, a dancing act, a singing act, and perhaps a one-act play.  In the states, this format was essentially vaudeville.  The music hall era was a heyday for female performers, with headliners like Gracie Fields, Lillie Langtry, and Vesta Tilley.  The advent of the talking motion picture in the late 1920s caused music halls to convert into cinemas to stay in business.  To keep comedians employed, a mixture of films and songs called cine-variety was introduced.     The other critically important tradition of that era was panto or pantomime, but not the Marcel Marceau type of pantomime you might be picturing, but a type of theatrical musical comedy designed for family entertainment.  Modern pantomime includes songs, gags, slapstick comedy, dancing, and gender-crossing actors.  It combines topical humour with well-known stories like fables and folk tales.  It is a participatory form of theatre, in which the audience is expected to sing along with certain parts of the music and shout out phrases to the performers.  It's traditionally quite popular around Christmas and New Years.  In early 19th century England, pantomime acquired its present form and featured the first mainstream clown Joseph Grimaldi, while comedy routines also featured heavily in British music halls.  British comedians who honed their skills at pantomime and music hall sketches include Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel.  The influential English music hall comedian and theatre impresario Fred Karno developed a form of sketch comedy without dialogue in the 1890s, and Chaplin and Laurel were among the young comedians who worked for him as part of "Fred Karno's Army". VODACAST   Hopping back to famous ladies of music hall, one such was Lily Harley, though her greatest claim to fame is having given birth to Charles Spencer Chaplin.  When Lily inexplicably lost her voice in the middle of a show, the production manager pushed the five-year-old Charlie, whom he'd heard sing, onto the stage to replace her.  Charlie lit up the audience, wowing them with his natural comedic presence.   Sadly, Lily's voice never recovered, and she was unable to support her two sons, who were sent to a workhouse.  For those of us who don't know workhouses outside of one reference in A Christmas Carol, think an orphanage or jail with indentured servitude.  Young Charlie took whatever jobs he could find to survive as he fought his way back to the stage.  His acting debut was as a pageboy in a production of Sherlock Holmes.  From there he toured with a vaudeville outfit named Casey's Court Circus and in 1908 teamed up with the Fred Karno pantomime troupe, where Chaplin became one of its stars as the Drunk in the comedic sketch A Night in an English Music Hall.  With the Karno troupe, Chaplin got his first taste of the United States, where he caught the eye of a film producer who signed Chaplin to a contract for a $150 a week, equivalent to over three-grand today.   During his first year with the company, Chaplin made 14 films, including The Tramp, which established Chaplin's trademark character and his role as the unexpected hero.  By the age of 26, Chaplin, just three years removed from his vaudeville days, was a superstar.  He'd moved over to the Mutual Company, which paid him a whopping $670,000 a year to make now-classics like Easy Street.   Chaplin came to be known as a grueling perfectionist.  His love for experimentation often meant countless takes, and it was not uncommon for him to order the rebuilding of an entire set or begin filming with one leading actor, realize he'd made a mistake in his casting and start again with someone new.  But you can't argue with results.  During the 1920s Chaplin's career blossomed even more, with landmark films, like The Kid, and The Gold Rush, a movie Chaplin would later say he wanted to be remembered by.  We'll leave Chaplin's story while he's on top because his private life from here on out gets, in a word, sordid.   Though Chapin was English, his film were American.  British cinema arguably lagged decades behind, but they began to close the gap in the 1940's.  Films by Ealing Studios, particularly their comedies like Hue & Cry, Whisky Galore! and The Ladykillers began to push the boundaries of what could be done in cinema, dealing with previously taboo topics like crime in comedic ways.  Kitchen sink dramas followed soon after, portraying social realism, with the struggles of working class Britons on full display, living in cramped rented accommodation and spending their off-hours drinking in grimy pubs, to explore controversial social and political issues ranging from abortion to homelessness.  These contrasted sharply with the idea of cinema as escapism.  This was the era of such notable stars as actor/comedian/singer-songwriter Norman Wisdom.  Beginning with 1953's Trouble in the Store, for which he won a BAFTA (the British equivalent to an Oscar), his films were among Britain's biggest box-office successes of their day.  Wisdom gained celebrity status in lands as far apart as South America, Iran and many Eastern Bloc countries, particularly in Albania where his films were the only ones by Western actors permitted by dictator Enver Hoxha to be shown.  He also played one of the best characters in one of my favorite and most hard to find films, “The Night They Raided Minsky's.”   There are few institutions in British history that have had such a massive role in shaping the daily lives of British citizens as the British Broadcasting Corporation, which for decades meant the wireless radio.  “For many it is an ever-present companion: from breakfast-time to bedtime, from childhood through to old age, there it is telling us about ourselves and the wider world, amusing and entertaining us,” says Robin Aitkin, a former BBC reporter and journalist.  The BBC solidified its place in the public consciousness from its beginnings in 1922 to the end of the Second World War in 1945 is of special interest because these pivotal years helped redefine what it means to be British in modern society.  This was especially true during the high unemployment of the 1920's, when other forms of entertainment were unaffordable.  The BBC was formed from the merger of several major radio manufacturers in 1922, receiving a royal charter in 1927, and governmental protection from foreign competition made it essentially a monopoly.  Broadcasting was seen as a public service; a job at the BBC carried similar gravitas to a government job.  Classical music and educational programs were its bedrock, with radio plays added to bring theater to the wireless.  The BBC strove to be varied but balanced in its offerings, neutral but universal; some people found it elitist nonetheless.  Expansion in offerings came slowly, if at all, in the early years.     Trying to bring only the best of culture to the people meant that bawdy music hall acts had little to no place on the radio.  Obscenity was judged by laws passed as early as 1727.  British libel and slander laws are more strict than in the US, so making fun of public figures was taboo even in forms that would have been legal.  And blasphemy?  Lord, no.  In 1949, the BBC issued to comedy writers and producers the Variety Programmes Policy Guide For Writers and Producers, commonly known as "the Green Book."  Among things absolutely banned were jokes about lavatories, effeminacy in men, immorality of any kind, suggestive references to honeymoon couples, chambermaids, fig leaves, ladies' underwear, prostitution, and the vulgar use of words such as "basket".  (Not an actual basket, the Polari word “basket,” meaning the bulge in a gentleman's trousers.  More on that later.)  The guidelines also stipulated that "..such words as God, Good God, My God, Blast, Hell, Damn, Bloody, Gorblimey, Ruddy, etc etc should be deleted from scripts and innocuous expressions substituted."  Where the independently tun music halls gave people what they wanted, BBC radio gave people what it felt they needed.  But comedy writers are nothing if not clever and there is always a way to slip past the censors if you try.   In the very beginning of radio, comedies lampooned the poor, because only those with money had radios.  As radio ownership grew, the topics of shows broadened.  First half-hour comedy program in 1938, Band Wagon, included musical interludes, was effectively a sitcom and set the stage for much of what came after.  By then, nearly every household had a radio.   WWII had an enormous impact on British comedy and entertainment in general.  Unlike WWI, which was fought on the continent, WWII was right on top of them, with the Blitz, blackouts, rationing, et al.  All places of amusement, which by their nature meant lots of people would gather and could be a target for bombings, were closed.  But the government soon realized comedy had an important role to play in helping its people to keep calm and carry on.  Bonus fact: The iconic 'Keep Calm and Carry On' poster was designed months before WWII began, but was never officially sanctioned for display.  It only achieved its prominent position in the public imagination after its rediscovery in 2001.  All the parody t-shirts still annoy me though.   Theater was allowed to continue, but television service was suspended.  This brought radio back to the forefront for communication and diversion.  The most popular show was It's That Man Again, which ran on BBC radio from ‘39-'49.  It's humor was a great unifier during the war, helping people to laugh at the things they were scared of.  People would often listen huddled around their radio during a blackout.  In its character archetypes, it offered a more comprehensive range of social representation than what had come before it, with characters ranging from east end charwomen to the upper class.  It was so universally popular that supposedly its catch-phrases, which is regarded as the first to really succeed with, were used to test suspected German spies.  If you didn't know who said what, they'd be shot.      During the war, Britain fought back against the Nazi propagandists' ferocious scaremongering with things like a song about the fact that Hitler may or may not have only one testicle, the other of which we were storing in a London theatre for safe keeping.  This attitude, combined with having had enough authority to last them a while, would extend to their own government at the start of the 1960's when Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Alan Bennett, and Jonathan Miller made fun of the prime minister in their stage show Beyond The Fringe, with the PM in the audience.  This would open the door for satirical news programs like 1962's That Was The Week That Was, grandfather to The Daily Show and The Colbert Report.  There was also The Frost Report, whose staff of writers included five names many of know well and you know we're going to get into more detail on - Chapman, Jones, Idle, Palin, and Cleese.   The war would remain subject to comedy, either as the primary setting or a recurring plot point for decades to come in shows like Dad's Army, Allo Allo, and even Are You Being Served?, one of my personal favorites.   If you've ever seen me at my customer service day jobs, I pattern my behavior on Mrs. Slocombe, though I don't reference my pussy as often. [clip]  Experiences in the war led to the prominence of absurdism/surrealism, because nothing could match what they men had been through.  One of the most famous example was The Goon Show, with Spike Milligan, Harry Secombe, and Peter Sellers.  The scripts mixed ludicrous plots with surreal humour, puns, catchphrases and an array of bizarre sound effects. Some of the later episodes feature electronic effects devised by the fledgling BBC Radiophonic Workshop, who also created the theme to Dr Who.  The Goon Show and other such programs were popular with those who were students at the time, seeding their sense of humor into the next generation.  Spike Milligan in particular had wide-reaching cultural influence.  The Goon Show was cited as a major influence by The Beatles, the American comedy team The Firesign Theatre, as well as, among many others, Monty Python.   PATREON   Do you remember how I said in episode #39, Short-Lived, Long Remembered that Jackie Gleason's Honeymooner's was the first TV sitcom?  I was mistaken and I don't mind issuing a correction.  Pinwright's Progress, which ran for ten episodes starting in 1946, was the first half-hour television sitcom, telling the tale of a beleaguered shop-owner, his hated rival and his unhelpful staff.  By 1955, ⅓ of British households had a TV.  That year saw the launch of ITV, I for independent, because it was *not run by BBC with its war vets with good-school educations, but by showmen and entertainers.  Where the BBC did comedies for and about the middle-class, ITV brought full-blooded variety to TV.  The BBC was forced to loosen its tie a bit to keep up.  ITV also had commercials, which BBC shows never did -a concept that is quite foreign to the American brain- so writers had to learn to pace their shows differently to allow for the break.  One stand-out was Hancock's Half-hour, which began on radio and moved to TV.  Fom 54-61, it pushed sitcoms with a focus on character development, rather than silly set-ups, musical interludes, and funny voices of radio plays.  Two writers on the show, Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, would leave to create Comedy Playhouse in 1961, ten half-hour plays.  One of these grew into the TV show Steptoe and Son (1962–74), about two rag and bone men, father and son, who live together in a squalid house in West London.  This was the basis for the American series Sanford and Son, as well as version in Sweden, Netherlands and Portugal.  For those not in the know, a rag and bone man collected salvageable rubbish from the streets, making it a bizarre name choice for a clothing company but oh well.    The tone and offerings changed considerably with the cultural revolution of the 1960's.  Rock music, the birth control pill, civil rights, everything was changing.  Round The Horne, which aired on BBC radio on Sunday afternoons was chock full of brazen innuendos and double-entendres.  Some of them were risque to the point of being ironically safe -- people who would have objected to them were not of the sensibility to catch the joke it the first place.  Their most remarkable characters were Julian and Sandy, two very obviously gay characters in a time when it was still illegal to be gay in Britain.  Julian and Sandy got away with the bawdiest of their jokes because they spoke Polari, a pidgin language made up a words from Romani, French, Italian, theater and circus slang and even words spelled backwards.  They might refer to someone's dirty dishes and the squares would have no idea that “dish” meant derriere.  Bonus fact: You probably use Polari words without even realizing it, if you describe a masculine person as “butch” or something kitchy as “camp,” even “drag” meaning clothes, particularly women's.    The Carry On Films, a franchise that put out nearly a movie a year for three decades and spun off a TV series, held up a cartoonish mirror to the depressed and repressed Britain of the 1950s and 1960s.  They blended the rapid-fire pace of music hall sketches with topicality and a liberating sense of directness.  Carry On also filled the gap left as music halls as an institution collapsed.   Monty Python's Flying Circus aired from 69-74 and enjoyed a unique watershed success not just for British comedy but also for television comedy around the world. Monty Python was unlike anything that had appeared on television, and in many ways it was both a symbol and a product of the social upheaval and youth-oriented counterculture of the late 1960s.  The show's humour could be simultaneously sarcastic, scatological, and intellectual.  The series was a creative collaboration between Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin, and Terry Gilliam, the sole American in a group of Oxford and Cambridge graduates.  The five Brits played most of the roles, with Gilliam primarily contributing eccentric animations.  Although sketch comedy shows were nothing new, television had never broadcast anything as untraditional and surreal, and its importance to television is difficult to overstate.  Their free-form sketches seldom adhered to any particular theme and disregarded the conventions of comedy that writers, performers and audiences had been accustomed to for generations.  Even the opening title sequence didn't follow the rules; it might run in the middle of the show or be omitted entirely.  Over the run of the series, a *few characters recurred, but most were written solely for one sketch.  The show spun-off a number of feature films, like Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), Life of Brian (1979), and the Meaning of Life (1983) and even a Tony Award-winning musical comedy Spamalot, first produced in 2005, as well as books and albums like Instant Record Collection.  Decades after the show's initial run, the mere mention of some dead parrots, silly ways, Spam or the Spanish Inquisition is enough to prompt laughter from even casual fans.  All the members who continue on to successful careers, but let's follow John Cleese to his next best-known project.  I put my favorite sketch in Vodacast; see if you can guess it before you look.  And tell me yours, soc med.   Fawlty Towers has been described as the sitcom by which other sitcoms must be measured, voted number one in the BFI's 100 Greatest British Television Programmes in 2000. Its main character, Basil Fawlty, was inspired by a seethingly rude hotel proprietor John Cleese encountered while filming abroad with the Monty Python team.  Cleese actually tested the character on another show in 1971, Doctor At Large, a comedy about newly-graduated doctors, based on the books of Richard Gordon.  The setting for Fawlty Towers was a painfully ordinary hotel that Basil constantly struggling to inject a touch of class into.  His escapades included trying to hide a rat from a hygiene inspector, keeping a dead customer hidden, and pretending that his wife Sybil was ill during their anniversary party, when in fact she's walked out on him).  Basil was the perfect vehicle for Cleese's comic talents: mixing the biting verbal tirades against his wife and guests with the physical dexterity utilised to charge about between self-induced disasters.  Part of the success of the show is arguably the fact that it ran for a mere twelve episodes, so never ran out of steam.  It's been remade in other countries, but those version never really capture the success of the original.  That's one of the key differences between British and American TV series.  A British show might have 2 writers for a season of 6-10 episodes, whereas an American show will have a team of writers for a season of 13-25 episodes.  Quality over quantity, I suppose.  In part, this is a reflection of the difference between the size of the TV audience in the two countries, and the economics of television production; for decades sitcoms on US television that delivered the highest ratings, whereas; in Britain the highest ratings figures were normally for soap operas.   The tone shifted again as the 60's gave way to the 70's.  The anger of 60's revolution gave way to a more comfortable feeling in the 70's.  One of the stand-outs of the decade, which continued into the 80's, was The Two Ronnies.  A sketch show starring Ronnies Barker and Corbett, it moved away from the long-standing comic and straight-man format.  It was the BBC's flagship of light entertainment, the longest running show of its genre.  If we're talking modern comedy duos, we need to talk about Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders.  Even in alternative comedy scenes, women had trouble gaining the same notoriety as their male peers.  A step in the right direction was 1987's French and Saunders, a sketch show that displayed the wilful amateurishness of much alternative comedy, but shunned both the violence and scatology or the strident politics that were staples of the big-name performers.  The duo's humour was distinctively female, but not feminist, and most of their jokes were at the expense of themselves or each other.  As audiences and budgets grew, the pair increasingly favoured elaborate spoofs of pop stars and blockbuster movies.  After the show French starred in The Vicar of Dibley and Saunders to the role she's probably best known for, Edina in Absolutely Fabulous.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Don't be surprised if this topic spawns a sequel.  I left out Punch and Judy, skipped right over literature, had to forgo luminaries like Morecambe and Wise, didn't get to the panel show format, and said nothing of Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, which may actually be a crime, I'm not sure.  Well, it's like they say in the biz, always leave them wanting more.  Thanks for spending part of your day with em.     Sources: https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/truth-behind-keep-calm-and-carry-on https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2016/feb/17/the-five-stages-of-british-gags-silliness-repression-anger-innuendo-fear https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Goon_Show https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Wisdom https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hancock%27s_Half_Hour https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/apr/17/gender.filmnews https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round_the_Horne http://www.screenonline.org.uk/film/id/1011109/index.html https://www.britannica.com/topic/Monty-Pythons-Flying-Circus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galton_and_Simpson http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/fawltytowers/ http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/06/history-brits-better-satire https://www.britannica.com/art/music-hall-and-variety https://www.biography.com/people/charlie-chaplin-9244327 https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1107&context=ghj https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U77CXPANrCc&list=PL9e1sByp65ixpMQlW9hpMMdomwSwGK9-Y

tv corbett western restaurants gift victorian office theater producers night american german guide music christmas god world war ii saunders english simpson french italian dad tony award wisdom army modern dialogue england british south america rock iran shakespeare hell meaning universe brainiac united states nazis bbc films palin sanford lord galaxy hancock drunk netherlands punch beatles sweden stan laurel chapman portugal wwii bean reach jennifer saunders hang cambridge progress bfi blast classical bonus horne jackie gleason honeymooners american tv new years mrs plagues sherlock holmes beowulf terry pratchett douglas adams chaucer sing damn british empire python oxford tramp blitz bloody peter sellers spam kitchen fyi britain dibley adolf hitler trouble monty python green book bbc america brits broadcasting edina wise tavern profile experiences basil hitchhiker albania stephen fry itv carry on charlie chaplin restoration absolutely fabulous fawlty towers terry gilliam gilliam britons holy grail decades chaplin john oliver spamalot alan bennett alice in wonderland marcel marceau colbert report panto red dwarf expansion gold rush innuendo easy street terry jones allo allo count duckula hugh laurie absurdism moxie michael palin two ronnies my god father ted jonathan miller john cleese romani christmas carol bafta idle dudley moore spaced cleese slocombe alan simpson bbc radiophonic workshop basil fawlty spike milligan hopping blackadder daily show good god west london king charles ii ray galton eric idle fom morecambe eastern bloc goon show peter cook flying circus norman wisdom firesign theatre charles spencer chaplin half hour it crowd young charlie vicar ladykillers mighty boosh graham chapman ruddy steptoe richard gordon galton keeping up appearances obscenity spanish inquisition are you being served polari dawn french lord chamberlain at large british broadcasting corporation ealing studios whisky galore enver hoxha that was the week that was
D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students
Episode 62: Dr. Amir Olfat D.O. Interventional Radiology Resident

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 26:45


Dr. Amir Olfat is a native Californian and a graduate of Chapman University, where he earned a degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. After graduating from Chapman, Dr. Olfat moved to New York's Hudson Valley for medical school.While in medical school he had the opportunity to move around the greater New York area, from Brooklyn's East Flatbush to Nyack, in order to complete his core clerkships. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Olfat completed an intense surgical internship at New York-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital where he was awarded “Intern of the Year”. Amir is now working on completing his residency in Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. He is excited about what the future holds for the field of IR. In addition to his academic interests in radiology and research, he enjoys photography, biking, and traveling.

DAOn the Rabbit Hole
What Are DAOs? (Chase Chapman)

DAOn the Rabbit Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 49:37


In this episode of DAOn the Rabbit Hole, we're talking to Chase Chapman — a DAO contributor at Index, Forefront, RabbitHole, and Decentology. She's here to share her thoughts and knowledge about all things related to DAOs.Chase talks about how she fell into crypto from a background in marketing and how she began learning about DAOs. She breaks down exactly what a DAO is and what makes a DAO decentralized compared to a traditional organization.We talk about how DAOs are structured — is there no hierarchical structure at all? How does that work without everything falling into chaos? What's the difference between a contributor and a community member? Chase also dives into the history of DAOs and how they have evolved over time.Chase tells us about the DAOs she is personally involved in and talks about the different categories of DAOs that exist today. We talk about social DAOs and how they could develop over time.Chase shares her thoughts on the positives and negatives about most DAOs today and how she would solve some of the problems in the space. Finally, we discuss what the future might hold for DAOs and how to bring more people into this world.To continue this conversation and stay up to date on all things DAOn the Rabbit Hole, you can follow Diana on Twitter @ddwchen and RabbitHole @rabbithole_gg. You can follow our guest, Chase Chapman, on Twitter @chaserchapman.—Kinjal's list of DAO resources: Kinjal's list of DAO resources: https://kinjal.mirror.xyz/eD3-Sgv2h50j-kwjHQCOnwqMKqSLTfnrqrtNypU-P5k—TIMESTAMPS:1:58 Chase's background and how she fell down the crypto rabbit hole2:59 What is a DAO?9:01 History of DAOs13:41 Categories of DAOs today16:39 How are DAOs structured?22:09 Technical requirements of DAOs28:55 What DAOs are getting right and wrong today36:56 Future of DAOs43:39 How to get involved in a DAO—If you enjoyed this episode, please rate, subscribe, and share with your friends and family so we can keep taking you down the rabbit hole with us. 

Iowa Chapman and The Last Dog
Iowa Chapman and the Last Dog (3-D Audio Version)

Iowa Chapman and The Last Dog

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 184:43


This version of Iowa Chapman and the Last Dog was Mixed using Dolby's Atmos Production Suite, it is best experienced with headphones. If you'd like to listen on speakers, the original version is your best option.In an apocalyptic future, climate change and overconsumption have made our planet a very different place. The seas have risen, resources are scarce…and animals have disappeared off the face of the earth. Most people believe they never existed at all. 12-year-old Iowa Chapman is not most people. And when she's rescued by what might be the last remaining dog, she realizes the responsibility she has to keep this amazing creature safe. Pursued by the evil Regulators, Iowa and Doggo set off on a journey in search of Haven, a legendary island where some believe animals might still be living. From Gen-Z Media, creators of Six Minutes, The Last Dog is GZM's first movie-length audio epic.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Screaming in the Cloud
Ironing out the BGP Ruffles with Ivan Pepelnjak

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 42:19


About IvanIvan Pepelnjak, CCIE#1354 Emeritus, is an independent network architect, blogger, and webinar author at ipSpace.net. He's been designing and implementing large-scale service provider and enterprise networks as well as teaching and writing books about advanced internetworking technologies since 1990.https://www.ipspace.net/About_Ivan_PepelnjakLinks:ipSpace.net: https://ipspace.net TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code they write, but also the containers and cloud infrastructure their apps run on. And a big part of that responsibility is app security — from code to cloud.That's where Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are, finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, repos, and pipelines. And Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like CodePipeline, EKS, ECR, etc., etc., etc., you get the picture! Deploy on AWS. Secure with Snyk. Learn more at snyk.io/scream. That's S-N-Y-K-dot-I-O/scream. Because they have not yet purchased a vowel.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I have an interesting and storied career path. I dabbled in security engineering slash InfoSec for a while before I realized that being crappy to people in the community wasn't really my thing; I was a grumpy Unix systems administrator because it's not like there's a second kind of those out there; and I dabbled ever so briefly in the wide world of network administration slash network engineering slash plugging the computers in to make them talk to one another, ideally correctly. But I was always a dabbler. When it comes time to have deep conversations about networking, I immediately tag out and look to an expert. My guest today is one such person. Ivan Pepelnjak is oh so many things. He's a CCIE emeritus, and well, let's start there. Ivan, welcome to the show.Ivan: Thanks for having me. And oh, by the way, I have to tell people that I was a VAX/VMS administrator in those days.Corey: Oh, yes the VAX/VMS world was fascinating. I talked—Ivan: Yes.Corey: —to a company that was finally emulating them on physical cards because that was the only way to get them there. Do you refer to them as VAXen, or VAXes, or how did you wind up referring—Ivan: VAXes.Corey: VAXes. Okay, I was on the other side of that with the inappropriately pluralizing anything that ends with an X with an en—‘boxen' and the rest. And that's why I had no friends for many years.Ivan: You do know what the first VAX was, right?Corey: I do not.Ivan: It was a Swedish Hoover company.Corey: Ooh.Ivan: And they had a trademark dispute with Digital over the name, and then they settled that.Corey: You describe yourself in your bio as a CCIE Emeritus, and you give the number—which is low—number 1354. Now, I've talked about certifications on this show in the context of the modern era, and whether it makes sense to get cloud certifications or not. But this is from a different time. Understand that for many listeners, these stories might be older than you are in some cases, and that's okay. But Cisco at one point, believe it or not, was a shining beacon of the industry, the kind of place that people wanted to work at, and their certification path was no joke.I got my CCNA from them—Cisco Certified Network Administrator—and that was basically a byproduct of learning how networks worked. There are several more tiers beyond that, culminating in the CCIE, which stands for Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert, or am I misremembering?Ivan: No, no, that's it.Corey: Perfect. And that was known as the doctorate of networking in many circles for many years. Back in those days, if you had a CCIE, you are guaranteed to be making an awful lot of money at basically any company you wanted to because you knew how networking—Ivan: In the US.Corey: —worked. Well, in the US. True. There's always the interesting stories of working in places that are trying to go with the lowest bidder for networking gear, and you wind up spending weeks on end trying to figure out why things are breaking intermittently, and only to find out at the end that someone saved 20 bucks by buying cheap patch cables. I digress, and I still have the scars from those.But it was fascinating in those days because there was a lab component of getting those tests. There were constant rumors that in the middle of the night, during the two-day certification exam, they would come in and mess with the lab and things you'd set up—Ivan: That's totally true.Corey: —you'd have to fix it the following day. That is true?Ivan: Yeah. So, in the good old days, when the lab was still physical, they would even turn the connectors around so that they would look like they would be plugged in, but obviously there was no signal coming through. And they would mess up the jumpers on the line cards and all that stuff. So, when you got your broken lab, you really had to work hard, you know, from the physical layer, from the jumpers, and they would mess up your config and everything else. It was, you know, the real deal. The thing you would experience in real world with, uh, underqualified technicians putting stuff together. Let's put it this way.Corey: I don't wish to besmirch our brethren working in the data centers, but having worked with folks who did some hilariously awful things with cabling, and how having been one of those people myself from time to time, it's hard to have sympathy when you just spent hours chasing it down. But to be clear, the CCIE is one of those things where in a certain era, if you're trying to have an argument on the internet with someone about how networks work and their responses, “Well, I'm a CCIE.” Yeah, the conversation was over at that point. I'm not one to appeal to authority on stuff like that very often, but it's the equivalent of arguing about medicine with a practicing doctor. It's the same type of story; it is someone where if they're wrong, it's going to be in the very fringes or the nuances, back in this era. Today, I cannot speak to the quality of CCIEs. I'm not attempting to besmirch any of them. But I'm also not endorsing that certification the way I once did.Ivan: Yeah, well, I totally agree with you. When this became, you know, a mass certification, the reason it became a mass certification is because reseller discounts are tied to reseller status, which is tied to the number of CCIEs they have, it became, you know, this, well, still high-end, but commodity that you simply had to get to remain employed because your employer needed the extra two point discount.Corey: It used to be that the prerequisite for getting the certification was beyond other certifications was, you spent five or six years working on things.Ivan: Well, that was what gave you the experience you needed because in those days, there were no boot camps. Today, you have [crosstalk 00:06:06]—Corey: Now, there's boot camp [crosstalk 00:06:07] things where it's we're going to train you for four straight weeks of nothing but this, teach to the test, and okay.Ivan: Yeah. No, it's even worse, there were rumors that some of these boot camps in some parts of the world that shall remain unnamed, were actually teaching you how to type in the commands from the actual lab.Corey: Even better.Ivan: Yeah. You don't have to think. You don't have to remember. You just have to type in the commands you've learned. You're done.Corey: There's an arc to the value of a certification. It comes out; no one knows what the hell it is. And suddenly it's, great, you can use that to really identify what's great and what isn't. And then it goes at some point down into the point where it becomes commoditized and you need it for partner requirements and the rest. And at that point, it is no longer something that is a reliable signal of anything other than that someone spent some time and/or money.Ivan: Well, are you talking about bachelor degree now?Corey: What—no, I don't have one of those either. I have—Ivan: [laugh].Corey: —an eighth grade education because I'm about as good of an academic as it probably sounds like I am. But the thing that really differentiated in my world, the difference between what I was doing in the network engineering sense, and the things that folks like you who were actually, you know, professionals rather than enthusiastic amateurs took into account was that I was always working inside of the LAN—Local Area Network—inside of a data center. Cool, everything here inside the cage, I can make a talk to each other, I can screw up the switching fabric, et cetera, et cetera. I didn't deal with any of the WAN—Wide Area Network—think ‘internet' in some cases. And at that point, we're talking about things like BGP, or OSPF in some parts of the world, or RIP. Or RIPv2 if you make terrible life choices.But BGP is the routing protocol that more or less powers the internet. At the time of this recording, we're a couple weeks past a BGP… kerfuffle that took Facebook down for a number of hours, during which time the internet was terrific. I wish they could do that more often, in fact; it was almost like a holiday. It was fantastic. I took my elderly relatives out and got them vaccinated. It was glorious.Now, we're back to having Facebook and, terrific. The problem I have whenever something like this happens is there's a whole bunch of crappy explainers out there of, “What is BGP and how might it work?” And people have angry opinions about all of these things. So instead, I prefer to talk to you. Given that you are a networking trainer, you have taught people about these things, you have written books, you have operated large—scale environments—Ivan: I even developed a BGP course for Cisco.Corey: You taught it for Cisco, of all places—Ivan: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: —back when that was impressive, and awesome and not a has-been. It's honestly, I feel like I could go there and still wind up going back in time, and still, it's the same Cisco in some respects: ‘evolve or die dinosaur,' and they got frozen in amber. But let's start at the very beginning. What is BGP?Ivan: Well, you know, when the internet was young, they figured out that we aren't all friends on the internet anymore. And I want to control what I tell you, and you want to control what you tell me. And furthermore, I want to control what I believe from what you're telling me. So, we needed a protocol that would implement policy, where I could say, “I will only announce my customers to you, but not what I've heard from Verizon.” And you will do the same.And then I would say, “Well, but I don't want to hear about that customer of yours because he's also my customer.” So, we need some sort of policy. And so they invented a protocol where you will tell me what you have, I will tell you what I have and then we would both choose what we want to believe and follow those paths to forward traffic. And so BGP was born.Corey: On some level, it seems like it's this faraway thing to people like me because I have a residential internet connection and I am not generally allowed to make my own BGP announcements to the greater world. Even when I was working in data centers, very often the BGP was handled by our upstream provider, or very occasionally by a router they would drop in with the easiest maintenance instructions in the world for me of, “Step one, make sure it has power. Step two, never touch it. Step three, we'd prefer if you don't even look at it and remain at least 20 feet away to keep from bringing your aura near anything we care about.” And that's basically how you should do with me in the context of hardware. So, it was always this arcane magic thing.Ivan: Well, it's not. You know, it's like power transmission: when you know enough about it, it stops being magic. It's technology, it's a bit more complicated than some other stuff. It's way less complicated than some other stuff, like quantum physics, but still, it's so rarely used that it gets this aura of being mysterious. And then of course, everyone starts getting their opinion, particularly the graduates of the Facebook Academy.And yes, it is true that usually BGP would be used between service providers, so whenever, you know, we are big enough to need policy, if you just need one uplink, there is no policy there. You either use the uplink or you don't use the uplink. If you want to have two different links to two different points of presence or to two different service providers, then you're already in the policy land. Do I prefer one provider over the other? Do I want to announce some things to one provider but other things to the other? Do I want to take local customers from both providers because I want to, you know, have lower latency because they are local customers? Or do I want to use one solely as the backup link because I paid so little for that link that I know it's shitty.So, you need all that policy stuff, and to do that, you really need BGP. There is no other routing protocol in the world where you could implement that sort of policy because everything else is concerned mostly with, let's figure out as fast as possible, what is reachable and how to get there. And BGP is like, “Hey, slow down. There's policy.”Corey: Yeah. In the context of someone whose primary interaction with networks is their home internet, where there's a single cable coming in from the outside world, you plug it into a device, maybe yours, maybe ISPs, maybe we don't care. That's sort of the end of it. But think in terms of large interchanges, where there are multiple redundant networks to get from here to somewhere else; which one should traffic go down at any given point in time? Which networks are reachable on the other end of various distant links? That's the sort of problem that BGP is very good at addressing and what it was built for. If you're running BGP internally, in a small network, consider not doing exactly that.Ivan: Well, I've seen two use cases—well, three use cases for people running BGP internally.Corey: Okay, this I want to hear because I was always told, “No touch ‘em.” But you know, I'm about to learn something. That's why I'm talking to you.Ivan: The first one was multinationals who needed policy.Corey: Yes. Many multi-site environments, large-scale companies that have redundant links, they're trying to run full mesh in some cases, or partial mesh where—between a bunch of facilities.Ivan: In this case, it was multiple continents and really expensive transcontinental links. And it was, I don't want to go from Europe to Sydney over US; I want to go over Middle East. And to implement that type of policy, you have to split, you know, the whole network into regions, and then each region is what BGP calls an autonomous system, so that it gets its stack, its autonomous system number and then you can do policy on that saying, “Well, I will not announce Asian routes to Europe through US, or I will make them less preferred so that if the Middle East region goes down, I can still reach Asia through US but preferably, I will not go there.”The second one is yet again, large networks where they had too many prefixes for something like OSPF to carry, and so their OSPF was breaking down and the only way to solve that was to go to something that was designed to scale better, which was BGP.And third one is if you want to implement some of the stuff that was designed for service providers, initially, like, VPNs, layer two or layer three, then BGP becomes this kitchen sink protocol. You know, it's like using Route 53 as a database; we're using BGP to carry any information anyone ever wants to carry around. I'm just waiting for someone to design JSON in BGP RFC and then we are, you know… where we need to be.Corey: I feel on some level, like, BGP gets relatively unfair criticism because the only time it really intrudes on the general awareness is when something has happened and it breaks. This is sort of the quintessential network or systems—or, honestly, computer—type of issue. It's either invisible, or you're getting screamed at because something isn't working. It's almost like a utility. On some level. When you turn on a faucet, you don't wonder whether water is going to come out this time, but if it doesn't, there's hell to pay.Ivan: Unless it's brown.Corey: Well, there is that. Let's stay away from that particular direction; there's a beautiful metaphor, probably involving IBM, if we do. So, the challenge, too, when you look at it is that it's this weird, esoteric thing that isn't super well understood. And as soon as it breaks, everyone wants to know more about it. And then in full on charging to the wrong side of the Dunning-Kruger curve, it's, “Well, that doesn't sound hard. Why are they so bad at it? I would be able to run this better than they could.” I assure you, you can't. This stuff is complicated; it is nuanced; it's difficult. But the common question is, why is this so fragile and able to easily break? I'm going to turn that around. How is it that something that is this esoteric and touches so many different things works as well as it does?Ivan: Yeah, it's a miracle, particularly considering how crappy the things are configured around the world.Corey: There have been periodic outages of sites when some ISP sends out a bad BGP announcement and their upstream doesn't suppress it because hey, you misconfigured things, and suddenly half the internet believes oh, YouTube now lives in this tiny place halfway around the world rather than where it is currently being Anycasted from.Ivan: Called Pakistan, to be precise.Corey: Exact—there was an actual incident there; we are not dunking on Pakistan as an example of a faraway place. No, no, an Pakistani ISP wound up doing exactly this and taking YouTube down for an afternoon a while back. It's a common problem.Ivan: Yeah, the problem was that they tried to stop local users accessing YouTube. And they figured out that, you know, YouTube, is announcing this prefix and if they would announce to more specific prefixes, then you know, they would attract the traffic and the local users wouldn't be able to reach YouTube. Perfect. But that leaked.Corey: If you wind up saying that, all right, the entire internet is available on this interface, and a small network of 256 nodes available on the second interface, the most specific route always wins. That's why the default route or route of last resort is the entire internet. And if you don't know where to send it, throw it down this direction. That is usually, in most home environments, the gateway that then hands it up to your ISP, where they inspect it and do all kinds of fun things to sell ads to you, and then eventually get it to where it's going.This gets complicated at these higher levels. And I have sympathy for the technical aspects of what happened at Facebook; no sympathy whatsoever for the company itself because they basically do far more harm than they do good and I've been very upfront about that. But I want to talk to you as well about something that—people are going to be convinced I'm taking this in my database direction, but I assure you I'm not—DNS. What is the relationship between BGP and DNS? Which sounds like a strange question, sometimes.Ivan: There is none.Corey: Excellent.Ivan: It's just that different large-scale properties decided to implement the global load-balancing global optimal access to their servers in different ways. So, Cloudflare is a typical example of someone who is doing Anycast, they are announcing the same networks, the same prefixes, from hundreds locations around the world. So, BGP will take care that you always get to the close Cloudflare [unintelligible 00:18:46]. And that's it. That's how they work. No magic. Facebook didn't believe in the power of Anycast when they started designing their service. So, what they're doing is they have DNS servers around the world, and the DNS servers serve the local region, if you wish. And that DNS server then decides what facebook.com really stands for. So, if you query for facebook.com, you'll get a different answer in Europe than in US.Corey: Just a slight diversion on what Anycast is. If I ping Google's public resolver 8.8.8.8—easy to remember—from my computer right now, the packet gets there and back in about five milliseconds.Wherever you are listening to this, if you were to try that same thing you'd see something roughly similar. Now, one of two things is happening; either Google has found a way to break the laws of physics and get traffic to a central point faster than light for the 8.8.8.8 that I'm talking to and the one that you are talking to are not in fact the same computer.Ivan: Well, by the way, it's 13 milliseconds for me. And between you and me, it's 200 millisecond. So yes, they are cheating.Corey: Just a little bit. Or unless they tunneled through the earth rather than having to bounce it off of satellites and through cables.Ivan: No, even that wouldn't work.Corey: That's what the quantum computers are for. I always wondered. Now, we know.Ivan: Yeah. They're entangling the replies in advance, and that's how it works. Yeah, you're right.Corey: Please continue. I just wanted to clarify that point because I got that one hilariously wrong once upon a time and was extremely confused for about six months.Ivan: Yeah. It's something that no one ever thinks about unless, you know, you're really running large-scale DNS because honestly, root DNS servers were Anycasted for ages. You think they're like 12 different root DNS servers; in reality, there are, like, 300 instances hidden behind those 12 addresses.Corey: And fun trivia fact; the reason there are 12 addresses is because any more than that would no longer fit within the 512 byte limit of a UDP packet without truncating.Ivan: Thanks for that. I didn't know that.Corey: Of course. Now, EDNS extensions that you go out with a larger [unintelligible 00:21:03], but you can't guarantee that's going to hit. And what happens when you receive a UDP packet—when you receive a DNS result with a truncate flag set on the UDP packet? It is left to the client. It can either use the partial result, or it can try and re-establish over a TCP connection.That is one of those weird trivia questions they love to ask in sysadmin interviews, but it's yeah, fundamentally, if you're doing something that requires the root nameservers, you don't really want to start going down those arcane paths; you want it to just be something that fits in a single packet not require a whole bunch of computational overhead.Ivan: Yeah, and even within those 300 instances, there are multiple servers listening to the same IP address and… incoming packets are just sprayed across those servers, and whichever one gets the packet replies to it. And because it's UDP, it's one packet in one packet out. Problem solved. It all works. People thought that this doesn't work for TCP because, you know, you need a whole session, so you need to establish the session, you send the request, you get the reply, there are acknowledgements, all that stuff.Turns out that there is almost never two ways to get to a certain destination across the internet from you. So, people thought that, you know, this wouldn't work because half of your packets will end in San Francisco, and half of the packets will end in San Jose, for example. Doesn't work that way.Corey: Why not?Ivan: Well, because the global Internet is so diverse that you almost never get two equal cost paths to two different destinations because it would be San Francisco and San Jose announcing 8.8.8.8 and it would be a miracle if you would be sitting just in the middle so that the first packet would go to San Francisco, the second one would go to San Jose, and you know, back and forth. That never happens. That's why Cloudflare makes it work by analysing the same prefix throughout the world.Corey: So, I just learned something new about how routing announcements work, an aspect of BGP, and you a few minutes ago learned something about the UDP size limit and the root name servers. BGP and DNS are two of the oldest protocols in existence. You and I are also decades into our careers. If someone is starting out their career today, working in a cloud-y environment, there are very few network-centric roles because cloud providers handle a lot of this for us. Given these protocols are so foundational to what goes on and they're as old as they are, are we as an industry slash sector slash engineers losing the skills to effectively deploy and manage these things?Ivan: Yes. The same problem that you have in any other sufficiently developed technology area. How many people can build power lines? How many people can write a compiler? How many people can design a new CPU? How many people can design a new motherboard?I mean, when I was 18 years old, I was wire wrapping my own motherboard, with 8-bit processor. You can't do that today. You know, as the technology is evolving and maturing, it's no longer fun, it's no longer sexy, it stops being a hobby, and so it bifurcates into users and people who know about stuff. And it's really hard to bridge the gap from one to the other. So, in the end, you have, like, this 20 [graybeard 00:24:36] people who know everything about the technology, and the youngsters have no idea. And when these people die, don't ask me [laugh] how we'll get any further on.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at CloudAcademy. That's right, they have a different lab challenge up for you called, “Code Red: Repair an AWS Environment with a Linux Bastion Host.” What does it do? Well, its going to assess your ability to troubleshoot AWS networking and security issues in a production like environment. Well, kind of, its not quite like production because some exec is not standing over your shoulder, wetting themselves while screaming. But..ya know, you can pretend in fact I'm reasonably certain you can retain someone specifically for that purpose should you so choose. If you are the first prize winner who completes all four challenges with the fastest time, you'll win a thousand bucks. If you haven't started yet you can still complete all four challenges between now and December 3rd to be eligible for the grand prize. There's only a few days left until the whole thing ends, so I would get on it now. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. That's cloudacademy.com/C-O-R-E-Y, for god's sake don't drop the “E” that drives me nuts, and thank you again to Cloud Academy for not only promoting my ridiculous non sense but for continuing to help teach people how to work in this ridiculous environment.Corey: On some level, it feels like it's a bit of a down the stack analogy for what happened to me early in my career. My first systems administration job was running a large-scale email system. So, it was a hobby that I was interested in. I basically bluffed my way into working at a university for a year—thanks, Chapman; I appreciate that [laugh]—and it was great, but it was also pretty clear to me that with the rise of things like hosted email, Gmail, and whatnot, it was not going to be the future of what the present day at that point looked like, which was most large companies needed an email administrator. Those jobs were dwindling.Now, if you want to be an email systems administrator, there are maybe a dozen companies or so that can really use that skill set and everyone else just outsources that said, at those companies like Google and Microsoft, there are some incredibly gifted email administrators who are phenomenal at understanding every nuance of this. Do you think that is what we're going to see in the world of running BGP at large scale, where a few companies really need to know how this stuff works and everyone else just sort of smiles, nods and rolls with it?Ivan: Absolutely. We're already there. Because, you know, if I'm an end customer, and I need BGP because I have to uplinks to two ISPs, that's really easy. I mean, there are a few tricks you should follow and hopefully, some of the guardrails will be built into network operating systems so that you will really have to configure explicitly that you want to leak [unintelligible 00:26:15] between Verizon and AT&T, which is great fun if you have too low-speed links to both of them and now you're becoming transit between the two, which did happen to Verizon; that's why I'm mentioning them. Sorry, guys.Anyway, if you are a small guy and you just need two uplinks, and maybe do a bit of policy, that's easy and that's achievable, let's say with some Google and paste, and throwing spaghetti at the wall and seeing what sticks. On the other hand, what the large-scale providers—like for example Facebook because we were talking about them—are doing is, like, light years away. It's like comparing me turning on the light bulb and someone running, you know, nuclear reactor.Corey: Yeah, you kind of want the experts running some aspects on that. Honestly, in my case, you probably want someone more competent flipping the light switch, too. But that's why I have IoT devices here that power my lights, it on the one hand, keeps me from hurting myself on the other leads to a nice seasonal feel because my house is freaking haunted.Ivan: So, coming back to Facebook, they have these DNS servers all around the world and they don't want everyone else to freak out when one of these DNS servers goes away. So, that's why they're using the same IP address for all the DNS servers sitting anywhere in the world. So, the name server for facebook.com is the same worldwide. But it's different machines and they will give you different answers when you ask, “Where is facebook.com?”I will get a European answer, you will get a US answer, someone in Asia will get whatever. And so they're using BGP to advertise the DNS servers to the world so that everyone gets to the closest DNS server. And now it doesn't make sense, right, for the DNS server to say, “Hey, come to European Facebook,” if European Facebook tends to be down. So, if their DNS server discovers that it cannot reach the servers in the data center, it stops advertising itself with BGP.Why would BGP? Because that's the only thing it can do. That's the only protocol where I can tell you, “Hey, I know about this prefix. You really should send the traffic to me.” And that's what happened to Facebook.They bricked their backbone—whatever they did; they never told—and so their DNS server said, “Gee, I can't reach the data center. I better stop announcing that I'm a DNS server because obviously I am disconnected from the rest of Facebook.” And that happens to all DNS servers because, you know, the backbone was bricked. And so they just, you know, [unintelligible 00:29:03] from the internet, they've stopped advertising themselves, and so we thought that there was no DNS server for Facebook. Because no DNS server was able to reach their core, and so all DNS servers were like, “Gee, I better get off this because, you know, I have no clue what's going on.”So, everything was working fine. Everything was there. It's just that they didn't want to talk to us because they couldn't reach the backend servers. And of course, people blamed DNS first because the DNS servers weren't working. Of course they weren't. And then they blame the BGP because it must be BGP if it isn't DNS. But it's like, you know, you're blaming headache and muscle cramps and high fever, but in fact you have flu.Corey: For almost any other company that wasn't Facebook, this would have been a less severe outage just because most companies are interdependent on each other companies to run infrastructure. When Facebook itself has evolved the way that it has, everything that they use internally runs on the same systems, so they wound up almost with a bootstrapping problem. An example of this in more prosaic terms are okay, the data center had a power outage. Okay, now I need to power up all the systems again and the physical servers I'm trying to turn on need to talk to a DNS server to finish booting but the DNS server is a VM that lives on those physical servers. Uh-oh. Now, I'm in trouble. That is a overly simplified and real example of what Facebook encountered trying to get back into this, to my understanding.Ivan: Yes, so it was worse than that. It looks like, you know, even out-of-band management access didn't work, which to me would suggest that out-of-band management was using authentication servers that were down. People couldn't even log to Zoom because Zoom was using single-sign-on based on facebook.com, and facebook.com was down so they couldn't even make Zoom calls or open Google Docs or whatever. There were rumors that there was a certain hardware tool with a rotating blade that was used to get into a data center and unbrick a box. But those rumors were vehemently denied, so who knows?Corey: The idea of having someone trying to physically break into a data center in order to power things back up is hilarious, but it does lead to an interesting question, which is in this world of cloud computing, there are a lot of people in the physical data centers themselves, but they don't have access, in most cases to log into any of the boxes. One of the most naive things I see all the time is, “Oh well, the cloud provider can read all of your data.” No, they can't. These things are audited. And yeah, theoretically, if they're lying outright, and somehow have falsified all of the third-party audit stuff that has been reported and are willing to completely destroy their business when it gets out—and I assure you, it would—yeah, theoretically, that's there. There is an element of trust here. But I've had to answer a couple of journalists questions recently of, “Oh, is AWS going to start scanning all customer content?” No, they physically cannot do it because there are many ways you can configure things where they cannot see it. And that's exactly what we want.Ivan: Yeah, like a disk encryption.Corey: Exactly. Disk encryption, KMS on some level, using—rolling your own, et cetera, et cetera. They use a lot of the same systems we do. The point being, though, is that people in the data centers do not even have logging rights to any of these nodes for the physical machines, in some cases, let alone the customer tenants on top of those things. So, on some level, you wind up with people building these systems that run on top of these computers, and they've never set foot in one of the data centers.That seems ridiculous to me as someone who came up visiting data centers because I had to know where things were when they were working so I could put them back that way when they broke later. But that's not necessary anymore.Ivan: Yeah. And that's the problem that Facebook was facing with that outage because you start believing that certain systems will always work. And when those systems break down, you're totally cut off. And then—oh, there was an article in ACM Queue long while ago where they were discussing, you know, the results of simulated failures, not real ones, and there were hilarious things like phone directory was offline because it wasn't on UPS and so they didn't know whom to call. Or alerts couldn't be diverted to a different data center because the management station for alert configuration was offline because it wasn't on UPS.Or, you know the one, right, where in New York, they placed the gas pump in the basement, and the diesel generators were on the top floor, and the hurricane came in and they had to carry gas manually, all the way up to the top floor because the gas pump in the basement just stopped working. It was flooded. So, they did everything right, just the fuel wouldn't come to the diesel generators.Corey: It's always the stuff that is under the hood on these things that you can't make sense of. One of the biggest things I did when I was evaluating data center sites was I'd get a one-line diagram—which is an electrical layout of the entire facility—great. I talked to the folks running it. Now, let's take a walk and tour it. Hmmm, okay. You show four transformers on your one-line diagram. I see two transformers and two empty concrete pads. It's an aspirational one-line diagram. It's a joke that makes it a one-liner diagram and it's not very funny. So it's, okay if I can't trust you for those little things, that's a problem.Ivan: Yeah, well, I have another funny story like that. We had two power feeds coming into the house plus the diesel generator, and it was, you know, the properly tested every month diesel generator. And then they were doing some maintenance and they told us in advance that they will cut both power feeds at 2 a.m. on a Sunday morning.And guess what? The diesel generator didn't start. Half an hour later UPS was empty, we were totally dead in water with quadruple redundancy because you can't get someone it's 2 a.m. on a Sunday morning to press that button on the diesel generator. In half an hour.Corey: That is unfortunate.Ivan: Yeah, but that's how the world works. [laugh].Corey: So, it's been fantastic reminding myself of some of the things I've forgotten because let's be clear, in working with cloud, a lot of this stuff is completely abstracted away. I don't have to care about most of these things anymore. Now, there's a small team of people that AWS who very much has to care; if they don't, I will say mean things to them on Twitter, if I let my HugOps position slip up just a smidgen. But they do such a good job at this that we don't have problems like this, almost ever, to the point where when it does happen, it's noteworthy. It's been fun talking to you about this just because it's a trip down a memory lane that is a lot more aligned with the things that are there and we tend not to think about them. It's almost a How it's Made episode.Ivan: Yeah. And don't be so relaxed regarding the cloud networking because, you know, if you don't go full serverless with nothing on-premises, you know what protocol you're running between on-premises and the cloud on direct connect? It's called BGP.Corey: Ah. You know, I did not know that. I've done some ridiculous IPsec pairings over those things, and was extremely unhappy for a while afterwards, but I never got to the BGP piece of it. Makes sense.Ivan: Yeah, even over IPsec if you want to have any dynamic failover, or multiple sites, or anything, it's [BP 00:36:56].Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to go through all this with me. If people want to learn more about how you view these things, learn more things from you, as I'd strongly recommend they should if they're even slightly interested by the conversation we've had, where can they find you?Ivan: Well, just go to ipspace.net and start exploring. There's the blog with thousands of blog entries, some of them snarkier than others. Then there are, like, 200 webinars, short snippets of a few hours of—Corey: It's like a one man version of re:Invent. My God.Ivan: Yeah, sort of. But I've been working on this for ten years, and they do it every year, so I can't produce the content at their speed. And then there are three different full-blown courses. Some of them are just, you know, the materials from the webinars, plus guest speakers plus hands-on exercises, plus I personally review all the stuff people submit, and they cover data centers, and automation, and public clouds.Corey: Fantastic. And we will, of course, put links to that into the [show notes 00:38:01]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Ivan: Oh, it's been such a huge pleasure. It's always great talking with you. Thank you.Corey: It really is. Thank you once again. Ivan Pepelnjak network architect and oh so much more. CCIE #1354 Emeritus. And read the bio; it's well worth it. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and a comment formatted as a RIPv2 announcement.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Success Journey Show
Ep-120 Overcoming Lifes Obstacles w/ Rodney Chapman

The Success Journey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 68:12


The Chase Thomas Podcast
Atlanta Sports Guys: Hawks Find Their Groove, Falcons Are Awful and Braves Win World Series With Garrett Chapman of 929 The Game

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 40:43


Outsider and Blue Wire's Chase Thomas is joined by fellow Atlanta Sports Guy 92.9 The Game's Garrett Chapman to talk about the Braves winning the World Series, the team's future in 2022, the Falcons laying another egg against the Patriots, why Matt Ryan and company are in trouble, how the Hawks have righted the ship, losing DeAndre Hunter, too much depth and Clint Capela's early defensive struggles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices