Podcasts about Excited

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  • 5,196PODCASTS
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Excited

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Latest podcast episodes about Excited

KATALYST Podcast with Hunter Burney
I'm excited to go into this new series Managing Change with Brad Smith as we wrap the year up. In

KATALYST Podcast with Hunter Burney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 10:39


I'm excited to go into this new series Managing Change with Brad Smith as we wrap the year up. In this segment, we talk about Brad's early life, education, and passion for helping companies succeed. Brad is the CEO of Stellar Insight, he has over 20 years of experience helping companies pursue growth and excellence through coaching, consulting, facilitation, and strategic planning. Managing Change is a series where our guests share experiences, coaching, and their preferences for managing individual or organizational change. Don't miss these highlights: Brad's early life and career 1:51 Getting to know yourself 5:15 Cause, effect and awareness 8:14 Connect with Brad Smith LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brad-smith-7458858/ Website: https://www.stellarinsightinc.com/ Connect with KATALYST LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/64504377 BE YOU! BE CONFIDENT! BE A KATALYST! #newseries #beakatalyst #leadership #podcast #managingchange #awareness #success #careerjourney #leadingchange #changemanagement #influence #leadershipdevelopment

FranklySpeakingwithDrWade
Excited to BACK!

FranklySpeakingwithDrWade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 20:42


Life takes us along with it. We can force our agenda against outside forces we do not control or we can adapt and roll with the environment presented.  Silencing my voice over the last 6 months to support a bigger purpose has not only been painful, but also humbling to hold back.  It has primarily served as a necessary strategy to help advance some crucial legislation impacting all patient's and chiropractors in WI.  I'm back and more inspired than ever to bring light to the challenges we all face moving forward. This episode is the start of more frequency and consistency to give you tools and strategies to take back your power. I love and appreciate you all and hope you find truth, direction and support in these messages. 

Wild and Precious Conversations
Dr. Stacee Reicherzer Talks About Her Book: Healing Otherness Handbook

Wild and Precious Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 52:48


Otherness: What happens when we are bullied, isolated, left out and “othered” — let’s learn how to heal that part of us so we can move into “Togetherness”I am so happy to have had a chance to talk with Dr. Stacee about her new book: The Healing Otherness Handbook.Our conversation goes from speaking about how to muck around in the compost of our lives and do our small things to create more beauty — to how to free ourselves when we are in isolation — to Jewish faith and the idea of Tikkun — to transgender ideas and how we can adapt to more pronouns :) and just what a lovely, fluid moment we are in right now.Notes:Dr. Stacee Reicherzer — Her website is full of resources and other good stuff.Dr. Stacee at TEDx — Taking Power Back from the COVID-19 BullyWild and Precious Patreon — Contribute if you feel like it. Or don’t - that is more than okay!Wild and Precious NewsletterWild and Precious BlogOnward. As we heal the otherness in us, in our communities, in our world.The Underbelly Project: Visit us at underbel.li If you enjoyed this conversation, a small ask: Share with anyone you know who might like what we’re doing over here. Excited to stay in the arena with you. Subscribe at underbelly.substack.com

Fit + Vibrant You
BONUS: "I'm EXCITED to Keep Going"

Fit + Vibrant You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 15:58


Ladies! You need to listen to Bev's story. After struggling with weight and diabetes for years (she could lose the weight, but whenever she reached her goal, she would gain it right back again), Bev has cracked the code on how to get and KEEP her results, AND enjoy the process. Listen in she shares how she... ✨ Lost 20 pounds ended the self-sabotage cycle and is EXCITED to keep going ✨ Drastically reduced her medication for Type 2 Diabetes ✨ Went from being a sugar addict to easily saying no to sweets without feeling deprived ✨ Decided that she was WORTH investing in herself (how her weight loss journey has positively impacted all aspects of her life) *Update* Bev just emailed me that while on vacation, she had lost another 2 pounds

Getting In: A College Coach Conversation
Encore: Who Gets In and Why: A Conversation with Jeffrey Selingo

Getting In: A College Coach Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 55:45


Excited to welcome New York Times bestselling author Jeffrey Selingo to the show to discuss his latest, Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions. We discuss everything from the impact of marketing and rankings on college admissions over the past 30+ years to the concept of “buyers” and “sellers” and how those distinctions can and should impact students' college application decisions. He also shared what he's hearing from enrollment managers this year and his thoughts on the COVID-dictated changes he thinks might stick.

Jason & John
Jason & John Show, Wed., Nov. 24, 2021, Hour 1 (w/GUEST HOST JR Moore w/Jason's Excited Meter in Seg 1 & 929/CA's Mark Giannotto in Seg 2 on Tiger Hoops/Fball)

Jason & John

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 52:21


Jason & John Show, Wed., Nov. 24, 2021, Hour 1 (w/GUEST HOST JR Moore w/Jason's Excited Meter in Seg 1 & 929/CA's Mark Giannotto in Seg 2 on Tiger Hoops/Fball) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Comicast
Issue 410: Which Marvel Disney+ Series Are We Most Excited For? She-Hulk, Ms. Marvel, Moon Knight, Echo...??

Comicast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 69:56


Follow the entire Comicast crew on Twitter @onepunch___, @ProducerMike975, @jnchang, & @gachodominguez Submit a question or topic to the Comicast Sack by emailing us at comicastpod@gmail.com

Born to be a STAR
Your favorite color

Born to be a STAR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:28


it's ok to change your fav color. Is a jacket better then a coat?. How do you pick out a rug? What happened to religion?   Media continues to get worse. Triple d and triple g. Dating shows blow. Which Christmas movies are better? Excited about Netflix.   Infusing meat, mashed potatoes, Turkey too. What's your favorite dessert? Apple cider can be homemade Happy Wednesday

Portfolio Career Podcast
Produce Great Work to Grow with Nikki Goldman

Portfolio Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:26


Growing a coaching business is hard work. For Nikki Goldman, she has been able to grow her B2B coaching business, I/O Coaching, by producing great work. She has been able to grow it largely without using social media. You also learn about how to have hard conversations and the future of Portfolio Careers. Excited for you to Build and Grow your Portfolio Career!As always, this episode with notes is available on my websiteLearn more about Nikki and I/O Coaching here.Connect with me on Twitter!

Trading Nut | Trader Interviews - Forex, Futures, Stocks (Robots & More)
150: When Blowing An Account Gets You Excited w/ FibsDontLie

Trading Nut | Trader Interviews - Forex, Futures, Stocks (Robots & More)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:15


Click here for Fibsdontlie's interview show notes: https://tradingnut.com/fibsdontlie/?r=pod FREE: Cam's Robot Training & Profitable Algo https://tradingnut.com/trading-robots/?r=pod For more free trader education: https://compiled.social/tradingnut

Ageless
How to always be excited about life.

Ageless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:05


Sometimes we are excited about the wrong thing and we end up doing things we'd rather not. Let's talk about passion and the astrological influences of the time.

Creative Juice
EP196: How To Keep Your Fans Excited During The Holidays

Creative Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 29:47


After Black Friday and through December, the music industry tends to go into hibernation, apart from holiday releases. However, the most successful artists can take advantage of this and market during the holiday season in creative ways!   In this episode of Creative Juice, we discuss strategies to keep your fans excited during the holiday season, even if you're not releasing music! Learn what makes sense about music industry conventional wisdom about the holiday season and what doesn't, creative strategies to engage your fans in December, and when to push for holiday sales offers!   If you've been wondering how to keep your fans activated as we move past Black Friday and Cyber Week, this episode will bring a ton of ideas to the table to help you nurture your fans as we head towards a new year!   DISCOVER: How To Make the Most of December and Save Money Doing It What Marketing Pros and Cons Stack Up For Musicians During The Holidays Why You Need To Nurture Your Fans After A Sale and How To Do It How Holiday Sales Increase The Value of Your Fans What To Do When You Run Out of Content   RESOURCES: Learn the top music marketing strategies Inside INDIEPRO EP195: How To Engage Your Fans with Text Marketing w/ Jordan Lawrence of Community PostPilot Looking to expand your team or bring on an agency in 2022? Apply to work with IndieX!   

The Untitled GenX Podcast
Saved by the Bell - ”Jessie‘s Song” (aka ”I‘m So Excited!”) (1990) — with Amye of Gen X, This is Why.

The Untitled GenX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 67:35


On this very special crossover episode, Lori is SO EXCITED to join Amye of the Gen X, This is Why podcast to discuss Saved By the Bell's iconic season 2 episode “Jessie's Song” (aka “I'm So Excited! I'm So...Scared!”)/(aka Jessie Takes Pills, You Guys). Lori and Amye put their minds to it/go for it as they chat being scared straight, disaster fantasies, inappropriate relationships with principals, holding boundaries, Hot Sundae's hot mess music video, and mistaking Zack Morris's narcissism as charming. Get to know Gen X, This is Why: Gen X, This is Why. The Me-Me B's Facebook group @genxthisiswhy on Instagram Saved by the Bell | "Go For It!" Music Video ft. Hot Sundae K.I.T. www.theuntitledgenxpodcast.com Instagram.com/theuntitledgenxpodcast Facebook.com/theuntitledgenxpodcast untitledgenxpodcast@gmail.com

Followers of the Force Podcast
Words Between Worlds #44 - Top 3 Moments from Star Wars You'd Be Excited to Show Someone

Followers of the Force Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 74:13


Follow us on Twitter: @FOTFPodcastLike us on Facebook: Followers of the Force PodcastBecome a Patron for just $1: patreon.com/followersoftheforceGo to our store on TeePublic: teepublic.com/user/fotfpodcasfRate, review and share the show on Apple Podcasts!

Level Playing Field - A LGBT sports podcast
Olympics' new gender framework has trans athlete Kirsti Miller very excited

Level Playing Field - A LGBT sports podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 61:55


The International Olympic Committee has announced it will end its trans-athlete policy in March, just after the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. Instead, the Olympics are offering a 10-point framework to encourage each individual sports' governing body to create its own policies around who can compete in the women's category. Kirsti Miller joins us this week from Australia to talk about the new policy. The trans athlete has advocated for changes to sporting policy for trans athletes for years. This new policy reflects some of what Miller has been pushing for years, namely a framework that is built around each individual sport and athlete. She talks about the effects that transitioning has had on her, and why she is so encouraged by the new IOC policy. You can follow Kirsti Miller on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Mediocre to Magnificent Podcast
The Mediocre To Magnificent Podcast Episode 135 - Get Something Out Of It

The Mediocre to Magnificent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:44


Go Birds
Eagles-Saints Postgame Pod: Actually Excited About the Eagles

Go Birds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 44:38


James Seltzer and Eliot Shorr-Parks react to an impressive Eagles win over the Saints. The guys discuss the Eagles legitimate chances at a playoff spot, the improvement of Sirianni and Hurts, and much more. Presented by Parx Casino Sportsbook App, new users download in app store or click ParxCasino.com/PA and use the promo code “GOBIRDS” for first bet risk-free up to $500. Must be 21. Gambling Problem—Call 1800-Gambler. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Spiritual Dope
Milagros Phillips A New Perspective on Race Healing

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 61:51


Spirituality encompasses the light and the dark… with the darkness meaning your shadows… without exploration, you may never uncover your truth. ⁠ ⁠ Join me this weekend with Milagros Phillips as we have an open conversation regarding spirituality, race, and more.⁠ ⁠ Racism is one of the most divisive issues in America today. From Charlottesville, VA to Ferguson, MO, tensions about race relations are high. ⁠ ⁠ There are many people who feel that racism is too sensitive a topic to discuss, but if we don't have the conversation around racism, how do people know what is acceptable and what isn't? ⁠ ⁠ This is an issue that will not disappear on its own or through silence.⁠ Connect with Milagros here: https://www.milagrosphillips.com/ and here: https://www.instagram.com/theracehealer/ The below is a machine transcript from otter.ai and has not been edited: Unknown Speaker 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general appear so limited in this process? Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the questions you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you, this world, the people in it? And most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another head of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:41 Hey, there's spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Milagros Phillips and she is affectionately known as the race healer. logros has been facilitating programs for over 35 years on race literacy, racial conditioning and healing from racism that inform transform and lead to inspired action. Programs are presented at educational institutions, fortune 100, companies, corporations and public courses seminars, a keynote speaker TEDx presenter, three times author or four times four time author, and certified coach for logros fourth book cracking the healers code, a prescription for healing racism and finding wholeness has been, it's been released recently, and we'll lagosians work comes from lived experience and is backed by historical and scientific research. It comes from walking through the shadow to find her light and in the process helping others find theirs. What she brings to this work is great compassion, a deep understanding of race and an awareness of people's individual and collective power. Waters. I'm gonna I'm gonna direct everybody else. So to your website to get the rest of your bio there. I think that should get us get us fired up there. Milagro Phillips 1:53 How are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you. Thank you so much for inviting me to be here to have this conversation with you. Brandon Handley 2:00 Absolutely, definitely looking forward to it. So I usually like to start these off with the whole idea that you know, you and I are kind of vessels for Source Energy, right? Call it what you want. And the idea is that somebody tuning into this podcast today that's going to hear a message that made specifically for them, it's going to be delivered through you. And it can only be delivered through you at this time in this place. What is that message today? That we're one human family, and we have a history that has never been healed? has barely been told, that gets in the way of us being that one human family that one global village. I really like that concept. It's funny. My children had a course called I think they went to a school called like the global village. This last year they did at home. Courtney didn't go into school traditionally, right. So they did at home studies. And that was the the coursework that they did. And you know, it's a global village, right. I mean, how else? How else could we look at it? And I guess that that's a little bit about what we'll be talking about today. Right? I mean, I'd love to just kind of, you know, talk to you about some of the work that you you're doing. Let's talk about how you became to be known as the race healer, which we'll just start right there. Milagro Phillips 3:29 Sure. Yeah, I was having a conversation with a friend about my work. And he said to me, Oh, you're here to be hunted if you're here to be one of the human race healers. And so we joked about how you know, the acronym was HRH, and which of course, he was like, of course, you know, Her Royal Highness, that would be you. Right. So so we got rid of the human piece. We just left it as race healer. And he kept calling me that and I really resisted that, you know, that title for a very long time. And then I finally I actually went to, to New York to have some work done on my website. And one of the women that was working on the website said, Well seems to meet your race healer. And I was like, okay, message from spirit. You're hearing it more than once you probably pay attention. And so to that became my nickname the race healer. Brandon Handley 4:42 Yeah, I mean, what what was your resistance to it? Like, who Milagro Phillips 4:46 am I to have a title like that? You know, I mean, I There have been things in my life that I've resisted like, when it comes to this work. For instance, I got my calling when I was 13 years old, the day that Dr. King died And, and I talked about that in the book, I locked myself in the bathroom to cry and my father kept knocking on the door and going okay in there. And I, you know, I keep saying, Yeah, I'm fine, but it really wasn't. And at some point while I was in there, just sobbing my eyes out, actually heard a voice, I said, Your to continue the work. And I had no idea what that meant. Except that I knew there was no way in the world I was ever gonna do race work like that was just not I'm not doing it, you know? And eventually, you know, obviously, I said yes to the column. But what's really interesting is that in that saying, yes, which, by the way, took decades for me to actually say yes to my calling. What I realized was that I sort of look back on my life, I realized I came in wired to do that work. You know, the people who were my parents, the place where I was born, the things that, like, who has a history like this. So I'll give you an example. My mother's best friend, this is when I was a little girl in the Caribbean, and mother's best friend lived around the block from us, and their backyard abutted our backyard. And at night, my mother was she was going to go visit her friend, and she would take me with her, we would walk through the backyard, because obviously that was the shortcut, right. And I remember being terrified of my favorite tree, which was huge with this huge avocado tree in the backyard. It was a beautiful tree. And I love this tree. And during the day, this tree was like my best friend sit under it to read. I was like, I learned to cook under that tree and just absolutely love this tree. So at night, though, I was terrified of that tree. I always felt like if I opened my eyes in the dark, I would see people hanging from that tree. Now I'm just a little girl, okay, like, between the ages of we lived in a house till I was eight. So I must have been between five and six years old. And it was rumored that they had hung slaves on that tree. And so I you know, like, who has a history like that you don't me like it just sort of, you know, politics and people in the south where it's like, yeah, it wasn't just a rumor. You know, we actually saw people being wrong from these trees. But, you know, in things that my father would say, and my mother would say, I mean, you know, I look back and I realized, wow, I spent a lifetime preparing to do this work. Brandon Handley 7:44 And I think that that makes sense. Especially when you said you know, you you heard the calling. And at a young age, right. Which sounds to me like it was because it was delivered by spirit. I don't know what kind of your your spiritual upbringing was at that point. But I mean, you we all kind of resist that, that first calling? Well, not everybody you hear that call me like, not me. Not now. This isn't this isn't for me, I'm gonna go do these 90,000 Other things that I feel like I should be doing other than this. Because to your point, you said, Who am I? Right, who am I and to play such a large role. But I think it's Joseph Campbell kind of talks about in the hero's journey in the call, right? That call doesn't go away that call like it will still kind of follows you around like a lost puppy is like, Are you sure? Milagro Phillips 8:39 Until you say yes. Brandon Handley 8:40 Right. I mean, I think I mean, I really agree to that. I think that that's right. And and and to your point, like, you're building up to that you are the perfect person for that calling. And when you feel that calling you kind of open up and apparently right for books. Can you do all the work? Right, right. Right. So I mean, I I'm not too familiar with, and I'm curious as we're having this kind of racism talk. What was the Caribbean like, I mean, versus the state. So you're there to your eight and then you come to the States I imagine. What was that? Yeah, no actually came Milagro Phillips 9:19 when I was the dance. And, I mean, obviously it was, it was a huge difference, right? The first thing that happened was, I came the beginning of November. And I remember my sister picked me up at the airport with a big fur coat. And, and I was wearing my, my cabana hat and my you know, it was dressed for the Caribbean right? It's got what else would I have been dressed with these short bobby socks and the whole thing and and I put on the scope. We walk outside and we get into a taxi. And all of a sudden this white stuff starts to fall on the taxi is nighttime And I said to my sister, that she goes nearly no, in other words, you better get used to it. So that in and of itself was quite a shock, you know, and of course, the cold air because you're not used to that, you know, it's sort of Olson's is this big shock, like, you stepped into a refrigerator kind of thing, you know, so. So there's that. And then, of course, I didn't speak the language at the time, so I had to learn to speak English. And, and just, you know, in also going from living in a house that was, you know, it was one floor, and living on a fifth floor, fourth floor, in an apartment building, it was just, you know, and instead of a backyard, there was a park across the street. So we were lucky, because we had a park across the street, of our apartment in New York, but, but it was just, it was just completely different, completely different. I was talking with someone recently, and I said, you know, we don't stop to think that people are migrating today, for the same reason that they have always migrated for the same reason that the people in the Mayflower migrated from Europe to come to the continental USA, and to go to other parts of the world. And that's because of, you know, people normally migrate because of food insecurity, housing insecurity, they migrate because of natural disasters, famines, and in you know, things like that. And wars, obviously, you know, and skirmishes and things like that. And so, you know, we forget that. And I think it's important for people to remember to be more compassionate, and to realize that the people who are who are at the border, are coming here for the same reasons that the Europeans came here when they came in the 1600s, and the 1700s 1800s, early 1900s, and so on. And how a lot of them were not considered white, you know, the Irish were not considered white, when they first came to this country, neither were the Italians, you know, and people had to lose their accent to assimilate, they have to stop speaking their own language to assimilate. So there were things that you had to do in order to be able to fit in, the difference is, if you're a black or brown person, you never do fit in, because the structure is not set up, for you to fit in. And so, you know, becoming aware of the ways in which immigrating and leaving your land behind affects you, at the psychological, emotional, spiritual level, you know, people also left their country, because they didn't have spiritual freedom. You know, and that's a huge thing for people to be able to practice their religion and their spirituality in the way that they want to do it. And so, you know, just being aware of all of that is extremely important. And then understanding the historical context as to why people had to leave Europe when they did, you know, in the place was rife with diseases, there was no sanitation. And so there was a lot of sickness, and you had only three months to grow your food. So a lot of people were starving and malnutrition, you can't even think straight when you're malnutrition, you know, not to mention the fact that the Crime and Punishment, the way that it was set up was something you know, it was set up to, it was basically based on violence, to traumatize, to destabilize to control. And so when the Europeans traveled the world and began to colonize the rest of the world, they brought with them what they had, which was their own unresolved trauma, the violence that they had experienced, receiving perpetrated upon the people that they were coming across. And then they were the diseases and things like that, that they brought. But they did the same thing to others that have been done to them. They made sure that people couldn't practice their religion or their, their spirituality, they had to let go of their languages, you know, the few native tribes that did survive. And the Africans that survived the Middle Passage, were were they had to give up their language. They had to give up their spiritual practices. They had to, you know, they, they had to fit in in the way that they were being made to fit in to this system. And when you stop to think about the fact that, you know, people who grow in cold climates who only have about three months to grow their food, who look out into their world, nine months out of the year, and there isn't even a leaf on the tree, their consciousness is the consciousness of lack, where people who are in places where it's always green, it's always lush, if the papaya is not growing the mangoes growing or, you know, something is always growing. So you can always feed your family, you have, you know, anyone can build shelter, because shelter is four sticks, and some plantain leaves to keep you from the sun, you know, to shelter you from the heat of the sun, that, you know, you don't really need to cover your body because it's hot, as opposed to you know, cold weather we have to layer up and you know, and so, so the the, the ways in which people did culture had to do with where they lived in the world, where their tribes developed in the world. And the and you know, those ways those cultures work well in their own environment. You know, like, for people in cold climates, it's good for them to preserve food and to be good preservers, because they only have three months to grow their food and whatever they harvest has to last until they can grow and harvest again, right. Whereas if you try to preserve food in hot climates, the food's gonna go bad. So it's, you know that those cultures and things work well in their own environment. The problem is, when you take one culture, and you impose it on other people, and in places where it doesn't belong, and then you get people to stop telling their stories, so they no longer have access to their history, you make them stop speaking their language, so they can't connect to the previous generation, who doesn't speak the same language and campus on the wisdom and the information and so on and so forth. I mean, you start to see what a mess, right? Brandon Handley 16:41 Yeah, no honor. percent. I mean, I see that, that last part, I see that even in a generational divide, where we're separated from even our young and our parents, right, that the whole tribal elder thing kind of goes out there, especially, at least in the Western civilization, and an America where it's like, alright, well, you're. So now that you're not usable, basically, is what we're saying, can you just go finish out your years in this corner, but all that wisdom is going there too. And there's conversations that aren't being had, and there's a lot of wisdom that that's not being had there. And to your point, in regards of the language, there's only a certain way to convey that story. And that's with the authentic language, right? Because a lot of that stuff does not translate into you know, English, right, it loses its it loses its flavor, or as it were. So, I mean, lots of reasons to migrate, understand, like, you know, the racism, definitely, you know, I think that, you know, as a nation, we all forget that. A, we were all immigrants at one point, be, you know, we were not all accepted all the time, regardless of where we think we are right now. But when the question is, what brought your family to the states? And, you know, I know, we talked a little bit about kind of the culture shock and of itself, but one of the things that since we're covering the racism aspect of it, how, you know, what was it I'm not familiar with, how it wasn't a Caribbean for you, right? And then the culture and the acceptance or non acceptance and what it was like for you to fit in, in the States. Milagro Phillips 18:26 Yeah, so um, so it was definitely different. And I remember when I first started to go to school, and I was learning English. Um, I remember that I lived in in one of those neighborhoods that was changing was a mostly Jewish neighborhood. There were some African American families, some Cuban families, and a few Puerto Rican fan was very few Dominicans. This is it 64. And the end of 1964, beginning of 1965, was actually when I started school. And what was interesting was that the reason first of all that I came to this country was because the, my father realized that the US was about to go to war with the Dominican Republic. And he wanted to get the whole family out of there. And we had, you know, his sisters lived in the US and we had cousins here and so on. So he tried to get the entire family out before the end of 64. And sure enough, the United States attacked the Dominican Republic in 1965. And so So you see this this onslaught of Dominican families of a lot of people who were our neighbors in the in the Dr. Ended up being our neighbors in New York, you know, because they tuber escaping what had happened in the country at that time. So again, you know, little things that we don't talk about, because a lot of people don't know that the US went to war with the Dominican Republic, and it was like, you know, this tiny country To mean, and this big US Army and Navy and all of you know, and so, um, so that was the beginning of that. And then, um, then I had to, you know, I was in school, I had to learn the language. And it was really interesting for me, because I remember that the black children didn't play with me because I didn't speak English. The white children in play with me because I was black and Hispanic children and play with me because they didn't want anyone to know that people who look like me came from where they came from. Because what happens is, you know, and, and I explained this to several people. When you, when you go around the US, and, and you look at the Latin X community, people look a certain way, it's mostly lighter skin, or brown skin, people, lighter, brown skinned people who get to get out of those countries. And I was explaining to someone that you have to remember that, that for those of us coming into the US, you have to get a visa, you have to get your visa through the Council of general, the Council of general, usually white males, who bring with them the same racism that they experienced all their lives, which has to do with segregation, and everything else. And so the only people they let out of those countries are people who don't look like me. And we were at that time, we were kind of a novelty, because my, my parents folk, it, both my parents, my entire family was bilingual, except for me, I had at that time, five brothers and one sister, I was the only one who didn't speak any English, but everybody was bilingual. My grandmother never spoke Spanish. And my mother was an American citizen, because she was born in the Virgin Islands. And in 1936, when the Virgin Islands were bought by the US and became the US Virgin Islands, they were they were British Virgin Virgin Islands. When they bought them, they all the people who were on that island who had been born there up until that time, up until 1936, who become American citizens, that my mother could only give citizenship to any of her children who was born in 1936, which I wasn't even thought of back at that time, you know? And so, you know, so there are all these restrictions that are put on those immigrations, and we don't always consider that. And so the people, for the most part, who get to get out of those countries, and for whom it was certainly back in the 50s, and 60s and 70s, easier to get out of those countries are the more European you look, the better your chances of getting a visa to get out. Brandon Handley 22:56 Sure, I mean, that makes sense, given how we roll, right? Like I mean, that's just just kind of, you know, that's definitely a good history of it. Where would you say it is at this point in time? Just like kind of racism in general. You know, what can we do? What do you feel like we are now and some of the work that you're doing? What's the trajectory? Milagro Phillips 23:20 Yeah. So as of the murder of George Floyd, by Derek Shogun. People have awakened. However, however, it's been over a year now. And people are starting to fall asleep, again, is what I've noticed. And unless something happens, and it's on television, and even, you know, I've seen some pretty horrific stuff, be on the news in between the COVID stuff, right? People are not really paying attention like they were before. And I think that when it comes to the subject, people are prone to exhaustion. And the truth is that if we're going to change, we can't afford to stay exhausted, it's okay to be exhausted. And then, you know, take a nap if you need to, but don't fall fast asleep again. Because there's so much work to be done. And there's so much that we don't know that we need to really awaken to and in start changing. I think people don't realize that racism is institutional, systemic, internalized, and interpersonal. And we keep trying to solve it at the interpersonal perspective. Well, you said this, and I should say that and I actually have people say to me, if somebody says so and so what should I respond? And it's like, Are you kidding me? Really, if you can't respond from your heart, there's a problem, right? Like, maybe you should do some really work around it so that you can respond from your heart. And so so there's this whole thing. The reality is that Brandon Handley 24:57 look, you might just want to jump in there real quick, right? Like I mean, I think that There's the the idea. And this would be, you know, again, what do we call it like crusty old white guys, right? Like, you know, coming from come from like that side of the fence. It's like, it's like, alright, well, I want to be sensitive, but I don't even know I was supposed to be sensitive to at this point in time, like, you know? Yeah. Right, cuz I'm just playing devil's advocate. I don't know who that person was like, What am I supposed to say? Like, I just want to have a conversation, and I don't want to come out looking like a jerk. Yeah. And I think that, what do Milagro Phillips 25:30 we do with that is, so here's the thing. Healing takes courage. It just does. It's not for the faint hearted. It just is, doesn't matter what it is, right? Whether whether you're healing from a broken arm, or a broken spirit, it takes courage to be with whatever is in that moment. And then to ask ourselves, why is this still hurting? Why is this hurting so much, you know, that that a lot of it is about becoming self reflective, rather than having a quick response. So that you can be right or so that you can fit in or you can say the right thing or be politically correct. We can't afford to do that anymore. People need to be authentic. And then they also need to say, I don't know what I don't know. You know, and not expect to be taught either, you can say that. I don't know what I don't know. Without an expectation that someone has to teach you. You can begin to ask questions and search for things so that you can start to get your own answers. Because a white person's never going to know what it's like to be a black or brown person or black or brown versus not going to know what it's like to be white. But we have we have a common thread. And we we know now through epigenetics, that we're all related. There's only one human family and one global village. Right. And the fact that we have been misinformed, that is not anyone's fault. But it is our collective responsibility to begin to ask questions, and to sit in uncomfortable conversations. Because if we think that a conversation is uncomfortable, and we want to escape it, can you imagine what it's like to be a black and brown person be stopped by the police? Where there is no conversation? How comfortable? Yeah, look, Brandon Handley 27:28 I mean, look, look, I'm uncomfortable getting stopped by the police. I'm a white guy, right. So I can only imagine. Right? And and you know, and so no idea, like, like we talked about for what are some of the uncomfortable questions that you feel like we should be asking. Milagro Phillips 27:44 So what is the history? What is the real history? Because clearly, we've not been taught the real history. Yeah. And really starting to do our own research, looking into what traumatized our families, what brought our families here, because it was some kind of trauma. You can, you can pretty much bet. I mean, people didn't jump on the Mayflower because it was the Carnival Cruise, you know what I mean? That they were gonna fall off the face of the earth by getting those fish you know, they were willing to do it, they're willing to risk their lives because it was so horrific where they were. So what trauma brought your family here? And how does that still show up in your family? Because we know now through epigenetics, that trauma gets passed down from one generation to another, we also know that it's impossible for someone to to traumatize another person without themselves being compromised. So in other words, both the victim and the perpetrator get to pass on that trauma to their children, their grandchildren, their great grandchildren honor, not up to at least seven generations. And so what we need to do is we need to become race literate. We need to become literate about our history and to see, first of all to understand that there's no such thing as black history. It's American history, okay. The fact that it's been segregated, like everything else has been segregated doesn't change the fact that it's still American history, and what people call Black history is really white history in you see what I mean? Like there's this Brandon Handley 29:21 No, I got it, I get it. Like, I mean, so we've got this this again, this is a point of contention for me where like, there's there's a continuous continuous, like kind of forced segregation, right, where do we get to the point where we can integrate to your point as a human race? Yeah, right. Um, and and I mean, I definitely you know, for what it's worth, you know, my you know, my grandfather came over from Norway right had to you know, American Iron is Americanize his name and all the stuff that we're talking about too, but you know, of course, you know, being white and tall and blue eyed. You know, it probably didn't have the same challenges. But you know, nonetheless, there were challenges came over for a reason. So I think that that that that the trauma or that conversation that you're talking about can be had on both ends. And especially as we come at it, you know, you and I are having a mature conversation, right? Or a conversation at least just says, Hey, you know? Yeah, that's a lot of messed up things happen, right? So a lot of these things were outside of you and I are control, what can we do to facilitate, you know, something cohesive and compassionate going forward? Right, what does that what does that picture look like? Versus you when we're talking this evening, I've even seen the Latino community losing their mind over being called like, Latinx. Right below, we can't, like we can't even say Latinx. Right. And it's another thing that's kind of being forced that like, I saw something today, about what you're saying, like Black History Month, there's this Latin Heritage Month, like, why is it have to be like this constant like segregation, you know, people, I think, should be proud of, of, or at least know their story. Right? Here's my story. This is, you know, not even like, you know, and to your point, like, you're coming from the Caribbean, right? And you've got all these other people like, No, you can't have people knowing about, you know, you like you're talking about the Latino crowd saying we can't, you know, be associated with you. And so there's, there's different stories, and I think that they all deserve to be told and heard. But how do we how do we celebrate the differences versus? Versus being afraid of them? Milagro Phillips 31:42 Yeah, I think that I think there's, there's room for an awareness of both. I think that if we are too much into the celebration, without acknowledging the pain, then the shadow eats us up. And if we're too much into the shadow without seeing the hope, then the shadow eats us up. Either way the shadow was right. And so it's unbalanced. It's it's being aware of the fact that we need healing, because what do we do when something hurts, we go to the doctor, right? They ask for a lineage, right? They need your history, right? So understanding the historical context of that pain is is incredibly important, being being courageous enough to walk through the shadow of that, and be able to and willing to admit to the violence of that shadow, being willing to, to really take in, and when I say take care, I mean, listen to another's pain, without judging them or thinking, Well, what's wrong? What did you do wrong, or that kind of thing. And really having a greater sense of compassion for all of us, ourselves and others. And one of the I do a two day intensive. And in that program, one of the the stages of healing and I talk about it in the book, is forgiveness. And that's a huge one to ask for people who are continuously being re traumatized, and experiencing violence toward them. And yet, it's part of the healing process. And, you know, getting to that place where you can actually not, not just give it word, right, but really internalize that forgiveness, and that compassion and the realization that traumatize people traumatize others, that we've all been traumatized in one form or another, that if we don't become aware of that we will continue to traumatize each other without even being aware that we're doing it. Except that we know that there's a discomfort in these conversations, or there is something you know, let me like those. Brandon Handley 34:05 Tommy it is it's I mean, I know that I was talking to one of our network diversity specialist sounds like and I told her, I said, you know, I don't, I'm probably gonna say the wrong thing. And I'm not doing it on purpose, like I just want to have I just want to be able to talk. Right, and without being a landmine. And again, I appreciate this, you know, to appreciate the sensitivity, right, the sensitivity and awareness needs to be there. But I don't have you know, we, it'd be great to kind of work around that fear of having an open conversation. I don't think that you should be afraid. Like, I'm not really afraid, right of having an open conversation and, and being honest about it, right. To your point, like when you said earlier, if we can have an honest, authentic conversation, there really shouldn't be fear involved with it if we're talking from the heart, right. So I think Milagro Phillips 34:55 some of the fear is we we sort of have hang our lives on specific things, right? And there's the threat that someone's going to tell us something that dislodge. Is that, right? So, so if, if we believe that certain people or certain way, and that's what we've learned and that kind of thing. And then somebody comes along and says, Oh, actually, it isn't like that, you know, that rails, your cage, and it causes cognitive dissonance and people are very uncomfortable with that. And very often, what happens when you want to have a conversation about race in a mixed environment is that you trigger people stress response is fight flight or paralysis, they either want to defend themselves or come up with some way of either they get angry with you, or they want to flee the conversation, or else they freeze, and don't know what to say and don't know what to do. And so just being aware, and having compassion around the fact that that actually does happen to people. And it also knowing that we first of all, we don't all have the whole story, and probably never will. We need to be open to hearing people's stories and listening to people, and being open to hearing what they have to say, regardless of the color of their skin, where they come from, or whatever, without scaring them into silence. And we do that a lot. When it comes to the issue of race, you put some research to say something right away, somebody will jump on them. And you can't say that or you know, or whatever. And so it makes it difficult to have authentic conversations when we're not free to say what's in our hearts, and to express it our way. And one of the things that I talk about in the book are the languages of the caste system, because we live under a caste system and explain all that. It's not like the Indian caste system, this particular world. I'm sorry, Brandon Handley 37:00 lagosians. Just a new book, The new new book, you're talking about? No. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, here's Caracas. Milagro Phillips 37:07 Yeah, um, that in that caste system, because we all live under the same umbrella. But we've internalized that differently. And as a result of that, what happens is that people speak different languages. And we're all speaking English, but we're speaking it from a completely different perspective. And what often happens is, let's say, a politician makes a comment. A white male politician makes a comment to be specific, right? And a person of color will say, Well, that was really racist what that person just said. And watch fight flight or paralysis, right? So the politician immediately defend themselves. And if they can't defend themselves, they'll get somebody else to defend them. It's usually another white male politician who speaks his language, right? And that person will say, of course, he's not a racist. Here's what he said wasn't racist, blah, blah, blah, right. And, and of course, to them, it doesn't sound racist, because they speak the same language, the language of supremacy. And at that level, they can hear each other and they say, what they say about and in front of people of color, and they understand each other people of color, hear it from their filters, that says, Okay, this could be a dangerous situation for me, I need to be conscious of the fact that this person just made a racist comment. I'm not sure that I'm safe with that person. So they'll say what you just said was racist, but to the person, it doesn't sound racist, it wasn't great, blah, blah, blah, you know, and so everybody speaking from behind their filters of the caste system, which means that you can't hear people properly. And I want to I'm so sorry, apologize. I have to plug my computer in, which I did not do earlier. So I don't want to lose you. I am so sorry about this. Brandon Handley 39:07 Sorry, why you're doing that? I mean, I think that what made disarm somebody or in that conversation, like, what's some of the language we can use? is racism, even the right word? Or do you just feel uncomfortable? Right, what you're saying to me is just making me feel uncomfortable triggers, you know, makes me feel unsafe, right, is by saying something like that. Do you feel like that might open the dialogue a little bit differently? And, you know, I get what you're saying too, like, I'm a big I'm a huge believer in filters like we've we've all we've all got our own set of filters and, you know, kind of our heritage wherever we were brought up from we're coming with our own, you know, package of, you know, filter packets or right we all come with it and Depending on where we're at, and you know, so we got, you know, a couple of white politicians, and they say some stuff and you know, somebody audience, they're like, Yeah, I've heard some stuff like this before. And that's not the right thing to say. And I'm definitely uncomfortable in that, you know, but call it out is racist. It's kind of like what's getting shouted out? Or are they really saying, that makes me feel uncomfortable? Milagro Phillips 40:19 Well, you know, so here's the thing. Racism, when when you really understand it, when you're able to unpack it, what you realize is that it's not a character judgment, it's conditioning. So what you're really saying is, you're revealing your racial conditioning, maybe a longer way of saying it, but it's basically the same thing. Okay. And, and, but what that does, is it then brings to mind that where that person may be functioning from, is that, you know, 600 years of racial conditioning, which doesn't go away. You know, what if people have been integrating since the 1960s, versus verses hundreds of years of this stuff, right, and I'm talking institutionalized, so they were turning to law systemics, they were systems to support those laws internalized because you internalize the environment, you live it, and then you act it out with the other people in your life. Right. And so, when, when we are looking, and that's why I wrote the book, it's like, you know, having a consciousness that, yes, people will say these things, and they need them. And they don't even think there's anything wrong with saying those things. If they're on one side of the spectrum, from the other side of the spectrum. It sounds really ugly, right? And so those people will call you on it. If no one calls you on it, you will continue to do it. Because you're doing better. Or you may just be functioning out of maliciousness. But some people really don't know any better. Right? So Brandon Handley 42:07 Well, I mean, I'll tell you, I'll tell you this real quick, if you don't mind me jumping in, like, you know, so I'm up here in the Northeast Philadelphia area, born in San Francisco, you know, hippie parents growing up, and all that jazz, went down from the Philadelphia area to North Carolina, right outside of Raleigh Durham. And, you know, went hung out with some of my neighbors, we're all hanging out, we're drinking, we're having a good time eating chicken wings and hanging out. And my neighbor starts telling, like these really racist jokes, and I had to pause. It's like, dumbfounded. First of all, I was like, I can't believe like, this does not serve as like, guys. I don't know about you. But like, where I come from, we really don't talk like this. Right. Like, and it was just, to me, I was blown away by the fact that it's still so prevalent. Right? And of course, of course, right? Because as we're talking here, like, I'm not, I'm on the other side of it, right? Like, you know, again, I don't feel to see the impacts. And, you know, it's impossible for me to but it's not possible for me, of course, to have these conversations right with somebody else's experienced it and come at it from a place of compassion. But I just thought I'd throw that in there. Because again, like, wherever you're at, right now, let's say you're from the Northeast from California, or someplace where it's not as institutionalized as you're talking about, right, as it has been. And, you know, they're still holding on to it. It's kind of it's kind of mind boggling. Yeah. So I mean, I'm just I mean, I've experienced, at least again, from, from the old white guy perspective, like, you know, still still experiencing it. And it's, it makes me uncomfortable. So I again, I can only imagine being in a position where one of my co workers as matter of fact, he had bought some property, and he and his mixed race couple, and in North Carolina still had people were still giving them issues. And this is very recently, right. Within the past couple years, they bought some property, and there were some people that wouldn't stop hunting on that property. And they would tell them, they'd be like, Hey, we're our family did we're gonna keep doing it. You can't tell us that. Like, they tried to hold on to it for as long as they could. But like it's in the end, it made them feel uncomfortable, where they just sold the property. And that, to me was a tragedy, right? Like, where are we today that, that this is still a thing. And we want to call ourselves a progressive society. Milagro Phillips 44:30 That's why it's important for people to become race literate. Because when people understand and even if they continue to behave the same way, they're doing it from a conscious place. And when you're when you've got information and you're conscious, you have responsibility. You can choose to ignore that responsibility, but that doesn't mean that responsibility of your awareness goes away. So helping people to become race literate is extremely empowering. and race, literary literacy is the knowledge and awareness of the history of race and awareness that we are, we're all raised in a racial caste system. By the time children are three years old, they can tell you what caste system they belong to. Who are the good people in the back in the caste system? Who are the bad people? Three years old? They've already been racialized, you know? And so, what are we going to do today to change tomorrow, you know, we cannot if we continue to behave, and to do the same way, and to act out of ignorance, and not change our behavior, we're gonna continue to see the same thing for yet another generation, another generation and another generation, like, we have a responsibility to become as aware, and as knowledgeable as we can. And you know, the spiritual path is a path of awareness. We, it's about becoming conscious. It's about feeling things in our bodies, and experiencing them in our emotions, and being open to what that means to us. How does that make us feel? You know, because if it made us feel well, we'd have conversations with everybody in anybody about race, the fact that people are so uncomfortable with the conversation, it tells you, that's where the juice is, that's where the healing needs to happen. That's where the consciousness needs to shift. And ultimately, everybody wants to solve racism, like I said, from the intrapersonal perspective, coming from their heads. But if we don't become aware that it needs to take that 12 inch drop into our hearts, and then another 12 inch into our guts, so we know it, and we are aware of it. And we we realize that part of it is learning to walk in somebody else's shoes long enough to understand why they're hurting. That's when we start to shift. Brandon Handley 46:59 No, I love that. Oh, that. What would you suggest for somebody that's beginning to, you know, to to gain some race literacy? Like what are some of the first steps into into that? What do you recommend? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 47:13 so again, asking questions, doing research, looking into one's personal history, you know, why did your parents come here? What, you know, why are you here now? Right? Understanding that, looking at some of the, the history of Europe, really, and what was going on there that made people want to leave? in droves? Right? What, what are our connections to one another, in terms of being this one human family living on one global village? And what does that mean? And how do we care for one another compassionately? How do we do what we really, I really believe human beings came here, to be connected, to love each other, to learn from one another, to become more conscious together. And a lot of this stuff is keeping us from doing that work, which is the deeper work that we need to do. And so, for me, becoming race literates is the first thing stop being afraid of our history. It's ugly, it's nasty, it is what it is. But if we don't look at it, we keep repeating it. And we are worthy of having the power to create something new, instead of recreating the past and thinking we're creating something new, right. And so having an awareness of our history, allowing our hearts to open to all people, realizing that everyone, everyone on the planet deserves to thrive, and have the opportunity to do that. And so for me, this, this is about becoming conscious, and in really living from the depth of our hearts, not in the love and like kind of, you know, ignoring life kind of way, but really, by being conscious, and bringing that love and that light into all that is happening on our planet today. So that we can create something new to that to leave behind for the next generation. Brandon Handley 49:23 I think that's fantastic. And that that part where you're talking about the love and light, you know, and skipping the shadow, right? Really, it's what I just saw somebody call it spiritual bypassing recently, right? You know, kind of like just like, I'm like, I'm gonna go ahead and if if I just kind of hold this space, but we need to address the shadow, like you're talking about in your biography. I'm assuming that you touched on that and in your book. And again, the most recent book is called Milagro Phillips 49:50 cracking the healers code, prescription for healing racism, and finding wholeness. Brandon Handley 49:57 Great and you can find, you know, yours Barnes and Nobles. Yeah, that kind of thing. Right looking looking for that. Yeah. So awesome. I love it. And, you know, look, we, we've got a lot of work to do. Milagro Phillips 50:09 We can do it. It's one human family. Brandon Handley 50:12 Right. Hey, would you say that we're getting better? Milagro Phillips 50:14 I think we are because part of getting better is becoming conscious. Because when we just we can make different choices. You know. Brandon Handley 50:24 So I think and I actually want to jump all the way back to an area that you talked about, about the exhaustion part. Right. And I think that, I wouldn't say that, you know, again, coming from the white guy view, but you know, COVID Plus, like this heightened, you know, view on on the racism? I think the whole package, everybody's just exhausted in general, but not to fall asleep at the wheel, how can we, you know, how can we do it in a way that energizes us, right, how do you see a way that we can do that? Or is that just a finding a balance that? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 51:05 no, I, I really believe that. We can do this in a way that energizes us. I see, since the death of George Floyd. Every week, I was doing seminars up until this march on race literacy, and just, you know, getting the community to come in and have these experiences, like come in, I mean, unzoom, and have these experiences on a weekly basis. I'm now doing it on a monthly basis. The first, first Monday of the month, I do this lunch and learn so people can, you know, bring their lunch at work to their computer and join this conversation and learn some things I will often share something about, about some historical piece, and then we have discussions about how that history fits into today. How are we repeating that history today, what it looks like and feels like, also exercises, we always end with a meditation to really bring people back into balance before they go back to work. And in, you know, I have a series of programs that I do, I have a two day seminar that I do that I've been doing since 2020, since 2001, so it's 20 years old this year. And it's so powerful, and people always say that they just never see race the same way again, it helps them to heal all kinds of things with their, their own family. Because we use I take people through a universal process of healing that allows them to be able to do that, which is you know, a lot of the stuff that's, that's in the book. So, um, you know, so people can join these conversations to stay awake and stay aware. I know that there are times that people don't want to attend these things, especially white nails, because they feel like they're going to be the bad boy in the room kind of thing. You know, the one that everybody's looking at is, you know, I don't do that in my seminars, because what I'm aware of, is the fact that we've all been misinformed, and those who are misinformed, they're bound to miss create, and it doesn't matter your gender, it doesn't matter your sexual orientation, it doesn't matter the color of your skin, we have all when it comes to race and racism, all of us have been misinformed. And we can't blame people for that. But we can hold them compassionately responsible for their own ability and choices to change. Brandon Handley 53:29 That was fantastic. Those zoom calls the Lunch and Learns is that open to everybody has something, Milagro Phillips 53:36 you can go on my website and get information on that on that program. And it's open to the entire community. And I will continue to do that as long as I can. Brandon Handley 53:49 That's fantastic. That's great that that's available. Thank you for that. So logros at this point of the conversation I kind of look at like anybody tuning into this I mean, obviously you great conversation on the racism and we touched on the spirituality I look at this as a spiritual speed dating, right? Somebody is looking to like get the next fish will connect on this conversation. So I'm going to ask you a question. Basler espiritual black Bachelorette, a number one who to do to do? Move, I think you've already established that kind of like we are all one would you agree that you know kind of we are all one in one shape. Milagro Phillips 54:30 I mean, you know, we're all cousins, some of us 35th cousins and mother's 50th cousins, but we're all related. And we know that through the study of epigenetics, so that's already been established. It's no longer one of these. Oh, you're my spiritual sibling. And yes, absolutely. But you're also my physical sibling. Yeah. And so being aware of that is really important. Brandon Handley 54:56 Now Perfect, perfect. Whoo doo doo doo doo. To, what would you say is our greatest distraction Milagro Phillips 55:09 when it comes to this topic, everything in anything, you know, anything we could throw in the fire, so that we are now focused on the fire and we take our eyes off the ball, right? When it comes to race, because people don't really want to deal with it. It is uncomfortable for most people. And yet, as I said before, can you imagine if it's uncomfortable in a conversation versus being uncomfortable, because, you know, you're you're being beaten to death in the streets or shot or your family member at you've lost them because of this, right? So there are levels of discomfort, right. And some people are more uncomfortable than others, because they are living the violence. And so for those of us who are not, it's important that we show up, even with our discomfort, because we're always going to feel uncomfortable until we start showing up and learning what this is really about. Brandon Handley 56:07 That's fine. No, it's true. Right? There's always a willingness to to not be, you know, uncomfortable as quickly as possible. Right. And, and I can't think of too many topics that are more uncomfortable than Yeah, that's right. Even Even amongst friends. And, you know, just trying to again, you know, because I think sometimes you just feel like the bad guy, like you said earlier, like, you know, I don't know that I go into a room feel like the bad guy, or, you know, the one that's been called out, but it definitely, again, you know, just just wanting to do the right thing, even though I don't know what the wrong thing is. Yeah. Milagro Phillips 56:44 You know, and that's, that's a huge piece. It's like it is the not knowing what the wrong thing is, or, or what is really wrong here. Like, I'm just uncomfortable with this. And in those, there's those who can escape it, right? Because it's sort of like, oh, you know, I don't have to deal with that, right. And there are those who can't. And yet, there's something, you know, um, it's Bradshaw, that wrote in his book, family secrets about how there are secrets and families that people keep and their secrets and families where it's sort of like, people just don't talk about certain things, right. And, and yet everybody acts, reacts and interact out of the family secret, whether they know the secret or not, right. And that's what happens to us as a human family when it comes to this history. Like, we all know, something's off, right? We don't know quite what it is. So I'll give you an example of that. For the most part, people call Haiti, the poorest country in the world, or at least one of the poorest countries in the world. But no one ever talks about the fact that Haiti has been paying reparations to Frances 1825, when they set themselves free in 1804. And from slavery, and the French kept trying to go back in there to re enslaved them. And finally, they use the Doctrine of Discovery to get back in there, and to have them pay reparations all these years. Now, if you are so poor, you can't afford to do anything, let alone pay reparations, right. And so, you know, just the realization that there's so many natural resources on that island that, you know, people are still finding natural resources on those islands. And, you know, when we only tell one piece of the story, what happens is that people get hung up on that one piece. And yet, there's something in our hearts that kind of knows that something's off, you know, people are constantly being told those and $19 a month to support a child in Haiti, when in reality, if friends gave back even one part of all that they siphoned out of there, that island would not be poor, okay, they just would not be poor. And that is not the only place it's all of these places that have been colonized to the so called poor countries, which most of them have happened to have dictators, which I think is quite a coincidence. Right. And those of us who are spiritual know that there are synchronicities, right. And so, you know, so just having an awareness like we need an expanded awareness of this stuff, and not just go with Okay, the going story is, Haiti is a poor country. So you know, Hades, not a poor country. Haiti is a country that has been stolen from Okay, that is very different, because you don't steal where there's poverty, because I know the seal, right? Brandon Handley 59:42 No, no, you're right, right. You don't exploit Milagro Phillips 59:44 people, because they're poor. You exploit them because they have natural resources as a human being. All right. So we need to get really clear about what it is that we're talking about. When we're talking about this stuff, which is why I wrote that book. It's like, people need to get clear Let's let's have an honest, authentic conversation that goes beyond the rhetoric. Oh, it's it's this right like, okay, so why is it that way? You know, it's nuts. Right? Right. You'll, Brandon Handley 1:00:13 we'll be on the first layer go beyond that first layer, right? This, this is what I heard. This is what I was told. You know, why would somebody tell you that? Yeah, I'm kind of getting beyond that, for sure. For sure. It makes sense. I never knew, right? I never knew that I'm, you know, still paying France back. Right. And I think that that's crazy, right? Even Even, even the whole idea of you know, the British selling the Virgin Islands to the state. So to me, it's just boggle your mind. So snowballs my so Ragosa thank you so much for the conversation. I enjoyed it. I think that you know, you're obviously doing some great work. Excited for you to release your fourth book. Understand that you're working on the fifth. And where can we send people to find out more about Sure. Yeah, Milagro Phillips 1:01:01 so you can visit my website Milagros phillips.com. So it's just my name.com. And there's a lot of information on there. And as soon as this podcast is open for posting it on the website, so Brandon Handley 1:01:13 fantastic. Thanks again for being Milagro Phillips 1:01:17 so much. I Unknown Speaker 1:01:20 really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dove podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove. CO You can also join the discussion on Facebook spiritual though, and Instagram at spiritual underscore Joe. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email Brandon at spiritual Co Co. And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How Relationship Equity Establishes Your Agency as a Category of One

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 20:03


Do you know how relationship equity could help you grow your business and establish yourself as a category of one? Michael Stamatinos has always thought of himself as a connector. His love for building bridges and connections led him to the business development, marketing, and sales world. He founded Omorfi, an agency that empowers individuals to take a leadership role in their community and he focused on his passion for the healthcare sector, the role of leadership in communities, and helping people make connections. In this episode, he sat down with Jason to talk about how relationship equity became the core of all his interactions with the people in his life, how agency owners could use this concept to improve their relationships with clients and peers, and how being passionate about your business can really help you establish yourself as a category of one. 3 Golden Nuggets Relationship equity. Michael considers himself to be a connector. He loves creating connections between people and really believes in the concept of relationship equity. To him, relationships are like a bank account, you have to make sure to make a deposit and you have enough money before making a withdrawal or a purchase. “There are folks that are very quick to make massive withdrawals and they haven't substantiated,” he explains. People will sometimes try to get something from a person without first establishing a true connection with them and building trust. How can you do that? By taking that relationship and multiplying it by time and by value. That is what truly builds relationship equity. How can agency owners use it? Relationship equity is all about connections and being bridge builders. Agency owners can really benefit from this approach when they focus on really understanding who it is that you're trying to serve and know what it is that's going on in their environment and in their world. Understand it so well that they think, this person really gets me and my business. But this is something that you can also take to your relationship with peers. “It's amazing what doors can be opened when you try to approach the world from a place of abundance,” Michael assures. Be in a category of one. Having that connection and understanding of your client's business and needs will happen especially when you find a niche you're really passionate about. When there's a connection that allows you the opportunity to start building and cultivating that relationship and building that bridge, this is the start of establishing yourself as a category of one in your industry. This way, you can empathize with and what they're going through and ask how can I help? Who can I connect you to? Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Investing in Relationship Equity and Establishing Yourself as a Category of One Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Excited to have another amazing episode. We're going to talk about relationship equity, and you're going to want to really hear what we're going to talk about and I got an amazing guest. So let's go ahead and get into the show. Hey, Michael. Welcome to the show. Michael: [00:00:22] Hey, it's good to be here. Jason: [00:00:23] Yeah. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Michael: [00:00:27] Uh, so Michael Stamatinos. Managing partner of Omorfi and we work with clients that are focused on growth. We work on strategic growth initiatives with some execution services. So it really boils down to one word: access, access to the right people, access to the right strategic partners, and in some cases, access to the right growth capital. So we really view ourselves as bridge builders and connectors at heart. I am a connector and that's really what we're focused on. So come from a pretty humble background. Parents are both immigrants, so grew up working in restaurants, being Greek, and just love working with people to the point where I wanted to be a clinical psychologist. And after my training, I realized that I didn't want to be in living receptacle to people's stuff. I still wanted to help people. So gravitate it into the world of business development, marketing, and sales, and been there ever since. Jason: [00:01:18] So I'm dying to ask you and you. And you probably get asked this a lot just based on how you did the intro about your family being Greek and in the restaurant business. Is your family like the Big Fat Greek Wedding? Michael: [00:01:29] 100% Yes. Jason: [00:01:33] How many cousins do you have? Michael: [00:01:35] We have several cousins named Nick and Peter and Costa, and it's very family-oriented. And my dad is quite a character, you know. When he talks to people, he's very animated, loves to tell stories. My mom's a little bit more of sort of the, just a homemaker, very peaceful, very calm. So sort of the ying and yang there. But my dad was a really hard worker and just grinded for a long time and stayed consistent. I think if there's anything that I've taken from him, it's that. Staying consistent and having discipline. Jason: [00:02:07] Awesome. Well, let's talk about relationship equity. How do you view this? Michael: [00:02:13] So I have an interesting story of how that kind of came about. So as I mentioned earlier, yeah, I'm a connector. I've always been a connector my whole entire life. I get a lot of joy out of putting people together, regardless of whether something's in it for me or not. And I was in a meeting one day with a client… And I don't know if you've ever had, if this has ever happened to you, but I got a stream of thoughts that were so clear that I had to excuse myself from the meeting. And I call it, I got a memo from that office, if you know what I'm saying. And that hadn't happened to me up until that point in my life. So I left that meeting. I always carry a little notebook with me. So I jotted down three sort of overlapping circles with a circle in the middle that intersects all the other circles. And I called it relationship equity, and really relationships are very similar to a bank account. When you initially start a bank account, you deposit some money. Well, if you want to go out and purchase something after you've started your bank account, you would draw some money. The reality is that if you continue to withdraw and you want to make a big purchase and you don't have enough money in there deposited, it's going to say insufficient funds. And that's really how I'm seeing the world now is that there are folks that are very quick to make massive withdrawals and they haven't substantiated. They'll do withdrawals by putting in deposits into that account. And sort of the three circles within relationship equity, that makeup relationship equity rather is trust. How do you build trust with people? Well, you have to have some level of authenticity and I'm not here trying to be someone that I'm not. I'm a real person, normal person. And there has to be some sort of a connection. In our case, it was through, you know, one of your members, Pete, Pete Cunningham. And that's how we really kind of transferred that relationship equity. And so there's that trust that. And then how do you build that relationship? Well, you take that trust and you multiply it over time. And it doesn't necessarily have to be long stretches of time. It could be short, such as it's on there's some folks that have gotten really close to in short amount of time. And then how do you build equity within that relationship? Well, you take that relationship and you multiply it by value. And the way that I define value for me is helping someone for the sake of helping them not having a hidden agenda. And when you do all those things, you build relationship equity. So when people ask me, what game am I in? I'm in the game of building relationship equity all the time. Whether it be with my wife, with my kids, with my friends and family and with clients and prospects. That's what I'm doing. And that's look, that's what got me here today. I didn't reach out to you and ask you to be on your show. It was through a series of activities of trying to add value and trying to be helpful and building relationship equity, which inevitably was transferred to this particular moment here. So this is something that I'm going to be doing until I'm not here anymore, regardless. Jason: [00:05:10] Yeah. I love the term and I've always told people, you know, especially cause they're like, hey, let me, uh, you got the audience I want. I'll give you this amount of money. I'm like, no, it just doesn't work that way. I'm like, you got to make deposits before you're withdrawing. I mean, a great example… It's always been, since I've been a kid, my grandfather worked on the long island railroad and I've always wanted to ride in front of the steam engine. And I met this one guy, Greg, that a mutual friend introduced us because he usually takes off a lot of time. We go play. And so we started kind of a couple of weeks ago, epic Fridays. So we just go out, climb mountains, do some really cool stuff. And I was telling him, you know, we were talking about like bucket list items and stuff like that. And I was like, man, you know, I've always wanted a ride in a steam engine. He's like, I know the owner of the Durango Silverton Railroad. Let me call them up for you. He surprised me. And so in the next couple of days, I'm going to get to ride, hit the whistle and everything. So just, just from relationships, like I didn't ask for that. So… Michael: [00:06:17] It's amazing. It's amazing what doors can be opened when you try to approach the world from a place of abundance and not to sound all woo or anything. But when you really try to add value and try to really help people for the sake of helping people, not only are you advancing society at large, but I dunno, it just, there's more opportunities that have come across my desk that I could ever take advantage of. It's just trying to be, be that way. So I think I'm going to keep doing that. Jason: [00:06:41] Yeah. I mean, there's so many examples. I, you know, I think of, you know, in our mastermind, you know, some members like Dunkin or Ian or Jeremy. They provide so much value to the membership, but they get so much business back and that's not their whole intent. Like they don't go in it saying like you were saying, well, what can I get from this? It's like, I'm going to give, but then whenever they need anything, like people are like, I'll give you the shirt off my back. What do you need? And they're just people that recognize that you really start scaling… You know, I was very minded, many years of my career, like, oh, you're in this business, I'm going to take you down. And then I'm like, no, no, no, you can build relationships and work with people. And even if you never get anything back from it, you feel good by doing it. Michael: [00:07:30] Yeah. The currency that I play with is relationship equity. And I get, as I mentioned earlier, like I view myself as a bridge builder. And what better way to live life than to continue to build bridges, show people how to build bridges. In other instances, you're doing the bridge building for them. But then you're also building tools to show people how to build bridges. I mean, I didn't go to a fancy school. I don't have any of these fancy degree. I didn't go in and I didn't do any of that stuff. And somehow I pinch myself sometimes when I find myself in some of these meetings with people, quite frankly, that sometimes I'm like, wow, how did I get here? Oh my gosh. And I did. And it has a lot to do with knowing how to get access to just scale. And it's all about building relationship equity. Jason: [00:08:18] Yeah. So the agency owners listening in, is there any steps or there's no trickery here, but if they're thinking, well, man, I would like to build more relationships and I'm thinking back, you know, a couple of years ago for me, I was crappy at building relationships. Like it's very hard to get in with me. Once you're in, you're in, you know, I was always closed minded and that kind of stuff. So how can agency owners benefit from this? Michael: [00:08:47] The way that agency owners can benefit from it is as follows is, understand who it is that you're trying to serve and know what it is that's going on in their environment and in their world and know it's so well to the point where they're like, wow, this person really understands me. That's how you connect with people. You having been a former agency owner and knowing the growing pains, the ins and outs you'd been there before. And when you're trying to serve a specific niche or market and you understand problems that are very… And I'm not talking about just surface level deep, I'm talking about going four or 5, 6, 7 levels down. That's when there's a connection that allows you the opportunity to start building and cultivating that relationship and building that bridge. So it starts there. And then the other thing that you really are trying to do is you really are going to have to position yourself as being, you know, that category of one. That truly understands that market. I mean, you have quite a niche and I'm assuming it wasn't, it was, it didn't happen by chance. This was done by design. And it had a lot to do with how you position yourself and how you understood the pain points that agency owners were going through. Jason: [00:10:00] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients? You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients using revenue growth platforms. Sharpspring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now, for a limited time my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with SharpSpring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smartagency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smartagency. Yeah, I always tell everybody I'm like, you have to know your audience you're going after and understand what they're feeling. Not their problem, but yes, you have to understand their problem, but how does that problem actually make them feel? And then empathize with them. You know, there's many people that do what I do that has no empathy and they just, they just kind of go shouting down from their fake mountain going, hey, I can help you, you know, look at what all the shit I've done. Versus like, I've been what you're going through. I totally get it. How can I help? Who can I connect you to? You know, one of the things I always tell people after I, I meet with them, like, is there any back connect you with? Because I do believe, like you were saying, you're a connector, you know, I've seen that, like the people that go, hey, you need to meet this person. And then whenever they're like, man, that relationship was amazing. Thanks so much, Jason. You know, and then just keep building on that. So I totally agree with all this. It's so easy. It's not like rocket science. I think you have to be aware in order to do it and kind of almost, you're almost kind of changing yourself a little bit because I think early on, I think we're all takers versus givers and when you give yeah, you get more. Michael: [00:12:10] And there's a great book called The Go-Giver and it's, I'm looking at something that I've described to as a kid, that there's something that when you shift from everyone defines success differently, by the way. For me, it's about being able to have the time and money to do what it is that I want to do and do it with the people that I want to do with and having great relationships with those people. I mean, at the end of the day, I'm not a slave to money. Don't get me wrong. It's, it's an important aspect of things that it's not the end all be all. And when you really place your identity outside of that, you start to make this shift from being successful to then being significant. So the shift from being successful to significant is it's a long journey and it takes a lot of work. And I can't say that it was a smooth ride for me, and it's not, I'm not done. I'm not done by any stretch, just so have a lot of growing to do. And the best is yet to come. Jason: [00:13:03] Yeah. And I think when you make that shift to significance, I remember when I sold the first agency, I was depressed and it was because I didn't have that significance. And then when I was able to create the community that we've created and really connect all these amazing agency owners together. You know, then I was like, oh man, I feel like I'm on top of the world. Versus before I felt like I was on the top of the world by myself. And that sucked a lot of people look at it from the outside and they're like, oh, that's awesome. I'm like, no, man. Like I enjoyed the journey. I enjoyed the climb. And now I feel like when you're connecting all these other people, you can be on their journey as well. And that's really pretty cool. Michael: [00:13:46] It's like, you know, like, a Sherpa. Jason: [00:13:49] Yeah, exactly. But I just, I can't climb as much. I can't climb as fast as, as those guys. That's amazing. Whenever you watch any of those Sherpas on Everest, I'm like, how are they doing this? And why would they want to do it? Michael: [00:14:06] It's crazy to see that happen. But I think it's metaphoric too. The hardest clients usually have the best views does. But sometimes those climbs might not necessarily be successful. I mean, I have to tell you that, you know, part of my growth story , and I'd be remiss if I didn't say this, came through a failed startup. I had placed everything into this, everything, you know, some people spend money to go do their MBA. I dropped every single thing that I had saved into this thing. And it didn't go well. And my identity was wrapped up into that. So having visions of grandeur, you know, making it and had, I knew just kind of looking back now because you know, you get kind of depressed when you lose everything. It's, it's not a fun place. You learn a lot about yourself. Jason: [00:14:56] But it makes you appreciate everything so much more as you're moving forward, because I was hiking the mountain yesterday and I was going through this thick brush and it just kept getting thicker and thicker. I couldn't get through it. So I had to backtrack. I had to go back down. And then find another route up. And that's, that's everything. We do everything in business, in life, everything it's never a straight path. It's always the zigzags and knowing when to turn back, I mean, I could have probably made it through, but I would have been bloodied and banged up. I was like, kinda like walking. So, awesome. Well, this has all been amazing. Michael, is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Michael: [00:15:42] I think just to, just around knowing and taking that niche that you feel like you can be the best in the world. I mean, I didn't say this, but you know, we have a really big presence in the digital health space. And it's sort of done by design in that aspect. And we've really positioned ourselves and placed ourselves to being in a category of one and pick something that you believe that you can be in a category of one and name it, name it, and tame it and proclaim it is the reality is that there's a lot of digital agencies that are out there and it's hard to differentiate. So do your damn best to be able to do that and pick your claim and work it and work it and work it and work it and stay consistent over time. Consistency over time wins. I'm telling you that there's, you know, people may think that we're pretty successful at what we do, but I got a lot of scars on my back to showcase that it's been a long journey and we stayed consistent throughout the whole entire time. Jason: [00:16:49] I love it. Yeah. You know, and you have to be passionate and whatever you pick don't choose it based on money. Like we were talking in the pre-show, why you chose healthcare and why you started working with other industries, like in plastic that you were like, oh, that's healthcare as well. Cause you're passionate about it. And the more passionate about it, the more you're going to do, and it's going to resonate with your audience that you're going after. Versus just kind of getting a stupid course out there that says here's the most profitable niches for agencies and pick one. Michael: [00:17:20] Um, I care about two things that I'm very passionate about, you know, relationship equity kind of really factors into this notion of access. And the way that I view access is around customers, partners, etcetera, but on a broader scale access around access to care, access to things like food. I mean, there's 50 plus million Americans now that don't know where their next meal is going to come from. That's an access  Golproblem, access to, you know, so access is something I care very, very deeply about when I see people that can't get access or maybe someone that wants to try to get into a job and necessarily can't get in and, um, you know, that's an access problem. And then the second thing that I believe that things hinge on is leadership. And there are leaders right now that are coming into some very influential roles that they're not necessarily tech savvy, they're tech dependent. They grew up with an iPhone. They grew up with a smartphone. And they view innovation as, as a differentiator, the view innovation as a way to generate more revenue. And when you're working with a digital agency and aspect of what they do is innovation. And the way I define innovation is providing value to many. Then you can do that incrementally over time. So those things kind of combined, you know, really hinge on whether or not people are going to be accepting of adoption of some of these innovations that come through. And that's exciting to me because you interact with people that you just problems that they're solving can inevitably make a pretty big radical shift and be part of that journey is an absolute privilege. Jason: [00:19:00] Yeah, exactly. Awesome. What's the website people go and check you out if they want to reach out to you? Michael: [00:19:06] Well, I'm on LinkedIn, so people can check me out on LinkedIn, Michael Stamatinos, and they can go to our website, michaelstamo.com and they can hear from us there. Jason: [00:19:15] Awesome. Okay, everyone, go check that out. Michael, thanks so much for coming on the show. And if you guys want to build relations that equity and be around them, amazing agency owners all over the world that are sharing what's working. Having a lot of fun, passing a ton of business back and forth. I really never talked about that, but just really elevating each other along the way over the years. I'd love for all of you to go check out digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind for agency owners that want to grow and scale faster and just be transparent and have a lot of fun. So go to digitalagencyelite.com and until next time have a Swenk day.

Frankie and Jess
Sleepwalkin' Stories

Frankie and Jess

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 88:34


Topics Include: What are you EXCITED about? Do you sleepwalk or does someone in your family?

The Weekly Scrap
Weekly Scrap #113 - Julio Ramos, Everything Saws

The Weekly Scrap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 86:25


Excited to have Julio Ramos on to talk about "Destiny Favoring the Prepared" among many other fire service topics. We discuss special operations, leadership, tactics and everything the audience threw our way!  Julio is a savant when it comes to saws for sure. Was an awesome Scrap!

Sincerely HER Podcast
I Am Excited For My Future | Note 390

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:41


The best is yet to come for you. Don't be afraid to trust your future.   Today's Affirmations: I Am Excited For The Future   Connect with me: SincerelyTam.com Twitter | @iamSincerelyTam Instagram | @iamSincerelyTam   Leave some feedback: Are my bite-sized notes helping you find clarity, get sh*t done, and win? If so, please subscribe and leave a review, and a 5-star rating.

SNTR Presents
New World Into the Void | Huge Update

SNTR Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 178:29


New World Into the Void is a huge update landing in the game today! The New World Void Gauntlet is officially being added to the game with a crazy amount of changes to the game. We will be sure to show off the New World Void Gauntlet gameplay along with all of the other changes in the game. Excited to finally have some New World new weapons along with new quests and other QoL updates like running faster on the roads and a host of weapon changes and buffs DISCORD - https://discord.gg/sntrnetwork DISPLATE - https://displate.com/sntr?art=60ef969267ffc 80STEES - Code LONO for 30% OFF - https://www.80stees.com KONTROL FREAK - Code LONO for 10% OFF at https://www.kontrolfreek.com/  BECOME A MEMBER - https://www.youtube.com/sntrupdates/join RAGELESS ROAST - https://ragelessroast.com

Marketing Trends
Natural Curiosity Leads to Comprehensive Marketing with Jeffrey Nicholson, CEO, and Co-founder, Tracer

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 32:03


Do you notice the minutiae details in everyday life? For example, have you ever recognized the way that other people hold their cell phones? If you do, your mind works similar to that of Jeffrey Nicholson, the CEO, and Co-founder of Tracer. This level of attention to detail has helped him throughout his career, particularly when it comes to picking up some of the latest trends, which he told me about in this episode of Marketing Trends.“I start with natural curiosity. I still, to this day, will do my own research and Google brands, and go through their experiences, and understand what other people go through. When you look at the consumer research on people, they use eight apps or less; they [have] very specific behaviors. I used to look at people's phones and [could] tell very quickly just on their layout, how they operate with phone position and thumb position. You have to start with curiosity, no matter who you are, from analysts all the way to CEO. You've got to know what's going on.”Under the tutelage of media giant, Gary Vaynerchuk at VaynerMedia, Jeff and his co-founder Leighton Welch, built Tracer with the plan to launch separately once the development was complete. Leighton developed the structure of the software while Jeff was operating the customer-facing side, servicing Vayner clients and using the software. VaynerMedia is still a client of Tracer and more companies every day are realizing the value it offers in solving complex data equations. Excited for you to glean some real nuggets of wisdom from this marketing leader. Up next on Marketing Trends. Main Takeaways:Developing Good Talent on your Team is Exponentially Beneficial: As your team grows, the more people you have that are closely aligned with your business mission, vision, and execution expectations, the better that will help everyone stay on the same page. Scaling a team up in the right way might take a little extra time, but the investment upfront will pay dividends later. Curiosity Leads to Excellence in Business: As a CEO being curious is critical to keeping a good view of the big-picture. Developing a natural curiosity around your work can lead to you discovering some basic but important ways you can improve your business operations. As you go through the customer-facing experience of other brands and products, notice the sticking points, the areas you could improve upon, and learn some potentially hard lessons the easy way. Designing Teams around Individuals with Various Skill Sets: Every member of your team brings a vast array of talents and skills to share with the company. Think about who you already have on your team and what other roles you could use support for when hiring to build out the most complementary team. Key Quotes:“I start with natural curiosity. To this day, [I] will do my own research and Google brands, and go through their experiences, and understand what other people go through. When you look at the consumer research on people, they use eight apps or less; they [have] very specific behaviors. I used to look at people's phones and [could] tell very quickly just on their layout, how they operate with phone position and thumb position. You have to start with curiosity, no matter who you are, from analysts all the way to CEO. You've got to know what's going on.”“I'm a big believer in talent and making sure that talent breeds talent and I think about it as a pyramid. Typically you're starting with your co-founders. The reality is that every level of that pyramid is imperative to the success of your business. I'm a big basketball guy. You need a power forward, you need a shooting guard, you need everybody to have different skill sets. That's going to be complementary to make you win. So you're a good communicating and functioning team… I've spent probably more time than most of the people I know in regards to just recruiting and retention because I do believe that, you know, people are the difference between winning and losing.”“I underestimate how difficult it is to be responsible for other human beings. As an early manager, I got some good advice and bad advice and you're just learning on the fly. I think now I feel a lot more comfort in being a leader in dealing with things.”“I spend a lot of time on [my work] because I care and I want to win. And honestly, I want to make sure I don't let anybody else down on the team. It's an easy motivation to keep yourself motivated, to make sure that we make the right decisions and spend as much time as I can researching and recruiting and, and doing the things.”Bio:Jeff Nicholson is the CEO and Co-founder of Tracer. Nicholson has been innovating in the media and tech space for 15 plus years. Before joining Tracer, he was the first Chief Media Officer at VaynerMedia, where he spent five years scaling the business globally. He has also served as the Head of Ads at SocialCode, which was the largest spending agency on Facebook in North America. Prior to that, he was VP of Ads at LeadKarma, which sold to BankRate for $30MM. Currently, he sits on the advisory boards of Roku, Pinterest, and NextDoor. He teaches at universities including Babson College, New York University Stern School of Business, University of Virginia, and Miami Ad School.To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

Talking Dawgs: A UGA Football and Basketball podcast
UGA Football What Are We Excited About, Nervous About, Don't Sleep on for REST OF SEASON

Talking Dawgs: A UGA Football and Basketball podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:50


We are excited about national championship run, we are nervous about Podlesny, and don't sleep on Stetson coming back next year.   Daniel and Clint talk about the Dawgs the way you would if you had a podcast. M-F Everywhere podcasts are found. Football. Basketball. College Sports. Locked On Podcast Georgia. Your team, everyday. Twitter: dawgspodcast Email: lockedbulldogs@gmail.com Voicemail: 731-630-1065 Title Sponsor   McDonald's This episode of Locked On (your team name) is brought to you by McDonalds, proudly serving communities since 1965. McDonalds has always been more than just a place to get tasty, affordable food – it's an unofficial community center. A big thank you to our friends at McDonalds for always being there. I'm Lovin It.   Sponsor Show Notes Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.comand use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Portfolio Career Podcast
The Minimalist Entrepreneur with Sahil Lavingia

Portfolio Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 49:39


Sahil Lavingia's new book, The Minimalist Entrepreneur, provides a roadmap for a different path compared to the one painted by Silicon Valley. A few pillars are starting, creating content, and being active in community. These pillars can be viewed as foundational to building a Portfolio Career. In addition to being the CEO of Gumroad, Sahil is a painter, course creator, investor, and now an author. His company, Gumroad, hires quarter-time executives to allow for them to work on other things and build out their Portfolio Career. In this episode, you will also learn how working remote has opened up space and potential opportunities for you. Excited for you to build and grow your Portfolio Career!As always, this episode with notes is available on my website.Connect with Sahil on Twitter! Connect with me on Twitter!

True Underdog
#BestOf2021: Racing For a Legacy with Josef Newgarden

True Underdog

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 46:40


Today on the show we're talking with professional racecar driver, Josef Newgarden. Josef has won the Indie series twice, he has been racing since he was a kid, and he didn't finish high school or college! We talk about how nothing can hold you back, including being an introvert. Josef had to step out of his comfort zone, and interact with the team in order to create chemistry, to work together better on race day! Josef also lost his first sponsor he ever had, he thought that was the end of his season, but another company stepped in and believed in what Josef could do. He went on to win the championship that year. Having passion for what you do, becoming obsessed with beating the competition, not letting failures become deterrents, but using them to fuel your passion; that is what Josef brings to the table in today's interview, and everyday he races. Pushing yourself, believing in yourself, and stepping out of your comfort zone will get you to new heights you didn't think were possible.   Links:    Follow True Underdog on IG: www.instagram.com/true_underdog Reach out to Jayson directly at jayson@trueunderdog.com Follow Jayson on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jayson-waller-/ Follow Jayson on Instagram: www.instagram.com/jaysonwallerbam Check out our website to meet the team, view show notes and transcripts: www.trueunderdog.com Apply for a chance to receive a $10,000 business grant: https://trueunderdog.com/underdog-achievers-program/   Mentioned in the Episode:   Rick's Book, The 21 Keys to Success: Ridin' with Rick: https://www.amazon.com/Success-Kolie-Crutcher-Freeway-Ricky/dp/0981464343 Rick's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freewayricky/?hl=en Rick's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRealFreewayRickRoss/ Freeway Enterprise Website: https://freewayenterprise.com   Timestamps:   1:03 - Josef's Upbringing 3:52 - Excited by the Challenges 6:13 - 20% Talent, 80% Passion 9:17 - Selling Yourself 14:19 - Empowering “No” 17:45 - All About the People 21:20 - Passion Beyond Anyone Else 26:52 - Love the Challenges 29:01 - Marrying a Disney Princess 34:02 - Becoming a Father 35:21 - Jayson Meeting His Wife 39:12 - Josef's YouTube Channel

The Pet Photographers Club
S10E12 | Five Aha! Moments from 2021 with Caitlin & Kirstie (Must Listen Episode)

The Pet Photographers Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 34:29


Oh my goodness, it is ALMOST DECEMBER?! Where did 2021 go? To celebrate our annual Black Friday Super Sale, Kirstie and Caitlin took a look back through the 2021 Podcast Archives to pick out our personal top five AHA! moments. If you missed any of these episodes along the way, consider this your sign to go back and have a listen. Or just tune into this episode and we'll sum up the best bits for you!TOP FIVE AHA! MOMENTS#1 Mark Rossetto's discussion on establishing a network with industry professional during the Season 8, Episode 3 Expert Panel episode. You can make your networks as official (think Pet Collective a la Marika Moffitt) or as unofficial (Kirstie organised a casual local coffee group) as you fancy!#2 Mikaela Vargas made SEO simple for us in Season 10, Episode 7. Did you know that Google uses “neural matching” to understand synonyms - meaning we totally don't have to (and shouldn't) use the same “xyz location pet photographer” keyword again and again throughout our websites?#3 Chris Garbacz from Studio Ninja shared a great hack - just use “job types” to track your leads and get detailed reports in your CRM. Listen to Season 10 Episode 6 for more CRM tips - and if you love Studio Ninja as much as we do, you can grab a great discount with the code PPPI50#4 Zoe Hiljemark helped us practice what we preach with her awesome press release guide. After we interviewed Zoe for Season 9, Episode 6, we used her tips and template to craft our own press release for the 2021 Pet Photographer of the Year Awards - and the results blew us away! Articles were published all around the globe, including in the New York Times, the Telegraph and the Daily Mail. Check out the blog post for Zoe's tips about how to approach the media here: https://www.thepetphotographersclub.com/the-blog/how-to-approach-the-media-to-promote-your-success-in-the-awards#5 Meg McMillan is a personal branding photographer and really got our cogs whirring for how we could adapt that business strategy as pet photographers in our Season 10, Episode 5 interview. We especially enjoyed her pricing strategy for microbusinesses.P.S. Excited for our Black Friday Super Sale?20% OFF STOREWIDE - USE THE COUPON CODE BLACKFRIDAYhttps://www.thepetphotographersclub.com/black-friday Other upcoming events21st Nov- Pet Photographers Meet Up in London: Grab an invite30th Nov- Workshop: IMPLEMENT A PET OF THE YEAR COMPETITION2022- Business Foundations Challenge: Doors open for January

Power Purls Podcast - Knitting, Crochet and Yarn Podcast
Barfy + Excited. Perfect. You are ready

Power Purls Podcast - Knitting, Crochet and Yarn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 13:04


You are ready.  Stop f-ing around with thinking about what you think you need to start your podcast. You have what you need = YOU. You are the asset of your coaching business.Open your mouth and SPEAK your truth … even if your voice shakes.Barfy + excited = on track. Right where you need to be because that means you are ready for this. Why are you holding yourself back from the amazing greatness that is YOU?Your people are waiting for your magnificence. They want to hear your message.You have a megaphone to do that. It's a powerful and magical medium that is called a podcast.What is really holding you back and keeping you stuck? Fear of opening up your mouth, fear that you'll sound unprofessional, not put together, like a fraud and not a “big enough” coach yet.I call BS on all of that.The feeling of certainty when someone has your back to help guide you. That is PRICELESS. I know this because I have the most amazing people in my corner to help show me my magnificence. I'll show you yours. The time is now. Your podcasting dream start right here on a Clarity Session with me to gain calm and confidence, knowing that if you need the support, there is a path to get you where you want to be and I guarantee it. I've been there … I've made the mistakes and I've learned how to do this Podcasting thing with 8 years of trial and error to show for it. Stop wasting energy and time, and let's get your podcast to start doing the job now. To help you meet people before they ever get on a consult, and all you need to do is speak … tell your story. Give transformations. Turn listeners into clients.It all starts right here. Get out from behind the bushes and feed your baby birds. 

Valentine In The Morning Podcast
Jon Comouche And Brian Are Excited About The New Spider-Man Trailer! Pt.1

Valentine In The Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:43


Listen to Valentine in The Morning every weekday from 5a-10a on 104.3MYfm in Los Angeles.

The Bloom & Grow Show with Amber Housley
Episode 126 - 3 Things You Need To Have A Successful Retreat

The Bloom & Grow Show with Amber Housley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 16:50


In today's mini-episode, I'm sharing my secret sauce to creating, hosting, and selling not only retreats, workshops but also live events. This is my signature trifecta that has created raving testimonials and transformations in my clients and customers. This also could serve as a great yardstick to compare to the experience you might be currently planning or selling right now. When I break each of these down, consider how they compare to what you are currently planning and where you might need to make some adjustments.   Content What are you learning?  What are you going to be activating on? What are we focusing on right now/What's the point? Experience Where will it be? What will they experience activities wise while there? How will you experience the other scents?  Attendee onboarding and during Transformation What will I walk away with?  What is my guarantee? What shift has taken place?   Excited to create and sell your pretty and profitable experience? Join the waitlist for my new course, Invite and Delight! You'll get the inside scoop as I walk you through how to create a transformational experience for your clients that brings your brand to life.   Links & Resources Mentioned In This Episode: Listen to the Bloom & Grow Show Podcast Download the FREE Retreat Planning Roadmap Join the waitlist for Invite and Delight     Like the Show? Subscribe on iTunes and leave a 5-star, positive review RIGHT HERE.    Amber Housley is a creative business and sweet life cultivator who founded her first business in 2007. Today, she's a Marketing Strategist for top creatives and influencers, producing hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue with her sales and launch strategies. Passionate about raising women to new heights, Amber shares her smart strategies with other women business owners through live and virtual trainings like the Flourish 5-day Marketing Plan Workshop, her Blooming Business Inner Circle, and Inspired Retreat— an annual business gathering of women entrepreneurs. Her Sweet Life Sisterhood tribe is made for women who want to run businesses efficiently, with joy, and without the expense of sacrificing family time.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How To Find The Right Formula For Quick Agency Growth

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 12:32


Are you looking for the right formula for quick agency growth? When Ellen Jantsch was working as a head of growth in a small tech startup, she felt there was space for an agency focused on testing and executing strategies into long-term sustainable growth. She held on to that idea while she worked as a freelancer and when she started Tuff, a remote growth team for hire. They work with teams in nearly every industry to deliver actionable strategies to attract and keep more engaged customers. Today she joins the podcast to talk about how she found the right formula for quick growth for her agency, her strategic move to grow the agency's most valuable asset, and the moment she started thinking of a more repeatable formula to generate new business. 3 Golden Nuggets Test to find the right formula. When discussing how to find the right formula to grow your business, Ellen recalls that, more than anything, what helped her find the right fit for her agency was finding what didn't work for them. “Testing and experimentation was a much quicker route to finding what was going to work,” she assures. The agency relied a lot on word of mouth at one point and at one point they started to try different approaches, from outbound sales to putting on workshops and events. Finally, they focused on an SEO strategy that now brings 75 leads per month to their door. The foundation to grow your most valuable asset. In an unusual move, for her second hire, Ellen searched for an HR person. “If you're serious about building a remote team and a small team,” she assures, “you have to put a lot of foundation in place.” So, she worked with this person to set a career framework and think about the hiring processes. They decided on details like how to set up benefits and compensation and how to create an inclusive hiring process. It took a lot of time, but your agency team is your most valuable asset, after all. By the time she figured out what direction she wanted for the agency and the type of roles she needed to hire, there was already a solid hiring process in place. A predictable pipeline is everything. One of the things that became very clear for Ellen when she thought about what she could do to continue to grow her agency was that she would need to figure out how to create a more repeatable formula for generating new business. A more predictable look at revenue and growth would allow making strategic hiring decisions early, versus hiring someone when the pressure is up due to so much work. The only way to get ahead of that is to predict what the next six months are going to look like. Sponsors and Resources Wix: Today's episode is sponsored by the Wix Partner Program. Being a Wix Partner is ideal for freelancers and digital agencies that design and develop websites for their clients. Check out Wix.com/Partners to learn more and become a member of the community for free. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Finding the Right Formula For Quick Agency Growth and Generating New Business Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here. And on today's episode, we have an amazing guest, uh, fellow Coloradan, if that's a word, I don't know. I just moved here so I don't know. But we're going to talk about how she's grown her agency so quickly. And, uh, go over some of the strategies that have worked for her and some of the things that might not have worked, so it helps you avoid them. So let's go ahead and get into the episode. Hey, Ellen. Welcome to the show. Ellen: [00:00:33] Glad to be here. Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:36] Yeah. Excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Ellen: [00:00:39] I run a business called Tuff. We're a small, fully remote growth marketing agency partnering primarily with startups, scale-ups, helping them get traffic and grow their revenue. We focus on tactics like Google ads, technical SEO, content, creative, Facebook ad, CRO, and email. Really trying to figure out how to test quickly and then operationalize small wins into long-term sustainable growth. Jason: [00:01:04] Awesome. And so how did you get started creating your agency? Ellen: [00:01:09] Primarily through freelancing. I think that's probably a common story, but I had done in my career prior to freelancing corporate marketing worked at an ad tech startup worked at like a really small startup as a head of growth. And I knew… Felt like there was an opportunity to, to start an agency like Tuff. But wanted to hone in on my own kind of experiences, primarily from an executional standpoint. So I freelanced for about a year and a half. Some consulting to strategy work, but a lot of executional work running Google ads, running Facebook ads, writing email copy. Trying to just kind of hone in on the services that Tuff was going to provide initially. And then got to a crossroads where it felt like I had enough money in the bank. I knew I didn't want to ever take capital as I started Tuff. And so I, I pretty much planned to have enough, enough money to pay myself a salary as well as two other people for six months, even if we didn't sign a single client. And at that point about three years ago, decided to start Tuff and put the freelancing work to the side. Jason: [00:02:11] Awesome, and so what were the roles of the two people that you hired first and why? Ellen: [00:02:16] Yeah, two people. Um, the first one was a PPC strategist, somebody to take over a lot of the day-to-day executional work I was doing for clients, Google ads, Bing ads, YouTube ads, that type of work. It allowed me to take off one hat and pass it to somebody else. The second hire was crazy to think about now, a non-revenue generating employee. Somebody to help us with people ops. I do think that if you're serious about building a remote team and a small team, you have to put a lot of foundation in place. We worked on a career framework. We thought about hiring processes. How do you set up benefits? How do you think about compensation? What's equitable? How do you create an inclusive hiring process? Just spend a lot of time getting that in place before we started actually thinking about building a team. Jason: [00:03:00] That's great. No, that's really great. That's first time I've heard someone bring on like an HR-type person as their second role. I thought you would say like project manager. And everyone always thinks they're not billable. Like, they're billable. I don't know why no one thinks that, but I usually tell people around the 10 person mark to get the HR and people usually are shocked. They're like, I thought you had to do that much later on. But I think a lot of people think they're just doing paperwork. And they're not doing all the other things to make sure you get the right people. Because the people in agency are the most valuable asset. Ellen: [00:03:36] Especially in a service-based agency, you know, I think it's people work with Tuff because they like the experience of the team members here. And if you don't get that right, then you have a lot of employee turnover. The cost of hiring the wrong employees is astronomical, if you ask me. And so I'd rather get it right the first time around. Jason: [00:03:54] Yeah. Well, do you guys feel that you've got it right on the first couple of hires? I know. Man, I hired so many of the wrong people. I got rid of a lot of the right people too. Many, many years. Cause I didn't have that person. Ellen: [00:04:06] Yeah, we really struggled in the beginning, mostly because we had a strong process for hiring, I feel, but didn't really know what we wanted. And I think that goes back to as well as being the kind of first-time founder never working on an agency before. We hadn't really established our playing field. So we were kind of like saying yes to every opportunity. We were doing any type of service that we could offer. We were just trying to generate revenue. And I didn't have a clear enough picture around what we actually need out of team members and what kind of like the long-term vision and who the right client is for Tuff. And we've kind of paralleled those. And as it became more clear around where we get the right results and the types of clients we want to work with, it becomes a lot easier to hire because you know exactly what you're looking for. But in the beginning it was a cluster. I was just shocked anybody wanted to work with us, to be honest. Jason: [00:04:50] Yeah, I think everyone has to go through the cluster. It's like that Vegas buffet, you're trying out everything. What was the pivotal moment where you got that clarity? Ellen: [00:05:00] Yeah, I think it probably happened about 18 months ago. And two things became really clear if I was going to continue to have any chance of growing Tuff, we had to figure out how to hire talent that's adaptable, autonomous more senior in position. So not people that we'd have to train extensively in the beginning who had experience working on small teams. So really honing in on characteristics versus job responsibilities, and that's been really helpful. Um, the second thing would be how do you create a more repeatable formula for generating new business? I think when you have a more predictable look at revenue and growth, it becomes a lot easier to then make strategic hiring decisions early. Versus waiting to kind of like feel the pinch in the stress of like, oh gosh, we've got a lot of work. We've got to hire somebody else. Or this whole thing is going to collapse. You can get to a point where you slowly get out of that and get ahead of it with hiring and you can't do that unless you can predict what the next six months is going to look like. Jason: [00:06:03] When you're an agency partner with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing, and growing your agency. Get the full coding and design freedom to create anything your clients need, along with the tools to manage and collaborate with your team seamlessly from anywhere. And when it comes to growing your agency, you can get matched with new leads every day and earn revenue share for every website you guys create. They're backed by the Wix industry leading security and cyber performance. You'll also have a dedicated account manager on standby 24/7 so you can reach your goals and start setting new ones. See for yourself, head over to wix.com/partners and re-imagine what your agency can accomplish. Yeah. Building a predictable pipeline is everything, right? Like if your business is built on word of mouth, which I always joke around saying that's just not scalable. And you're relying on other people, then you're going to take on work that you probably shouldn't be. Because there's no such thing as a bad agency client and only a bad prospect or a bad process. And, and so when you can build that predictable pipeline, it makes things a lot easier where you're picking and choosing. So let's transition to that. What's worked for you for building a more full pipeline? Ellen: [00:07:25] I think more than anything, what hasn't worked. I have found at least with Tuff, testing and experimentation was a much quicker route to finding, finding what was going to work. And I think in the early days we relied a lot on word of mouth. Um, larger agencies. We tried to kind of like create partnerships for any clients they didn't want. Jason: [00:07:43] That doesn't work. Ellen: [00:07:45] No. Let's see, I put on workshops, I went to events. I would like get in touch with people that had been connected with LinkedIn. We tried outbound sales, um, saw some success there, but definitely not like a natural skillset for me. So a bit of a stretch. So we tried a whole bunch of different things for about a year. Um, got exhausted. And finally realized how do we generate more inbound leads then have, have healthier conversations and get people knocking on our door and getting curious about working with top and wanting to work with us. And so we started getting really specific with an SEO strategy. So that took, you know, that's a slow burn. It's not a, it's not like paid acquisition. It's not like referrals. It takes a long time to build it was a schlep. But now when you go into Google and type growth marketing agency, you're going to see Tuff in the number one spot. If you type content, strategy, agency, technical SEO agency, YouTube ads agency, we're going to be in the top three. And now we're lucky and humbled enough to have 75 leads knock on our door a month. And we maybe take on one or two. And I couldn't have predicted that level of scale ever, but the organic acquisition has really been important for us. Jason: [00:08:52] Very cool. Yeah. You know, I always tell everybody, it's kind of like, as you're building and growing the business, you got to experiment with what's not working. And then kind of go back to kind of the basics and really build on that foundation. And what we found too cause a lot of times. In the very beginning, when we were growing our agency, we grew it from being in the search engines and people coming to us. Then when we started getting, wanting to get to the next level, we started realizing, man, we need this outbound channel. Man, we need this strategic partnership channel. You know, Google changes one thing, we're toast. And then we're laying off a lot of people. So it's always… always a work in progress. Ellen: [00:09:37] Yeah. I couldn't agree enough. And I think we kind of, you know, like we partner with clients every day to think about growing revenue and acquiring new customers or users for them. And we try to apply the same process for Tuff. So we do quarterly growth marketing strategies. We stay pretty committed to it, but I would say we're like in that moment right now, Jason, where 75% of our leads come from organic traffic. And when you think about having all of your eggs in one basket, it's terrifying. And so we're starting to get to this point where we're capturing a lot of existing demand, how do we start to create a little bit more demand? And how does that look like for us long-term? Jason: [00:10:12] Yeah. I almost even look at it too of like, when I hear 75 leads a month, I'm like, okay, good. How can I make them even better? Or how could I even convert them more? Like I was talking to Darby or skill specialist. I'm like, well, out of the conversations that you set up, how could we have the ones we want… How do we increase that conversion rate? Just a little bit. That's always those little fine tweaks that work. I'm going to ask you something I've never really asked anybody that I'm gonna start doing the show. What's the thing that you've regretted that you haven't done in the agency yet? Ellen: [00:10:47] For the agency. Hmm. That's such a great question. I think, um, this is very tactical, but I apologize. It's top of mind. We didn't add on our creative team until recently. And in the growth game, we're really metrics driven data driven, thinking about tactics and the strategies behind those. But if you don't have really good creative, you're not going to get very far. And for so long we outsourced that. Not really trusting in our processes, not really understanding what that would look like in house. And we didn't bring it in house until about three months ago. And now I'm like, oh shit, we need to triple that team tomorrow. And so I think I would've just looked a little bit more holistically at our services and figure out… Again, it just goes back to how do you exchange the most value? And where can you team be the strongest? And I was slow to, I was slow to pick up on that. Jason: [00:11:34] Awesome. Well, Ellen, this has all been amazing. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Ellen: [00:11:40] No, I think you've covered it. Jason: [00:11:42] All right. Perfect. Uh, what's the website people go and check out the agency? Ellen: [00:11:46] tuffgrowth.com. Jason: [00:11:48] Awesome. Very easy. Everyone go check it out. And if you liked this episode, make sure you guys subscribe. Make sure you hit the like button, comment. And uh, if you guys want to be around amazing agency owners on a consistent basis. Where you can grow your agency faster because you can get their opinions and then they can share what's working for them. So you can scale and grow faster. I'd like to invite all of you to the digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind where the agency owners are growing very, very quickly and having a fun time doing it. So make sure you go to digitalagencyelite.com. And until next time have a Swenk day.

Serial Progress Seeker
#51 My Bitcoin Strategy (2 Catalyst that get me Excited)

Serial Progress Seeker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 26:31


In today's episode, Ben walks you through why he's looking at Bitcoin from a different angle and why he's getting extremely excited about the future of Bitcoin. We dive into 2 catalyst that Ben believes will put Bitcoin specifically into a rare position. Warning: Not financial advice. No one knows what will happen with Bitcoin (especially Ben). Show notes: http://www.serialprogressseeker.com/whybenlikesbitcoin

CrossPointHB
Cultivating Wisdom | GOD'S WILL & WISDOM | Bruce Garner | 11.14.21

CrossPointHB

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:28


Pastor Bruce Garner Sunday, November 14th, 2021 CULTIVATING WISDOM This Sunday we will conclude our series "God's Will and Wisdom" and I am EXCITED to open my Bible to Proverbs 1 with you! To grow wise, there are things you need to KNOW and things you need to DO. Proverbs 1 (the foundational chapter of the chief book dedicated to wisdom in the Bible) will tell us ALL of it. Want to enjoy God? Your family? Your work? It's ALL there. I hope you'll join me, and bring someone with you. Read or listen to Proverbs 1 a few times before Sunday. I promise the time will be richly rewarded!

Scene Invaders
Disney + Day Review | What to be Excited About | Movie/Tv Shows (What to Watch)

Scene Invaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 90:19


Chone, Brad from Canada & Coach Hendricks talk about Disney + Day, and give you all the info you need on what to be excited about, what to look out for, and what to watch! Subscribe to our Podcast wherever you listen to Podcasts! We are on all of them, but the most popular links are below. Scene Invaders Links: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2Uzl1JcV9WlncUufpvW4No iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/scene-invaders/id1289489168?uo=4 Google Play Music: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xMDFkYTk4OC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/scene-invaders-productions/scene-invaders Anchor: https://anchor.fm/scene-invaders . Social Media Pages: Twitter--> https://twitter.com/SceneInvaders Instagram--> https://www.instagram.com/sceneinvaders/ Facebook--> https://www.facebook.com/SceneInvadersPodcast . Email Us! We will cover anything you want us to --> SceneInvaders@gmail.com

Simple Passive Cashflow
AHP's New Fund With Jorge Newbery

Simple Passive Cashflow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:17


Excited to learn more about the NEW AHP fund?In this podcast, we are reunited with Jorge Newbery, Founder and CEO of American Homeowner Preservation.He'll discuss the two new opportunities you can invest in, namely: AHP Title Fund and preREO.Always note that each fund is different.But if you invest today, your money will be back in approximately five years.If you are looking to join our Inner Circle, join the family office Ohana mastermind.Visit simplepassivecashflow.com/journey.Deep dive on legacy building ideas!Visit simplepassivecashflow.com/legacy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Men Talking Mindfulness
"Everyman" Mindfulness - with listener guests Daryl Roy and Randy Bach

Men Talking Mindfulness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 74:10


Excited for today's show… as per usual, it's the standard raw, uncut, and unapologetic… but today is a little different… a special show… because our guests are actually two of our listeners! Randy Bach and Daryl Roy… two self proclaimed “regular guys” who are now mindfulness practitioners - and from our conversation today, you'll see what mindfulness has done for them, how they overcame obstacles and continue to run into obstacles with the practice (perfectly normal!) and how mindfulness is for everyone - all genders and sexes, all races, all religions, all ethnicities… everyone… NOT just the yogis, monks, and hippies! Announcements… Next cohort for the Mindfulness and Movement(M2) Experience kicks off December 1st. To find out more about this program developed by us and our partners at MovementRx, check out https://movement-rx.com/mtm or, join us for one of the upcoming FREE workshops… https://offers.movement-rx.com/mindfulness-movement-workshop-2… these workshops are next week Nov 17th at 12 noon EST or Nov 29th at 6pm EST. Daryl Roy: After a career in the US Army and Commercial Nuclear Operations, Daryl founded 3D Media, a tech company bringing augmented reality and virtual reality to military and industrial worlds for knowledge retention, increased safety, and effective training. Daryl is married and has 3 children. Randy Bach: Randy claims to be “just a small town kid from the Appalachian Mountains of Northeast Tennessee” but he has grown into an amazing man… a solid husband, father, grandfather, veteran, military/veteran spouse and military retiree who never stopped dreaming. Randy feels truly blessed beyond anything he could have ever imagined, from being given a chance to enter the world's greatest Air Force on a moral character waiver and then going on to achieving the rank of E-9 (Chief Master Sergeant) to finding and marrying his amazing wife and raising 2 daughters and now being blessed with 3 grandkids. Lindsay's Timestamps (via Restream) 0:00:20 Intro 0:01:20 LIVE 0:02:30 Next M2 Experience starts December 1st! https://movement-rx.com/mtm 0:04:30 Welcome to our guests and listeners Daryl and Randy! 0:06:30 Will leads Opening Grounding Practice 0:11:00 Daryl's Mindfulness Journey 0:17:00 Randy's Mindfulness Journey 0:21:30 What drove Randy to find Mindfulness 0:25:00 https://missionsixzero.com/challenge/ 0:26:30 What Daryl discovered during the process of healing 0:33:30 Daryl's current practice and why it is so important 0:36:30 How Randy uses simple techniques to ground whenever he needs 0:39:00 A sneak peek at next season's topics 0:44:30 Randy on becoming emotionally aware 0:48:00 How Daryl is learning to deal with guilt 0:57:00 Why you should write yourself a letter 0:58:30 Recognizing how our own practices are affecting those around us 1:04:30 What does it take to stick with the practice? 1:09:30 Jon leads Closing Grounding Practice Website ► http://mentalkingmindfulness.com/ Listen on Spotify ► https://bit.ly/MTM-Podcast Listen on Apple Podcast ► https://bit.ly/MTM_Apple_Podcast Watch on YouTube ► https://bit.ly/3BifO6Q Opening and closing Music: Malecon by Soyb & Amine Maxwell https://soundcloud.com/soybmusic https://soundcloud.com/aminemaxwell Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/al-malecon Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/xbWzYbtMgIE

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals
Tech Advances in Real Estate Syndication with TJ Lokboj

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 28:09


TJ has a wide range of experience in entrepreneurship, real estate investing, and technology. After selling his first company, TJ transitioned into a career in tech and has worked with some of the most reputable startups in Silicon Valley, CA, and Silicon Slopes, UT. He has pioneered net-new growth initiatives to support startups targeting fortune 500 companies with initiatives in digital transformation, cloud migration, and optimizing people, processes, and systems for these large organizations. Outside of work, TJ loves to read and spend time with family.   [00:01 - 07:41] Opening Segment Get to know TJ Lokboj Bringing institutional level deal flows What is SyndicationPro? TJ talks about disrupting technology for a greater cause   [07:42 - 18:17]  Tech Advances in Real Estate Syndication What makes real estate technologies interesting? Excited to add value to the industry! A New Service: SponsorDocs The Best Practices to Adopt for Any Investor Security as CybersecurityThe Risks of Having an Adequate Cybersecurity The Magic of Portals!   [18:18 - 28:10] Closing Segment Quick break for our sponsorsGroundfloor offers short-term, high-yield real estate debt investments to the general public. Check www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ to get started. What is the best investment you've ever made other than your education?Spirituality TJ's worst investmentHis first business What is the most important lesson that you've learned in business and investing?“Business investing, it's a people's game.” Connect with my guest. See the links below.   Tweetable Quotes: “Utilizing adopting technology is becoming a gold state's becoming a standard.” - TJ Lokboj “Technology is doing wonders for our industry and serving both our sponsors and investors.” - TJ Lokboj “It's all about people and find a mentor.” - TJ Lokboj ------------ Connect with TJ Lokboj through tj@holdfolio.com, tj@syndicationpro.com, Instagram, and LinkedIn.  Visit their website https://holdfolio.com/ and https://syndicationpro.com/.    Invest passively in multiple commercial real estate assets such as apartments, self storage, medical facilities, hotels and more through https://www.passivewealthstrategy.com/crowdstreet/ Participate directly in real estate investment loans on a fractional basis. Go to www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ and get ready to invest on your own terms.  LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes              

Enthusiastically Spiritual
Igniting Your Inner Spark with Amanda Monnier

Enthusiastically Spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 39:47


How lit is your inner spark?Are you ready to remember, reawaken & ignite that inner spark?Then get ready to do just that with my guest Amanda Monnier.Amanda knows that she was put on earth to support people in waking up and remembering who they are. She helps empower her clients and helps them heal from the inside out, break ancestral patters, and shift into the fullest embodiment of who they are at a soul level.She is an energy healer, certified energetic allergy healing practitioner, certified magnetic mind coach, certified yoga teacher(CYT 200 & Yin Yoga), Emotion Code Practitioner, certified Transformational nutrition coach, and holds a bachelor's degree in Psychology. She is a woman on a mission to create a movement of healed, intuitively-connected humans- people who are on a truly aligned with their heart and soul, creating a life on their terms, and passionately unleashing their gifts into the world. She is completely committed to her soul work of changing lives.What enthusiastically spiritual mini morsels are in this episode:

Fights Gone By w/ Jack Slack
62 - Getting Too Excited About Max Holloway vs Yair Rodriguez

Fights Gone By w/ Jack Slack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:17


And then Felicia Spencer mauled some poor lass

Absolute Geek Podcast: a Nerd Podcast | Sci-Fi | Comics | Movies | Comedy | Geek | Music | TV Shows | Entertainment |Dungeons

Welcome to the 292nd episode of the Absolute Geek Podcast. In this week's episode, we are talking about the final ghostbusters afterlife trailer, the Spiderman now Way Home poster, Spider-Woman coming to the MCU, and Squid games season 2. All this and more as we talk about the news coming out of Disney + Day. In a world where geek culture is now trendy, lifelong, Phoenix-based geeks dare to share their opinion on comics, movies, and TV. Join us as we venture into the vast cave of pop culture to find and discuss the latest in geek news. Some of their favorite topics range from discussing the future of Rick's group in The Walking Dead comics and TV shows, or the never-ending dispute of the future of DC movies versus the all-powerful Marvel. No matter what the topic they have it covered! Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review. #AbsoluteGeekpodcast ​​​​​​ #ComicPodcast​​​​​​ #MovieReviews ​​​​​​#ComicBookReviews​​​​​​ #DCComics​​​​​​ ​ #MCU​​​​​​ #ComicList​​​​​ #itsfridaynightinphoenix #Xmen1997 #Disneyplusday #Squidgamesseason2

The Timms Take
49: "I feel excited, festive even..."

The Timms Take

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:25


In this episode, Matt and Rachel revisit their conversation about traditions, Matt issues a public statement and they share some "Key Plays" in Oliver's recent development. We want to hear about your traditions! What has sizzled? What has fizzled? Let us know at timmstake@gmail.com!Mentioned in this episode:The Bible Ride (tragically out of print, but available on Ebay!)Shauna Niequist on Coffee & Crumbs

Star Trek Podcasts: Trek.fm Complete Master Feed
Warp Five : 210: The Original Cosplay

Star Trek Podcasts: Trek.fm Complete Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:16


“Civilization” 20th-anniversary reflections In the first encounter with an Earth-like planet that is home to a full-fledged pre-warp civilization, the crew of the Enterprise NX-01 faces a situation tailor made for the Prime Directive. Excited to explore an alien world and society that reminds them of their own roots, the crew pioneers the trademarked Starfleet plastic surgery and heads down to the surface. But they find themselves in the middle of an alien infiltration that puts their morals to the test and delivers a story worthy of The Original Series. In this episode of Warp Five, hosts C Bryan Jones and Matthew Rushing continue our 20th-anniversary retrospective that takes you through all of Star Trek: Enterprise, one episode at a time. In this installment, we explore “Civilization” and how the story captures the pure excitement of early space exploration as well as the feel of The Original Series. We also discuss the early seeds of what will develop into the Prime Directive, Phlox's house of cosplay, Captain Archer as a first impression of humanity, and debate how the universal translator works. Hosts C Bryan Jones and Matthew Rushing Production C Bryan Jones (Editor and Producer) Matthew Rushing (Executive Producer) Norman C. Lao (Associate Producer)

The Mediocre to Magnificent Podcast
The Mediocre To Magnificent Podcast 134 - Stay Committed

The Mediocre to Magnificent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:46


When you stay committed and are willing to trust the process doors will open and Magnificence will happen.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Why Becoming the Agency CEO is a Marathon, Not a Sprint

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 20:32


Are you looking to start your transition to the role of agency CEO? David Anderson started living the entrepreneurial dream more than twenty years ago when he started Off Madison Ave, a full-service marketing agency he founded with his partner after getting fired from his agency job. After two decades as a business owner, David has experienced success and failure. Having learned from many successes and the hard knocks of business and life. In his conversation with Jason, he talks about the many challenges and mistakes that helped him learn, why taking a step back from day-to-day operations is a marathon, not a sprint, the importance of building your leadership team and letting them make their own mistakes, and what he has learned after many agency acquisitions. 3 Golden Nuggets Taking a step back is a process. After many years in the business and finally being able to take a step back to being his agency's CEO, David admits that he made many mistakes along the way. The first time, he recalls, he hired someone from the outside and did not have a solid onboarding process for that person. That fell apart quickly and they even ended up losing clients. Later, he had a leadership team implement EOS, which he highly recommends, but he chose not to be the innovator and integrator. It fell apart and he had to step in to fix the situation. Finally, he brought somebody up through the ranks, worked on a transition plan, clearly defined authority, and is holding that person accountable. “It's a process,” he says, “and you will have your failures in it.” Allow leaders to learn from mistakes. David has figured out a leadership team system that works for his agency. There were mistakes along the way, however. One of them was tying the head of the team's financial bonus to their financial income. He later changed that and now their bonuses are tied to the overall performance of the agency, not of an individual. Also, what business owners need to do is let go as they bring on those senior people. You don't hire senior people and micromanage. They don't want to be told what to do. With that, you also have to accept that there will be failures and things that don't work. If you want to grow your team, you need to let them make mistakes. On mergers and acquisitions. With 24 years in the business, our guest has seen his fair share of acquisitions. So, what does he look for in a potential purchase? In their case, as a full-service agency, they look for businesses that can complement their services. So they've purchased agencies that allow them to gain a deeper focus on some aspect of the business. On the financial side, they are definitely looking at the EBITDA. He's also made some mistakes on this front, and his advice is that, when it comes to people who will help you evaluate a potential acquisitions organization, they need to understand the industry. The person selling won't mind if you're uneducated, but you will surely overpay. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Building Your Leadership Team & Letting Go of Day-to-Day Operations is a Marathon, Not a Sprint Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here with another amazing episode and amazing guest. We're going to talk to an eight-figure agency owner who's going to talk about how he really kind of transitioned out of really doing everything and transitioned more to a leadership role where he doesn't have to make all the decisions, which I think a lot of us like. We're also going to talk about M&A, growth, getting bigger, so sit back and let's get into the episode. Hey, David. Welcome to the show. David: [00:00:35] Hey, Jason. Thank you for having me. Looking forward to it. Jason: [00:00:38] Yeah. Excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? David: [00:00:42] All right. So Dave Anderson, I live here in sunny Arizona, where it's still a hundred plus degrees here, today when we're recording this anyway. I am in Arizona. I have been an agency owner for about 23, 24 years now and worked at another agency for a good three years before that. The name of the agency is Off Madison Ave. We are a full service, kind of going back to the old terms, full-service agency that does everything from creative media, public relations, social media, digital. All of the kind of stuff that we've had. We're about 35 full-time people but our business model is really evolved to where we're with a plethora of great talent out there now of how we're using a real combination of full-time people and people with specific skill sets to do our diverse client work every day. Jason: [00:01:41] And so tell me kind of how did you guys get started or why did you start? David: [00:01:45] Ah, that's a great question. So I have one business partner. Roger Hernie, a great friend of mine. So we were both working… Jason: [00:01:52] Still, still business partner? David: [00:01:53] Still business partners, 23, 24 years in October years later, still business partners. And I can, I can give some insights if you like, why I think that has worked overtime. But we were both working at the same agency. And to be honest with you, I got fired one day. First time I'd ever been fired in my life from a job. Um, my wife and I were one month pregnant with our first child on the way. I still remember going and telling her and picking her up at work. And she said, how'd the day go? And I said, well, they got fired today. That'll stress out your wife in any situation. Jason: [00:02:26] Was it Friday? David: [00:02:27] Uh, it was Monday. I started the week off the right way for her. So… Jason: [00:02:33] I've always been fired on Fridays. David: [00:02:35] Yeah, no, this was a Monday. And it's a story that needs to be told over alcohol. The agency kind of turned into, um, the culture was bad and the CEO asked me one day why it was bad. And I told him my honest opinion and I didn't last long after that. So I come from the PR side of things. Background in politics, PR. My business partner worked for McCann Erickson, he is the creative guy. And we just working together, saw the value… Again, I'm an old guy way back then were PR and creative, but didn't really work well together, they were more siloed. And we really wanted to bring that together to bring a total marketing picture. So yeah, 23 years later, we've done three small acquisitions over the years to help us grow. And like every one of you, we've had our best of days on our absolutely worst of days. Um, I'm a lot grayer now, but you know, we've survived. Jason: [00:03:32] Very cool. And, um, tell me what's been the process…? How long did it take you? Or if you kind of remember some of the key elements or key things that happen to get to a point where you don't have to be in the day-to-day operations anymore. David: [00:03:50] Yeah. It's a great question. And I'm going to be honest with you. I severely messed it up two times before I got it right. And it's a thing that I work with kind of both other business owners now, and agency owners. The process of working on the business every day, not in the business. And then ultimately be able to move where I am now today, where I don't really have any day-to-day role in the company. I'm still involved from a financial side. If we do an acquisition, like we did last November, I'm very involved. Um, but I work directly with our GM. So the first time I messed it up, I hired a person from the outside who supposedly had a lot of agency experience, bigger agency actually. And after going through the process, what I did horribly wrong was I didn't have a solid onboarding process for the new person that was coming on. Honestly, I kind of said, this person's hired, he starts on Monday. And by Monday afternoon I was like, good luck! You know? And within six months, we've lost clients. Most hurtful was I lost, I think, three of our top-five leadership team members because of that person's leadership style, how they were doing. Just a bad, bad time. So I had to come back in and fix that. The second time, I had a leadership team and we implemented EOS to be honest with you, which I'm a big fan of. But I chose not to be the visionary or the integrator and I left it to our executive team and the partners that were involved in the business. And that went really bad too, because when you kind of pick the integrator to lead, the other people didn't agree. There was no solid decision-making. There was not clear definition on when to bring it to the owners or me as the owner of decisions. And, again, it completely fell apart and I stepped back into fix it again. Now this time, I think I have finally gotten it right where we brought somebody up through the ranks, worked on a transition plan, clearly defined authority. I am holding that person accountable. The biggest thing where I failed was lack of accountability as I kind of turned the day-to-day operations over to others. Now there's a level of accountability. I still am very involved at times on the EOS part of it on our rocks and making sure where we are. And we are more than a year into it now and the person who runs the bay, they, her name is Sasha has done a fantastic job. The agency is growing. Our clients are happy. Our culture has improved. So what I would say is it's a process. It's a marathon, not a sprint, and you will have your failures in it. Jason: [00:06:47] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients? You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients using revenue growth platforms. SharpSpring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in SharpSpring. Now for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with SharpSpring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smartagency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smartagency. Now I've seen it all kinds of different ways where… There's two ways I've seen it work out well. One is to bring in… One of the first guests actually brought in someone as a consultant to work with the team and to really kind of get to know them. And then eventually they hired that person as the CEO and it was kind of like, oh, well, you're part of us. You've been working with us for six months. That kind of stuff. I've seen that work. And it's a good test. And then I've also seen kind of going through the ranks. But a lot of times what people struggle with is if you don't have people through the ranks, what do you do? And that's why I wanted to kind of give you option number one, that I've seen work. I've also seen it not work where they brought in someone temporarily, and then it doesn't work, but that's fine. They're not the CEO yet. You're testing out the waters and then you can kind of go… Let's talk about a lot of times when agency owners get over the couple of million mark, right? Like you can get to the million mark by accident, I feel. And then you can kind of get to the 2 million mark by accident and a lot of luck. But then to really kind of take it up from there, you have to build out a really good leadership team. So let's talk about how did you build out your leadership team? Like not particular names, but what were their roles? What did you learn from that? Like, what did you… what didn't work? David: [00:09:05] Yeah, so great question. And again, I feel we're in a good spot now, but lots of mistakes along the way. So how we do it, we call them group heads in our organization and we put people at the lead of like our account service team, our creative team, our PR team, and our media team and creative team. So we put a person at the head of all of them, and then I made them the leadership team that they were the ones to work collectively. Um, you know, we're not big enough to, and never have been. And I, quite frankly, I don't think I agree with having people that are just managers and not… So they're working directors is what we call them. They were directors that head of their group, group heads. But they were the ones who were responsible for making sure we weren't siloed and the workflow and functioning like that. And that has worked very well with us. But as agency owners know, actually any CEO leadership knows… The challenge there is managing the personalities, the issues, the finances. You know, one of the biggest mistakes I made was tying my group head's compensation to the financial bonus to their financial income. And then it was a question of how much money do I get? Because I get to put more in my pocket on that. And so what I did was their, and still is, their compensation of bonuses and stuff like that is based on the overall performance of the agency, not of an individual. Otherwise, you'll always have people looking out for their own personal wellbeing that they go through. So it's really that… Now also as a business owner, agency owner, what you need to do, two things is one is you need to let go as you bring on those senior people. You don't hire senior people and micromanage. They don't want to come in and be told what to do, but you as an owner have to relinquish that. And with that, you have to accept, there's going to be failure. There's going to be things that don't work. These are how people learn. And we as owners, when the first time something goes wrong, we jump back in to save the day and tell everybody else what they did wrong. And believe me, I, you know, if you can see me, I've lots of gray hair. This is how I got to that point. But I think, and I've seen, you know, in entrepreneurs, business people as general, we hate to fail we're as competitive. But I believe if you really want to grow your team and you have to let them fail, just like our kids, you know, you have to learn lessons the hard way. So I hope that's helpful. Jason: [00:11:39] Yep. What was your first leadership role that you hired and second and third? David: [00:11:44] I still remember that when it was Roger and I. Well, the first full leadership role that I hired was in our media group because it was the area that we were most knowledgeable in. Roger being a creative guy, me being a PR person. So we brought that media expertise and was one of the very first things. Jason: [00:12:06] Gotcha. And why the media role if you guys had expertise in it? David: [00:12:11] Well, we really didn't. We were faking it. We were using a lot of outsiders to do the work for us. And when we got to a certain point in billings of media, we realized that we needed that expertise of not only just for placing and all of that, but the analytics behind it. And that's where we really needed the expertise. That's why we started there. Jason: [00:12:35] Gotcha. I always like to see when, uh, when people are like, well, so many people hire based on things that they don't know. And I'm like, I think the best thing is, is like hiring on the things, you know. Cause then you can actually, you know, are they full of shit or not, you know? Going there. Kind of switching focus a little bit… This focuses on growth, mergers and acquisitions and buying agencies. You know, with our agency Republics, that's how we've been able to grow, we've done 10 acquisitions so far in the past year and a half, and just had tremendous growth. So, and you've said you've done some MNA as well. So what do you look for? What's worked what hasn't worked when you bought agencies? David: [00:13:21] Yeah, that's a great question. Our philosophy right now is to find things that complement the services. We aren't necessarily looking for another full-service agency. That's going to come in with creative teams, PR teams, all of that. Like the acquisition we did, um, in November of last year was a PR agency based out of San Francisco. And we wanted to really bolster our PR capabilities. It was also a step in over 20 something years and probably something I would do different, maybe do different is… We've always been more of a generalist agency. We've had some core areas of focus and we really want to move to a much deeper focus in two areas specifically. And this was a great way to bring in a book of clients that fit into that area where we want to be more specific. So I would say is, you know, an M&A there's two types: financial, which you're just adding revenue dollars, and they're strategic. And we're looking more strategic with the one we just did. The one before that allowed us to get deeper into technology. How do we use technology more in our marketing? As a result of that, we've also started another startup, um, a SAS-based product in the marketing space that we've also done that. And if I go way back to the early two-thousands, we were a very traditional agency and we didn't have the digital capabilities that the whole marketing world was going to. And we made an acquisition to get us really deep into that space also. So they've almost all been very strategic for us. Jason: [00:15:05] Awesome. And when you're looking at buying an agency or when you bought these agencies, is it a roll up? Is it cash? How are you evaluating them? David: [00:15:18] Yeah. You know, we do the typical valuations stuff that we have. And I'm sure you've seen more than once or twice that people in their minds have a much greater valuation for their agency than what the numbers… I can tell by your face you've seen that a couple of times. And I've had, you know, while we've done four acquisitions, I've probably had 20 where we got to a serious conversation that we do. So we really look at the numbers. I'm actually a finance major coming out of school. But then you also have to take the intangibles into it. So it's always, usually a combination of some upfront money earn out that, you know, goes with it from there. Jason: [00:16:01] How do you evaluate how much they're worth? Is it on EBITDA? Is it on top line? What are some of the factors that you put in there? David: [00:16:08] More EBITDA. More is EBITDA. And then, you know, you play the whole add back game of what to, you know, really kind of goes to… From my country club membership, to my Ferrari, to my vacation home in there to get to where, it's a game. I mean, you know, as well as I do, it's a game. What I would tell… and I'm sure you've had similar experiences use people who can help evaluate a potential acquisitions organization who understands our industry. One of the big mistakes I made on the first acquisition that we did is I used my regular attorney who knew nothing about the marketing industry. I overpaid without a doubt because of that, the, you know, you know what you're doing. Because it does, it does become a game with add backs and you know… How owners are willing to structure their compensation. Jason: [00:17:04] Well, if you're selling you don't mind, if the person buying you is uneducated. Make sure you tell us that lawyer so all the sellers can use that versus David: [00:17:14] Yeah, I totally agree with you. The other thing, I had this happen once as we went through a whole valuation. We were moving forward and then it came back and I had this owner. It was a PR agency said… I think the valuation of their company came back and like 1.5 million, something like that. You know, pretty small agency. And the agency said, well, just our contacts are worth a million dollars alone. Who we know in the media is worth just a million dollars alone. So I would never sell for less than $4 million. And I was like, well, I guess we won't be moving forward. Jason: [00:17:47] Yeah. I always like to tell that person I'm like, well, you can wish in one hand and crap in the other, it gets filled up first. David: [00:17:53] I love that. I'm going to steal that if that's okay. Cause that's very well said. Jason: [00:17:58] Yeah, Well, I stole that from cousin Eddie on Vegas Vacation. David: [00:18:04] Love it. Absolutely love it. Jason: [00:18:06] Well, this has all been great, David, is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? David: [00:18:11] No. Well, a couple things. One is, you know, as agency owners and entrepreneurs, make sure you have a great network around you of advisers is what I would say. Find like-minded… I'm a member of EO Entrepreneurs Organization. It's, you know, provides the CEO forum. Vistage. I was part of Vistage. Get people around you who know more than you, have more experiences that you, that you can experience share. Because that's how we learn and grow. And that's what we do best. I would also say, do whatever you have to do to work on the business every day, not in the business. And I fully understand when you're a smaller agency crossing that first million-dollar mark, $2 million mark, and you're finally making good money. And then the thought of hiring a six-digit leader, a six-figure income. Oh my gosh, that's going to set me back again. That's how you grow, you know, and it's just what you need to do um… If you want a growth the company. If you want a lifestyle company then, you know, that's perfect. And neither one is right or wrong. It's just, you have to marry it up with what you want to do. And the whole process I went through of getting out of the day-to-day, it's absolutely a marathon. It's not a sprint. I would say you need at least 18 months to plan properly for that. That's just my experience to do it in the right way. Jason: [00:19:36] Awesome. And, uh, what's uh, the agency website people go and check you guys out? David: [00:19:40] Uh, Off Madison Ave. A V E, not avenue. So offmadisonave.com. Jason: [00:19:46] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, David, for coming on the show. It was awesome. And I totally agree with you on surrounding yourself with amazing people that are further ahead, so they can actually help you and see the things… And kind of setting me up for that, that was perfect. I want to invite all of you to go to digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind just for experienced agency owners. So I understand that there's other groups out there that have all kinds of different industries. But if you want to be surrounded by amazing agency owners on a consistent basis, I want all of you to go to digitalagencyelite.com. And until next time have a Swenk day.

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show
Excited For Christmas!

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 12:51


We are getting into the Christmas spirit early this year! Who else is feeling the holidays already?

Neebs Cast
7 Days to Die Alpha 20 - What We're Excited For!!!

Neebs Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:27


Alpha 20 should be right around the corner, and Dora is eager to start editing the NEW season. Now all we need is some wonderful conversation about what we are looking forward to the most in the upcoming Alpha 20 update. That's why we recorded this for you:) You're welcome.

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
11-10-21 - Robby McCombs - Vanquish The Foe - How excited are you about Collin Chandler committing to BYU?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 18:27


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/Subscribe to the Cougar Bytes podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-bytes/id1459679000Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMzQ3Nzc1OS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/5ZypcLEPas3ityVckKckVaPocket Castshttps://pca.st/9zjSOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes1459679000/cougar-bytesSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/3477759Stitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/podcast/espn960sports/cougar-bytesTuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports--Recreation-Podcasts/Cougar-Bytes-p1217875iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/cougar-bytes-43051393/

The Sports Junkies
11/10 Hour 4- Tony Massenburg, Are fans excited for Mitch?, Ryan Zimmerman

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 40:58


  1:00 NBCSW Basketball analyst Tony Massenburg 24:00 Are WFT fans excited for Mitch Tribusky? 34:00 Ryan Zimmerman See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast
Episode 345: CJ Albertson – 10th at his first World Marathon Major. What he was thinking and what he’s excited about next!

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 82:35


CJ Albertson placed 10th at the Boston Marathon just a couple weeks ago. He lead the race up until around mile 17. We get to hear about his mindset during the race, his race plan, how he is feeling after the race, and how he wants to tackle Boston again. CJ is a 2:11 marathoner, he ... more »