Podcasts about maori

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Best podcasts about maori

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Latest podcast episodes about maori

The Data Chief
New Zealand's Crown Research Institute CDAO, Jan Sheppard on Treating Data as a Treasure

The Data Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 48:30


Treating data as a treasure is a foundational principle for Jan Sheppard, the Chief Data and Analytics officer at New Zealand's Crown Research Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR.) This agency leads ongoing research in public health, environmental health, and forensics for the country of New Zealand. Like many other CDAOs, her role is relatively new. But the unique values she applies to data can be traced back many hundreds of years to the indigenous Maori people of her country. Through her work, Jan recognizes the profound impact data can have on people and their environments for generations to come. Learn more about the important climate and health policy challenges that ESR is working to solve with data in this episode, plus her take on data literacy vs. business savviness, and why her data strategy is just two pages long. Tune in to learn:How do you make vastly different data work together at ESR? (07:12)Data's role as a treasure (11:43)How do government and private companies look at data differently (13:50)How do you guard against the misuse of data? (18:39)Dangers of misinterpreting the models and need for data-savvy. (21:16)Jan's data North Star - recognizing the value of the data (25:10)Goal to create digital twins to help address climate change (30:13)Working around the difficulty of unstandardized ESG reporting (34:05)Maori values and data at ESR - the life force of data (40:35)Get even more insights from data and analytics leaders like Jan on The Data Chief. https://www.thoughtspot.com/data-chief Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at https://mission.org.

RNZ: Morning Report
Teachers' union leader wants streaming ditched

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 6:27


A teachers' union leader is advocating for high schools to ditch streaming, which arranges students into classes based on their perceived ability. It's been shown to be particularly harmful to Maori and Pacific children, and schools that have abandoned the practice have seen improvements. The PPTA's vice president Chris Abercrombie says his pitch to stop streaming has garnered a positive response from members at the organisation's annual conference. He's optimistic they'll vote to support the stance later this week. Abercrombie spoke to Susie Ferguson.

The RegenNarration
139. Douglas Rushkoff on surviving the tech billionaires & embodying the over-culture

The RegenNarration

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 77:09


Douglas Rushkoff is the Professor of Media Theory and Digital Economics who MIT named one of the “world's ten most influential intellectuals.” He also hosts the podcast I listen to most, called Team Human. And he's the best-selling author of 20 books, including the new one, Survival of the Richest: Escape Fantasies of the Tech Billionaires. The publisher's blurb reads: ‘We always knew but now we *know*. The tech elite mean to leave us all behind. In Survival of the Richest, Rushkoff traces the origins of The Mindset in science and technology through its current expression in missions to Mars, island bunkers, and the Metaverse.' A big early influence on me, Frances Moore Lappé, said: “Beyond eye-opening, this book is eye-popping. A master story-teller, Rushkoff brings to life perhaps the greatest challenge of our time, The Mindset that drives so much destructive behaviour, and blinds us to solutions beyond new technology and consumption. A must read.” This is a profound and fun journey, firstly into the Mindset, then back out again. For Douglas' book is no dead end, but an opening. Where the billionaire preppers and trans-humanists are ultimately dead ending, the current of life is flowing in a different direction. 0.00 Introduction 3.30 The Mindset! 19.30 Origins of The Mindset 33.00 Getting caught up in The Mindset while trying to ‘fix it' (while exploring family stories and the wonders of epigenetics) 42.30 Douglas' encounter with the Maori and our respective exchanges with Tyson Yunkaporta 53.30 ‘Human' economies and platforms 61.00 If we're the over-culture now … 66.00 A transformative tale in Douglas' life before choosing to start a family 73.00 Music ... This conversation was recorded online, with Douglas at home in New York City on 27 September 2022 (Australian time). Title slide image: Douglas Rushkoff. Music: Regeneration, composed by Amelia Barden, from the soundtrack of the new film Regenerating Australia, available for community screenings now - https://theregenerators.co/regenerating-australia/ Find more: Stay tuned for a special ‘offcuts' extra to this episode, out next week. Read a transcript of our conversation on the episode web page, out shortly – https://www.regennarration.com/ Douglas' website, where you can also pick up the book Survival of the Richest (and others) - https://rushkoff.com/ The Team Human podcast - https://www.teamhuman.fm/ Hear my previous conversation with Douglas on episode 41: ‘Playing for Team Human' - https://www.regennarration.com/episodes/041-playing-for-team-human Thanks very much to the generous supporters of this podcast, for making this episode possible. If you too value what you hear, please consider joining them to help keep the podcast going. Just head to the website at https://www.regennarration.com/support If you'd like to become a subscriber to the podcast, connect with other listeners and receive other benefits, head to the Patreon page at - https://www.patreon.com/RegenNarration Maybe even wave the flag by picking up something from The RegenNarration shop - https://www.regennarration.com/shop You can also support the podcast by sharing an episode with a friend or colleague, or rating or reviewing the podcast. Thanks for your support!

Heritage Matters
Heritage Matters - 03-10-2022 - Otago Radio Association, Taieri Plains Maori and Goldfields Graveyard Research

Heritage Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 27:29


Otago Radio Association, Taieri Plains Maori and Goldfields Graveyard Research - In this programme Gregor looks at the first radio Pioneer in Dunedin, Judy takes us out to the Taieri Plains and reports on pre-european Maori there, and finally Bill interviews two reseachers from the Medical school about the lives of women on the Central Otago Goldfields.

RNZ: First Up Podcast
First Up - The Podcast, Monday 3 October

RNZ: First Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 48:42


On today's First Up pod - Nick Truebridge in for Nathan this week: we have the latest on the stadium stampede in Indonesia and thousands are without power after Hurricane Ian; this week is your last opportunity to vote for your mayor, councillors and local board members - why is turnout so low and the remains of more than 60 Maori and Moriori, many of them stolen by a notorious Austrian grave robber, have finally returned to their descendants in Aotearoa. First Up - Voice of the Nathan!

BACK OF THE 135
ep.149 JACQUI HAREMA

BACK OF THE 135

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 120:33


Jacqui Harema is the Director of Whānau Ora at Te Whānau o Waipareira in West Auckland.  She is of Maori and Samoan descent and is currently campaigning as a candidate for the Henderson-Massey Local Board and the Portage Licensing Trust.  Voting ends a week's time after this episode was recorded. For more info on Jacqui Harema click here: https://jacquiharema.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/backofthe135/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/backofthe135/support

Under the Radar Podcast
Marlon Williams

Under the Radar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 63:04


As a child, New Zealand singer-songwriter Marlon Williams believed that if he could nail the songs at iwi or tribe gatherings then surely everything in the world would be ok. Nevermind that elders were discussing big issues such as Maori land rights, water rights and education, Marlon had an inate believe in the virtues of song and his vocal prowess as a singer. Indeed his voice is something to behold — a melismatic, velvety croon that can register as Roy Orbison or Elvis. And before the release of his latest album My Boy, it could be said that it's a voice more comfortable in a different era or genre or part of the world, but after this third record — it's clearly a voice that transcends all of it. Marlon can raid the chest of drawers on any musical era and come up with a piece of art that is contemporary because it speaks to current afflictions in a knowing way, uniquely framed by his indegenuity and wry, humor.Many thanks for making this possible — Marlon for a great psych session, both times! To Dead Oceans for use of all Master Recordings. Native Tongue for Publishing rights. And Jessica Linker at Pitch Perfect PR for all the added support. Thank you to Lily Sloane for additional music and Martin Austwick for additional sound engineering.Songs Featured: "River Rival," "Hello Miss Lonesome," "Dark Child," "Strange Things," "Make Way For Love," "Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore," "My Boy," "My Heart Is A Wormhole," "Princes Walk," "Thinking Of Nina," "Don't Go Back" and "Easy Does It."To share your thoughts on this episode, email: celine.teoblockey@undertheradarmag.com Or leave a voice message here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi
Te Waonui a TMK for Sunday 22 October 2022

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 19:18


This week our Maori news team looks into why there's still no reliable way to record targeted hate crimes despite a funded team and hundreds of audits, and why the Children's Minister was forced to apologise. Plus plenty more.

Tova
Producer Jeremy's song about... Kelvin Davis' "be more Maori" attacks

Tova

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 2:30


Kelvin Davis has had a heck of a week. He told ACT MP Karen Chourr to cross "into the Māori world" and that it was no good looking through a "vanilla lens"... which was interesting as she is Māori! He then doubled down, saying that he knew she was a Māori, but that she was brought up like a Pākehā.  He refused to apologise for his comments, but then he apologised. Producer Jeremy thought this deserved a musical tribute.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tova
Kelvin Davis drama - "The Prime Minister has a job to do. Actually take a stand"

Tova

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 2:16


The Prime Minister needs to step up, take a stand, and have a good hard look at the culture in her party.  Kelvin Davis's comments about ACT's Karen Chhour - basically accusing her of not being Maori enough, not living up to some expectation he has of the kind of Maori woman she should be are offensive in the least and at most, racist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Film Roundtable
Shawn Peters + Bradford Young, moderated by Maori Karmael Holmes - Film Roundtable #60

Film Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 69:25 Very Popular


Film Roundtable is welcoming back this week two of our dear friends and two of our most favorite guests to have on the show; Filmmaker + Cinematographer Shawn Peters and Visual Artist + Cinematographer Bradford Young.  This conversation is moderated by the inimitable Maori Karmael Holmes, Founder of BlackStar Projects.  In this episode these close friends talk about life and where they find their joy and inspiration. They discuss how to uplift and support the next generation of image makers. Those coming in their wake and whom are carving out their own paths of storytelling that look very different from the antiquated ways. They spend time uplifting one another in this conversation which is a beautiful example of their friendship, collaboration and the deep teachings they each receive from one another and their respective gifts. It is an exchange that leaves you understanding the importance of supporting one another in community in a creative sense and also how great it is to have just really good people in your life. Enjoy!!

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Heather du Plessis-Allan: Kelvin Davis's apology is a good start, but Labour needs to knock this off

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 2:59


It's good to see Kelvin Davis has apologised.   He called ACT's MP Karen Chhour to apologise for essentially saying she wasn't Māori enough . She's accepted the apology.  Yesterday in the house, he said she was “looking at the world from a vanilla lens” And when he was challenged on it later, he didn't realise. He doubled down and said “She does whakapapa to Māori, but she was raised in a Pākehā world. “  An apology is a good start. But I reckon Jacinda Ardern might need to have a chat to her Māori caucus about knocking this stuff off.  Because this is not the first time that a senior Māori minister in the Labour Party has said something like this. The last one was Willie Jackson back in May who basically did the same thing to David Seymour - who whakapapas to ngapuhi - calling him a “useless Māori.” Back in 2010 he said Maori on TV - like Mike Mcroberts specifically - were just Māori faces.  The reason the PM might need to knock this on its head is because there's a risk this happens again.  It's not a mistake from these MPs.  I think it's an insight into what they really believe. There is a way of thinking among some adherents to identity politics predominantly, if not exclusively, people on the left that you are not really Māori or black or a woman or queer. If you don't furiously agree with the groupthink that you're supposed to if you're Māori or black or a woman or queer.  Take a look at what's just happened in the UK this week, and again, it's a Labour MP doing this. Rupa Huq has called Kwasi Kwarteng - the UK's first ever black chancellor - "superficially black" because "If you hear him on the Today programme, you wouldn't know he's black."  She's had to apologise and been suspended from the Labour party.  Remember Peter Thiel, the tech entrepreneur who is gay? He was told by an academic he was “not a gay man” because he backed Donald Trump.  This stuff is sad because it judges people for their identity, not their policies and delivery and actions and character. It is the exact opposite of what we've all been raised to do:  Judge people for what they do, not how they look. I expect this stuff from the Māori party because they're making a point of being radical and slightly out of line. But I don't expect it from our governing party. The Labour party of Savage and Lange and Helen Clark  Here's sincerely hoping they've learned their lesson and don't do it again.  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Barry Soper: Political editor on Kelvin Davis apology to Karen Chhour

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 5:35


Kelvin Davis has issued an apology to ACT MP Karen Chhour following his controversial comment about her seeing the world through "vanilla eyes" despite Karen Chhour being Maori. Our political editor, Barry Soper, is with us to explain why Labour definitely motivated him to make the apology for their sake. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

#BHN Big Hairy News
#BHN Kelvin Davis in hot water | Maori Party website deemed 'racist' | Women's Sport | The three strikes law

#BHN Big Hairy News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 72:23


Just Pat and Nala tonight so a lot on the agenda to get us through along with opening up Discord if you want to come in for a chat https://discord.gg/duFfVwQT Kelvin Davis in hot water with his "you're not Maori enough" comment to Maori Act MP Karen Chhour The case of the 'Three Strikes Kisser' Daniel Fitzgerald has brought into focus the danger of the extreme punitive law, especially on the vulnerable and mentally ill. We'll look at this tonight. Race Relations Commissioner Meng Foon has said that statements on the Maori Party website claiming that Maori were "genetically superior" have been deemed 'racist' by him. Excite is building in some corners for the Women RWC but with only 3,000 spectators at a recent game we wonder what is the state of Women's Sport and where should it be And maybe a quick look at the low voter turn out for local body elections and how that helps the right when it comes to elections

ScreenFish Radio
Episode 79: 1on1 with Tearepa Kahi, Cliff Curtis and Jay Ryan (MURU)

ScreenFish Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 22:45


Written and directed by Tearepa Kahi, MURU tells the story of ‘Taffy' Tawharau, a Maori police sergeant who spends his time in relative quiet. Unbeknownst to Taffy, trouble is brewing as the government has their area under surveillance for potential terrorist threats. Led by Gallagher, the current focus of their investigation is Tame Iti, a Maori rights activist who yearns to help his people reclaim their identity. In this 1on1, we speak to Kahi, and stars Cliff Curtis and Jay Ryan about the tension between protecting and service and whether Gallagher is a villain.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Karen Chhour: Act MP on Kelvin Davis' 'Māori world' comments

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 3:28


An Act MP has taken offence at comments made in the House by a senior Labour Minister, referring to her race. Minister for Māori Crown Relations Kelvin Davis took a swipe a Karen Chhour, during an exchange about Oranga Tamariki contracts. He accused her of not understanding the Māori world-view, and told her it was no good looking at the world through a vanilla lens. Chhour is Māori, and took exception to the Minister's comments. She says Davis attacking her like that is taking away her mana and is quite distressing. She says it's made worse by the fact the Labour Party says it wants to give Māori back their mana. Act MP Karen Chhour joined Mike Hosking. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

An American Conversation Podcast
Michelle Uriarau Episode 101

An American Conversation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 78:31


Michelle Uriarau is co-founder of Māori women's group Mana Wāhine Kōrero (pronounced ‘Muh-nuh Waah-hee-neh Coor-reh-raw), the only Indigenous group, formed by Indigenous women from New Zealand, to advocate for the safe-guarding of women, children and cultural integrity against gender identity indoctrination. Ngā mihi (thank you) Don't forget to Like Share & Subscribe to Support Women's Voices Unite on An American Conversation Podcast. Please donate to An American Conversation Podcast to support women's voices in the United States & around the world!  Thank you so much in Advance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jna4bCCn1k https://www.AnAmericanConversationPodcast.com/Donations

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Film & TV: Bad News, Wakefield, WHANAU 2021

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 9:22


Film and TV correspondent Tamar Munch joins Kathryn to talk about the latest season of Alice Snedden's Bad News (streaming on The Spinoff), Australian psych hospital drama Wakefield streaming on Neon and WHANAU 2021, the fourth instalment of a longitudinal documentary series funded by NZ On Air and streaming on MAORI+.

RNZ: Morning Report
Police can't say how many hate crimes targeted specific groups

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 3:36


Police still have no reliable way of recording who is being targeted by hate crimes despite funding a dedicated team and hundreds of audits in the last year. Inquiries by RNZ have found police are unable to say how many hate crimes targeted specific groups such as Maori or the rainbow community, nor what the specific hate crime was. The Race Relations Commissioner wants progress sped up saying other countries can collect this data. Ashleigh McCaull reports.

Private Passions
Gwen Adshead

Private Passions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 39:01


The Broadmoor psychiatrist and psychotherapist Dr Gwen Adshead shares her passion for choral music with Michael Berkeley. When people ask Gwen Adshead what she does for a living she sometimes tells them she is a florist, because she is unable to face another conversation about why she has devoted her life to working with ‘monsters'. Gwen has spent thirty years as a psychiatrist and as a pioneering forensic psychotherapist working at Broadmoor Hospital in Berkshire with some of society's most violent, and vilified, offenders. The author of more than 100 academic books and papers, Gwen recently co-wrote a best-selling book, with her friend Eileen Horne, for a more general audience: The Devil You Know takes the reader into the therapy room at Broadmoor to try to understand people often labelled as ‘monstrous', including serial killers, stalkers and child sex offenders. Gwen tells Michael about her work at Broadmoor, encouraging offenders to understand what drove them to violence, to face up to what they have done, and to try to find a future free of violence. She finds parallels in her work with music: the leader of a group therapy session has much in common with a conductor; and as a psychotherapist Gwen has to listen to her patients with the same concentration as when she is listening to fellow choir members. Gwen's passion for choral music runs through the programme with pieces by Tallis, Gibbons, Lauridsen and Verdi, and a Maori song that conjures up her early childhood in New Zealand. Producer: Jane Greenwood A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 3

RNZ: Standing Room Only
A natural combo - te reo and jazz

RNZ: Standing Room Only

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 7:52


Te Whare Wananga o Waitaha University of Canterbury Librarian Lisa Davies (Kai Tahu) is determined to make te reo more accessible. She's also a jazz musician, so she's brought both together. She's part of Nga Reo Tioriori, a collective of Maori jazz musicians who'll be performing a gala concert at the Christchurch Big Band Festival next month.

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi
Te Waonui a TMK for Sunday 25 September 2022

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 22:31


This week our Maori news team are there as Maniapoto reaches settlement with the crown, Maori fisheries take stock 30 years after one of the first major settlements, recognising mana whenua at Kura Tawhiti and plenty more.

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Oral Questions for Thursday 22 September 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:14


Questions to Ministers Dr EMILY HENDERSON to the Minister of Police: What recent successes have Police had in relation to combatting organised crime in our communities? RICARDO MENÉNDEZ MARCH to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she stand by her reported statement from November last year that she would scrap the warrant-to-arrest sanction today if she could; if so, what is the barrier to removing the warrant-to-arrest sanction? Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: How many people are there in total on the waiting list for first specialist assessment and the surgical waiting list? ARENA WILLIAMS to the Minister for Maori Development: What announcements has he made about supporting the future of the Maori media sector? Hon PAUL GOLDSMITH to the Minister of Justice: Is she confident the justice system is effectively responding to the recent surge in destructive retail crime and increased levels of violent crime? LEMAUGA LYDIA SOSENE to the Minister of Immigration: What recent reports has he seen about the Government's work to enable pathways to residence for migrant communities? ERICA STANFORD to the Minister of Education: Does he stand by all of his statements and actions? RACHEL BROOKING to the Minister of Justice: What further changes is the Government proposing to ensure greater transparency for political donations? RAWIRI WAITITI to the Minister of Corrections: Does he have confidence in the Department of Corrections, following a report that a policy of no face-to-face visits has now been in place for around a year and is currently impacting around 5,000 inmates? TANGI UTIKERE to the Minister for COVID-19 Response: What recent announcements has the Government made regarding the COVID-19 response? MARK CAMERON to the Minister for the Environment: Did he act upon the statement he made on 1 September 2022 and ask "officials to look into the expected number" of farms requiring resource consents for intensive winter grazing compliance; if so, is he aware that, of the estimated 3,500 farms in Southland that intensive winter grazed in 2021, Environment Southland has granted consents to just three? SIMON WATTS to the Minister of Local Government: What is the total amount that has been spent to date on the Government's Three Waters reform programme, including development and communications, and does she believe this represents good value for taxpayer money?

Many Lumens with Maori Karmael Holmes

Bonus Episode! Maori chats with the renowned filmmaker, activist, and this year's Blackstar Film Festival Luminary Award Recipient, Mira Nair (Salaam Bombay!, Monsoon Wedding, The Namesake). Mira talks about her childhood, how she made her way from India to the United States to attend Harvard, and her early artistic influences including theater, photography, and cinema vérité. The two explore the relationship between film and social change, the making of her 1991 film Mississippi Masala, her experiences directing while parenting, and more. 

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Scriptwriter turned best-selling thriller writer

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:53


Kathryn speaks with screen writer and director Michael Bennett. He was the 2020 recipient of the Te Aupounamu Maori Screen Excellence Award, given in recognition of significant contributions to the Maori screen industry. Michael Bennett is widely acclaimed for his work documenting the case of the wrongly convicted Teina Pora, including his documentary The Confessions of Prisoner T and a subsequent non-fiction novel and feature film, both called In Dark Places. With a stellar career in film making and script writing, Michael had never attempted writing fiction - until now. Better the Blood is a post-colonial crime thriller and it's already captured the attention of publishers around the world, with 11 translations in the works, and plans for a TV series are underway.

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Questions for Oral Answer 20 September 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 53:40


Dr DUNCAN WEBB to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he seen on the New Zealand economy? CHRISTOPHER LUXON to the Acting Prime Minister: Does he stand by all of his Government's statements and actions? MARJA LUBECK to the Minister of Education: What progress has the Government made in supporting employers to maintain and increase the number of New Zealanders in apprenticeships? TEANAU TUIONO to the Acting Minister of Agriculture: Is the Dairy Industry Restructuring (Fonterra Capital Restructuring) Amendment Bill consistent with her Government's commitment to addressing the global climate crisis; if so, how? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that "we will enter a period of more targeted spending", and does he consider that Government spending in the past six months should have been more targeted? ANGIE WARREN-CLARK to the Minister for the Environment: What actions is the Government taking to enhance protection for New Zealand's most productive land? CHRIS BISHOP to the Acting Minister of Housing: Does he stand by the Minister of Housing's statement from May last year that "We have heard, we've listened, and we've acted to make sure that we are putting in a different system for Rotorua", and is he satisfied with emergency housing provision in Rotorua? CHRIS BAILLIE to the Minister of Education: Does he agree with the New Zealand Initiative that "The Ministry conducted no research on the effects of these 'Modern Learning Environments' on students' learning prior to compelling schools to adopt them. Neither did they conduct any evaluation of their effects after they were established"; if not, what evidence has the ministry provided the Minister to show that modern learning environments improve literacy and numeracy skills? Hon MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Police: Did he receive any recommendation from the Police regarding the asset value threshold in the proposed Criminal Proceeds (Recovery) Amendment Bill; if so, what was that recommendation? TAMATI COFFEY to the Minister for Maori Development: What recent events has he attended to celebrate te reo Maori? JAN LOGIE to the Minister for Women: Is she concerned that the gender pay gap increased recently to 9.2 percent and that Statistics New Zealand did not report on the ethnic minority gender pay gap altogether? ANGELA ROBERTS to the Associate Minister of Education (School Operations): How is the Government supporting students who have experienced lost learning opportunities as a result of disruptions from COVID-19?

RNZ: Nine To Noon
One Hundred Havens: A history of the Marlborough Sounds

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 21:55


Author Helen Beaglehole first visited the Marlborough Sounds in a small yacht after a very stormy Cook Strait crossing. She returned numerous times over the next 40 years, exploring and sailing the Sounds' intricate network of coves and dense bush. When she learned little had been written about the history of the Sounds, she set out to change that, and the result is One Hundred Havens: The Settlement of the Marlborough Sounds. As she notes, it's the story of two people and two fates: Maori, who had their land "bought" by the Crown and were placed onto ever-shrinking reserves and the various waves of Pakeha settlers through the area. She joins Kathryn to talk about what surprised her in her research into history of the Marlborough Sounds.

95bFM
Electoral Engagement w/ Shane Reti: September 20, 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


Voting for this year's local body elections has begun, which is bringing increasing scrutiny to the issue of voter engagement. Particularly for young people, Maori and Pasifika, but also for the general population, voter participation in local elections is relatively low and on the decline. In regards to next year's national election, the Independant Electoral Review Panel has begun seeking public input on potential changes to the electoral system that could benefit New Zealand's democracy. For Casper's weekly catch-up with National MP Dr Shane Reti, they discussed this topic of voter engagement as well as what might be expected from this electoral review and which changes he might believe to be useful.  

RNZ: Morning Report
Maori King pays respects to Queen

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:12


Throughout her reign, Queen Elizabeth had many meetings with Maori leaders, visiting marae and communities across the country. Among New Zealand's representatives at her funeral was the Maori King, Kiingi Tuheitia. Kiingitanga chief of staff Ngira Simmonds, speaking spoke to Guyon Espiner on behalf of the Maori King.

RNZ: Standing Room Only
Mitchell Manuel combines tartan and koru

RNZ: Standing Room Only

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 13:50


2022 is the Year of the Tartan. It's also the 50th anniversary of the delivery of Te Petihana Reo Maori to Parliament demanding recognition of te reo. Artist Mitchell Manuel is about to open an exhibition of work in Scotland called Woven Identities, where he brings together tartan and koru, celebrating his own Scottish-Maori mixed ancestry. More broadly, he's also exploring the whakapapa, the genealogical and cultural connections between Maori and Scottish people. Lynn Freeman first asked Mitch why the Scots are so heavily represented in New Zealand? Mitch Manuel's exhibition Woven Identies opens on Wednesday at the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum in Scotland

RNZ: Standing Room Only
Enter The Sandman - sand artist Marcus Winter

RNZ: Standing Room Only

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 10:32


If you've ever seen a Tibetan Buddhist sand mandala you'll appreciate the potential for this under-appreciated art material - at least away from the beach. Marcus Winter aka The Sandman is as much magician as he is artist in the way he uses grains of sand to create images. Marcus is collaborating with two other Maori creatives on an immersive show for the 2022 Koanga Festival at Auckland's Basement Theatre. And he tells Lynn Freeman the aim is to build our connection to the tohu of the natural world through storytelling, taonga puoro and sand. Marcus Winter aka The Sandman is appearing in Nga Tohu o Te Taiao, It opens at the Basement Theatre on Tuesday as part of the Koanga Festival.

RNZ: Standing Room Only
Why the low number of tagata moana writers getting published?

RNZ: Standing Room Only

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 13:31


This is a shocking statistic in 2022. Just 3% of annual publishing in New Zealand features Maori and tagata moana writers. Facing these woeful figures, it's clear a strategy is needed to support and encourage the moana creative sectors who are trying - but clearly failing - to get their voices heard. Where are 2022's Whiti Ihimaera, Selina Tusitala Marsh, Alan Duff and Tusiata Avia? Kim Meredith is the Manager for the Coalition for Books. She's working on a national strategy along with Reading Warrior publisher David Riley and published poet, playwright and short story writer Courtney Sina Meredith. Lynn Freeman talks to Kim Meredith and Courtney Sina Meredith about the shout out they're doing to creative moana communities for feedback and ideas.

Die fünfte Schweiz
Tanja Zurbrügg – Glücklich in Neuseeland

Die fünfte Schweiz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 18:36


Schon als kleines Mädchen wusste Tanja Zurbrügg, dass auf sie die grosse Welt wartet. Gefunden hat sie ihre Heimat auf Neuseeland. Seit zwanzig Jahren lebt sie mit ihrer Familie ausserhalb von Auckland. Ihr Partner ist ein waschechter Maori. Tanja Zurbrügg ist im Kiental aufgewachsen. Ein zweihundert Seelendorf im Berner Oberland. Schon früh wusste die heute 46-Jährige, dass sie die Welt entdecken möchte. Für eine Schweizer Firma in Spiez arbeitete sie einige Jahre in Afrika. In der Modebranche designte sie Stoffe für die Pariser Fashion Szene. Sie lebte einige Jahre in London, doch irgendwie war sie noch nicht angekommen: «Ich durchstöberte sämtliche Bibliotheken von London, bis ich einen Reiseführer über Neuseeland entdeckte!» Heute lebt Tanja Zurbrügg mit ihrer Familie in einem grossen Haus mitten im Grünen von Auckland. Sie ist Mitinhaberin einer grossen Agentur, die tonnenschwere Tanks nach Übersee verschifft. Das grösste Schweizer Festival Einmal im Jahr findet das grösste Schweizer Festival in Auckland statt. Tanja Zurbrügg hat das Festival zehn Jahre lang organisiert und dafür gesorgt, dass allerlei Schweizer Köstlichkeiten auf der Insel landen: «Von Rivella, Ragusa über Raclette-Käse ist alles zu haben. Ein Highlight für die «Kiwis», wie man hier liebevoll den Neuseeländern sagt.»

RNZ: Morning Report
Lottery grants system under review

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 3:25


Billions of dollars from Lotto's gambling profits have been handed out using an incoherent funding model, that sees Maori, Pasifika and other minority groups miss out. The Department of Internal Affairs has done its first review of the lottery grants system. The Minister of Internal Affairs Jan Tinetti is now considering cutting the link between gambling and charity. Guyon Espiner reports.

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Zoe George and Alan McElroy (Part Two)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 23:04


Today on The Panel, Wallace and panellists Zoe George and Alan McElroy discuss this weekend's Government announcement to protect horticultural land from housing. Plus they discuss a petition to improve NZ's close captioning laws for broadcasters and the health benefits of te reo Maori.

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi
Te Waonui a TMK for Sunday 18 September 2022

RNZ: Te Manu Korihi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:48


This week our Maori news team capture all the celebrations around 50 years of the Maori language petition.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
More Maori and Pacific teachers needed 2022 Kupe Awards

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 3:03


More Maori and Pacific teachers needed to improve education outcomes.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Tech partnership aims to translate news into te reo Maori at scale

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 25:10


A new partnership between a local translation software company and Microsoft aims to bring vastly more daily news in te reo Maori in print and online. Straker Translations is based in Tamaki Makaurau, listed on the Australian stock exchange, and has a growing list of global customers, including a recent contract signed with the United Nations. The business uses AI, machine-learning and human translators to provide translations in a multitude of languages. Founder and CEO Grant Straker (Ngati Raukawa) says the partnership with Microsoft will enable news media to translate whole articles into te reo Maori at scale. He speaks with Kathryn Ryan, along with Microsoft New Zealand Managing Director Vanessa Sorenson.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Sir Peter Gluckman: Koi Tu Director calls for national screening programme to detect stressed expectant mothers

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 4:33


New evidence from think tank Koi Tu has found at least 15 percent of Kiwi women are affected by mental distress during the perinatal period. That number rises to 33 percent for Maori, Asian, and Pacific women. Koi Tu Director Sir Peter Gluckman told Mike Hosking the research shows the consequences of a stressed mother for both them and their babies are serious. He says unless we identify stress early in mothers, we will see more children fail at school, and more women commit suicide. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

You're Gonna Die Out There
An Ultramarathon Support Emu

You're Gonna Die Out There

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


Hey hey Nature Nerds! This week we're still long-distancing while Jen is on the mainland. But no worries, Jen shares some science news about the largest bat colony in the world and then Megan talks about Kununurra and the tragic, yet inspiring story of Turia Pitt. Organization to Support: Miriwong Language Nest http://mirima.org.au/ The Miriwoong Language Nest began as a pilot program in 2013, before being rolled out formally in 2014. The program creates an immersive environment and uses immersion techniques to enable young children to learn Miriwoong and exposes them to new language experiences. It is based on a model developed by the Maori in New Zealand and the Language Nest at MDWg is one of the first to operate for Indigenous languages in Australia.

95bFM
Wednesday Morning Glory with Tuva'a

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


It's Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori, and I use this as an excuse to talk about the interconnections of Polynesian culture, specifically between Maori and Samoan languages. My friend Balamohan Shingade also comes into the studio to talk about his work in Hindustani music as well as give us a live performance.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
National commemoration for anniversay of Maori language

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:26


On a cold September 14th 1972, Hana Te Hemara and a group of elders and language champions marched on parliament, presenting the petition signed by 33 thousand Maori and Pakeha, and calling for the introduction of Maori language and culture in schools nationwide. By that time, te reo Maori was in grave danger of dying out, but the actions of the petitioners sparked change - kohanga reo, kura kaupapa, wananga followed, and Te Reo Maori became an official language. Kathryn speaks with Midday Report Presenter, Mani Dunlop at parliament, and Hana Te Hemara's great niece, Hana-Rawhiti Maipi-Clarke, who is speaking at the commemoration.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
"Our elders would get slapped with a ruler for speaking Te Reo"

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:20


Today marks 50 years since the Maori language petition was presented at Parliament, igniting the Maori language movement. On a cold September 14th 1972, Hana Te Hemara and a group of elders and language champions marched on parliament presenting the petition signed by 33 thousand Maori and Pakeha, and calling for the introduction of Maori language and culture in schools nationwide. By that time, te reo Maori was in grave danger of dying out, but the actions of the petitioners sparked change - kohanga reo, kura kaupapa, wananga followed, and Te Reo Maori became an official language. A commemorative event is on at parliament this morning to mark the anniversary, where one of the speakers is Hana te Hemara's great niece, Hana-Rawhiti Maipi-Clarke.

Jono & Ben - The Podcast
BONUS: Mike McRoberts On His Te Reo Maori Journey

Jono & Ben - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 5:41


New Zealand's anchorman Mike McRoberts is in studio to chat about his brand new documentary out tonight! Mike chats about his Te Reo journey and how significant the Maori language and culture is to him.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat
#189 James Laughlin - High Performance Leadership Expert and Former 7-time World Champion

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 37:59


Today we spoke with James Laughlin - High Performance Leadership Expert and Former 7-time World Champion Music took James on an extraordinary journey around the world, winning and travelling along the way. He ended up in Christchurch, New Zealand, where he settled and created his High Performance Leadership Programme - lead yourself, lead others, lead always, with guests such as Kieran Read and Steve Hansen, former captain and head coach of the All Blacks. James works with elite players as a mental skills coach with Canterbury Rugby, and with executives in relation to purpose, habits, and overall leadership development. We unpacked overcoming major tough moments such as the Christchurch earthquake, a miscarriage and splitting up with a partner. We learned about what young Finn, James' son teaches him everyday, and why boundaries are essential for parenting. There was a fascinating dialogue around identifying and contacting mentors, why music was James' calling at a young age, and when James found his purpose. Legacy of Dad...what a line! ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Highlights

RNZ: Morning Report
Mural unveiled to celebrate Maori language petition anniversary

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 3:37


A five-storey mural of te reo advocate Hana Te Hemara will be unveiled in Ngamotu / New Plymouth this week. It's part of celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of the Maori language petition to parliament in 1972. Te Hemara was a founding member of the Maori rights group Nga Tamatoa which helped collect 30 thousand signatures calling for te reo Maori to be taught in schools. Taranaki Whanganui reporter Robin Martin has more.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Monty Soutar on his first foray into fiction

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 25:16


Acclaimed Maori historian Monty Soutar has turned his hand to fiction for the first time, drawing on almost 40 years of research into the history of Aotearoa and his own ancestral line. Kawai: For Such a Time as This, is the first in an ambitious series looking at how colonisation has shaped Aotearoa New Zealand. In the novel, a 19 year old Maori student asks his elderly grand-uncle about his tipuna, the respected warrior Kaitanga. That's in 1980. Then we're taken back to 1734, to Te Maniaroa, to the aftermath of a battle.

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Highlights - Kent Redford - Co-author, ”Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 13:20


"So there are lots of different indigenous peoples who have their own world views and experiences. One of the most impressive people I know is Aroha Mead. She's a Maori, and she's a lawyer, and she has been active in this conservation organization IUCN for decades. New Zealand as a nation and the Maori as a people have engaged in very careful and systematic discussions amongst themselves about what they think about synthetic biology, and its potential use on the islands of New Zealand and in some of the areas that are sacred to them. People can read. They have written and published on some of this work. And again, the first thing to say is there is no such thing as a Maori position. There are some people who felt very strongly that this was a terrible idea, and there were other people who felt it was an essential thing to do because New Zealand has a tremendous problem with invasive species."Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology.https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Kent Redford - Co-author of "Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 56:24


Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology."So there are lots of different indigenous peoples who have their own world views and experiences. One of the most impressive people I know is Aroha Mead. She's a Maori, and she's a lawyer, and she has been active in this conservation organization IUCN for decades. New Zealand as a nation and the Maori as a people have engaged in very careful and systematic discussions amongst themselves about what they think about synthetic biology, and its potential use on the islands of New Zealand and in some of the areas that are sacred to them. People can read. They have written and published on some of this work. And again, the first thing to say is there is no such thing as a Maori position. There are some people who felt very strongly that this was a terrible idea, and there were other people who felt it was an essential thing to do because New Zealand has a tremendous problem with invasive species."https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Today's Top Tune
Marlon Williams: ‘My Boy'

Today's Top Tune

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 2:43


Hailing from New Zealand, singer Marlon Williams infuses his pop-inflected song  “My Boy” with Maori strums and a new backing band.  “The urge to turn every song on the planet into a Māori strummer descended on me like a fever sometime during the long and winding tour cycle of ‘Make Way for Love,'” Williams says. “So writing it into my artistic life became the only way to get the fever to lift.”