Podcasts about Fuck

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Profane English-language word

  • 7,205PODCASTS
  • 13,114EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
Fuck

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Fuck

Show all podcasts related to fuck

Latest podcast episodes about Fuck

Be The Serpent
Episode 100: Superstravaganza

Be The Serpent

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 117:09


On this week's episode, we have a two-hour special to answer questions sent in by our darling listeners! Thank you to everyone who has been with us through the last four years! The Great Hiatus begins now, but we will return for at least one more episode next year! Get hype!   What We're Into Lately My Name  Beyond Evil Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers All the Feels by Olivia Dade Frankenstein by Mary Shelley And This, Your Living Kiss by opal_bullets The Courtier's Love Affair (and Other Stories) by tridenture Harlots Bridgerton  The Living and the Dead  Macey's NaNoWriMo Project: The Resurrection Chalice In the Realms of Gold by Victoria Goddard Sword Dance trilogy by AJ Demas Plum Duff by Victoria Goddard Alex's NaNoWriMo Project: Some by Virtue Fall   Other Stuff We've Mentioned Spoiler Alert by Olivia Dade Supernatural Sleuth of the Ming Dynasty Merlin A Taste of Gold and Iron by Alexandra Rowland The Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold Unmasked by the Marquess by Cat Sebastian Silk and Steel Our Opinions Are Correct Tales from the Trunk Fated Mates Heaving Bosoms Smart Bitches, Trashy Books Fansplaining The Fantasy Inn Breaking the Glass Slipper Overinvested Campaign Skyjacks Tor.com The Rec Center Pinboard Dragon Age: Inquisition Fantasia in D Minor by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Allegro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart BtS episode 6 “Cross Your Stars and Hope to Bi” BtS Special Episode Strange Horizons Miss Congeniality BtS episode 80 “Extravaganza” My Hero Academia Yesterday Upon the Stair by PitViperOfDoom BtS episode 98 “[SPOOKY NOISES]” “Bakugou and Todoroki's Foolproof 5-Step Plan to Fuck with Mineta Minoru” by Anubis_2701 Naruto The Witcher (video game) The Witcher (TV) Person of Interest (2011) The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Ursula K. Le Guin The Ones Who Stay And Fight by N.K. Jemisin Singing my Sister Down by Margo Lanagan The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Yuri!!! in Space series by Fahye Choir of Lies by Alexandra Rowland A Sword On Two Fingers by Freya Marske (unpublished) Viable Paradise (writers' workshop) Sam Hawke (Australian author) Jenn Lyons (Author) E. Jade Lomax (Author) The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins Welcome to Night Vale podcast The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison The Hands of the Emperor by Victoria Goddard astolat Macey's Frozen Meat Salesman Segment Macey's misspent youth Sutton cottage (from A Marvellous Light by Freya Marske) Stars in the marsh (from A Choir of Lies by Alexandra Rowland)   Transcription The transcript of this episode is available here. We'd like to take this moment to give an extra-special thank you to our team of scribes, who are amazing and meticulous and dedicated and extremely hard-working. Scribes, thank you, thank you, thank you. You're all amazing.

The Yak
Welcome Back To F*CK FM | The Yak 11-29-21

The Yak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 81:27


All the FUCK with a side of FUCK and nothing but the FUCK

SuperFeast Podcast
#144 Sexual Activation and Feminine Embodiment with Eva Williams

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 76:53


Eva Williams is the founder of Golden Lotus; A divine online portal of meditations, movement practices, and sexual/spiritual energy education designed to cultivate spiritual awakening, sexual activation, and embodied sovereignty. This episode explores rebirth and the unfolding of the sacred feminine through preparation and activation rituals, with a deep dive into birth and pregnancy. Tahnee and Eva journey into the numinous layers of Eva's healing work, her Golden Lotus portal, her focus on cultivating and purifying the body through ancient techniques, sexual embodiment, self-pleasure practices, and the many dimensions of birth work. A healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques, Eva carries a depth of knowledge that women need now more than ever. Currently, the way most women in society birth is within the structure of an over-medicalised patriarchal system. Sacred feminine lineages of natural birthing wisdom have been at large, replaced with time constraints, interventions, inductions, and regulations; The antithesis of a naturally unfolding feminine space. How did we end up here? With so much of her work focused on this space and where sexual embodiment falls into birth, Eva discusses the importance of birth preparation; From detoxing, orgasms, and opening the pelvis to the deep work of trusting the body and baby to do what they instinctively know how to do. This conversation is a deep weaving of energetic, sexual, and birth culture healing; For all women, past, present, and future.   "Many people come into tantra with a concept of a partner base in mind. But the way I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women; I never thought I would be working with birth. That was not my aim; My aim was to heal people. I worked on everyone. Ultimately, I wanted to find God. I wanted a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And over time, that guided me in that direction.  But there was a level of care and sobriety cultivated within me before I was put on that path. And this level of deep devotion and sobriety to my self-development was paramount".   - Eva Williams     Tahnee and Eva discuss: Doula work. Ultrasounds. Inducing labour. Foetal monitoring. Dolphin midwives. Birth preparation. Empowered birth. Tantric practices. Devine Female Orgasm. Self-pleasure practices. Feminine embodiment. Female sexuality and birth. The pelvis is a fluid body. Somatics and embodiment. Time constraints placed on pregnancy and birthing.   Who is Eva Louise Williams? Eva Louise Williams is a healer and teacher with over a decade of experience in bodywork, energy work, and feminine sexual cultivation techniques. She began her journey at 18 learning reiki and pranic healing, before becoming initiated into Kriya yoga (the lineage of Babaji) at 20, then went on to study Shiatsu, Japanese Acupuncture, and Taoist sexual cultivation techniques. She began teaching others at 26 and received the transmission for Golden Lotus at the age of 29. She currently has over 10,000 hours of experience as a bodyworker and teacher. Eva is also a doula, a birth educator, and an RYT 500 in tantric Hatha and kundalini lineages. Golden Lotus was founded to both serve and lead female seekers towards awakening and remembering Self-love & trust. It is a series of teachings that cultivate spiritual and sovereign embodiment; the focus lies in stabilising, purifying, and awakening through ancient techniques and spiritual secrets taught through a state of ritual and Holy full-body Prayer.     CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: goldenlotus.com Golden Lotus Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody, and welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. Today, I'm joined by Eva Williams. I'm really excited to have her here. I've been following her work online and she's really aligned with what we do at SuperFeast. She's an explorer of this wide world of Daoist medicine through the Japanese lineage, but also, she waves in, from what I can tell, you seem to bring in all these beautiful, different traditions, Sufism, Kriya yoga, different types of feminine embodiment, Pranic healing, that kind of stuff. So I'm really excited to have you here today. I'm really excited to share with our community your work.   Tahnee: (00:37) And if you guys are interested, we'll talk about it through the podcast, but Eva has a whole lot of resources on her website, courses you can do related to different aspects of a lot of the stuff we teach at SuperFeast. So thank you for joining us here today, Eva, it's such a pleasure to have you here.   Eva Williams: (00:53) My pleasure. Thank you so much.   Tahnee: (00:57) Yeah, I'm so excited. I think I first came across you on Instagram and I've had a look through what you offer. I know you haven't studied with Mantak, but it really seems aligned with a lot of the work that I learned through studying with him, the feminine work around energy cultivation. Obviously, you've studied Shiatsu and Japanese acupuncture. So you speak to the meridians and all those kinds of things. Would you mind telling us a bit about your journey here? How did you get to be offering Golden Lotus to the world?   Eva Williams: (01:30) Yeah, sure. All right. My journey's been quite interesting in terms of length because my mom is really into alternative medicine. I remember when I was six years old and I just had this incredibly bad tonsillitis, it was to the point where I was being taken out of school for days and days every week. And my mom noticed that I responded really, really well to the osteopath that she would take us to because she used to take us all three to the osteopath regularly. And so the osteopath said, "Look, this kid is responsive as hell. You should just take her to a cranial osteopath because that will help."   Eva Williams: (02:12) So I started going to this professional cranial osteopath when I was six, and it was the only thing that assisted, it was the only thing my body would really respond to. So really, from an early age, my mom knew that, particularly me, I think my brother and sister definitely as well, but particularly me, if anything would happen, like when I was 13 and I had anxiety, my mom was like, "Oh, we could put her on anti-anxiety or we could do reflexology with Bach flower remedies." And also, I had psoriasis, I had developed psoriasis when I was 13. And psoriasis, for those of you who don't know, is a skin issue, and it's one of these just really stubborn, autoimmune things.   Eva Williams: (02:55) Anything that's autoimmune is basically, no offence to all of the fantastic doctors and the medical community, but anything that's autoimmune is basically in the realm of, "We don't really know what the fuck is happening, so here's some steroids. That's where we're at." And so I started trying out these different things and some of them are called like bowel neurotherapies, which are where you'd have a salt bath and then UV light therapy or something like that. And there's not a lot of sun in the Netherlands where I was living at the time. So I started getting into this world where every time I'd be going to this clinic, I'd be checking out the cards on the notice board.   Eva Williams: (03:34) And there'd always be like random things like Karma healing or like emotional Chakra clearing. And one day I found this card and I was like, "This is so good." I walked around with this card for like a week or two, and then I called the person. And I remember, as soon as I called her, she was like, "Yeah, how can I help you?" I'm like, "Look, I don't really know what you do. Do you speak English? I don't really know what you do, but I feel really like this is something that I need to try." And she was like, "Hmm, no, you need Dini." I was like, "I'm sorry, have we even met? I'm trying to book an appointment with you."   Eva Williams: (04:04) And she was like, "No, you need Dini." I was like, "Oh, okay. I need Dini." And then this woman was this like 75-year-old woman who looked so young. And she was like, "How old do you think I am?" I'm like, "We've been through this before." She was just amazing. And she barely spoke any English. And I remember I was 15 when I first went to see her, and she did Meridian massage. She did Meridian clearing and healing. She was just a healer, so she would tell me a bunch of different things, and then she would do this work on me. She would tell me things that I look back on now, I'm like, "Dude, she was so on point."   Eva Williams: (04:44) But at the time, I was like, "What the fuck is she talking about?" She's like, "You're taking on a lot from your father." I'm like, "Okay."   Tahnee: (04:51) What does that mean?   Eva Williams: (04:51) Exactly. And now, I'm like, "I'm that person." But it was quite a unique experience. And I remember when she first read my astrology chart, she just looked at me. And it was very Dutch. The Dutch are very dry, they don't beat around the bush, they're very pragmatic and straightforward. And she was like, "Wow, that's not good." I was like, "Why are you doing this to me?" So she started saying to me really early on when I was 15, 16, I didn't like high school, so I left high school when I was 15 to teach myself. She started saying to me really regularly, "You have to promise me that you will do this work." She's like, "Do you think what I do is amazing?" I'm like, "I think it's pretty out there."   Eva Williams: (05:36) And she's like, "Okay, but what you are going to do is this, but much, much more." And she's like, "You have to promise me." And my mom taught me from when I was really young that a promise is a really strong word and you don't use it if you can't keep it. So I was like, "Far out, man, this is my life ahead of me and you want me to..., " But she sent me to some other people, liquid crystal healers and all sorts of things, so I was getting into some really bizarro stuff. And I wasn't telling my parents that much about this because it no longer had this homoeopathic application anymore. Now, it was just like, "Fuck it, I'm going to go on a journey and meet the [inaudible 00:06:07]. See you later."   Eva Williams: (06:08) I was getting into some really out-there stuff at like 16, 17, but it was, it was really amazing. So I followed that thread and I taught myself, I homeschooled myself. And I got into a really great university. And so I went to university, everyone told me people are more free thinking in university, etc, etc. And I thought, "Okay, great." But actually I didn't find that, I actually found that the institutionalised information had just become denser. I didn't find that people were more free thinking, I found that there were more presumptions. And especially for someone who didn't go through the IB or the international baccalaureate programme, it was really difficult for me.   Eva Williams: (06:51) I had some really awakening moments, just some really jarring stuff happened where I was like, "I don't think I really belong here." And my dad moved to India that year, and so my brother and sister and I all went to see him in India. My dad's a geologist, so all around the house, ever since we were little, we'd had tumbled rocks, amethyst, turquoise, this or that. So he was always teaching us about all these crystals. So when my brother and I got to India, we saw the tumbled rocks, these beautiful amethyst, and we both took one. We were like, "Let's go to the Himalayas."   Eva Williams: (07:28) He's like, "Yeah, let's learn yoga from a really old yogi." I was like, "Yeah, let's go do that." So and I was like, "Dad, I'm taking this rock with me." He's like, "If you take that, you're bringing it back. That's my rock." So I took this amethyst in my pocket and I went into the Himalayas. And I met a woman and she... I wanted to study Reiki, that was my thing. She just looked at me and she was like, "Hey, look, I'm going to give you these codes for all the different levels of Reiki, and then I need you to come back and I want you to teach my level two students." I'm like, "Lady, I just walked in here. I don't know what Reiki is yet."   Tahnee: (08:01) I've got to learn.   Eva Williams: (08:06) "I've got a nab at this, I had a dream on the bus. There's a lot going on right now. I don't think I'm ready to teach people something I haven't learned." But what she was picking up on was that I could touch people and feel what they were experiencing. So I came back the next day, and I was just putting my hands on people and I just explained what I could see or feel. And she's like, "You need to promise me ... " I was like, "You know what, I've heard all of this before, my friend. I have heard all of this before." So I went back to the Netherlands to university, and I was doing my 30 days. You have to do this self Reiki thing after you do Reiki.   Eva Williams: (08:45) And during that period of time, I was like, "I'm not meant to be an architect, I'm not meant to be doing what I'm doing. And so I need to go." And so I gave away everything I owned and I said to my dad, "I'm free again." And he's like, "Yeah, great. You left high school twice and now you're leaving an international honours university. This is a great run you're having over here. I hope you put my amethyst back."   Tahnee: (09:07) Yeah. So proud.   Eva Williams: (09:10) He's like, "You'll face... " I'm joking. And he was like, "Okay, look, you've always been who you are, no one's stopping that. But what are you going to do? You should have a bit of a plan." And I was like, "Yeah, well, what do I have to my name?" He's laughing. He's like, "What do you have to your name? You're a broke student. You have nothing but a ticket home to New Zealand that I will give you until you're 22." So I was like, "All right, great. I'll take it." So I went to New Zealand for three weeks and I went for a Reiki session. And this woman, she did that same thing, she's like, "You don't need me, you need Barbara and you need Jan."   Eva Williams: (09:43) And I'm like, "Okay, send me the names." So I started exploring all these different modalities of incredible light work, just incredible, incredible things while I was there. I go down to the ocean and dolphins would come and visit me, and then I'd go see the healers, and they're like, "You called those dolphins." I'm like, "Okay. All right. Let's calm down." But now I'm like, "We all call the dolphins." Now, I'm like, "Of course, I called the dolphins."   Tahnee: (10:07) They're our people.   Eva Williams: (10:08) My allies. They came to me in my hour of need. It was just a beautiful time. And then one day, in my heart, I just heard... I was waiting for that moment where you hear it from within, because I have a very active mind, so I can make up whatever I want to hear. But I heard Melbourne from my heart. And I was like, "Okay, that's where it's going to be." So I called my parents, I'm like, "I'm going to Melbourne." They were like, "Oh, thank God, she's got a plan." And I went there and I thought I was going to stay doing something graphic design or something design oriented, because that's a big part of my passion in life.   Eva Williams: (10:42) And I found the Australian Shiatsu College, and I found my shakes. I found my Sufi shakes. And once I found these two things, everything else fell in line. Yes, I was initiated into Kriya yoga over when I was 21, which was amazing. When I was 20, still finding my feet, I hadn't found the college yet, I hadn't found my shakes yet. I used to lie in my bedroom listening to singing balls. And that was this one guy who I just loved, very camp, but amazing, but just incredible sound healer, just such an amazing heart and soul. And he would just put all this water in a bow and he'd be like, "These are the dolphin's ball, the dolphins are coming to sing us."   Eva Williams: (11:26) And he would hit it and he would play it. And it was like, oh my God, this man, I don't even know where he comes from, but he's amazing." So one day I fell asleep, listening to this and I woke up and how you know YouTube just plays. And I saw this image on my screen, and I looked at it and it was this blue light and this golden man. And it just said, "The golden body of the Yogi." And I knew in that moment this is why I'm on the planet. This is why I'm on the planet. And so then I found out who that was, and that was an image of Babaji. And so then I found out about Kriya yoga.   Eva Williams: (12:00) And it's interesting because when I had looked for yoga schools in India years before, the only ones that I had found that I wanted to go to were the Kriya yoga schools. And so I became initiated into the Kriya yoga lineage of the Babaji and then his disciple Lahiri Mahasaya, and then Sri Yukteswar, and Paramahamsa Yogananda. And that was the beginning of things unlocking for me. And then I found Shiatsu in oriental medicine, and I went on to study Japanese acupuncture. And then I also found a teacher, a female teacher, and she did a beautiful mixture of yoga and Daoist work with the Jade egg. And then through the studies that I was doing and her even teaching in the same building, I just made this place my home and we'd get all these amazing international practitioners.   Eva Williams: (12:50) I found myself picking up exactly what I needed from that, including doula training and all sorts of things like this that were going on in the space. And then I worked at a Japanese bath house after I graduated for five years or so, I think it was, or something around that. And I really was so lucky because even if you want to rack up hours as a practitioner, it's very hard to find a place to be doing flat out work as Shiatsu practitioner just right out of school. But I was able to rack up at 10,000 hours really quickly in my first, I would say, first six or seven years of work.   Eva Williams: (13:27) And then I went to Bali, I got married. I went to Bali for a honeymoon, and then I just decided I was going to move to Dubai because it was something I really wanted to do. And then about a year into being in Dubai, I was just lying in the bathtub and I just had this full download through my body. And these images came to me and all this stuff and I was just being told what to do like, "You need to write this down, you need to go and get these things." And I was told to build out a whole altar. So I had this massive altar. And I was just sitting in front of it like, "Okay, I now live in a church. What next?"   Eva Williams: (14:06) My husband, he was in Iraq at the time, so he wasn't home. So I was like, "Nobody's going to know about my weird little mat?" And then when he came home, he's like, "That's a lot of candles. Do you need to light all of them at once? Are we doing a séance? What's happening here?" But as I was doing this, the spirits of these different plants I've been told to buy exactly 13 were coming to me, people were sending me things. I was finding things that I'd had in my library for a long time, I'd just never seen them with that particular glow or from that angle, that a transmission was coming through.   Eva Williams: (14:41) And I basically just sat down and I wrote the 10 transmissions of level one of Golden Lotus, which is the eight extraordinary vessels and the 12 main meridians. Unless you do a practitioner training, I don't do Triple Warmer and Pericardium. So it's basically just the five elements. So water, wood, earth, metal as it were, and fire. And then the eight extraordinary. But we do the Chong Mai twice because it has the main vessel and then two other vessels. And for the purpose of female sexual cultivation, it's important actually to separate those two. And then from there, it just started unlocking, like level two became the three gates of orgasm and just the content was just pouring down.   Eva Williams: (15:28) And it was a mixture between a really pure transmission I was being guided to and led to, and then a really deep weaving of just years and years. I'm very, very autodidactic because I didn't go to high school even, so my ability to sit and research and work if I have the impetus is quite high. If not, guess what?   Tahnee: (15:54) Very low. I can relate to that.   Eva Williams: (16:00) I'm like, "Let's have a show of hands." I'm pretty sure everyone's like, "Yeah, that's a... '' So I was able to just channel this, and then it just was really natural that these two modalities, the way it's structured is that the level one is really about working with the Yoni egg, so the Jade egg. It's really about clearing your own body, detoxing and recentralizing through the pelvis. So clearing trauma in the pelvis, opening the sensitivity of the pelvis, and really weaving in the whole rest of the body to a pelvic alignment. So beginning to really understand all of these different reflex zones that we have in the body that all relate to the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (16:43) And I don't just mean the internal reflex zones of the different organ systems, I also mean really beginning to explore somatically the balance between the sacrum and the buttock and the stone and the breasts, or how there's different alignments of your pelvis and your jaw and your mouth. And there's multiple different ways that we can set up these reflexologies that allow us to have a sense that we're hinging from the pelvis. So it's very much about coming into that, and it's not supposed to be... It's supposed to basically teach you how to come into contact with your own energy, to disperse it through your whole body so that you can actually have proper tantra experiences and also to self-regulate.   Eva Williams: (17:23) Because the level two work, it's almost like we go from a pelvic central model out to the body. And then the next level is all more explicit. So it's like self-pleasure practises. Or if we do like a retreat, we'll do some touch exchange practises. If you come to my clinic, I will do internal work at times, things like this. And so that's very triggering work. And I've seen, because I have been in many of these schools with sexual energy, the lack of self-regulation that is taught before highly activating practises come into play. And I didn't like that.   Eva Williams: (18:02) And so while I didn't necessarily plan the way that Golden Lotus was channelled, it is a very deep reflection of the beliefs in the general that I've taken, which is that we need to prepare our body before we do all this highly sexual activating practise. Because otherwise, I think one of the big things in the tantra communities and things that's happened is, it's just become all about sex dressed up as something spiritual, you know?   Tahnee: (18:26) Oh, I know.   Eva Williams: (18:28) You're like, "Really? I've never come across this before."   Tahnee: (18:31) I'm just laughing because I spent some time at Agama Yoga in Thailand I have never laughed so hard. We did a 10 day silent meditation and we were asked to abstain from sex for 10 days. And every day, someone would ask, "I really feel like I need to have sex today. Could I possibly not have... " I was like, "So you guys can't go 10 days without touching yourself or someone else." I've never seen anything like it. So if you love Agama, I found it a really toxic culture. It was almost high school. I was really shocked.   Eva Williams: (19:10) It's infamous. It's infamous for this. My teacher went there, one of my teachers was there and she told me all about it. And then even recently, I was sitting with a friend and I was mentioning some of these things, and she was like, "Oh my gosh. One time, when I was at the very beginning of my path, I went to this place." And as soon as she said it, I knew. I was like, "I know where you were talking about. I've never been there myself, but it's infamous."   Tahnee: (19:37) It was an experience. Yes, I hear you.   Eva Williams: (19:37) I think that this thing is also, I think a lot of people come into tantra with a concept of partner base in mind, and the way that I was trained, particularly with my teachers in this more Sufi tradition and things like this, I never went into any of this work looking for my sexuality. I never thought I would only work with women, I never thought I would be working with birth. This was not my aim. My aim was just to heal people. I worked on everyone. And ultimately, my aim was just to find God, I just wanted to have a very deep spiritual experience or a series of those. And so that over time guided into that direction, I just saw the level of care and sobriety that was cultivated within me before putting me onto that path.   Eva Williams: (20:30) The level of deep devotion and sobriety to my own self-development was paramount. And so there wasn't a sense of like there was a real sense that I wasn't allowed to just mess around, I wasn't allowed to just go to whatever workshop I wanted or something. I was really guided very strongly as to what is an integrity and what is not an integrity as far as transmissions go. And I'm very grateful for that. At least it worked for me within my system of integrity. So then basically it brought the birth of this beautiful work and I think that people love it when they do it, and I think people do feel that they can regulate themselves through it.   Eva Williams: (21:12) And that work for me, very, very naturally falls into birth work. If you are learning how to move and you're learning all these different ways of detoxing and opening your body and then you're learning these three gates of orgasm, which is very specifically sent into the pelvis, so then we are really going into the semantics of the pelvis alone. If you're doing all of that work, that is the birth prep is just extraordinary. And so I developed that into a birthing programme as well, because we need more of that. I think that you're not really taught how much prep goes into birth until you're pregnant.   Tahnee: (21:48) And it's really not a great time then to be exploring.   Eva Williams: (21:52) No. Not at all because it's traumatic.   Tahnee: (21:53) Because of your trauma.   Eva Williams: (21:53) You can definitely do some work on it then, but you need some guidance and holding through that because unwinding trauma can take a really long time, the somatic body's not quick   Tahnee: (22:10) Not fast, very slow.   Eva Williams: (22:17) It really likes to take its time.   Tahnee: (22:17) Oh man, it's so true. And I think what is so interesting about what you're speaking to though with coming into birth work, I know for me, I did muntuk's work and I was having internal work there and working with eggs and clearing those, that whole period of time was big for me. It was unpleasant in some ways and really beautiful and powerful in other ways. But I came to birth and I remember thinking like, "If I hadn't done that work, I wouldn't be able to hold myself through pregnancy and birth the way I've been able to, through pregnancy and birth."   Tahnee: (22:56) And you are speaking to this sense of sobriety and this sense of strength and just the ability to hold your own energy and read your own energy and tune into it, I think that's the piece for women going in and it's like, you're going to have people try and tell you things that you have to filter through, your truth filters. You have to make decisions around your sovereignty and around your care that you probably... These are big decisions and you don't have much context for them usually. I know for me even being fairly educated, there's just stuff I was like, "Do I have to do this? What are the rules?"   Tahnee: (23:32) And I think if you don't have that strong foundation, I think that's stuff golden lotus, it sounds like it just provides that container for women to start to build that trust in themselves so they can go and then really be open to what is honestly the most incredible experience you can have as a woman. I know woman choose not to birth, but for me, profound, but a lot of preparation too, I think in my experience.   Eva Williams: (23:58) I think it's really underestimated how much prep it takes. And I think it's also, to understand that you've got so much content that you want to read about the spiritual, about the physiological, but also how much you've got to inform yourself around just-   Tahnee: (24:13) Practical.   Eva Williams: (24:14) Yeah. Just random medical stuff, because we are taught to just, if someone's wearing a white coat, they know. They wouldn't suggest it if it wasn't for your best.   Tahnee: (24:23) Is that true?   Eva Williams: (24:23) That's not true. And it's sad. It's so sad to acknowledge that, but that's unfortunately the truth. And so I'm in the process of putting together a programme now which really takes people, basically it's like a month-by-month programme. So you can buy the modules as a month or you can buy them as a whole. And it's got workbooks and meditations. It addresses the emotional, the spiritual, how far along your baby is and where they're growing.   Eva Williams: (24:57) And it really also, for me, there's like this very strong concept of, you have the mother, you have the child, and then you have the mother-child unit, this third that's being generated and they call it mama toto in Swahili, this concept of the mother-child. And to build a bridge between these things because one of the things that I've noticed in for example, certain modalities like APA, like the pre and perinatal psychology, people who do fantastic work is that one of the main... how do I explain this for people who don't maybe come from this context? Someone asked me recently, how can you tell if your doula is a good doula? How can you choose a good doula?   Eva Williams: (25:44) How many stars are there in the sky, my friend? And then immediately it came to me, I know it really... And I realised that the doula that I really, we don't even call ourselves doula's anymore because we consider ourselves more birth keepers or birth workers because the work gets so close to midwifery at a certain stage that the idea that you are not advocating for a client or all these sorts of things, it doesn't have a place when you get to a certain level of birth work. And these women, all of them speak to the baby individually to the mother. And immediately I realise, "Oh, if your doula will have an individual relationship to the baby, as they do to you, but they are there for you, to me, that's a good doula."   Eva Williams: (26:38) And I know that sounds strange, but I come very much from this concept that the baby is always the most conscious being in the room, born or unborn. And so if we can begin to actually... What I would love for more women to know is that a lot of women really get bogged down with this idea like, "It's me, it's my body. Yes, my partner's helping me, but I have to carry this. I feel heavy, this baby's relying on me." And so there becomes almost a scarcity of this really deep sense of drudgery or something related, or just a deep sense of lack of support that becomes related to birth.   Eva Williams: (27:10) And one of the things that I think is really important for women to understand is neither on a physiological level, not spiritual level are you alone? This baby is the one that will release the hormone that will tell your body and your stomach when to dilate. This child will send stem cells to heal your body into your blood. This child is there for you, and this child is leading this labour actually. So this child is bringing you energy and bringing you protection, and bringing you gifts of healing. And this moment is actually for you, it's not happening to you, it's happening for you.   Eva Williams: (27:49) So the moment that that child is born is your rebirth as well, it is your moment to also let go and let something new come through. And I think that interconnection, that interplay is what allows women to not just trust their body, which is one of the thing that I wish more people could establish prior to falling pregnant, we should call it rising pregnant, "I rose pregnant."   Tahnee: (28:14) It's beautiful.   Eva Williams: (28:16) But also that they begin to trust not just their body, but the baby. So they're like, "Yeah, my body knows how to do this and this, baby's got this, I've got it. Our relationship got it and my body's got it. So this is what's going to happen." And just really leading from that place. And for many people, that might sound fantastical, but the more that we're going to understand birth, the more that we look at what's happening with the stem cells, the more that we look at the neurology and the physiology of labour itself and the more that if you have done that previously, you'll know that this is real, this is actually what's happening, that there is this very deep exchange of support.   Eva Williams: (28:56) And that's what I think is the most powerful thing is when a woman trusts so innately in her body and in the child that has chosen her to take this journey, that bond is what's leading the labour. I just think that that's very powerful. So the course that I've developed is to try to assist with that, and then obviously is also bringing different movements for different trimesters because different parts of the body obviously get affected at different times, and hypnobirthing scripts and of dolphin and whale stuff going on there, because you know, our allies.   Tahnee: (29:31) It's so funny all the stuff you're speaking about. With my daughter, she's five now, nearly five, but I had a dolphin come to me while I was pregnant with her in the water. And she had me through the whole pregnancy, guiding everything. I was doing body work at the time and I had this really strong download that I had to stop. And I remember contacting my teacher, who's the female teacher of Chi Nei Tsang from Mantak Chia. She was like, "If the baby's telling you to stop your stuff," and I had this golden thread with her and she was this little golden being, so probably about, I think around two dissolved completely. It got weaker and weaker over time. But just all of that stuff...   Tahnee: (30:17) And I had a lot of stuff going on in my life when I was pregnant with her and she just held me like I was... I remember thinking, "I should be really stressed out right now, but I feel really safe and really held through this." And it took me a little while to realise that that was her contributing that to my experience. And I think that trust is something she gave me, which I think is a really beautiful thing. I'm halfway through my pregnancy now, I'm four months, but this pregnancies been really different for me. So it's interesting. I'm interested to see how they play out, because I haven't had that same sense of baby protection or strong baby messages.   Tahnee: (31:03) But I'm interested in that space because I think it's hard to talk about that stuff as a woman, the midwives I had were very practical, wonderful women, but they were very grounded and of the earth. And you had a textbook pregnancy and a textbook birth, well done? And I was like, "Yeah, but what about all this cool stuff that's happening to me?" And they were like, "We don't want to talk about that stuff." I was like, "Okay."   Eva Williams: (31:33) It's a shame actually because it's weird thing-   Tahnee: (31:35) I'm glad you're here.   Eva Williams: (31:35) What did you say?   Tahnee: (31:38) That I'm glad you're here in the world.   Eva Williams: (31:41) Dolphins are so important in birth. That's so important. People who are not getting this message, I'm like, "You guys have to... " I always tell my clients, I'm like, "Just Google." I'll be like, "Yeah, the dolphin midwives." And then everyone at the table laughed. I'm like, "Huh." Wait until you see it.   Tahnee: (31:57) It's true, Hawaii.   Eva Williams: (31:57) I know. And then I'm like, "Google it. You Google dolphin midwife." And people come back, "Whoa." I'm like, "Yeah, that's actually a"-   Tahnee: (32:01) And wasn't they doing it in Russia, the Google something?   Eva Williams: (32:05) They did, yes. Birthing to being, Alana's work was incredible.   Tahnee: (32:08) Because Jeannine Parvati Baker talks about it a lot in her work, and some other people have talked about studying.   Eva Williams: (32:16) I think the woman who found a birth into being, she had a centre in the Caspian sea where the dolphins would come in and people would just be freebirthing in the water, which is wild. And so we have over here, birth it's a very obstetric-run American imported system. It's pretty brutal. So we are looking at different birth centres talk of shifting some things around birth here because Dubai is like a playground in terms of, they're so open to new ideas. And people may not think of them like that from the outside, but they really are.   Eva Williams: (32:56) They're so innovative and there's some very special, very, very, very special energy to the Emiratis to the Bedouin people, just something very special. So we were looking at working with a very beautiful woman whose work I incorporate a lot into mine, her name's Dr. Gallery. And she has some beautiful, gentle birth clinics in London and things like this. And she said, "Oh yes, I'd love to come out and do something with you guys in Dubai, but I only want to work with the dolphins." And she's a full OB/GYN. And I was like, "You and me, this is going to work so well." I was like, "Scrap all the land we've found, we're going to the ocean."   Eva Williams: (33:43) I was like, "This is the future of it. This is the future of birth." And I think that there's a lot of beautiful places in Cairo and around Egypt as well like in Sharm El Sheikh and in the Red Sea that we might begin to also see really beautiful work with the dolphins popping up. And I know that a couple of people that I know have wanted to do things like this in the North of Ibiza, and South, but the problem is the water's very cold over there, so it's not really something that can work as well. But in these waters, when the dolphin comes to the baby, it is telling you that you are going to give birth soon. Maybe in this instance, I don't know where you were in your pregnancy.   Tahnee: (34:18) No. I was heavily pregnant. My husband I got engaged there, and we got married there. It's this very special spot for us. And I was standing probably naval deep in water and it came, honestly, I was terrified. I was not like, "Oh my God." I was like, "Ah, I think a dolphin is coming at me." And it whooshed so close to me. My husband was out deep and he turned around and saw the dolphin and was like, "Whoa." And then there was a whole pod behind him. But it broke off and came and checked me out. And they can sonar heartbeats and stuff so I was thinking it must have been checking me out and being like, "What are you doing?"   Eva Williams: (35:00) So what they do is when you're very heavily pregnant, if they come towards you and if they put the nose toward the belly or come very close to you, usually you're always going to give birth.   Tahnee: (35:08) I thought it was going to scare me.   Eva Williams: (35:08) Oh, what a lovely experience.   Tahnee: (35:14) I was not like, "Oh my God." Seriously, I was like, "Holy crap, is this safe?"   Eva Williams: (35:18) I know. Every time I was in New Zealand and dolphins came as well, I was swimming in the water and I just shot bowl upright and I was standing and I was like, "There's something in the water." And I'd hear these voices like, "It's okay." I'm like, "It's definitely not fucking okay." My instinct body was like, "This is not okay." And my spiritual body was like, "It's going to be okay." And every part of me was like, "That's fine, but I'm still going to stand because I can run, and those, they can swim. This is not my territory."   Tahnee: (35:45) It's true.   Eva Williams: (35:49) It's so true. But they can activate the labour. They can do this really strongly by communicating with the child as well. It's something very, very powerful.   Tahnee: (35:58) Super cool. And the indigenous people here where we are, they believe that they are their people. Every time I've been in any ceremony or anything they will speak to the whales and the dolphins here as being ancestors.   Eva Williams: (36:10) Yeah. They bring children.   Tahnee: (36:14) Yeah. It makes a lot of sense.   Eva Williams: (36:18) I believe they bring the children because they don't just turn up when a woman's very pregnant to assist in the physiological activation of the hormonal aspects of labour, many, many women will see dolphins on the night they conceive or at the time or just before conception. And whenever a woman's like, "Yeah, we're trying to get pregnant. Oh, I saw dolphins." I'm like, "You go have baby." I had a friend and she saw porpoises. They're not even dolphins, I was like, "You go have a baby." And they did the ultrasound and they tuned it back to that time.   Tahnee: (36:49) Perhaps they're related to a dolphin somehow.   Eva Williams: (36:51) I'm like, "It could be a manatees, I don't care, you're having a baby." I'm joking.   Tahnee: (36:59) An orca. Let's not get too crazy. But it's okay. Tell me about this primary thing. That's interesting, because I know if you're not aware of this, I don't know if we've spoken about this on the podcast yet, so the hormonal cascade that the baby triggers in the mother, this is all these beautiful juicy hormones like oxytocin and things that, A, make birth less painful, which is a good thing. And B, obviously also the whole cascade of uterine contractions, breast milk coming in, all of these things. So the baby actually triggers that. And one of the things that happens a lot in our culture is we induce, or if there's an obstetrician that my midwife shared with me who wants to induce everyone at 38 weeks in a hospital near us.   Tahnee: (37:40) And this kind of thing just terrifies me, and I have friends who've waited 43 weeks plus for their babies to come.   Eva Williams: (37:48) Especially plus babies.   Tahnee: (37:51) My daughter was 42 weeks on the day. And I just think, can you speak a little bit to women who might have fear around, "I'm getting pressure from my OB/GYN or my midwife to induce." I know it's a real slippery topic, but at least speak to that.   Eva Williams: (38:06) No, no. It's not. I don't think it's slippery at all, I think it's underdressed. And it's interesting, I remember, so here they've got DHA, the Dubai Health Authority, has a policy around a certain time. Even if your OB/GYN is more liberal, there's a certain red tape that they can't really cross. And so I remember the first hospital birth I did in Dubai, home birth is illegal here by the way. It's actually not illegal to give birth at home, it's illegal for anyone to assist, anyone who has a licence issued by the government could get it taken away if they assist you.   Eva Williams: (38:44) So if you bring in a midwife from overseas or for me, I'm not an OB/GYN or a midwife, so I'm also not really assisting people with home births here because I don't think that's necessarily a great thing to do. But if someone were in labour and it was progressing really quickly, rather than stress them out and shove them into a car, I think I know what I'd probably end up doing. But it's an interesting thing because I remember the very first one I attended, the OB/GYN was just pressuring my clients so hard and she was outside and afterwards she was crying.   Eva Williams: (39:20) She's like, "I don't know what to do." And so obviously, as a birth worker, I've got 117 different things to pull out of the cupboard because I'm acupuncture, Im like okay acupuncture, we've been doing Homoeopathy week, 36 or 38 at that point, let's try some different homoeopathy, maybe something that's addressing more of the fears and emotions. Let's do massage, let's do the dirty three, hot food, a glass of wine and have some sex, all of that. And then also internal work, massage the cervix, check how it phased someone is, just at that stage of pregnancy. So we did a really beautiful ceremony of her husband and her on the bed, and I did the internal work. It was very dark. We put on music.   Eva Williams: (40:10) And we just really checked out what was happening, what the engagement was. So not a vaginal exam, but just to actually see, and definitely not a sweep or something, none of that stuff I'm trained in, but just really actually to feel how the effacement was going, how the pelvis was feeling, what was actually getting caught up in the pelvic. Was there something caught up there or was she just not ready? And for me, it was really clear that she's just not ready. It's her first baby, it's 39 weeks and the baby is just not ready. It's not coming yet.   Eva Williams: (40:38) I think that what's difficult about getting pressure... I remember after this situation, I gave them all these techniques. I said, "We're going to make a plan. Don't worry." And they felt better, and I went to my car and I just fucking sat in my car and cried for 20 minutes. The sense of stress and pressure, and it's not even my baby, that happens in that room when a doctor strong arms you and tells you that what they know is right, when it may not feel right for you, is so intense. And I know that doctors don't fully understand that. I know that OB/GYNs, not all of them fully understand that. I have the great privilege of working with many who do.   Eva Williams: (41:17) And I remember during this labour, I was sitting out in the hallway and I was just crying. And the doctor came to me and she's like, "Why are you crying?" I'm like, "Dude, you're pushing so hard. This is ridiculous. This is going to end really not well." And then she started tearing up and sat down next to me. And she's like, "It's just a lot of pressure." And we were just having this full heart to heart, just weeping in the hallway. Like, "What the fuck?" But it managed to buy me another 48 hours for my clients, which is amazing.   Tahnee: (41:46) Good work.   Eva Williams: (41:52) It's so much pressure. It's so much pressure. The thing is that there's very little that actually requires induction. Things that do not require induction, your baby is too big for your pelvis, it's a big baby, your baby has passed 40 weeks, meconium has passed, the cord is around the neck. These are not reasons for induction and they're not reasons for C-sections either. It's just very intense. I think some something that people don't understand is that an OB/GYN or a medical professional on your birth is someone that you want there in an emergency situation, they have no requirement to witness physiological birth. They have none. They do not have to witness a single, natural, physiological birth as part of their training, they have to do surgery.   Eva Williams: (42:48) So their whole frame of reference is coming that birth as an emergency. They have never had to sit. If you ask an OB/GYN what's a normal to long labour, I had an OB/GYN tell me that 10 hours was a long labour. I'm like, "Jesus Christ, what are you guys having? Have you got a slip slide set up out here." I was on a midwife tour recently in Aspen, someone's like, "How does labour take?" And the midwife's like, "It can take up to two hours." I was like, "What?" If it's your fourth baby and you're at nine centimetres. It's just ridiculous.   Tahnee: (43:19) Wow.   Eva Williams: (43:19) Yeah, I know. I know. And I always think to myself like, "Wow, I think that 40 hours of fairly active labour is long." I think that labour from early labour onward can go on for a week. That's the sort of time I'm willing to just give a woman and her body to just dilate at its pace and do its thing, and it's just unheard of. So if people are getting pressure to induce and it's funny, because we've made this thing over here and we're not doing it yet, but it's a couple of doulas and I have this, it's kind of our joke, but I also want to do it. And it's going to be for women who for partners, 36 and 37 weeks onward, and it's going to be the induction group.   Eva Williams: (44:01) Basically, you all come together and we watch a funny movie or a beautiful movie about birth, and you get a glass of red wine. We're not getting hammered over here, but you get a glass of red wine. We have some food, whether it's Indian or Thai, something with a little bit of spice, a little bit Mexican or something, and you just share. And you can share if it's stressful, you can share if it's funny, we share content and information. And then if you want to stay for the second part, we teach something like certain techniques, maybe not actually internal, but certain techniques like clitoral stroking or labial massage or hip massage or things like that that your partner can do that will assist in your hips getting ready and things like that.   Eva Williams: (44:42) And just from 37 weeks on, everyone is welcome to just join, come, have that glass of wine, just get a move on. Do a bit of dancing, have a bit of laughter. Because the group, you share more pheromonal energy. Because that's something that isn't readily shared, adrenaline and cortisol inhibit oxytocin. So if you're stressed, you cannot go into natural labour, they inhibit one another. So if women are feeling stressed about being induced, the thing that they really need is they need to disconnect from the timeline of intensity, they really need the opportunity to disconnect from that.   Eva Williams: (45:17) So if the doctor's pressuring you and says, "Okay, well take your time, but I need to see you again in two or three days." Don't go, don't go in two or three days. If they need to see you again, they can see you in a week. All they're going to do is an ultrasound and whatever, maybe a sweep. Give yourself the space that your body needs. And also, really, really, really take your homoeopathy from 36 weeks, from 36 weeks, be taking your homoeopathy and be taking just this very gentle way of beginning to release the stress on the system. Take the aconite, take the arnica.   Eva Williams: (46:00) Another thing that's really important, and again, this all goes back to prep, because if you're doing everything at the last moment, you're going to be dealing with a lot. In the programme that I run, around third 30 to 34 weeks, in between this time before your GBS test, we explore different internal works. And not necessarily me doing that, but maybe it's related to sex with the husband, maybe it's related to self-pleasure, maybe it's just internal gaze and interception kind of meditation, but we start unblocking and unlocking anything that might be held in the pelvis.   Eva Williams: (46:37) And then also, if you have a chiro, there's the Webster technique, or if you have a Bowen therapist who can do the sacral... There's a series of sacral releases that they can do. Anything you can do to prepare your body, to feel really good and open, speak to your cervix, ripen your cervix, yourself, speak to it, see beautiful pink light moving through it. All of these things work, they really, really work. And what doesn't work is being pressured into having a baby, it just doesn't fucking work. There's no evidence to support that it's ever worked.   Eva Williams: (47:11) It's insane, even with the foetal monitoring, even that, there's the only proof that it actually has any benefit is it there's no proof. The only thing that it's actually done is increased C-section rates. And so, these sorts of things, we have to just be really mindful of what the outcome is. Is the outcome an alive baby or is the outcome an empowered woman who knows herself and knows her body and can recover in the postpartum process because she's actually connected to the child, because oxytocin is also a huge part of recovery. It's what's bringing the colostrum and the breast milk, it's what's actually involuting the uterus.   Eva Williams: (47:52) So if we don't have this connection from the outside, if we're having those issues, then we also face a much longer recovery period. And that's when you really begin to see from an emotional perspective, from a body work perspective. If I see diastasis, like a herniated diastasis or something like this, for me, that's always that the woman has been opened in the birth process, but she hasn't had the closing afterwards, so she has no centre. Can you imagine what it would be doing to your back, to not have your rectus abdominis working? Basically, your back would be as stiff as a board, and that's a woman who feels that she's not supported. She hasn't been supported through that process.   Eva Williams: (48:37) I don't know, this stuff is so intuitive and natural, it feels so natural to say, but we aren't there as a culture of medicine and we're not there as a culture of birth yet either, and it's difficult. And there's a way I just want to say to people, just protect kept yourself. But I actually love working with OB/GYNs and I do love working with the medical system when they get it right, and they very often, if you find the right people and places, they do get it right. I had a doula complain to me the other day about how, at this one hospital that's really great here, the midwife didn't even turn up and the baby just came out.   Eva Williams: (49:17) And I was like, "Is this a complaint? This is a complaint that the baby just naturally came out and the mother caught her home own baby?" I'm sorry, I don't feel the same level of stress around this that you feel. It's so beautiful to hear about less managed births. And this is for those people who are being pushed toward induction, this is called active management, basically, of expectations in relationship to doctors. And another thing to understand is that 40 weeks doesn't really mean much.   Tahnee: (49:52) So arbitrary.   Eva Williams: (49:54) It's insane. I'm not standardised by that. Some hospitals do it from the first day of your last period, some do it from the last day of your last period? It's just ridiculous and there's no evidence that proves that. I think of 10% of children come on their due day.   Tahnee: (50:11) Not good odds-   Eva Williams: (50:12) I know, right. Yes. And everyone wants to be fucking Natalie Portman or Kate Moss or something. And guess what, 1%. You know what I mean? It's one of these expectations that we set up. We are lying to women when we tell them that they should be fitting that mould, and we are taking away from them the opportunity for them to make their own mould of what it looks like. So contentious. It doesn't actually feel that contentious, it feels really straightforward, but whatever.   Tahnee: (50:39) Well, it's interesting because I think one thing for me with birth too, it felt like... I don't want to be in the feminine/masculine, for me, time when I'm in a feminine space, linear time is not a thing. It's not real, it doesn't exist and there's this just natural unfolding of things as they are. My feeling around birth was very much like we're trying to apply this very linear masculine dimension to it and it doesn't exist like that. I think this idea of 10 moons or being able to see it in this sense of it's with them and it's a flow, but it's not something that's going to happen on a day. I'm struggling with it right now, people are like, "What's your due date?"   Tahnee: (51:33) And I'm, "Well, I don't know, sometime in April." And they want a due date. Well, I do know it's April 1st, but I don't believe my baby's going to come on April 1st.   Eva Williams: (51:44) I can tell you what I do always is I just take the full moon of that month. And I was like, "She's not due, then she's due in the beginning of the month." I'm like, "I don't care."   Tahnee: (51:56) That's when they come.   Eva Williams: (51:57) The baby is now officially due on the full moon. Baby's like a full moon, that's what's happening. It doesn't mean we won't prepare and I don't necessarily calculate my weeks from that, I'll do it from that ultrasound or whatever. And the programme that we are doing is a 10-moon programme, it's 10 modules and they're 10 moons. Yeah, it's just recognising that children have a rhythm, it's not something that we can set or determine. That rhythm is related to obviously the tides of our own life. Some babies like a new moon. There's no set rules, you can't apply them one way or another, like you said.   Eva Williams: (52:33) And I love this idea that, look, birth is very much about learning about abundance, about our own abundance, that we can actually create a whole other being. It's this radiant space that we enter into. Adding scarcity of time to that means that a woman feels a scarcity of space. And if she's feeling a scarcity of time and space, as these two things do manifest together within her own body, you're taking away the whole dimension and realm that she needs to live inside of during her birth, like you said. It's this feminine space. And that doesn't mean that we can't have a plan during pregnancy, it doesn't mean that certain practises won't be better at different times.   Eva Williams: (53:12) It doesn't mean any of that, but it's the invasiveness of how we treat birth needs to stop. I'm working on a new project right now, and I'm very excited about it and I can't say much about it, but what I can say is that one of the main focuses of it is the removal of incredibly invasive techniques. And some of them aren't even necessarily invasive, they're just fucking disgusting like the gestational diabetes test.   Tahnee: (53:40) Oh, that was the only fucking thing I did last time. And I was like, "This is the most sugar I've had in my entire adult life." Maybe as a kid, I gorged on Lollies, but other than that." That's the only time I was sick in my pregnancy was after that.   Eva Williams: (53:54) Yes, so many women have said to me like, "Oh yeah, definitely, the most traumatic thing of my pregnancy was that time."   Tahnee: (54:01) I was like, "Fucking hell, guys." It's like nine Coca-Colas or something. I'm like, "Great."   Eva Williams: (54:07) And it's not necessary. It's not necessary because there's so many other ways to remediate or even to tell. And what was so funny is, I was with a client recently and she had to shift OB/GYNs because on her due date, the original OB/GYN is not going to be there. And so we had just gone to that OB/GYN and said, "Look, we're opting out of this." And she was ready to fight. She's like, "I don't want this person." I was like, "Just chill. I'm sure they'll be fine with it." Don't go in for a battle, that's one thing. All birth workers, everyone, just don't go in for a battle. If you have to put your armour on, do it, but don't go in for a battle. And the doctor was like, "Huh. I've been in birth for a long time and I've seen a lot of incredible advancements and devices and ultrasound and all sorts of things really. And yet they still haven't managed to make something less disgusting than that drink. That's okay. Don't worry about it."   Eva Williams: (55:01) Even an OB/GYN was like, "Yeah, you'd think we'd gotten to this level, but really it's just Lucozade, sugar." And then we had to go to this other one and really communicate once again like, "Hey, the preference is for this off the table." And she just was like, "That's the most disgusting drink in the world, I wouldn't push that test on anyone." I was like, "Wow."   Tahnee: (55:19) Amazing. That's a good change in culture. [crosstalk 00:55:22]. What's your rate on ultrasounds in general? I haven't spoken about this much on the podcast either, but I do get asked about it a lot, and there's the one side of it where people are like, "It's good to know and it gives you that reassurance." And then there's the other side, which is probably more of the side I'm on where it's like, "What would it tell me that actually... What benefit would that information actually give me?" So I'm curious as to your take on that as a birth keeper.   Eva Williams: (55:53) Well, it's a great topic. One thing I can definitely say is, you know your body, you've done a lot of work with your body. I have also clients who are just super on it, and yet sometimes, and I'm thinking of one person specific, that if a woman, for example, has a miscarriage or something like this, even if she isn't someone who would naturally or usually lean toward wanting ultrasound or something like that in that early part of the next pregnancy, it brings an enormous amount of relief to know that everything's going healthy.   Tahnee: (56:38) Reinsurance.   Eva Williams: (56:38) Exactly. If you have chromosomal issues in your life, those 12 week tests, in your family, for example, or even the 20-week morphology exams, they can bring a lot of knowledge. So from my perspective, what I usually say to women when they say, "What do you think is necessary, blah, blah." I said, "The first thing that's necessary is anything that will bring you comfort. If your level of comfort and certainty and anxiety will drop with each or any of those visits, then those are the ones that are necessary, because your emotional and mental wellbeing is more important to the baby's health and growth than anything that an ultrasound is going to do to your body. That's my perspective.   Eva Williams: (57:25) And then usually, they just say that the main tests that are important are your morphology, your 20, 21-week scan, and that's really just to see if there's any... For those of you who don't know, that's not really an ultrasound, it's a full building out of, they check all of the different organs.   Tahnee: (57:44) It's pretty cool. I was like, "Whoa. There's a kidney and there's a... "   Eva Williams: (57:53) They go in, they check all the tissues, they check the formation of the organs. This is technology that I'm grateful that we have because it can put a lot of decision making power into people's hands. And simultaneously, I know a lot of people who aren't down for it, they're like, "No way, that's even worse than an ultrasound. That's super intense for the baby, blah, blah, blah." For me, it's all about comfort. And I have had a couple birth workers recently and clients saying, they're like, "Well, I know you're very pro natural birth and this is not."   Eva Williams: (58:26) I'm like, "Hang on a minute. I'm not really for or against anything, I just don't really have a role to play. If you're planning a C-section... " I know what the body is capable of, and those are personal experiences that I've had. You can't take that away from me or I cannot pretend that I don't know what the physical body can do and what we may need to train for, but can actually get what this experience can be. So I can't take that out of my being that if you know that that's available, that you gravitate toward it, but it doesn't necessarily mean that I am anti anything."   Eva Williams: (59:03) I've had my time being anti epidural, and then I saw a series of Pilates teachers and yoga teachers who had super tight pelvic floors get an epidural after like 36 hours of labour, and just one hour, boom, baby was out. Really incredible experiences. Legs were still working, everything. So I can't go through the level of experience that I've had, I can't afford to fight anyone. I hate it in the birth world, I hate this, the fight that happens when people are... I believe in advocating that there's a point where if you can change that inside of yourself, you stop attracting moments to have those conversations. That's what I have found in my personal experience.   Eva Williams: (59:45) And so I try to just be very, very open, and the reason is because I don't necessarily need to specify what I will and won't work with, because I really only attract people that I really will be the right person for. But I would say, if someone is just like, "I don't know what to get and when." I would just say, "Look, the most standard thing is that you have a 12-week ultrasound, you have your 21 week morphology. That puts a lot of power in your hands. Look it up, do a little bit of research." And then usually, there'll be something as a bare minimum right before your birth, like a 36-week thing, and then we'll do a GBS swab."   Eva Williams: (01:00:21) And you don't have to do your GBS swab, you don't have to get that scan. You can just wait and go into labour naturally as well. But those are some of the options. And I don't believe that you need anything more than that, but I've been with women who are going every third day in the end of their pregnancy just to sit in a room for 20 minutes just to hear if the baby's safe and good. If that's wh

Who Goes There Podcast
332: Ep332: Fear - WGT

Who Goes There Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 67:36


Ok, show of hands. How many of you have been finger-blasted on a rollercoaster? All of you. Just as we thought. You know who you have to thank for that, right? That's right, Mr. Smuggling Plums in boxer-briefs himself Marky Mark! Some of you are too young to remember this, but before he was doing whatever he did in Transformers and whatever the FUCK he was doing in The Happening, good ole' Boston Mark was the homicidal boyfriend that kickstarted a million ovulations in Fear. Wanna hear Machine Head by Bush a hundred time in 90 minutes? Buckle up, buttercup. We're doing the damn thing! Artwork was once again done by the incredible Cal Gee. Go follow him on instagram. Also follow Matt on Twitch: @MattyDingDong If you enjoy the show, please consider joining our Patreon subscribers. That means for less than the cost of a beer, you get bonus content, exclusive merchandise, and special giveaways! Most importantly, you get to help us continue doing what we love. The Who Goes There Podcast is available to subscribe to on iTunes and Spotify.  Can't get enough? We also do that social media shit. You'll find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Twitch, and YouTube.

Broad and Hazy
I'd Fuck Val Kilmer as Jim Morrison

Broad and Hazy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 111:30


Joe covers Green Day F.O.D. Jeff and Joe talk about Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin. They drink North Coast Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout.Below are the links to check out please interact with us on all our social media platforms.https://podcasts.google.com/.../ODc4YWJiODUtMWVjNy05MzYxL...https://media.rss.com/broadandhazy/feed.xmlhttps://podcasts.apple.com/.../broad-and-hazy/id1569088927https://open.spotify.com/show/4disfnUsjmLqss01FLSnAG?si=7O-ujMR0Qh-9AD3BHDvJIw&utmsource=copy-link&dlbranch=1Please feel free to interact with us on social media.~Reddit: r/BroadandHazy~Facebook: Broad Hazy~Twitter: @BroadandHazy~Instagram: broadandhazy

Get In Da Corner podcast
Mad Mex, the one eyed FUCK - Get In Da Corner podcast 267

Get In Da Corner podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 81:41


Mad Mex, the one eyed FUCK, got his ass cornerized once again! We tripped and fell on our faces DOWN memory lane. Shit stain dildos, Mark the MEATBALL Savage, and more good will dressing rooms got defecated in. Get Er Dumb with US LIVE every Wednesday night at 9 pm et / 6pm pt ON the Mixlr app AND YouTube youtube.com/getindacorner/live - mixlr.com/get-in-da-corner Support Live TTS streamlabs.com/getindacorner paypal.me/getindacorner ALL of Da Corner links linktr.ee/getindacorner PODCAST Stitcher bit.ly/gidcstitcher Apple Podcasts bit.ly/gidcp iHeart - www.iheart.com/podcast/256-get-i…podcast-30962911/ SoundCloud @getindacorner Google Podcasts bit.ly/gidcandroid TuneIn bit.ly/gidctunein Spreaker bit.ly/gidcspreaker Bitchute www.bitchute.com/channel/getindacorner/ Spotify open.spotify.com/show/3K6GNEeEGA3K44oIvaVDVh LIVE STREAMS (wednesdays @ 9pm est) Mixlr mixlr.com/get-in-da-corner Dlive dlive.tv/getindacorner YouTube youtube.com/getindacorner YouNow younow.com/GetInDaCorner Twitch twitch.tv/getindacorner SOCIAL CRAP facebook.com/getindacorner instagram.com/yuknassty twitter.com/YukNassty_ twitter.com/DoggaBaby MUSIC Spotify bit.ly/dacorner Deezer bit.ly/cornerdeezer #ComicPodcast #ComedianPodcast #DaCornerpodcast

Solid Over Social
Fuck The Price POP UP Shop and Showcase/TONE BONE/SMOOVE GOTTI

Solid Over Social

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 33:01


Expensive Trappin and Fuck The Opps clothing brands link up for a pop up shop and music showcase in the Antelope Valley . We sat down with Super Producer Tone Bone on da beats and upcoming artist Smoove Gotti about what started them and what motivates them . We also talk about the effects of negative music in the community . Tune in and watch the video of this episode on the Solid Over Social Facebook page --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/SoildOverSocial/message

Happy Impulse Unfiltered
Creative for Hire with Andrew Hochradel

Happy Impulse Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 59:12


Thanks for listening and as always, thank you for giving a fuck.Happy Impulse ™ Unfiltered was created, produced, and is hosted by Roberta Hall (and special guests)Happy Impulse—aka Roberta Hall—is an artist, political activist, and hell-raiser from the United States. Her art focuses on the satirical and subversive, bringing vivid colors and pop-culture to her dark humor.Happy Impulse Unfiltered podcast is a no-bullshit, only anarchy approach to today's issues. Because global warming sucks, weed is lit, mental health should be celebrated, LBGTQ+ rights are human rights, and so much more.Bi-weekly, I and other creatives give their outlooks and opinions on society's bullshit. The more we talk about this shit, these issues, the more we can improve the world around us. If you give a f**k, this show is for you!Fuck being silent. Give sound to your strength.This podcast shares Happy Impulses ethos it gives creators a platform to share their stories with the world.This weeks guest is Andrew Hochradel You can find more on Hoch at (https://www.instagram.com/hochdotco)You can find more from on Happy Impulse onWebsite/Store - https://happyimpulse.comInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/happyimpulse/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/happyimpulsecreativeTwitter - https://twitter.com/HappyImpulsePinterist - https://www.pinterest.com/happyimpulse/Dribbble - https://dribbble.com/HappyImpulseBehance - https://www.behance.net/happyimpulseCo - Produced and Edited by Frederick Gautier (https://frederickgautier.com)Music provided by Epidemic Sound (https://www.epidemicsound.com)“Dubweed” intro music by Dream Valley Music (https://www.shockwave-sound.com/artist/dream-valley-music)

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Appreciation Is Attraction with Cole Slate

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 33:48


Happy Thanksgiving everyone! First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for, but one of the things we are thankful for and what we're going to be chatting about on this episode, is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus chase. I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand and the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS, if you're a lender everyone has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? Ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. Today we welcome Cole Slate onto the episode. As broker and owner of Slate Realty, he does everything 100% referral base. A lot of brokerage team leaders instantly shift into lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that, but what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow to make your business 100% referral basedWhat marketing yourself as hyper community meansMistakes to avoid when first starting out ResourcesLearn more about Cole SlateReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas to real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living.It's your job to remind them. Let's get started What's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome to another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast.It is Happy Thanksgiving. First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for. But one of the things we are thankful for our for our guests, and in the spirit of being thankful what we're going to be chatting about on this episode is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus Chase, because I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand, I've been saying the shift last five fucking years before Tom Ferry every set of damn thing about it. And the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS if your lender ever has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? And ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. So what we're going to chat about today, I've been seeing this dude on Facebook, hosting events. He's always doing shit and I like indirectly know you from Facebook, and he just opened up. Another brokerage is growing rapidly, but he does everything 100% referral base, a lot of brokerages team leaders instantly shift into like the lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that. But what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today. And without further ado, we're gonna introduce our friend Mr. Cole, slate to the show. What's up. Cool,Mike, thanks for having me. I really appreciate it. Big fan of the podcast and it's cool being on the zoom with you and hear your voice on the interview not coming through my truck speakersto tell tell us tell everybody who you are, where you're located. What you guys got going on down there. And then I got a bunch of questions for you in regards to how you're attracting all this business and attention in your local community.Yeah, absolutely. Like Mike said, my name is Cole slate, I'm from the Northeast Florida area, particularly St. Johns County. You know, your statistics and research nationally, it's one of the hottest markets in the country. Every stat that you look at has St John's in Northeast Florida and the top 10 And yeah, most liberal all referral base really a lot of people talk about you know, their, their hyperlocal Well, I market myself as being hyper community. So you know, building the brand, for doing stuff the right way. And you know, for the right reasons and you know, giving back to the neighborhood first responders to charities and things like that.I love that hyper community write that down, folks. Um, yeah, let's get right into it. So first off, when did you get licensed? And when do you start in real estate?So I got my license in September of 2012. I started I was blessed to be to earn a buyer's agent position all the top teams in the area, the Welch team with Keller Williams, and after being on that team for a year decided to try it on my own. And it's been a it's been a nine year blur, you know, ever sinceso one of the things that you like, glad you did, but you'd never do it again. Right? So like every every every career of a realtor would Did you ever buy leads, like in 2012 when you join a team, you're probably you know, getting fed a little bit maybe through open houses and or whatnot. But when you went off on your own, have you always been more referral based? Did you ever go down the Zillow lead buying platform or any of those things?So you know, I did it I bought, I got into Zillow leads one time and it was because our zip code that I'm actually from born and raised no a opportunity opened up and it goes so quickly that I kind of viewed it as a calling shotgun and I'm like, let me go and it was like the smallest increment available I think was something like 10% share, you know, five or 10% share something like that. So I did just to say that, you know, I swooped in there, and the whole my spot is a premier agent. But you know, I was so busy I talk about horrible follow up you know, I never did it because I was busy with the the family friends of referrals, you know?Yep. And a lot of times people just buy leads just to say that they have something inbound, but very seldom do they even call them back. That's why Zillow went to referral model Why realtor.com went through referral model guys, you guys don't call back the lead you're given and you start hurting their brands. So they said, Fuck it, I'm gonna bring it in house and I'll convert them for these lazy sons of bitches. And then I'll give it to him and then I'll charge them triple the amount in the form of a referral fee because I'm selling them an appointment versus a frickin name and a number. Alright guys, so let's get I want to get into this how big the community first cuz I want to break I want to paint the picture how many people would you say are in your immediate area? If you were to give me a number on the population?Oh man. I think in our county alone, it's close to 300,000 people, you know, we're very suburbia, you know, there's no there's some country, suburbs, things like that. I heard um, you know, take it with a grain of salt. It was on a commercial, but I heard the Jacksonville area population, we're looking at around one and a half million.That's a big market,it's not gonna remember to that landmass wise, Jacksonville is the biggest city in the country. So that's 1.5 million over I think everyone by definition, like five counties.So does that mean like everything's filling in right now? Building and because a lot of land,there's land for a developer to step up. They're doing everything in their power to to do so.And let's get into this. You're running the brokerage? Are you still in production yourself?Right now? Those are refer out? My wife is my business partner. And we we procure business, but we refer to our agents good and compete, or do you wanna?So what I know you have some sort of system in office, you have to have something that your agents are implementing that are generate the referrals, probably something that stemmed off your own success?What are they doing? How are you doing this? Let's start at the agent level, let's take it to the brokerage level. Andthen how I'm sure you guys have like company sponsored events, agents ship enough of that, and all that stuff. It's a team effort. But let's start at the beginning. What are the agents doing? And what did you do to consistently generate those referrals? Because it's not like that's not a small population. If you're in a town of like, 20,000 people, then yeah, you might see John dick and Mary in the fucking grocery store every other weekend, and say hello to him. And that's how you're staying in touch with people. So there's like the local realtor, but when you're in a busy area like this, you have to do more than now you have to build a brand and you can't build a brand without consistently communicating or appearing for people. So what are the agents doing? What did you do in the past that built your brand to stay in front of people?Yeah, so the first thing that agents are really buying into is my style of farming, you know, you have your stereotypical farming from two decades ago, or it's a bunch of random mailers and everyone's sets, everyone's sending the same stuff. And you know, that, you know, more, let's call them season agents thing to that's sufficient, because they're seeing their their face and their contact information from the mailbox at the end of the driveway till they get to the trash cans, and garage. So we do mailers, for example, but we provide, we provide value, you know, my my neighborhood that I live in, for example, we send out two meal two meals per month, okay? One of them is statistics broken down, not just just sold or anything like that, we send out a average price point for the most for the three most recent sold for each 1000 square foot increments. So under 1999 square feet, the top three average was x 2000 to 2999 heated and cooled square foot, the average per foot was x and just keep going on. So people have some type of idea, you know, my neighborhood, for example, still being built right now but it's going to be approximately 5000 rooftops. So that's just an idea of you know, what's one area the next is, you know, like I said, I'm from the area so I have a lot of relationships with local businesses. So I'm teaming up with these businesses like let's talk about a coffee shop for example. Go to the coffee shop I said hey, you know, I'm I'm going to design mailers I'm going to pay for the distribution the mailing I'm gonna send them out would you be down for a save 10% off of $20 tab at a you know what you're paying for them? I mean, for a coffee shop that's nothing right that's that's a free introduction and I'm handling all the distribution so you know talk about a value add you know, everyone everyone in my neighborhood comes up to me on a weekly basis just thanking me for everything not only providing the you know, the valuation statistics for the property but as well as a coupon for a free cup of coffee you know, ifthere's one piece is one piece market driven then and then one piece is just more community Correct? Awesome. All right. So this is really good guys. Here's what I I don't know why I honestly cannot stand this about the industry is that every time we fucking communicate, we feel like we have to be selling something or getting something in return and you don't understand guys like for any of you that have faith like there's a constant like, it's very simple, you give and you get in return, right? There's a reason why people tie in, they set a certain certain things. And if you truly believe your use, what's the word he saw you see, or whatever it is, what you get, you'll get back in return. And you cannot like if you're just always selling, selling, and you're always like, just so just this or all of your content has to deal with how many listings you sold, your broker sold, instead of like caring about the damn community and actually being a servant of it. You don't ever obtain anything other than that you're just a salesperson chasing your next check in the eyes of most people. But when you start creating content, events, or anything that gives you the excuse to have a conversation with people, that's how you build a brand. I would bet that I could see why those two pieces would serve each other best. I guarantee you that people enjoy the information and the statistics, but the ones that they remember that are the personal ones. And then it Re and it sort of triggers them to be like, oh, yeah, by the way, I did get that one thing like your your sales should is better received because you're creating value.Well, it's everything compounding together like that what I was saying this day and age farming is so much different than it was two decades ago, you know, so you have those mailers. And on top of that, you know, one examples we had, with all the COVID crap going on everything we had a vendor fair but suited to all being at the neighborhood beauty center, it was a tour of people's driveways on them. I'm not gonna sell a house out of my driveway. So what did I do, I threw a big old block party, I got a food truck, the time I got out houses, got a video game truck to come down a guy playing live music, you know, that's what people are gonna remember. Now, as a part of, you know, what's going on, I got more people reached out to me than the freakin president of the HOA, yet all having to do with, you know, coming in all these different ways in regards to farming the you know, the community.And I like how you're outsourcing the cost to so like, you're not just I'm sure these businesses are giving you a couple bucks, and that's paying for the distribution. You're just the guy started organizing it, but it's your brand your face all over it. So what is your out of pocket on the mailers? And how many advertisers? Are you getting to actually cover the nut?Yeah, I mean, it's, it's not much I want to say it's something like 50 cents apiece, or something like that. And we're like I said, you know, we're going out of 1500 houses, you know, so we don't we don't put actual sponsors on the mailers. But what these businesses do in regards to cross promotion, as I said, it's all about scratching the back, right? So where it might be 750 bucks coming out of my pocket for this month, you know, these pencils, drawings, and these coffee shops and everything, you know, they they give back so much to my business. You know, for example, you know, the grand opening that we had on on Thursday, we had, I think seven different restaurants involved and I didn't spend a penny they're all giving back to me for helping them promote their business and really, you know, give back to the community in them by providing, you know, sushi boats and case studies and a cornbread bar and you know, stuff like that. And it's all like he said earlier, it's all about the giving back and the back scratching, and you know, things like that.Let's even pencil this out, though. So it's just this as far as direct mail pieces and you're sending to a month you're seeing your out of pocket costs is about $700 a month on that. Yeah. Alright, so this comes out to be at $400 a year. Okay, so just as just one channel, you guys, that's why you guys ever, what's your ROI? What's your ROI? All right, let's go fucking talk about the ROI Right Now. All right, $8,400, what's your average sales price in your market? 400. Okay, so he needs to sell three quarters of a house to break even over the course of the year, three quarters of a house, this is a full house three because it was a full house $400,000 would be $10,000 commission. So you need a quarter of a house you need 84% of a house is what he needs to sell two and a percent to break even. Okay, so, but here's the thing that everyone's gonna say. How can you trace back that ROI? Oh, my God, there's not a direct thing when you're building a brand, you never will. That's the power of a brand. Because I bet I guarantee he gets people that just call him from wherever. And it's the result of a combination of all the multiple forms of communication over time. That individual single one guys look atyou look at what the mailers doing to not only am I providing the value to my neighborhood of 5000 houses, but the business that I'm promoting. Yeah. Do you think they're the for Who do you think the first firm is that they're going to call when they have a new employee moving in or someone leaving or you know, whatever the case may be. So it's about scratching as many bags as possible and creating an excuse to appreciate and promote everyone else.When people ask us all the time when we do a obviously you guys don't know yet we script and distribute videos, people and people do a lot of different strategy but a lot of times people would say, Oh, why am I gonna do a business owner strategy? Well, it's a different your YouTube channel will never blow up doing business owner interviews, I'm sorry, no one's gonna go to your YouTube channel, like, this guy's the best business owner views ever, and you're just gonna become the next YouTube celebrity, doesn't mean it's a bad business video to create. So it's just a different strategy. And why I love that strategies, because when you start scratching the back of business owners, those are the largest referral sources you're ever going to come across. Because they all share a mindset, which is very entrepreneurial, you're more likely to get a referral from a business owner that a fucking liberal, put it that way. Alright, that's just the way it is. Sorry, but that's true business owners have a mentality mindset where they know how hard it is, and they will scratch your back. And that's what happens. Business owners always give more referrals than non business owners. I don't know why that is. I think it's just the way they're all wired. They're wired to serve, they're wired to give them their natural referral numbers. So when you create a community of these business owners, you're creating a community of referral sources. And every person's referral source, no one's a client. And it's a mindset thing, like everyone has the ability to refer you. Right, everyone lives somewhere. And everyone knows someone who's moving at least two or three years if you track but a certain percentage of those people and those business owners are going to be moving this year to and they don't even know it yet. Some of them are gonna get pregnant, some of them are gonna get divorced. But there's a move that's going to happen. And when you're thought of first 80% of people closing the first one they meet with, that's why attention matters. I love the mailers what else you're doing. You're not just doing mailers in the community, though.Oh, yeah, for sure.Let's go on to channel number two, because that's just one chat on your you're crushing it. I love it.Yeah, it's doing the events in the neighborhood. You know, every time there's a vendor fair or garage sale or all the above, find a way to get involved, you know, in my neighborhood and being sticklers about, who was able to be involved with the vendor fair that they had two weeks ago. So one of our raving fans that lives in the neighborhood is a she does she owns a little in house bakery that she you know, she takes out of her home does baked goods, cookies, cupcakes and things like that? Well, when I told her what happened that they wouldn't let you know, realtors insurance people, they wouldn't let services like that evolve, she goes cold. Why don't you just throw me a couple of bucks. And I'll put your logos on half of my on all these cookies that I make? And I'll just give out your business card and cookies for free to everyone there. Yeah, that's awesome. So you know, things like that. But you know,how many events are you guys do an A in? Are you at an all your agents are inviting their friends, their families and all that, right? So you're duplicating your efforts? Like youdo probably eight to eight to 10 events a year? No, that's not necessarily just in my neighborhood. Right? That's cute. That's period. You know, we do a crossing guard appreciation, Teacher Appreciation, first responder appreciation. We do. We used to call it a customer appreciation party. But I took the customer out of it and just left it appreciation because I'm wanting to throw, you know, a one big appreciation picnic and water to happy hours for not only the people who have close business with us, but who is referred to as our top preferred partners when it comes to you know, mortgages inspectors, you know, who's who's creating excuses to appreciate them. Everyone else in our industry just expects to take them while I'm going to send you a home inspection. Where's my lead? You know, we need to appreciate them to the site agents that's in the building industry. 30% of our buyers are new construction. Not a lot of people can say that. So who's appreciate who's appreciating appreciating the site agents? You know, it's finding excuse to appreciate all the people, especially those who aren't always appreciated.Yeah. And so I always get like, how does one of my top blog posts honestly, on my website is client appreciation events. And it's about a couple of different agents doing different things in their markets. And people in agents too, would always say, Hey, dude, I don't want to do an event that's going to cost me like $2,000. So I want everyone to change their mindset. If you were to buy in, if I said I'm going to give you 100 leads a month, most agents eyes would light up, we agree that 100 leads a month, but let's just break down what you're buying a lead for. What you're really doing is you're just buying a conversation, and you're buying a conversation that happens to be about real estate, which is why the conversion rates only going to be one to 3% Some people are looky loos some people are actually serious. 80% of them already have an agent and trust me, and then that small bit that actually transacts always reserved. So that one to 3% I don't care how many autoresponders or how good your follow up is. If you converted 4% God bless you. But those guys and gals are really doing well. They have all kinds of technology hidden from every which way to do that the average person isn't going to have that advantage. But when you're having a client party, and you're running into like 400 people at a time or 150 people time, you're still having conversations now, ever. So what do you mean like? Well, let's just do statistical because none of this stuff is theory, this is mathematical science, all of the conversations you're having, regardless if you're buying them, or if you're doing them naturally 10 to 15% of those people are moving, and 100% of those people have a referral for you. So we would have a lot of these client parties, we didn't do eight a year. I love that we do two a year six months. And we would just have mega bashes is like when I was like a total party animal. And I was like literally running out nightclubs, because I didn't have a kitchen. So I got it cheap. I dropped like 15k on a frickin club event like DJs, like lights, ice sculptures and shit. People would be talking about these events, and we'd had 700 at once was our highest was 800 700 people. But they would roll in and it was just a party. Four years down the road, I was still getting business from these parties because no other real estate guy ever threw like a rave, I guess if you want to call it that, but whatever it was, it was cool at the time would have been my script now. My point is, is that when you get to those, it's the conversations you have you guys in this whole business is about conversations, I'm gonna always says this is really simple. You got to get appointments, close appointments, get appointments, close appointments, that is horrible advice, have conversations, close conversations, and then add them to your database and then stay in front of them forever, because that's what it's not a matter of if they're gonna move. It's a matter of whenfolks one of the things you said Man, I know like you and I share so much the same, you know, point of view and outlook and all that is, you know, going back to the Zillow of life or whether it's Zillow, whatever these online leads are that people were lucky to convert 3%. And how much on average, do you think per month, people are putting into leads like that? Do you have any type of idea? Lots. Alright,so let's see, let's even call it didn't say1500 bucks. Okay, talk about ROI, where's your ROI going to go further 1500 bucks a month towards these vs cold leads of people you've never met before. Or put that same 1500 bucks into your warm sphere, the people you haven't met before the people who have already closed or referrals, you know that that ROI is easy, or you should be spending your money?Well, people try to because they're chasing transactions instead of referrals. That's why there's a major difference if I'm chasing transactions, and I'm going back to that 10 to 15% game, but when I'm chasing referrals, everybody's referral source it might not be today, but it might be tomorrow or might be in three months. I don't care when the referrals come in. I know it's coming though.100% 100% And like so many people in our business don't have this you know, this big picture view you know, even if you're working with a buyer right now and they decided they want to chill out and wait a couple years. Look whether they're closing with me tomorrow, or they're closing with us three years from now. I have enough confidence and you know us and what we do and our relationships and things like that I'm not worried about when the closings happening. Yeah, what I mean it's it's keeping the relationship Yep.Three to five houses man that's what people buy over the course of their lifetime. It doesn't include any people they can refer you to so yeah, you got to play the long game with us. Let's take this to social What do you guys do in stand in front of people on social I see the events I love the in person I love the direct mail what's happening on the social side are you guys doing content guys creating content and create any media and video stuff are you guys running campaigns ads, any any of that?So I actually just in the past few weeks, got into paying for Facebook ads, I've never done it before. And what we are doing is you know my favorite my favorite button to clip whenever you're filling out your your audience is the targeting your your friends and friends of friends. Because with us being all word of mouth and having such an awesome reputation in the community. Chances are if your friends have followers of our business page you've heard of us so all we're doing is giving you that value to like our page or to click on our website or call our office. Right that makes the most sense over again that's a warm lead to me versus cold you know paying for lights or you know this these random introductions or whatever. We have an awesome social media following on Facebook. Our Facebook business page has a process Really 9300 likes. And again, same type of thing is my mindset, you know, we do a lot, you know, testimonial Tuesday new listings, open house, you know, the stereotypical stuff that you have to do. But the other half of our strategy is giving spotlights to the businesses that support our business, you know, go check out this restaurant, this is our top lender, give them a call, give them an opportunity. This is our top inspector. So if you go through our social media, I would say probably 1/3, to half of our content is, you know, throwing referrals and throwing spotlights and throw in appreciation to all the companies and businesses that we work with, not only within, but outside the industry as well.So you're telling me if you start selling every other people's stuff for them, they're start selling your stuff for you.That's for me, it's all about showing appreciation, whether it's the parties with social media content, whatever it is,I'm gonna title this podcast appreciation. Someone then in that name? Yeah, that's awesome. Do you guys have a Facebook group yet? of all your friends and family?Of course, we have these late real estate community. And how engaging is that? Oh, that's fantastic. You know, my whole mindset behind that was to not only be a resource for all of our past customers past refers everyone you know, we want to we have over 900 members of it, but we wanted to still give it a sense of exclusivity. Yep. But I also want to take a step further and say, hey, you know, y'all are 900 Something people that we have past business and relationships with? Well, what can we do for dollars to work together and cross promote and network and things like that?Great. Yeah, I love that. If you notice, like, there's a theme here and it's not about us I don't think cola said I want on the show here. He's always said you are them. us if it was I reference. And that's just a lot of this mindset, you guys that you if you if you really want to build your brand, you can't fake it. You have to actually be compassionate about your own community and compassionate about what you do and all this stuff like that. I think that's half the reason a lot of people are you know, have commission breath. And they're just looking for the, they're looking for the next transaction. But, you know, at the end of the day, what we're saying here guys, is that you'll end up with plenty of transactions if you just started serving and stop selling. serve your community and most of your business is going to come from people right in front of you. It's gonna come from your Facebook friends or Instagram followers and people will follow you on Tik Tok nowadays, it's not going to come from a bunch of strangers. So I'm gonna come from people you don't know you're going to burn out how many agents have you seen burnout just start chasing lead chasing business as a broker and MC trained some of them that didn't want to invest in themselves? How many of them have you seen just going out of business?On a there's so many because I mean all all that these agency and the especially with the market, right and particular market in the Northeast Florida Association of Realtors get approximately 11,000 realtors, okay. Think about that versus 3300 listings active on the MLS those are insane numbers. And all they see is you know the hot market social media and frickin HGTV and all this stuff and they think it's just something you just go get in and easy money easy paychecks you know, they don't understand that you don't treat it like a nine to five you don't put in you know, I laugh at 40 hours. You don't put in full time hours. You're not going to get full time.Yeah. Yeah. Do you even have listing presentation you just show up inside paperwork?So show us on paperwork? Yeah, you know, we have you know, over my time you know, I've created our presentation based off of just experiences right? And so I have stuff that I will take with me and when the you know you read you read the seller right? So if their mindset is very detail oriented Well hey, you know I brought this packet with you I'm happy to go over it with you word by word. If they just want to hang out have a drink and have a conversation show me what the house looks like they're just gonna lead the way hey, you know if you can't get to sleep tonight you need some light reading then read what's on this folder? Yeah, you know but at this point with you know, our reputation and community and things like that it is Hey Cole something came up we're getting to transfer come over to paperwork real quick. And I'll keep those done.Yeah, it's actually work man. Well, dude, this is awesome show. appreciate you sharing anything anything else you want to addon? I'm not necessarily I think you and I could go all day long. You know, such such a similar mindset and and all that. You know, one thing that we are doing actually happened today I have a really close relationship with the Sheriff of St. Johns County, the county I live in he came to our ribbon cutting and everything. One of his community community relations deputies reached out to me said hey, you know when you donate 500 bucks for families? I think it was for families that need a meal on Thursday. By the time I had the time to say yes, he had already got someone else to say yes. So I was like, You know what, I wonder what the deputies are doing on Thursday. You know, the ones that have to work instead of being with their families. So you know, we're putting together this is literally two or three hours ago I'm getting off with you and taking it down to the sheriff's office we're putting together 39 tumblers koozies a $20 Visa gift card for the deputies to go grab lunch and they can be with their families you know that all an investment is $780 It ended up being okay but when these 39 deputies get you know something something like this you know for for the holiday when it can be with their families and just like a surprise token of appreciation you know, all that stuff adds up and do you have now wellhere's what we're talking about guys that's mindset he could have easily said oh shit, fine. Could have hung up the phone. You could have stopped but then Cole here says no sports quarter got to find out another way to spend that $800 Because he didn't care about the costs he cared about the impact well done.My my buddy that's the community affairs liaison or whatever. I texted them I said man, you hit me up for 500 bucks. You spent 800That's great. That's good. People support others who care man and serve it's just you know it's just a wired Yeah, it's what we're wired and if you give you're gonna get and if you continue to do the right thing by people it'll eventually pay off for you you know that surely firm believer net? Why don't you go ahead and tell everybody where they can find you on social if they want to follow you anything if they want you got your website or any of that and then we'll get the strap?Yeah, absolutely. Again, my name is Cole slate. My personal Facebook account is called slate. Our Facebook business page is slate real estate. That username is slate real estate 904 Instagram called slate My email address is cold at Slate dot real estate and our firm's website is www dot slate dot real estate.Appreciate it man awesome show and appreciate you guys listen other episodes of real estate marketing dude podcasts anything we could help you with script that distribute this video if you liked this concept of attracting business versus chasing it give us a call. I can't stand chasing business and I know you can't either and we'd love to help you start attracting it and be just like coal out here can't build your heart and I can build the attention around your brand and make sure no one forgets about who the hell you are what you do by creating content keeping that in front of people all done for you so you can visit us a real estate marketing do.com real estate marketing comm check out some of our other products listing advocate calm and if you're a broker owner check out our software all in one transaction management at Sweet assist.com We appreciate you guys have a good one. Thanks for the follows reviews and connect with us on social media you guys next week. Peace Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Serienjunkies Podcast
Dexter: New Blood - Storm of Fuck?

Serienjunkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 65:36


Tonight's the night! Hanna und Bjarne besprechen den Auftakt der Weiterführung der erfolgreichen Serie Dexter. Nach acht Staffeln und mit fast zehn Jahren Pause ist Dexter Morgan alias Jim Lindsay (Michael C. Hall) ein Shop-Angestellter in einer Kleinstadt. Sein „dunkler Begleiter“ wird jedoch wieder aktiviert. Unser Podcastteam bespricht die komplette erste Episode von Dexter: New Blood und wird ab der 30. Minute die zweite und dritte Episode der neuen Staffel besprechen. Achtung Spoiler. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gen X Guide To The Universe
A Very Special Episode: FUCK HOT BIRD

Gen X Guide To The Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 16:21


You know you didn't ask for a bonus episode and likely didn't realize you wanted a bonus episode, but here's a very special episode for Thanksgiving! Heather is spending the day in Connecticut with family wearing softpants, Jameson is cooking a turkey boob for family and friends, both are avoiding the Beehive Bowl. And when you watch the parade today, enjoy Sonic the Hedgehog who's returning and is “hungry for blood” (https://tinyurl.com/5ctzd8hw). Tune in next week when we return to MTV and Unplugged.

Think B4U Speak Debate Podcast
"Yaddamean Fuck" w/ Cue Reckless

Think B4U Speak Debate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 50:09


Think B4U Speak has made it to episode 80 and prepared to keep going! This week they have special guest Cue Reckless to bless the 80th show! Let's get it!

Motivation | Health | Self Help with JV Impacts
E1127 | Perfection Is Going To Fuck You Up!

Motivation | Health | Self Help with JV Impacts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:47


E1127 | Perfection Is Going To Fuck You Up! I Fuck Up All The Time. I am not looking to be perfect. I am looking to be better. Listen Now! Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping | Promo code 20WARRIORS at MANSCAPED.com Free Discord | https://3twarrior.com/discord49541345 90% OFF WARRIOR ACADEMY! JOIN TODAY! (CRYPTO/MINDSET) | https://3twarrior.com/90percentoff 3T Warrior Academy YouTube! | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_e0zCKJyBdLYAvTQBgQrPw 3T Labs Gear and Supplements |https://www.3twarriorlabs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

F**k This Shit Podcast

Season 2 wraps up with an episode detailing each time I've been to jail and all the fun stuff that comes with that. Also stories of me trying to out-drink my dad, my thoughts on Kyle Rittenhouse, and some exciting news about next year! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

That Being Said w/George & Sami
Week 12 NFL Mascot Matchups + 3 Best & Worst QBs in the NFL Right Now... OOF

That Being Said w/George & Sami

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 70:22


Pod That: Two Brothers Talking Sports are back! George & Sami did their 3 Stooges and 3 Kings of NFL QBs as always (1:20), plus the NFL Mascot Matchups for Week 10 (29:14) & Last, the Get To Know You section! ( ) Don't forget to DM us your questions, stories, thoughts, ideas & more @PodThat Instagram for 'Get To Know You' at the end of the pod. Leave us your best MESSAGES...Fuck it, make it anything: https://anchor.fm/podthat With that said, George & Sami Jarjour of Pod That are in full force!.... Go to www.BetUS.com and use promo code: PodThat to get 125% bonus on whatever you deposit. Brought to you by the Sports ON Tap (SONT) - www.TheSportsOnTap.com Pod That Twitter & Sports ON Tap Twitter Pod That Instagram & Sports ON Tap Insta Pod That Facebook --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podthat/message

SuperFeast Podcast
#143 Why The Weak Are Crumbling Right Now with Jost Sauer

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 62:36


Over the past two years, the world has witnessed an onslaught of lifestyle stress and disruption brought on by a global pandemic and its ripple effects. The mental stability of many has suffered, and we are currently witnessing a mental health implosion like never seen before. On the podcast today, with remedy and reason for staying robust and ready for any invasion (microbial or psychological), we have our favourite lifestyle medicine man/Qi practitioner, Jost Sauer; Supercharging us with wisdom and guidance on maintaining sovereignty and strength. If you're a regular listener of the SuperFeast podcast, your ears have most likely been blessed with Jost's lifestyle elixirs before.   Given the current circumstances, we thought it was time for another injection of Jost's knowledge, guidance, and warrior mindset. This episode carries a potent message of going within, getting back to earth, and taking care of our inner world, our health, and not being sucked into noisy distractions of the outside world. Jost shares his insights on approaching COVID as a personal growth strategy; An opportunity for a new level of growth not yet encountered, and a reason to nourish the body, spirit, and essence. Jost also breaks down simple Daoist instructions on how to get in sync with nature, our organs, protect our Jing, Qi, and Shen, and follow the path of yin and yang; So we can maintain sovereignty and strength, no matter how many times we get knocked down. Be sure to tune in for this poignant, powerful conversation.     "If the blood gets weak, we get caught up in politics. If the blood is strong, we feel good within ourselves; And if we feel good within ourselves, we stay detached. That's all it is. So when I talk about detachment, it requires strong blood and strong Jing. Just focus on your Jing, focus on your blood, take your herbs, take your mushrooms, live the lifestyle, and that's really all there is; The rest will come naturally".   - Jost Sauer      Host and Guest discuss:   Signs of depleted/weak blood and Jing. The best hours for deep rest, and why. Why blood/Qi levels are at an all-time low. How fear triggers weakness within the body. Lifestyle practices to harness and guard Jing. The Metal element Lung-Kidney relationship. The importance of having a spiritual connection. Why we guard the three treasures; Jing, Qi, Shen. Why people are feeling depleted and weak right now. Following the Qi cycle model to strengthen blood/Jing. Why rest and recovery are essential for a robust immune system. Supporting your health/wellbeing through consistency and lifestyle. The body/mind connection and how weak blood/Jing leads to a weak mind.     Who is Jost Sauer? Jost (aka the lifestyle medicine man) was born in Germany in 1958 and is an acupuncturist, author, Qi practitioner of 40 years, and healthy lifestyle expert. His background includes competitive skiing, body-building, and ironman training. Post-drug addiction and suicidal depression led him to martial arts, TCM, the power and cycle of Qi, and the understanding that a natural rhythmic lifestyle holds the secrets to anti-aging, health, and success. Jost has been using lifestyle therapeutically for his clients for over 20 years. Jost is an expert in Chinese Medicine, which he lectured in for over a decade at the Australian College of Natural Medicine, has been running successful health clinics since 1991, initially specialising in addiction recovery, and has treated tens of thousands of clients. His passion is sharing his ongoing discoveries about making lifestyle your best medicine through his books, blogs, articles, workshops, and retreats (all of which we linked in the resources below).   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Jost Website Jost Facebook Jost Instagram Jost Youtube Jing Blend SuperFeast Eucommia Bark SuperFeast The 15 Minute Bodyweight Workout Higher and Higher Book - Jost Sauer  Chi Health Cycle- Jost Sauer's new book Qi Cycles And The Dao with Jost Sauer (EP#48)   Lifestyle Medicine with Accupuncturist Jost Sauer (EP#63) The Importance of Sleep For Healthy Hun and Qi with Jost Sauer (EP#102)     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Okay. Jost, Welcome back, man.   Jost Sauer: (00:03) Yeah, welcome back. Nice to be back on here again, I think.   Mason: (00:07) Yeah, I think fourth podcast?   Jost Sauer: (00:11) Must be.   Mason: (00:11) Look at this [inaudible 00:00:12] I'm sorry. I'm so excited. Mostly because I know the realms we're going to be touching on. But I'm genuinely excited. I know the pace that you move in and your chemical process is transforming at such a rate that I know I'm going to hear things from you and the way that you've synthesise them based on all this material that's going on in the world. I'm going to hear it completely newly plus some new downloads. I can't wait. Let's jump straight in. How you going at the moment and how you are finding the world and where's your work taking you?   Jost Sauer: (00:50) Okay, look, I've been working with people for 40 years now. It's 2021, I started in 1981. And so obviously, originally I started in social work. The focus on mental health always was the main focus. So 40 years working with people you come across a lot of stories, and you really observe people's inner world, because you have to dig in. But what I'm experiencing the last year, what I've observed in the last year, I have not observed before. That's obviously something a totally new game that's playing and impacting on people more than all the other ramifications and troubles and tribulations I worked with in the past. Obviously, stress level is going through the roof, and because the question was about how I cope with this, I mean, from a Chinese medicine perspective, stress is a good thing. I mean, when we do tai chi, we stress the body. We need the stress in order to evolve. And so the body is actually designed to unleash forces during stress that otherwise wouldn't come forward. There's obviously a massive growth potential right now, if we know what to do.   Jost Sauer: (02:14) If you don't know what to do, then it's obviously, it can be a killer. It can really destroy you. And so the key element is here that without a stress factor, that means churning on the organs and churning on the blood, we can't actually produce vital forces. The one thing we can do to the body is to be lazy. Sit around all day, be comfortable, and just waiting for things to happen, and get delivered the action, rather than us actually stimulated to act on stressful situation and needing to get up and dig deep. Especially, dig very, very deep, and unleash forces that otherwise we didn't know we had. There's obviously always a principle of all-growth factors. We get thrown into a situation, we didn't know we could cope with, and suddenly, we discover we got vital forces available to us that before we couldn't. So from a Chinese medicine perspective, that would say, "The universe would never give us a problem if we don't have the potential to cope. The universe would never give us a situation if you don't have the ability to grow from."   Jost Sauer: (03:23) It's almost like the situation that we're facing, it's like what a martial artist would look at. Is that COVID, the virus, it's a threat, but it tries to invade the body, and we need to fight against it. So in order to fight against it, we will get stronger. It's like a battlefield right now and we need to look at life we are at war. But the war is a little bit tricky because it's not only COVID, the virus, it's also the government and it's also Big Pharma, and it's also people will buy into a belief pattern that are definitely based on some sort of like development from the dogmatic foreign politics and big business. So the enemy is not really direct. Personally, I'm not worried about COVID because I know what to do, but I'm more worried about what the government is going to do.   Mason: (04:31) I'm curious there because you said in 40 years, you haven't you haven't ever seen anything like this, and with your patients and with people that you're talking to. We talked about cracks showing, big crack showing mental health issues been gone through the roof. I'm curious. There's a few ways to approach this question. Now, what is it about the approach? What is it about that? The virus, the pharmaceutical companies, the media. Why are so many people... Let's say if no one has a challenge that maybe you don't get through it, but you do have the potential if you make the right choices to get through this challenge, why are people stumbling more than ever? What's tripping them up that's leading to so much mental disharmony and how are people going to get back into a flow and meet this battle in staying mentally healthy?   Jost Sauer: (05:25) The primary reason is, people's core is deficient and weak as never been before. From a Chinese medicine perspective, people's blood and chi level is at an all time low. That's as a result of having lived a life in comfort, too much in comfort, or the life of not needing to work as hard physically. Instead, to hand over to the computer to do the work. So means, getting up and sitting down and straight, alleging all the work done mentally and wire the computer without engaging bodily function, which would produce blood. Blood production is vital in China's medicine, because that's your fuel, that's your Elixer, that's your life. If your blood is strong, you got passion, you got drive. You want to express yourself, and you feel strong. This is the most important thing if the blood is healthy, your Jing is healthy, you feel strong. If your blood is deficient, and your blood is unhealthy, you feel weak. Of course, when you feel weak, you need to be protected, you've got the instinct, I need to get protected.   Jost Sauer: (06:42) And so over the last 10 years, society has depleted their blood, their Jing and their Chi, and therefore progressively year after year feeling more and more weak. And so people are actually starting to reach a point now where they feel weak just by getting up and all day they feel weak. And having observed people for 40 years, I must say this year is probably the highest number of weak people I've ever seen. I do regular workplace wellness talks. I'd go to companies and I talk about health measurements. And the last few weeks the talks I've been doing in particular last week, I was talking to a company, and there were 60 people in the audience. I've never seen so many weak people in one spot. I'm not judgmental, but I'm observing and I know what to look for. I know the signs of when blood is deficient. I know what to look for when the Jing is deficient. And I look at the face, I look at the way their [inaudible 00:07:41] the posture, the body, and I can see, "My God, these bodies aren't producing enough blood. Not producing enough Jing." If they don't produce enough blood and Jing, your self awareness is tempered by your psychological self profile of being, I am weak.   Jost Sauer: (08:00) If I feel weak, I am prone to accept the protection from a higher instances. That's why the government obviously now is doing all this fear mongering in order to trigger that weakness, and then obviously people are, "I need to get protected. I need to get protected." If that would have done the same thing, like 2,000 years ago to a village, [inaudible 00:08:25] the Vikings they wouldn't have had a problem. They would have got up and put the sword up and, "Get the fuck out of here. You don't get fuck with us." But if I feel weak, and the fear comes in, obviously, I defeat myself. So obviously, in all ancient cultures, the most important thing is, always nourish your essence. Always nourish the treasures. The Jing, the Chi, the Shen, because that gives you the feeling of being strong. If you feel strong, you will ward off enemy. If someone tries to invade the village, you are ready to attack, you're ready to fight. And obviously, I mean, people would say it was done [inaudible 00:09:17], whatever it is. Over the last 10 years, the lifestyle has led to a high level of lifestyle disease as never before. So we're looking at an enormous number of people dying because of lifestyle disease. But fundamentally, lifestyle disease is the deficiency in the vital forces. And that is really the real problem.   Mason: (09:38) When you talk about weakness, I can't help but just bring up in my terminology, like a weak mind. And we know the blood is transporting the Shen, our mental acuity to the rest of the body. And I do so to bring up the term "weak mind" because I know that people will think what I'm saying is, if you go and trust the government, you have a weak mind. Or if you go and do ABC, you have a weak mind. But it's not that it's what... You've nailed it. You bought into the fear, and you've got a weakness within yourself that you're not self generating, and you can topple over. And so you reach for a higher power an institution to tell you what to do. I mean I always feel, there's people listening to this that are choosing one road or the other road. I know, people that have beautifully with a strong mind, choosing to do medical interventions, and I know other people that are just freaking out with a weak mind and choosing to do that same thing. And there's a very big difference there. I love the way that you describe that man.   Jost Sauer: (10:41) I mean, the mind in Chinese medicine is affiliated with the substance, and that is obviously once again, connected to an organ. When we talk stronger mind, we don't really talk stronger mind, we talk strong organ, strong blood, which then means you have a strong mind. It's like, in order to experience power, you need a strong engine. And so the body-mind connection is obviously always number one in Chinese medicine. And so when we're talking about a weak mind, what we mean is, "I got weak blood, I got weak Jing."   Mason: (11:25) [crosstalk 00:11:25] no will no capacity to have that will take on responsibility for yourself.   Jost Sauer: (11:29) Yeah. If you if the battery's low, you feel defeated. If you've got lots of Jing, lots of power, lots of blood, and you're wrestling with someone or you go for a run, obviously you're trying to win. But if you come at the end of a marathon, and you're completely depleted, the battery is empty, and then someone tackles you, you would give in to the power invasion and say, "Okay. I can't do it anymore." That's what we see now. On the line is that people can't do it anymore. I hear this all the time now in clinic and when I do my talks, "I can't do this anymore. I had enough. I can't do this anymore." So when the battery is empty-   Mason: (12:16) Do they just mean life in general or?   Jost Sauer: (12:18) What they say with that is, "I can't fight against this anymore."   Mason: (12:21) Yeah, right.   Jost Sauer: (12:22) I had enough. I can't fight. It's too much fighting. But what it means it's like saying, "If we would have the same problem we have now 30 years ago, it wouldn't have been a problem." 30 years ago, people were still much healthier than what they are now. So 30 years ago, Jing and blood on a communal level was four or five times higher what it's now, if you want to give it a hypothetical figure.   Mason: (12:52) People that were like a strong piece of German rye bread versus a piece of flabby tip top white bread these days.   Jost Sauer: (13:00) Yeah, yeah. It's been too long. But the most important thing is obviously, the endless stimulation and lack of sleep. When it comes to what builds blood, every effort will tell you, it's recovery. We work hard, we get stressed, we work hard, we recover. We engage with the stimulus, we work hard we get our best, we recover. That's a principle that all the ancients have been doing. The vikings you fight hard, and then you recover. But recovery is now completely impaired in the western society, because recovery requires a deep, nourishing sleep. And for recovery purposes, the best sleep is before midnight. 9:00 PM go to bed, and then you sleep beautifully till two or three. So you got this six-hour sleep. The sleep before midnight is like four or five times more powerful than the sleep after midnight. That has been established already in the old times from way back. Everyone knows you got be trying to get that sleep before midnight. I still remember back in the early '80s, when I came to Australia, television stopped at 10:30 PM.   Mason: (14:22) It goes, "Fyiii."   Jost Sauer: (14:24) Good night everyone. And those of us who stayed up and smoked lots of bongs, we were staring at that ABC symbol for endlessly.   Mason: (14:37) I've vague memories, vague memories of that little like rainbow.[crosstalk 00:14:41]   Jost Sauer: (14:44) It was totally hilarious. The way I looked at it. Shit is still the same shit. But what it meant, good night, everyone. Let's go to bed. If you didn't go raging and partying, you actually had your sleep. And then you went to bed and there was no stimulation. But over the last 10 years, that has been dramatically changed. So first of all, television has gotten several channels now so it goes on 24/7, then you got the internet. But the next problem is the smartphone. Obviously, that means people have the phone, the stimulation brought up into the midnight and later. And so the body never actually goes into the recovery mode. There is absolutely no traces anymore for us to recover proper. Therefore, people would say, I just had enough I can't cope anymore. If exercise constantly, if you do like one of those ultra marathons and you do three, four days in a row, after the fourth day, you would say, "I had enough." You need to go home, you need recovery.   Jost Sauer: (16:04) Recovery is something that has been taken outside the equation of our lifestyle, we don't have that anymore. And so it's just people taking emails home, people working. I mean, we get emails that, when me see that next morning, when we go through the emails like after breakfast when I turn my computer on, I see emails have been sent at 2.00 AM, 1:00 AM and things like that. And especially with all those lockdowns people going working later into the night. And so obviously, all that impacts on the blood. And so the vital force needs to be replenished. If the vital force is not replenished through effective recovery, we're getting weaker. You would never see a martial art fighter in the UFC, before a big fight, having six weeks stay up all night. You never hear that. Never hear that. I live in the martial art world, I love martial art, and that need you to be strong because you don't know what that opponent is about. You don't know what the fight is going to be. You got to be prepared. You don't know the outcome. It's all about being as prepared as possible. You don't go in unprepared, you've got to be totally prepared. And then you're ready for surprises to come forward. Suddenly you discover a strength you didn't know you had.   Jost Sauer: (17:33) And this strength, this power that suddenly comes through, is stored in your blood, and it's stored in your Jing, and it's stored in your kidney. Your kidney stores the essence. And so therefore, the lifestyle of the fighter, or the female fighter, because there's a lot of incredible female fighters out there now, like women I would not face up to. I wonder, "My god, their power is mind boggling." But when you look at their lifestyle, all of them, early to bed, up early especially before an event in order to get the maximum recovery. And because we are at war now, we got to understand, "Okay, the only choice we have right now is, we're going to just protect and guard our essence." Those government, I mean, I nearly said those government assholes. It's absolutely it's fiery it's what they're doing now.[crosstalk 00:18:37] off their heads. It's complete insanity. They should all be shot. That's it, finished, start new. It's almost like we need a revolution shot at everyone's head and start again. I mean, it happened before in the past. They're crossing the line, they're crossing the line.   Mason: (19:01) The whole nature. I mean, I remember our last podcast went into sleep as well. And I want to keep on talking about it. Because we're not listening. I know why. I've I haven't. I mean, but I'm kind of like that battlefield. This is what we're looking at. We don't know how long and we don't know what's coming next. I have a lot of friends that when I do talk about it from this combative kind of mindset, and I also kind of have faith and trust in the process and I just simply do. I have, as we both know, there's that yin yang goes, on the Dow and something's going to happen eventually. There's going to be opposite reactions and I love having faith with that. It doesn't mean that I don't also call a spade a spade and acknowledge that there is a huge assault on the natural human right now. And so, the battlefield... And lot of your posts recently that spurred me to kind of get you on again, is just like I might be putting my own terminology into it. How do you maintain your sovereignty and not get knocked over, regardless of your choices through all of this? How do you guard your centre, guard your essence, and remain you and don't get compromised?   Mason: (20:21) Don't lose this battle essentially. The fact that you've gone up going to sleep, it's such an unlikely battlefield, isn't it?   Jost Sauer: (20:28) Yeah.   Mason: (20:29) Because right now we need stamina. We don't know how long this is going to go for. Maybe everyone forgets about it, like next February. Who knows what comes next? Who knows how much corporate interest and pharmaceutical interest goes in trying to the claim ownership over the human body? Who knows regardless of what choices you make, hopefully strong choices, not from fear, how much do you stay an individual. And the first battlefield the fact that you've gone back to sleep, and I feel like something's ringing in me right now. Because I have not been treating it as such. And I can feel I'm like, "Now, this is where you need to start." And I will ask you what other elements you see emerging as going, "These are the basics that you need to be aware of in order to stay within the natural and not fall over into reliance." But I really appreciate you hitting that space again. For the sake of our sweet kidneys and livers.   Jost Sauer: (21:30) Yes. And spleen. First of all, I always remind myself that being here in the physical is a battle. All the ancient scriptures, the Bhagavad Gita is based on a battlefield, the Taoist look at being in the physical is a battle, is a fight. That's why they're all trained warriors. The sea culture that I've studied quite extensively under, they carry a dagger and a sword with them all the time. So they understand that you've got to be a warrior or a female warrior. And so we are in battle. So the nature of the physical of planet Earth is, it's a battle. It's a battle between good and bad, yin and yang and so you got that constant struggle between one force trying to override the other force. You always have, obviously, from a Taoist perspective is like the source of inspiration. There are two forces, there's a dark force and there's the light force. And depending on how you live, and what you want, you will be guided by that source of inspiration.   Jost Sauer: (22:53) So if you got sinister motives and incentives, you will be guided by the source of inspiration that comes from a darker source. If you have a well being in mind of all humanity, you affirm with the lighter force, then obviously, your source of inspiration will be the light and you will be guarded accordingly. The support is obviously always behind the scene from either force. So Big Pharma, those people, obviously, their source of inspiration comes from the darker side, where, obviously, us freedom fighters, our source of inspiration comes from the light. So that means we have our connection to the light, they have their connection to the dark. And so behind the scene, those forces will actually move through us in order to act on us. For some reason, this planet Earth, which is considered planet number four, in the constellation of developments towards the journey of the soul towards higher realms, this is always been the planet of war and peace or the battle in order to understand the forces within.   Jost Sauer: (24:06) For example, they've identify that there's trillions and trillions of viruses in our body and those viruses fight each other all the time. Some of them are good and some of them are bad, and that the battlefield that creates the field of yin and yang, and that creates actually, what that physical makes up to be. And so it is dark and light, wet and dry. And so as a result of that is we got our existence, and that then shapes us somehow. So every morning, I remind myself that that is actually what we're here for, to engage with that field. And that's obviously the yin and the yang and the readiness to prepare to fight. And so then the next thing is that Taoism in particular has given us a lot of instructions, how to deal with that battle, how to fight the battle. So the first thing what they do is obviously they have identified the lifestyle. And the lifestyle is those who follow the path of yin and yang will become invisible to those who try and to control yin and yang.   Jost Sauer: (25:20) Big Pharma tries to control yin and yang. If you follow the path of yin and yang, you got under the radar. And this is something been said for thousands of years. So what we're experiencing right now has not been here before. It's just like in our lifetime, for the past 40 years, we haven't experienced it to such intensity. But it has been before many times and it's been observed in the history of Taoism and Buddhism all along, which is why obviously, those cultures always dedicate themselves to prayer and worship towards the forces, so that the group forces support them. And if you obviously you don't do that, then you may not have as much support. So obviously very important is to have a spiritual connection. Very, very strong, just be firmly grounded in a spirit of connection every morning to, "Boom. All right, I am a fighter of the light, I am connected to the light, I want the light." And obviously in that moment, it will come through to us. Every time you say, "I am light," bang, it's there.   Jost Sauer: (26:28) Obviously, if I can neglect that I weaken my position. That means I am on my own and that is not a good idea. I mean, my genetic background is, I'm the Viking. That's my philosophy, the Viking philosophy. The Vikings were enormously grounded and connected to the spirit of belief, that would not go into battle without being spiritually connected. That was their absolute most important thing. I am spiritually connected to my spiritual path, and when I lose my body, I will continue my battle. And that's all the training I've had all along with the Masters I studied under for all those years, that the spiritual of connection is crucial. So if you've got the spiritual connection, that means you actually feel supported. And then you understand deep down, "Okay." It's all part of life what we go through now.   Jost Sauer: (27:23) So the next thing is that Taoism has given us the instructions about how to nourish this body so we can fight effectively, such that we can keep getting up because what makes a good warrior, a strong warrior is the person who keeps getting up. They get flogged but they get up again. Like Rocky said, "It's not about how hard you can punch, it's about how hard you can get punched." It's about getting up again. That's why all those Rocky movies are great, because he just gets flogged, he gets up again, gets flogged, gets up again. And that's the spirit. That's the spirit that we need. Of course, they're trying to flog us, but that's the nature of the game. If I go into the ring for a sparring session, of course I get flogged. But I also keep getting up.   Mason: (28:26) That tenacity and that knowing that no matter what happens, I'm never giving up. I'll never going to stop. That connection. And then you come back to lifestyle, which is always amazing. Lifestyle [inaudible 00:28:42] it's always so fun to forget that it comes back to the consistency and lifestyle. That that's the thing that's going... And always when you start getting battered and beaten a little bit and you feel like you're losing your way, you get up, you go right. I'm going to get into my bad habits again. I'm going to like, [crosstalk 00:28:59]   Jost Sauer: (29:06) That's boom. That's a downward spiral.   Mason: (29:06) Well, and that's what you reiterate here because what we were talking about is our capacity to stay within our warrior, within our warriors centres, within our natural self with strong blood with a connection to what our own unique spiritual path is, to regardless of what choices you make know that you're not compromising and that you're willing to just get up again and again and again no matter what life throws at you, you never give up and hopefully doing so without deteriorating as you go along. Ideally doing it that way. Again we've talked about sleep. For you, going back into those basics and what's going right now, why are the cracks widening and people being exposed mentally having weak blood and weak bodies and then showing I can't do this anymore. I can't get up anymore. What are we introducing again to the lifestyle? Why don't we just reminding everyone about it, what we need to be doing and what are our staples and what of our flows in order to keep that blood strong?   Jost Sauer: (30:05) Okay, before we get into that, China's Medicine says that your blood and your Jing is your armour. If I live incorrectly, it's like, I'm going into battle and throw away the armour. I don't need it. So guarding the one is the holy mantra, the highest mantra in Daoism. Guard the one, and the one is your blood, your Jing, your Shen the treasures. Obviously that means I need to understand that this requires a certain life. If I live incorrectly, I will throw away the armour. That means, bullets will enter. The sword will get me, because the attack is obvious. I mean, anyone can see now that we are under attack. So when you get under attack, you're going to put the armour on. So obviously, it's not about choice anymore it's about a necessity. We need to shift in our mindset that it's not about, "Well, I'm going to say up late tonight, whatever." No. You got to put your armour on. Because if I don't follow the rules of Dao, if I don't follow the natural laws, those fuckers will get me. Whatever Bill Gates, whatever those fuckers are, they will get me. But if my blood is strong, he fucking can't get me. It's a promise of all masters, if our Chi is strong they   Jost Sauer: (31:40) That's why they do all this technique. That's why they're trying to undermine you. They're trying to make you weak. Because if you weaken your blood, they can get into you. It's a war tactic. Dismantling the beautiful castle, dismantle the foundation. First of all, we need to understand we are it's an urgency right now. It's not about a debate anymore. It's like we have no choice. We've got no choice other than nine o'clock, nine thirty, you got to turn off that phone. If you're not, Bill Gates is going to get you and fuck you. And he will. If not, there's going to be Pfizer, or some other fucking spike protein shit going on. Some other moderated gene that's coming next time. They're gonna have a lot of weapons, they haven't even started yet. But it's all part of a process and they will never do anything if our blood is weak. They can't get in. It's been a [inaudible 00:32:46] and it's been forever like that. The strong will always survive. It's how it is. And the strong are the blood and the Jing.   Jost Sauer: (32:56) So therefore, first of all, we need to switch the mind to, it's not about free of choice anymore. It's about we have no choice. It's because of those big pharma. We got no choice. We don't live in peaceful times anymore. There's rockets throwing everywhere now. And so it's silly to go without putting the armour on. It's totally silly. But when the armour is on they can't pierce yourselves. That's how it is. That's the first thing. The mindset needs to take you from choice to urgency, so I don't have any choice. We are at war, they are after me, they're trying to get me. And if my blood is strong, they can't get me. That's the first thing. So the next thing is obviously, to develop the discipline to ward off to the demands of the physical to be stimulated 24/7. We got to just ward that off and say, "Okay, if I'm stimulated 24/7 I jeopardise my recovery phase. If I jeopardise my recovery, my armour will get weak. My blood will get weak. Jing will get weak, so I got no choice."   Jost Sauer: (34:21) That means the Chi cycle is in fact, the ultimate model right now because it tells you what to do. The Chi cycle is like the model that will strengthen our blood, our Jing. All along, it's a system to make us strong, so we can live our path, so that we can follow up on our ideas without getting infected or impacted by those who are trying to stop us. And so obviously, that means we need to understand that it's there to support us. Once again, the universe will not give us a challenge without giving us all the possibilities to succeed. It's in old scriptures. Whatever God is, whatever that higher consciousness is it, it will constantly give us challenges, but it has given us also the ability to succeed. So it's within us.   Jost Sauer: (35:23) It's just like the dark forces like Bill Gates and Big Pharma. They know that. They're really sneaky little shits, because they're undermining you why you believe. So they give you a 24 simulation, they give you all the beautiful gadgets so that you are completely addicted to it 24/7, so you're lost in it, so all your blood gets weak and weak and weak, year by year, so you feel weaker all the time so they can get in and get you. It's not much point demonstrating against those guys, it's more important to build our blood and Chi because then they can't do anything.   Mason: (36:07) It's a huge point. It's the classic point, make your own bed before you go out and try and change the world. It's never been more palpable. As you're saying, we are on. We are on at the moment in terms of thinking that, "Going out and protesting, fine." A part of really does love that, regardless of what it's for, I really love watching people go and do that. But as you said, that's secondary. To you taking responsibility-   Jost Sauer: (36:42) That's it. It's secondary. Of course, we need demonstrating. We need to speak up. Of course, we need to speak our truth. But you need to have your armor up, you got to be strong. You got to believe in yourselves. And really just, "Fuck, you can't get me." I mean when I was young, back in the days as an anarchist in Germany, I was facing up against the cops. We were fighting the cops in demonstrations. They came to us with their plastic shields just like Melbourne. They came up with their rubber bullets and their gas bombs. So they're in formation, they matched towards us. And obviously, we learned very quickly, we also need to be armoured. And obviously, I learned all the tricks how to get armoured. And so obviously, then you can actually go face-to-face with that force. Because there is a psychological warfare, fundamental and underlying to that, that is far more impactful and far more sinister. And that psychological warfare wards off, can't get in if your blood is strong.   Jost Sauer: (37:51) Jing is stored in the kidneys. Jing is just your shield that's like the shield of a strong animal. Like when you look at a tiger, that's Jing. And of psychological warfare of the tiger. And of course, if there's this little mosquito bang warfare goes in. And obviously, but the beauty of that is, we have got all the tools available to get so strong, we got all the tricks, we know everything how to get so strong, stronger than those guys who are trying to screw us. Stronger than Bill Gates. And when I look at those Big Pharma dudes, they don't look strong. If I would have a wrestling match with them, I would flock them on the ground straightaway. They don't have that power. But they have these collective cheers, this psychological warfare, but they're not strong warriors. They're just like, they actually are weak. Imagine as one of those guys, by yourself on a street, it would be a totally different scenario. Look at Bill Gates. Look at him. It's just like if I probably move a little flag on his face, he will break his arm.   Mason: (39:05) I have this I have this joke. I'm not sure if I'll ever be allowed to do stand up comedy again at this point. I have this joke that I'm with Bill Gates, that when you look at his body, it's so flabby that they call it the antibody. They talk about the fact that when he has sex with his wife imagine all the vaccine sexual innuendos that she has to put up with. But just looking at the fact that, "Oh my God," Bill Gates, the antibody. When he has sex with his wife, he inoculates her and then she has his antibodies in him. He's the human vaccine.   Jost Sauer: (39:52) Yeah. It's very twisted. I know exactly what you mean. I mean, in order to get into that lifestyle of what they're doing, in order to have that intent, you got to be twisted psychologically in the first place. And then obviously getting evolves this loss force of the source of inspiration in order to keep you going. Obviously, they're going to twist you more and more and more, because they suck out Jing. Dark forces live on Jing. It's like vampires. They live on Jing. So they're sucking you out-   Mason: (40:19) Can you talk a little bit about that how Jing... With the fear cycle, I assume it's something to do with them. How exactly is that Jing funnelled off and out of somebody?   Jost Sauer: (40:32) Okay. It's metal element, which is the prime element to armour the Jing. So the metal element is lung. Your lung communicates with the kidney, kidney-lung communicating. Pathologies are the result of kidney-lung not harmonising or kidney-lung not communicating. For example, a lot of pathologies develop because people's inability to breathe correctly. When we breathe in, we take the Chi from the kidney, from the lower path, right up to the lungs, but then we're going to ground it again in the lower path in the lower genitals. And when you look at the whole spectrum of your breath, starting at the sacrum, going right up to the upper chest, so pathology develops, if that ratio that gets smaller and smaller and smaller. It starts initially as the whole range, but then the range gets smaller and smaller and smaller, till people only breathe in the upper region, only the upper region. Now they're not communicating, lung and kidney not communicating anymore. And that obviously when pathology starts to develop.   Jost Sauer: (41:48) When you have sex, automatically you engage lung and kidney. That's why sex is important. Tantric sex is important because immediately, it rectifies that deficiency in the breathing, and brings the whole ratio and the spectrum of the breathing all the way from the upper to the lower. You got that long, deep, connected breathing again. And then obviously gets rhythmatic, and when it comes to the combination of the orgasm, what happens now you breathe in all the cosmic Chi. And now the body gets flooded with cosmic Chi. That is all instrumental to metal. So the metal element is the prime element that regulates the function of having the ability to connect to this breath correctly. So this is where the protection of the Jing comes in, and the leaking of the Jing. So someone who just breathes with only in the upper region, and never Breathes deeply, most likely suffers from premature ejaculation or has got no patience in sex. So the more you get into deep breathing methods, the better lover you become, it's a fact. And that's why a lot of tantric movements work with the breathing first.   Jost Sauer: (43:09) The Jing needs to be guarded. So when we have sex we guard the Jing effectively. If you wouldn't guard the Jing and guide the Jing through the body, you would lose the Jing which is means premature ejaculation, you would lose the semen. And then obviously, bang, that's all and done with. You need to de la musica, no good sex. Obviously, that means if you have unhappy sexual experience is because the Jing is not nourished. The Jing was weak, it's that the essence has been lost. It's not a happy experience, if a man gets involved and then loses it straight away. And then obviously, both parties men and women, are not happy. Whereas, a really profound sex experience is where the Jing is hold on to on every level. So you take it through all the body parts, you play with the Jing in all different postures till it comes to the final culmination, and that makes it really, really happy both parties. The result of that is, the happiness is the result of holding on to that Jing.   Jost Sauer: (44:18) The trick in life is to know how to hold on to that Jing. And so that's where obviously, the metal strategies come into. That's why the Qi cycle is so important, because the Chi cycle always starts at metal time. Metal element is the harnessing of the Jing. We're getting up at a time when metal is in its peak time. So that means, I can now go in and get a grip of the Jing, harness the Jing and then circulate through the whole, body through my practise. So whatever practise I do, if it's Yoga, if it's tai Chi, martial art, it's all the same. First of all, we need to hold on to that Jing. And that's obviously the pranayama breathing technique, all kinds of breathing techniques. What we spoke about last time in depth about the Wim Hof and things like that. That allows me to hold on to the Jing, and then I move it through the body. That means now I have actually got a grip of the Jing. So in order to prevent the Jing leaking, I need to get a grip of the Jing, I need to feel it. So metal is armour, metal is holding on and some holding on. And so that means I'm holding on to the Jing.   Jost Sauer: (45:37) And obviously, holding on is also affiliated for letting go. So at the same time, I'm letting go. And as I'm letting go, what comes in is the cosmic Chi, because metal is breath. And your breath is directly connected to the cosmic Chi. So if I do the practise straight on waking up, that allows me to hold on to that Jing, but also connects me to the cosmic Chi, and then through the mechanism that is inherent in all of us, which we don't need to understand, we just have to do, the Jing comes in. And once we get a grip of that Jing, it is with us all day. And then we hold on to it, we feel it, we feel the armour is up. And then obviously the next thing is, once we have done that process, the next step is now we're going to have a nourishing meal. A nice substantial nourishing meal. Where we sit down in peace, because we do feel at peace by them. Because we went through all the incredible pathways where every emotion has been looked up and transformed. We feel at peace. And that means we feel good. There's no need to engage with the stimulus of the physical world because we feel so connected to the inner world, that the outer world is irrelevant.   Jost Sauer: (46:56) So there's no need to go to look at the phone, there's no need to go on Facebook. There's no need because I feel too good. It's like a good drug. That's what good drugs do. You feel good within yourself. And that's what Jing is. Is like a good drug. So I feel good, I don't need the outer. I'm happy. If you got good gear, you don't need the outer world, you're happy. And so that's exactly the same thing. So I feel good. I then eat a substantial meal and as I eat that beautiful substantial meal, of course with lots of good herbs, I always have my Eucommia bark. I do my beautiful porridge, then I have my beautiful porridge sold overnight with seeds lots of seeds and lots of ginger, lots of cinnamon I mean a big pot not a little pot. A huge pot. And then I have a beautiful cup of tea with the Eucommia bark. Because I found it works really well to eat porridge in peace transcended in a deeper state, and then having this dip of Eucommia bark with every bite. And be like, "Whoah," this goes in, goes in, goes in. I feel like, "Whoa," I just want to sit there and just don't move.   Jost Sauer: (48:07) And then may have a little bit more, and then maybe have a bit of Reishi. Because when I have my breakfast, I usually have little cups. I showed them on the website here. I got my little cups and I got my cup with my Eucommia bark, I got my cup with my Reishi, I've my cup with knowledge of the tongue under the four major. And then I've got them all there. It's like a banquette. What a feast. [inaudible 00:48:40] like a glass of water. I have a couple of Eucommia bark. And while I'm eating I'm sipping a bit of this and I'm sipping a little bit of Reishi. I just go with my feeling. I don't go by, "How much is supposed to be put in there?" I usually always put more in then I sip. And then sometimes I drink the whole out, sometimes I'll leave half behind. I'll just go with how I feel. And same with eating. I can go with how I feel. And then when I eat, then I drink and I'm always, "Ah." Then I just sit back and then I realised, "Ah, it's 2021 and there's other people out there. Oh, there's Bill Gates trying to screw me. Fuck him. Ah, there's like Facebook or whatever. Ah, all right there's emails."   Jost Sauer: (49:27) It's sort of like I was totally gone, totally in a different world. And obviously I use my Jing practise, I use my metal practise, and I use the tiny syrups, I use the mushrooms. And I use all that. And then obviously that has taken me into the inner world and it makes me strong and happy. And then that's the reference point for the rest of the day. It's far more pleasant to be there then dealing with the outer world which is bullshit. So of course I want to return.   Mason: (49:58) Oh Man. I feel I've got so much to digest of my own. Really it's nice. One thing I've really remembered today is the gravity of the situation. Just in western civilization, as the technology gets rolled out, the gravity of the situation of staying connected to our essence, and remembering with these little disciplines that we don't, and as you said, we don't have time, there's no there's no choice anymore. There's no time to muck around. If you're ready, if you're doing this, if you're going to be one of these people that goes, "I'm watching this. I'm not going to be able to be knocked over permanently I will get up again and again and again"   Jost Sauer: (50:46) Yes. Get up again.   Mason: (50:47) I'm going to [inaudible 00:50:47] on the side, I'm looking for one of those ways where someone needs just to be committed to putting roundup all over everything always. I'm not going to be a weed, you will never get rid of.[crosstalk 00:51:02] I mean, weeds is where it all starts. And then the natural ecosystem always does return.   Jost Sauer: (51:09) Yeah. That's the whole idea. Because that's the whole idea. It will always continue. This is not the end. We need to understand that this is how life works. But it will continue, it will not be finished. Of course, they always will try to get the old upper hand but they will never get the upper hand. That's not possible. It will always move towards the good. Tao always got the final saying, because we are protected. We are protected. We have given blood and Jing. And those people don't have that. And because they're using chemicals, they're using all these weird shit, I don't even know what it is anymore. Whatever the fuck that is mRNA whatever the bullshit. The body is so complicated, they will never get even close to it. The body is far beyond every one of those scientists. We don't need to understand how the body functions, we need to align the body with the forces then will understand why other feeling? Why that annoying? But we can't put it into words, is not necessary. Because we are healthy we are fit and living correctly is the most important thing right now. And whatever that is that created everything, it is good and it only as good in mind, but it wants to make a strong. That's all it is.   Mason: (52:50) I love it. I love it. I always love chatting to you mate. I feel like I'm getting the sense I can feel everyone listening to this throughout time and I think it's a good time to let everyone go and digest everything and really get the gravity of the situation. You're the lifestyle medicine man and just really let it sink in and allow you your lifestyle to emerge in relation to protecting your essence and your treasures. And you mentioned, for everyone listening, you're talking to a lot of businesses you're giving talks to people on how to stay healthy and radiant. From business culture perspective and you're also doing, you're doing your own clinic as well still?   Jost Sauer: (53:39) Yeah. I still got my own clinic. The reason why I'm doing talks at the moment, it's actually is about how to cope with COVID. But not about from the point of view, what is COVID, more like looking, "Okay. How are we going to get stronger as a result of that." I look at COVID as a personal growth strategy. My focus is personal growth. I look at COVID is just other means for another level of growth we haven't had before. And so if I go to the gym, and I've got to put five kilogrammes on the bench press, of course, it's going to not care and going to take me far. But if I going to put 85 kg on the bench press, I can go somewhere. And so that's obviously the situation. But in order to know how to deal with it, I need to be prepared. I go into businesses at the moment because they really truly suffer from all that because just so many people are so scared, and that we really are scared, and because of so much fear, it impacts on their mental health. And as a result of that mental health is now deteriorating rapidly as never before.   Jost Sauer: (54:47) So my books are out in the UK, so I'm talking to a lot of people in England, and they're observing the same situation that mental health is deteriorating rapidly. And so obviously what also realise is that counselling techniques don't deal with this anymore. Because when you are riddled of fear of COVID, because of the government, you just... Like here in Queensland the CHO is just every day, "Delta is coming. Delta is coming. Delta is coming. You will get infected." I mean this is just part of... And I emailed him anytime and said, "You got to shut up. You're going to cause one too many anxiety problems." Because I've got clients now, who don't leave the house anymore, because they're too scared Delta is around the corner, because the chief health officer said, "Delta is coming." And obviously, but the emails not seem to getting through. So from a psychological perspective, counselling perspective, what they do is completely opposite to what we need, we need encouragement, we need like a Winston Churchill who'll make us strong, not someone who tells you, "You'll all be fucked."   Jost Sauer: (56:03) So that one works or the businesses suffer from that, because a lot of workers are scared of turning up at work, and then they're too scared of someone around them has got Delta and they're going to get Delta or so are you vaccinated. If you're vaccinated, I could get your spike protein, if you're unvaccinated I'll soon get Delta. So either way, I'm screwed. That means if I got the vaccine, I can't get transmission, but then the other source said, now you'll still transmit, but then you've got a higher viral load if you're not vaccinated. So people have no idea what's going on anymore. And as a result of that if you can't resolve it, trying to resolve a Facebook or Instagram discussion on the vaccine. Try to resolve it.   Mason: (56:54) Try the Byron Bay community board. I think that's the least humanity and the funniest as well discussions around the vaccines.   Jost Sauer: (57:07) This is like, "You can't go there." So because we can't resolve it, as a result of that is we got now the highest level of mental health weaknesses before. Because mental health is a part of the five attributes of focus, memory, nourishment, and the ability to perception and reaction. So the five elements make up your mental health. But if you can't get any information anymore you can resolve, and now you're trying to resolve, you're going circles, you're going in loops. And as you go in loops, you are there, where a drug user finish off when they take too many drugs. So that's why we have a mass psychosis now. Everyone now is basically in the same situation, same stage, as someone who has taking a little bit too many drugs. They're trying to resolve and you can't resolve it, you're going in loops.   Jost Sauer: (58:09) But once you start going in loops, what happens is you weaken your spleen, your earth element. And earth or spleen is transformation and transportation. Transform, transport, move, move, move. But if you can't resolve it's going in circles, you don't move. So if the spleen doesn't move, that means nutrients aren't assimilated and they aren't moved up to the heart to produce blood. So trying to resolve and can't resolve leads to blood deficiency. That's what I observed when I worked with drug users. The whole world is exactly there now, what I've seen in drug rehab. It is the tweaking, too many drugs you're trying to tweak, if you finish you are in psychosis.   Mason: (58:53) The dopamine hit, like that as well?   Jost Sauer: (58:56) They can't get it anymore. When I treated psychosis back in the day in my rehabs, all I did, I didn't engage with the psychosis. I tried not to make the client resolve the situation. I just focused on building the spleen by herbs and lifestyle, and practise, and acupuncture. And as you build the spleen, transformation and transportation takes place. Suddenly things are moving again. Suddenly, it's clear. When the spleen starts moving again, mental health is going strong again. Mental health is either weak or strong. We all have mental health, but it's either impaired or it's strong and fundamental to mental health is your spleen. And so mental health is deteriorating over the last year because of people's innate desire trying to resolve the situation. You can see the whole trouble on the internet because people try to resolve what's going on, and they get really, really angry with each other because they can't resolve the debate. And you can't, and that's exactly the psychic war tactic that Bill Gates and those Big Pharma evils are doing. They're basically, "Make everyone loop, loop, loop." And then make everyone's spleen weak, weak, weak. As a result of that your mental health goes weak.   Jost Sauer: (01:00:26) Now, obviously, businesses suffer. Your business suffers. If your mental health is low, you're not productive. That's why they're realising that the vaccines don't do anything in terms of building mental health. And the campaign makes it worse, it weakens mental health. Obviously, some businesses started looking at alternatives, and that's they approached me, so I go into businesses, because I'm not going looking into what is COVID from a scientific or medical perspective, I look at how it's impacting on your organs? How is the government programme impacting on your organs? How is the whole mass psychosis caused by all these constant mental warfare they're doing? And all we need to do is build your spleen. So I'm doing strategies with businesses. I take everyone through a process. Do this, do that, eat that food, take this mushroom, take that herb, do this breathing technique. And automatically, the spleen gets stronger. And as a result of that is it will start impacting on the other organs, which are affiliated with mental health, and suddenly your mental health gets good again. This is the other thing, that this, whatever they do this Big Pharma dudes, it has a massive impact on your spleen. And that's obviously another aspect we need to look into. That's metal, Jing, and then there's the spleen.   Mason: (01:01:59) I think we've talked about the spleen, I think on our other podcast with Jost. And we've said it multiple times, if you're out of sync with your organs and with nature, the place to start stepping back in his start standing on the earth and on the soil, which is the spleen.   Jost Sauer: (01:02:18) Yes. Get back to earth.   Mason: (01:02:24) Get back to earth. Don't get fancy around going into kidney time and liver time and all that just yet. Just get back in three square meals, consistency.   Jost Sauer: (01:02:35) I never focus when I work with clients, I never focus on get up at five, I don't follow the organ clock I follow rhythm. And the rhythm, always the Chi cyclic rhythm. So it's about the rhythm, and then the rhythm eventually will move it towards the right time. But that will happen naturally. But the rhythm is always metal, earth, fire, and then water, and then wood. That's how the rhythm works. Because, everything metal is reaction. Every chemical process, everything in your life is dependent on the reaction. Metal is the starting point to everything. What I hear lots is, "My life is so out of control. I don't know where to start." And the Chi cycle says, "Of course, you can start. The start is always metal." It always starts with metal, because metal is your breath. Metal is the change in state, metal is reaction. You can't have anything in life without a reaction. A reaction is prior to something. And if you want change, it means you need to instigate the reaction. And that's metal.   Jost Sauer: (01:03:53) So we always start getting up to metal. So that means we start getting up to do breathing first, because everything starts with breath. When you look at all the spiritual practises, if it's martial art, Kung Fu, if it's yoga, if it's Tibetan Buddhism, it all comes down to 8,000 years ago, the first practise was breathing. It all comes down to breath and breath is metal. So it all starts with metal. Then from metal, that means you start the day with breathing. You're getting into the breath, you're going into metal, then we'll start to initiate a cycle of reaction that will move you towards betterment. And then you go into earth, and then you go into fire, and then you go into water, and then into wood, and then to sleep. It's just the rhythm which is more important than anything else. And that automatically then, once you follow the rhythm, you will discover the Tao. Like jazz music is all about getting the rhythm and you suddenly know what to do. Get into the rhythm. Like sex when two partners meet and have sex, you and get into the rhythm first. And once you have the rhythm, you discover what do.   Mason: (01:05:02) It emerges, it's a good exercise to go. Okay, can you tell me, Jost, exactly what time do I get up and what time [inaudible 01:05:09] breathing you're looking from that Western medical, give me the solution versus what you're saying? There's a rhythm. I mean, remind everyone that you've got a book. What is the new book's name I kind of-   Jost Sauer: (01:05:25) That's The Qi Health Cycle.   Mason: (01:05:28) That's the Chi Health Cycle.   Jost Sauer: (01:05:29) The Chi Health Cycle. That's actually now in 11 languages. So that's published in the UK, it's published in Germany, it's published in Italy. It's going really well in Europe. Welbeck Publishing took over that book about two years ago, and they made incredible beautiful job out of it. It's one of those really expensive high class, British publishers who just put like a real lot of effort into that book. It's all beautiful gloss and beautiful symbols in there. And it's beautiful. It's really well presented, a lot of nice pictures, a lot of yin and yangs. And it's all about that real lifestyle. Because Tao says over and over, "It's not our job to understand it." We can't. That's why we don't have to be scared of Big Pharma because what they know about the body is just so minimal to what really goes on. The secrets of life they never will be able to tap into it. They're trying to corrupt it, but they won't win. And the real power is within. And if we align with those forces, and commit ourselves to the light, that information will come through us. And we get stronger.   Mason: (01:06:46) Yes. I love it. You're my favourite warrior. I selfishly do these podcasts. I come out firing and just I'm like, "Yeah, that's right. Yup, that's right. I remember." So I love it. I really encourage everyone to jump over to your website. We've got all that in your show notes. Is your website the same?   Jost Sauer: (01:07:07) Yeah, still the same?   Mason: (01:07:11) Guys, go get after it. Jost Sauer.   Jost Sauer: (01:07:18) That's correct. J-O-S-T. Jost a Viking name. Viking warrior name. It means hope.   Mason: (01:07:28) Fill me with hope. All right. Everyone go get [crosstalk 01:07:30] the book that will give you the Chi cycle. Get on your herbs, get some good sleep. And you can work with the Jost as well. I've had a few friends go and do it. And just always incredible. You've been around doing this for so long. I've got so many incredible stories. It's definitely an asset to our community here. So get on it. Love your work, man. Thanks so much for coming.   Jost Sauer: (01:07:56) Thank you. It's always great fun.   Mason: (01:08:00) Well, until next time, we'll give it what? Maybe we'll just keep it at a four to six months cycle.   Jost Sauer: (01:08:05) Yeah. There is always something that goes on in the western world in the physical that needs to be discussing.   Mason: (01:08:12) Yeah. Maybe next time everyone will start calming down and will digest the intensity-   Jost Sauer: (01:08:19) Maybe Bill Gates is gone. And the Big Pharma blew up, new communities everywhere.   Mason: (01:08:27) That's a lot to do in six months. Beautiful. Anything else you want to share with everyone? Or you're good?   Jost Sauer: (01:08:34) We just have to understand that what we go through right now, it's all part of a bigger picture. If the blood gets weak, we get caught up in the politics. If the blood is strong, we feel good within ourselves. And if we feel good within ourselves, we just stay detached. That's all it is. So when I talk about detachment, it requires strong blood and strong Jing. Just focus on your Jing, focus on your blood, take your herbs, take your mushrooms, live the lifestyle, and that's really all there is and the rest will come naturally.   Mason: (01:09:08) I love it, mate. All right, catch you next time sending lots of love.   Jost Sauer: (01:09:13) Yep. I will do that. Okay, [Mason 01:09:16]. Talk to you then. Okay, bye.     Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

Bro Bro Bro Bets
What the fuck is going on - 11.23

Bro Bro Bro Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:41


Tone, Gump and the rest of the boys give all their picks for the NFL, College Football, NBA, NHL, and College Basketball. Good Luck God Bless Hammer DAHN

Young and Corporate
94- Sneaky ~Sausage~ Link

Young and Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:20


Realistically how quickly would you kill Peter and Eric in a game of Marry, Fuck, Kill?  The dudes discuss Thanksgiving sides and Eric's rent soaring in price.

The Corner Flag
152: Ole's Not At The Wheel

The Corner Flag

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:11


The inevitable has inevitable happened. Ole Gunnar Solskjaer stepped down from his role as head coach of Manchester United following a disastrous 4-1 defeat to Watford. The boys discuss everything that went wrong in that game, and in his 3rd season at United, and how the Glazers have no plan in place to appoint his successor. Michael Carrick has taken interim charge while they search for an interim manager till the end of the season, following which they will appoint a permanent manager. Fuck me sideways. Elsewhere, we talk about Chelsea's 3-0 victory over Leicester and their title chances, the effect of the AFCON on Liverpool and Edouard Mendy and who would fare better, Gerrard and Dean Smith's victorious starts with their new clubs, Newcastle's energy and Sergio Aguero's heart problems.  Plus, we are back with #RandiRona! Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @cornerflagpod Visit us on www.thecornerflag.in and hit that donate button! Subscribe and listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts from and don't forget to give us a 5 star review!

Loud About Nothing
116 - Fuck Friendsgiving

Loud About Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:08


The boys are finally recording live from their studio so follow them on youtube and social media. They quickly start talking about one of the most humbling experiences or their lives last week at Animecon. They both don't like Thanksgiving food, which is apparently not the consensus opinion. Robbie talks shit about Friendsgiving. Sebastian agrees and tells the story of the very first Friendsgiving. They both miss a large metaphor in the new Taylor Swift song. Sebastian says how the new Adele album is almost perfect. call in to the pod @ 929-900-6393 & follow us on social media @sebastianconelli @robbienunes @loudaboutnothing

Cup to Cup | The Comedy Podcast

Hang on to your giblets folks because we have a jaaaamed packed one for you all this week! The Mayor causes chaos when he introduces “Password”, a new weekly game the guys will play with big implications for the big board. A Florida Man tried to twerk out of trouble and don't tell Mike from Dadurdays Home Brewing when he can put up his lights! It's final four time in our Best French Fry bracket as #8 Whataburger takes on #4 Arby's. Fuck ups, Fill In The Blank and Trivia to takes us home. Premium, sexy, beautiful. All here.  It wouldn't be a pre thanksgiving episode without an argument about sides, dry Turkey or how often Jason poops. So grab another plate and enjoy the show, cheers!   Jose's highlights...   5:49 - 6:05 - Chase always gets shit on 8:58 - 9:28 - Clutch 11:50 - 12:20 Chase tryin to be slick 12:55 - 13:25 - can you have more than one entree at thanksgiving  22:08 - 22:38 - Twerkin Kev 28:27 - 28:52 - About a week ago 34:00 - 32:30 Kevs brain is broken 36:27- 36:57 When is it too soon 50:19 -50:49 Chase is doin too much 66:45 - 67:15 what size is your cock and balls? 79:01 - 79:59 Who eats mashed potato's plain  92:01 - 92:25 Bleach blonde Kev.    CuptoCupLife.com Facebook Instagram Twitter Youtube   Email the podcast if you want to be a guest or sponsor an episode!

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

I Don't Wanna Hear It
147 – One and One Are Five: New Jersey Michael's Submarine Sandwiches

I Don't Wanna Hear It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 103:41


I Don't Wanna Hear It Podcast147 – One and One Are Five: New Jersey Michael's Submarine SandwichesJust in time for turkey day, here's ten not shitty things we're thankful for. Instead of speaking to your family this Thanksgiving listen to us yammer on as you gorge your gullet. It's not like you talk to your relatives anyway: Uncle George went full Q and Aunt Beatrice died in the bath. Fuck these people.Check out more of our stuff at I Don't Wanna Hear It and join the Patreon, jabroni. I mean, if you want. Don't be weird about it. Oh, and we publish books now at WND Press because we want to be bankrupted by a dying medium.Episode Links:Crystal's CakesChurch of MiseryTrash TalkBlack Friday Death CounterMy Work Is Not Yet Done by Thomas LigottiFarewell by Minus the BearRed Letter MediaDead MeatDescender by Jeff LemireAscender by Jeff LemireEverything's Eventual by Stephen KingFollow Wasteland @wastelandpod on InstagramWasteland Podcast on SpotifySome of our old bands are on Spotify:Absent FriendsWe're Not DeadYears From NowMusical Attribution: Licensed through NEOSounds. License information available upon request.“5 O'Clock Shadow,” “America On the Move,” “Baby You Miss Me,” “Big Fat Gypsy,” “Bubble Up,” “C'est Chaud,” “East River Blues,” “The Gold Rush,” “Gypsy Fiddle Jazz,” “Here Comes That Jazz,” “I Wish I Could Charleston,” “I Told You,” “It Feels Like Love To Me,” “Little Tramp,” “Mornington Crescent,” “No Takeaways.”

Fullscreen
The Hypocrisy

Fullscreen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 53:30


The Challenge Spies, Lies and Allies Ep 15 Recap. Fuck boys all around. Check out our Patreon! www.patreon.com/fullscreenpod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Song credits: Anything by Soyb & Amine Maxwell @soybmusic @aminemaxwell Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: bit.ly/soyb-amine-havana Music promoted by Audio Library youtu.be/Xqrw9DuIlkA

The Two Bobs Podcast
TTB168: DoorDash Defecator

The Two Bobs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 52:53


The Two Bobs episode 168 for Monday, November 22, 2021: What are The Bobs drinking? Rob enjoyed a The PastryArchy Oatmeal Cream Pie from DuClaw. https://duclaw.com/beers/the-pastry-archy-oatmeal-cream-pie/ Robert broke the rules again and had a Boatswain Chocolat Stout from Rhinelander even though Rob already had one on the show. https://untp.beer/7wO6 Follow us on Untapped at @PhilRoberts33 and @robertk328 or we'll cancel your Elf on a Shelf. Just kidding! We're not doing you any favors. No random shit this week. Fuck you, it's Thanksgiving. This week's CRAZY NEWS shot three people and was acquitted. Only in America! A judge in Georgia has outlawed Elf on a Shelf. Unfortunately, the rest of the country still has to deal with that asshole. https://goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/judge-parents-break-canceling-elf-shelf-81037733 A DoorDash driver took a shit in the lobby of a residential building. $80 for a sandwich and all you get is a mess to clean up…and a sandwich. https://www.foxla.com/news/doordash-driver-uses-residential-building-lobby-as-toilet An old lady in Wisconsin (not Elderly Listener—she lives in Michigan) got blitzed, grabbed a fake gun, and hung over an expressway overpass waving the gun at passersby. What could go wrong? https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2021/11/10/jean-hansen-charges-tequila-fake-gun-i-94-overpass/ Authorities in Indiana embarked on the slowest police chase ever after a man stole a street sweeper. https://www.whio.com/news/local/stolen-street-sweeper-leads-richmond-indiana-police-low-speed-pursuit/UCPKOU7TRRAV5CPVKA4F4FPHKQ/ A man collected over 1,000 pubic hairs from gym locker rooms and then planted them at crime scenes to throw police off his trail. He's either a pervert or a genius. Or a perverted genius. Yeah, that's probably it. https://dailynewsreported.com/breaking-news/man-caught-with-over-1000-pubic-hairs-he-collected-from-gym-locker-rooms-and-showers-authorities-say-he-planted-them-at-crime-scenes-to-throw-police-off-his-trail/ Please share the show with your friends, and don't forget to subscribe! Visit www.thetwobobs.com for our contact information. Thanks for listening! Leave us a message or text us at 530-882-BOBS (530-882-2627) Join us on all the social things: Follow us on Twitter Like our Facebook Page Check out our Instagram Follow Rob on Untappd Follow Robert on Untappd The Two Bobs Podcast is © The Two Bobs.  For more information, see our Who are The Two Bobs? page, or check our Contact page.  Words, views, and opinions are our own and do not represent those of our friends, family, or our employers, unless otherwise noted.  Music for The Two Bobs was provided by JewelBeat.  

The ECHO Cast | A The Division 2 Podcast
#162: Fuck Bobby Kotick

The ECHO Cast | A The Division 2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 51:23


This week we talk about my Battlefield 2042 review, Halo Infinite's single player preview, The Game Awards nominations, Bobby Kotick & Activision being awful, Streamlabs drama, and the Xbox 20 Year Anniversary event, my thoughts on some games I'm playing, listener questions and content updates.

Como en la barra
153. OH MY GOD... WHAT THE FUCK

Como en la barra

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 90:16


153. OH MY GOD... WHAT THE FUCK by Como en la barra

Your Place or Mine
Go Fuck Yourself - My Four Favourite Toys (

Your Place or Mine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:23


Well hello there, babes. Welcome back to Your Place or Mine, hosted by Bae Savage. In this solo episode, I share reviews and tales from some of my favourite toys from the Love Shop.I unpack why these 4 toys are my current favourites, the Dory, the Sia, the Herc, and the Tempest. I talk about ways I use them and why they're giving me some impactful experiences. I share a bit about how I've used these with partners and why you should treat yourself to something new.Head to https://loveshop.ca/baesavage and use code BAESAVAGE at checkout to save 15% off. This directly supports the podcast! Thanks to the Love Shop babes for always keeping me satisfied!Links to the toys I mention: DORY - https://loveshop.ca/products/loe-dorySIA - https://loveshop.ca/products/loe-sia-vibratorHERC - https://loveshop.ca/collections/dildos-harnesses/products/posh-silicone-dongs?variant=39559599849541TEMPEST - https://loveshop.ca/products/cheeky-tempest-anal-beads-butt-plugDon't forget about the upcoming Your Place or Mine Comedy show happening Nov 28th at Bar Cathedral, grab your tickets and find more info here: https://www.baesavage.com/linksWant more? Head to https://www.baesavage.com/ and be sure to follow: https://www.instagram.com/baesavagexo/

Pazik Performance Group
#284 - Daily MG - The Only Rule Is It Has To Work by Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller - 6 of 6

Pazik Performance Group

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 7:13


“There's a story,” I say, “that major league managers all tell their players these days.” I go slowly. I speak too fast when I speak in front of people. I spoke way too fast in spring training, and during all the pregame shift speeches. But I'm going slow now. After every clause. I take a pause. To hit my marks. To keep my meter. “It goes like this: When the explorer Hernán Cortés landed in Mexico, with plans to defeat the Aztecs and colonize the New World, he ordered his ships be burnt. This way his men would have no way to flee. The only direction they could go was forward. The only option was victory. History says it worked, but I hate this story. This is a story about a leader who didn't trust his men, didn't think they would be loyal and fight on their own, couldn't do the job unless some manager at the top took away their agency. “Cortés was selfish as fuck. “Cortés, to me, is the Pacifics, telling other leagues' managers that their players aren't good enough to move up, keeping them all stuck here. “That's not us. That's not our team. “We want to do everything we can to get you guys out of here, and we pay for that. We've lost a lot of good players because of it. But we're not going to be Cortés. Cortés was a bad guy. “There's a different story I like a lot more. It's about a guy named Hugh Glass. “Hugh Glass was a frontiersman in the 1800s, before the West had been settled. He went to the coldest parts of the country, to North Dakota and Montana, where the Indians were violent and the winters were cruel and the grizzly bears were everywhere. In 1823, he surprised one of those grizzly bears, and she charged at him, threw him to the ground, mauled him, and left him near death. The party he was with was sure he would die, so they left him. Only two men stayed behind, to dig his grave, and to bury him. But after they were attacked by Indians they fled, too. They took his rifle, his knife, and all his supplies. Hugh Glass woke up abandoned. He had no food or supplies. His wounds were festering. They were so deep you could see his exposed ribs. He was two hundred miles from another American. “Glass could have given up. Instead, he looked around and said fuck it, because Glass knew one thing: There is no such thing as almost dead. There is dead, and there is alive, and if you're alive you have a chance. “He set his own broken leg and began crawling. To prevent gangrene, he laid his wounded back on a rotting log and let maggots eat away his dead flesh. With no weapons, he still managed to drive two wolves from a dead bison and ate the meat. He fixed his eyes on an isolated mountain far off in the distance and crawled toward it. It took him six weeks. He survived mostly on roots. “We know this story because he lived. And we know it because people remember. Records get left and stories get told. Your story will get told. Baseball men in major league front offices will know it and scouts will know it. People you know will know it, and people you meet in the future will find out about it. Everything the world remembers about you as baseball players is happening right now. “Right now, we get to decide whether they're going to remember a team that got frustrated, that felt abandoned, that gave up and let San Rafael be the heroes; or whether they're going to remember a team that said Fuck no, patched themselves up, and made themselves the heroes. “There's always a part where the hero looks defeated. Always. Every story has it. Where you guys are now is not new and it's not unusual; it's the starting point for every third-act turnaround that this world has ever known. “A couple days ago, I was listening to a tape recording of our dugout during the third game of the season. That was the game when we fell behind five runs in the first, and then we were down 9-2 in the fifth. The amazing thing about that recording was how loud our dugout was; we were talking, we were encouraging, we were rattling the other team. We sounded like a team that knew it was going to win. You might be thinking, yeah, we had Feh in the dugout, and Feh brought that energy. And it was Feh that I heard on that tape. But it was also Baps. It was Gonzo. It was Schwieger. It was Sean Conroy. It was Kristian. It was Moch. And even though I didn't hear him, I'm sure that Hurley was there doing his death stare the whole time, freaking Pittsburg out with how intense he was. It was Hurley who singled in the tenth, stole third, and scored on a wild pitch to win that game 10-9. “You guys have this in you. I swear to you, I see it, Theo sees it, Yoshi sees it, and everybody's going to see it. When you go out there today, you just need to see it yourself. I want to hear that dugout that's confident, that never stops talking. I don't care if you're a rookie, I don't care if you're new, I don't care if you're hitting .200, I don't care if you're scared: I need to hear you today, and every day for the rest of this season. Don't worry if you sound stupid. The only rule is it has to work. So let's do this.” - Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Brand Vs.USP Which Do You Have?

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:07


The end of the year is coming, and I know with the holidays it is very easy to get burnt out, but I implore you to go ahead and invest that time into your self and look at what you could be doing differently and purposefully. On this weeks episode, I'm going to share with you what I believe the future is for businesses. I mean, there's a reason why we started this podcast five years ago, we saw the writing on the wall. We're saying attract, attract, attract before everyone even heard it in their vocabulary. They're still saying Chase, Chase Chase. It's because consumers changed the way they look for information. What they want from their lender or their realtor has changed and nobody's hiring you anymore because of the company you're affiliated with. I don't care if you're at exp or REMAX or you're at Keller Williams, or if you're a broker and you're at lending tree or Bank of America, no one gives a crap, you're getting hired off of your personal brand period. And it's going to continue to work that way.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeBranding vs. USPHow to provide a personal experienceHow to compete with companies spending billions of dollars going into the marketplace to create alternatives to the buying and selling or lending processResourcesReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike way Ambassador real estate marketing. This podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them let's get startedwhat is up ladies and gentlemen, welcome to their episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. Hey low, folks, it is getting to that time of year Thanksgivings coming up. And that usually this last two months, it's when you start planning for the next. I mean, let's be honest, I don't know about you. But I always get burnt out about this time of year, regardless of what I'm doing. And I was always when I was in real estate, even today, when we're doing a lot of video work for people and whatnot. But the end of the year, what I'm excited about is that it's a time that you actually go ahead and work on the business, decide what you're going to not be doing any more than what you're going to be doing and then just sort of strategize and take that time take the holiday time off with four days off next week. holidays come you know from that December 20 to the end of the year, it's you get two weeks where it's pretty laid back. But I implore you to go ahead and invest that time into your self and look at what you could be doing differently and purposeless. podcasters we don't have a guest on today, we're going to teach a little bit. And I'm going to share with you what I believe the future this entire businesses. I mean, there's a reason why we started this podcast five years ago, we saw the writing on the wall. We're saying attract, attract, attract before everyone even heard it in their vocabulary. They're still saying Chase, Chase Chase. And it's because consumers change the way consumers look for information is what's changed in the way consumers and what they want from their lender their realtor is has changed and nobody's hiring you anymore. Because of the company you're affiliated with. I don't care if you're at exp or REMAX or you're at Keller Williams, or if you're a broker and you're at lending tree or Bank of America, no one gives a crap, you're getting hired off of your personal brand period. And it's going to continue to work that way. So amazing. I was talking to someone the other day, as a matter of fact, I'm doing this podcast in my garage, and I'm running a company two days a week out of my garage. And honestly, people don't quite care if I do a demo with somebody. And I'm like, hey, guess what, I'm in my garage, right now. Because people, I feel like this whole COVID thing is even more so with social media, but like the whole professional thing is gone fucking way out the window. And what people are really looking for is that personable experience, they just want authenticity they want to be they want the person they're talking to the they could trust them, in other words, but you have to be thought of or brought to first. And that's what we're gonna be chatting about today. What is it that people want? And how do they go out and actually hire you first? Well, it's very simple. comes down to three separate things, of what people whether they're by hiring a real estate agent or looking for a lender or whether they're buying video services from me, or they're hiring us to do a website or something. It doesn't matter people break things down price. Are they looking for convenience? Are they looking for an experience or service, okay, and any business is going to have the exact same thing. So let's look into talking about convenience in the market. If you're a lender, there's things like Quicken Loans, Zillow, Home Loans, Rocket Mortgage, if you're a real estate agent, there's things like Zillow, there's ibuyers, there's flat fee brokerage offerings. So interruption is here. And the reason why it's here is because the consumers want it. I mean, these companies are spending billions of dollars going into the marketplace to create alternatives to the buying and selling or lending process. And if there wasn't an appetite for that information, or that type of service to exist, well, they wouldn't be putting billions of dollars into it, would they? So how do you really compete back against that as an individual? Because the truth is, is that all these companies are going to weigh outspend you they have way bigger bank accounts than you or your brokerage and they have way bigger bank accounts. And if all of you got together even they are funded very well. Now, it's not all doom and gloom, though. Because the truth is, the way that you're going to keep back is the one thing that these big conglomerate companies that have these offerings are these unique selling propositions. The one way you fight back is through your personal brand because brand will trump anything brand can't compete against or they can't compete against the personal relationship you have with yournetwork. past clients, right? These big companies are going to weigh more money, they're going to have different programs and incentives, they're going to have slick tack, they're gonna have better search better websites, it's gonna feel very threatening. But just like I told you a couple minutes ago, consumers are going to choose who they feel most comfortable with. And it's very important that you speak to them first, okay? Over 80% of people hire, the first person they meet with the truth is that these companies are trying to get their first. This is where your brand comes in your brand is what people remember about you. And no, they don't remember what you do for a living, including your best friends that they do remember, is how you do it. That's your personal brand. So what we're talking about here is, you know, the National Association of REALTORS had a conference out here a couple of weeks ago, and the topic of the conference was that everybody needs to be creating their own content. I 100% agree with that's the whole reason why we created real estate marketing Dude, we script edit and distribute video content for people that wanted us to do it for him. Now, why doesn't anyone else. And it's crazy how many agents are not creating their own content, but you cannot build a brand or stay on top of mind with people that you already know, or have used you in the past if you're constantly trying to sell your shit. That's where content comes in. There's a difference between marketing and advertising and an employer to go back and check out the podcast I did on that. So I also wrote a really in depth article on my website called advertising versus marketing, if you want to know more about it, but marketing is not advertising and advertising is not marketing folks. And when we're talking about why I'm saying you need to go all in on your brand this year, immediately is because that's what people remember. The problem is, though, that you probably haven't really viewed yourself as a brand and most people don't. So let's talk more about what it is. It's not. It's a mixture of your personality, the experience people have with you. But also, it's how you remain on top of mind. Okay. And when we're talking about separating ourselves from the herd, there's really only two ways you can do it. Now, one is you can attract business or separate yourself from all the other realtors and all this interruption through a unique selling proposition. This is why a company like Redfin could go into any market without a brand and start transacting immediately. They have a unique selling proposition in the form of a rebate rebate program that a certain percentage of the population is always going to transact with that's proven. So do you have a unique selling proposition? For you? How do you do that? Well, I can share with you how we're doing it. And this is another thing I implore you to check out. We're going to be implementing our listing advocate system, which is just a multiple offer multiple home seller Option Program. Now how we're offering that listed advocate system is we're saying hey, we don't just give you one way to sell your house, we give you five and let you decide you want to do a fixin list you want to cash offer? Do you want to do a sell in stage, you want to do a trade up option? And then let them decide to calculate all their net sheets and compare everything side by side? Because that's one unique selling proposition that no other agent in our market has? And none of the eye buyers even have yet? So but what do you do? If you don't have that? Well, maybe you start we have a couple of clients of ours that have a give back program where they sell or they donate five 10% of their Commission's or the proceeds from a closing back to a charity or foundation. That is a unique selling proposition. Right? You could have your own rebate program, or you could have your own flat fee offering Why couldn't you if I'm a real estate agent, we are going to do that I'm gonna have a flat fee program and I'm gonna have a full service and let them decide. See people want options. But if what you're doing is doing what everybody else is and what the hell are you doing differently to earn their attention to stand out and they remain on top of mind when people actually need your services?Think about that. Does the brokerage you're with have a unique selling proposition?Right? Do you have certain programs you're selling maybe you're a new construction specialist. Maybe you're a lender and you only do non warrantable condos or rehab type loans. But specializations are also a niche This is what separates yourself from other people. So think about that. What do you what is it that that you need? What's What do you do? That gets people to be like oh, that's different in your product and service what you're offering and don't say oh I have access to the MLS because so does everybody else or MLS is public accessible now. And people aren't hiring you because of your real estate license or hiring you because of how you do business and what you do with it. It's very, very important that we understand how minds work and what people really want to really focus on what options they want to feel like they're not getting ripped off. Now, the other way you can build your brand, if you don't have a unique selling proposition is going to be through your personal brand. And yes, you can do both. Right? You could? Well, there's no reason why couldn't you do both? We're going to do both. We're doing both I'm doing both right now do both on this podcast, my selling you in any of my products, or my just sort of telling you about them and telling you how we're going to use them and why they work. So now if you don't have a unique selling proposition, your personal brand becomes your unique selling proposition. Right? You have to remember that 80% of people still use the first person they meet with, which means this is still a popularity contest. And yes, you have a personal brand. But the key is that you can't build a brand or a personal brand without creating content. This means yes, you need a Facebook account. Yes, you need an IG account. As you need to be active on social media. It is impossible to build any brand without consistent communication to an audience. There's no way I built real estate marketing dude, Brandon, we got a million downloads on our podcast, by simply showing up sporadically over a three month period of time. We did it by showing up every freakin weekend with a new episode, and kept publishing that episode to the same audience. And over time, we were rewarded with lots of downloads, and the more constant we have the more podcasts I do like this, some of you guys are gonna call me and be like, Hey, I like what you said, Dude, I want you to hire us. I want to hire the marketing dude, so that you guys could turn me into a local celebrity? And I'll say, okay, great. Let's do it. Am I selling you? Absolutely not. I'm serving you. There's a difference between how we communicate. And that's what a personal brand is. So if you're looking at how do I build a personal brand? Well, you do it by creating content, you could do it by creating video content, which we believe in is the number one way to do it. That's why we have real estate marketing dude. But you don't have to do video content. Let's just be honest, not everybody's going to get on video. I wish everyone would I believe you have to but doesn't mean if you don't, you're going to be out of business either. But you are going to have to do something that creates content, or what I previously was talking about create a unique selling proposition. What is it that you do differently is what people want? You can't attract anything without being the same. Do you think I could pick out? Let's just take there's 100 sheep in a field? Do you think I could pick and they all have different names? Do you think I could pick out which ones Larry? No, that's exactly what consumers think about real estate agents. today. We're all selling the same thing. Now if I have 100 sheep in the same corral, or whatever the hell you call it in the field, and one of them's a black sheep, well, he sort of sticks out that black sheep has my attention. If I was gonna go cut any of those sheep's wool, I'd probably start with the black one first, just because it's a little different. See what I mean? So like, we are in the business of content creation, you have a brand, but you'll never build a brand without either without creating content. How can you do this a lot of different ways. You could communicate with people through other ways other than video. There's a reason why every single real estate agent or lender that you see very active on social media, whether they're doing real stories, constantly posting on IG and Facebook, there's a reason why those people are also selling or doing a lot of business. It's because they have attention. Like do you know anyone, I want you to go ahead and look at your Facebook feed. Look at anyone who's active on social media right now. I want you to see if any of them are not doing business, let's flip the script. And then the question is going to be well, they're all doing a lot of business. How well because they're creating content, that every content every piece of content has to be aboutyour loan program or your the house you sold, you could create content with your kids being a human, the freakin pumpkin patch. It doesn't matter. But you have to remain present. If you stop talking to your network if you stop talking to your social reach if you stop talking your email list. If you stop talking to other people who've given you referrals, I've done business with you in the past. It's very tough to build a brand because the truth is they forget who you are and you're not that important. The key to all this if you're going to build a brand is how do you do it in your way. That's the key. One option is you hire real estate marketing Dude, come on. But the other option is you sit down during this holiday season. If you actually think about who the hell am I? What makes me different? Let me look at the last 10 clients that I had, and what do they all have in common? See, it's people, birds of a feather flock together, chances are the last 10 People you served, you guys had something in common. And there's a reason why we all become friends with the clients that we work with. It's because we attract like people, there's no shortage of people in your occupation, whether you're investor, a real estate agent or lender, there's a million of you out there. And to be honest with you, most of you are all selling the same shit. I can't differentiate any of you, except the look of your face. But we honestly if you're not creating content, I don't know what you look like, either. I just know you're just another lender, you're just another sheep in the field. So what can you do this year? That makes you different? Can you host open houses instead of open houses, have Taco parties that are posting on social media and start doing everything you do with tacos? Because you love eating tacos? Fuck yeah, you can? If you have a beard, can you create a show called beard budget? Yes, you can do that, too. If you have eight kids, can you create content with your kids and all of them and talk about real estate? Absolutely. You can do whatever the hell you want. That's the beauty of this is that everyone has a brand. I've seen people that most of us think have no business of getting on video do very well with video, not because they worked with us. But because we figured out what their brand strategy was before they got started. You see, you don't have a career in content creation, or long living life and content creation without first identified how you should be creating that. And the truth is, that's going to be different for every single person. Because just like God only made one of you and you have a fingerprint. Well, you do have a brand and there's not going to be any single one alike. And that's pretty fucking cool. So I come back to you. And I say, hey, implore this back to you, like you have a couple options, this coming up, winter, and as are what are you going to do next year? I'm telling you, what's happening. This is all I do. The writing's on the wall. You have companies like us that will help you do that. And there's others if it's not us, I don't care if you choose us or not, we might not even like each other. But you have to work on building your personal brand. And that's a requirement. If you're gonna listen to the show, start building your fucking brand. I get messages from people on like Instagram and Facebook a little bit. Hey, thanks for your advice. I've been following you for two years, I implemented everything you say, and we're fucking crushing it. And I'm like, I love that. And the stuff I'm talking about isn't rocket science. This is a giant popularity contest. I'm just showing you people how to not be forgotten about by doing things that are authentic, consistent, and generate attention. So don't overthink it. Focus on what you're going to be doing each month that generates attention around your brand. What can you do on a monthly basis, consistently that people will notice? Can it be direct mail, it could be video email, it could be a bunch of social media. You could send people clumpy mail, you can do business owner interviews, you could do neighborhood tours, if you're going on video. You can do client events, monthly events, you could do giveaways, you can do toy drives. I don't care what it is you do but you have to do something that generates attention. That reminds people of what you do for a living. That's it. It is the simplicity behind building a brand.It's not hard and it's probably right beneath your nose. So take the tips I have today. Want to keep it short. Hopefully resonate with this. Because of any additional questions. Visit us at real estate marketing to check out the blog and check out some of our podcasts and leave us some reviews. Share this shit on social media for me, let me get the word out there. If you enjoy what we're doing here at marketing, dude, the more people that share this, the more people we get to serve more people we get to serve, the more we get the help. We're brands we blow up and it's a beautiful marriage. So we appreciate guys listen, the show for the last five years and this holiday. Take the time with your family. And while you're sitting around at that Thanksgiving Day table. I want you to think about and be like Hey, what the hell am I doing this year? What am I really thankful for? Be thankful for your business, your clients, thankful for the opportunity. But those who don't work on their business hit their own glass ceiling. Oh, just be thankful. Be grateful. And then stop. Thank about what you want to do and then take fucking action. Hope you guys enjoyed this episode of real estate marketing dude. If you want to visit us at our website is the American to do.com and make sure you follow our social channels all over the place. Look us up real estate American radio.com or real estate marketing dude, you'll find us follow us subscribe, and we hope to hear from you soon. Appreciate you guys this in the show. We'll see you guys next week. Bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

The 40k Badcast
40k Badcast 105 - Multiple, Key Boneheads

The 40k Badcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 123:56


Remember y'all, you don't stop Waaaghin' until you start poggin'. In this episode, Dan screams into the void, the fellas take sides in the canned soup brand wars, and Campbell spectacularly fucks up a simple joke. Like, he really fucked it up. He's reached new heights of failing at doing something easy. Also, the bois unleash their feelings about dogs (get it?), and boy howdy are they gonna get shit from dog owners. Whatever. Fuck them. Not the dogs. The dogs are great. But their owners? Nah, bruh. https://twitter.com/DB_Sleazy https://twitter.com/BrotherSRM https://www.patreon.com/40kBadcast https://shop.spreadshirt.com/40kBadcast/ contact@40kbadcast.com https://www.facebook.com/40kBadcast/

That Being Said w/George & Sami
3 Stooges & Kings of NFL QBs + Week 11 NFL Mascot Matchups

That Being Said w/George & Sami

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:46


Pod That: Two Brothers Talking Sports are back! George & Sami did their 3 Stooges and 3 Kings of NFL QBs as always (1:20), plus the NFL Mascot Matchups for Week 10 (29:14)! Don't forget to DM us your questions, stories, thoughts, ideas & more @PodThat Instagram for 'Get To Know You' at the end of the pod. Leave us your best MESSAGES...Fuck it, make it anything: https://anchor.fm/podthat With that said, George & Sami Jarjour of Pod That are in full force!.... Go to www.BetUS.com and use promo code: PodThat to get 125% bonus on whatever you deposit. Brought to you by the Sports ON Tap (SONT) - www.TheSportsOnTap.com Pod That Twitter & Sports ON Tap Twitter Pod That Instagram & Sports ON Tap Insta Pod That Facebook --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podthat/message

Brevity Box
B-Daddy Takes The Wheel; "Twitching", A Rodg, H Ruggs, FMK, and more

Brevity Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:50


In the beginning of a month of shows dedicated to our good friend Snake Racer, The fellas school Becky on Twitch and the importance of the gaming community. In a week where A-Aron Rodgers done fucked up but Henry Ruggs III fucked up even worse, we discuss the importance of owing up to you mistakes and taking accountability. The episode takes a fun shift when Brando pitches a very interesting game of Fuck, Marry, Kill and would you rather. Tune in for great discussion!www.RuminationsRadioNetwork.comhttps://www.instagram.com/brevityboxpodcast/www.instagram.com/RuminationsRadioNetworkTwitter: RuminationsRadioNetwork@RuminationsNEmail: RuminationsRadio@gmail.com Email: BrevityBoxpodcast@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/RuminationsRadioMusic and Production by Mitch Proctor★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

FWACATA
GET THE ZANSHIN GOING BROOOOO! Last podcast for the year! (Possibly)

FWACATA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:20


Hey folks! We are getting our shit together and becoming aware! ZANSHIN! ZANSHIN MOTHERFUCKER! We are getting Zen as Fuck and nobody is going to stop us! Or maybe just become a better human I don't know I never said I knew anything wtf!?! Also this is probably my last podcast till the end of the year I will be back in 2022 hopefully fucking zen as hell broooo! Until then enjoy! https://medium.com/the-ascent/how-to-use-zanshin-to-conquer-your-frantic-mind-c06942bb2b7b Making that FWACATA daily! Find more on my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FWACATA Daily uploads and videos here: https://instagram.com/fwacata Find all my stuff here: Www.fwacata.com #fwacata #miamicomics #makecomics #entrepreneur #podcastlife --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fwacata/support

Behind the SchƎmƎs
S01E71: Eerie Over Eerie

Behind the SchƎmƎs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 185:40


Greetings Greetings under the Moan Day Moonlight, Come one saucy sage, come all Cthulhi! Bet bet bet chill bet it's another spooky packed episode filled with the Decline of Western Seed, and A BOTG report from Lavish hits the greatest Rock and Roll mausoleum. Quirkess and Boo-Bury blast down to Astroworld, with the 808 pumping! Flipping off the ambulance, it's Behind The Sch3m3s! Atlas said "Fuck it". #jk. BYO3-DG Call in and leave your Scream-Mail on the Cr33p Phone! 612-263-SXXY ZOSO'S CORNER (Show Notes) If you like what you heard here, check out our revue show! ms. informed NAtion Follow us on Social Sesame at FeedBag (Facebook), Insta-Groan (Instagram) and The Twits (Twitter)! @behindthesch3m3s https://www.behindthesch3m3s.com/

writing class radio
116: How Do You Fulfill a Promise When You're Stuck in Prison?

writing class radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 34:07


This is the second episode in a 10-part series inspired by the people Allison Langer taught memoir writing, in a men's prison. You will hear stories her former students wrote after taking her class and stories from other incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people around the world.To help us get this right, Xaire has agreed to co-host the series with us. Xaire is a poet, singer-songwriter, actor, and teacher who teaches writing and poetry to kids in the foster care system and kids caught up in a detention center. THIS MUST BE SAID: We don't mean to sensationalize crime or someone who breaks the law. Airing these stories is in no way meant to take anything away from the victims of violent crime. Instead, we want to share stories, because we believe that stories lead to understanding. And if there's something we need more of these days, it's understanding. On this episode, you will hear one of our favorite stories by one of Allison's favorite people: Clifton Jones AKA 2-Tall. 2-Tall's story is about legacy and more specifically, about the promise he made to his mom and to himself. (If you'd like to follow along, see entire story at the bottom of the show notes.)You will also meet Chris Wilson who spent 16 years in prison. Chris is an entrepreneur, activist, and author of The Master Plan. Allison sent 2-Tall The Master Plan, so he could read his powerful words. For more Chris, listen to his Stoop Story. Chris talks about how his traumatic childhood and a life sentence led him to turn his life around and ultimately, help others.Writing Class Radio is produced by Allison Langer, Andrea Askowitz, Xaire, and by Matt Cundill and Evan Surminski of the Sound Off Media Company. Music by Xaire, Koi, Marnino Toussaint, Amadians.There's more writing class on our website, writingclassradio.com: including video classes, essays to study, and editing resources. If you love the lessons you get on each episode, you can get them ALL in one place--our three-part video series--for $50. Click Video Classes on our website.If you want to be a part of the movement that helps people better understand each other through storytelling, follow us on Patreon. For $10/month Andrea will answer all your publishing questions. For $25/month you can join Allison's First Draft weekly writers group, where you can write and share your work every Tuesday 12-1 (ET). www.Patreon.com/writingclassradio.A new episode will drop every other WEDNESDAY. So look for us. There's no better way to understand ourselves and each other, than by writing and sharing our stories. Everyone has a story. What's yours?This series is dedicated to Luis Aracena. You are missed and loved. May you rest in peace.The Making of My Unbreakable PromiseBy Clifton K. Jones (AKA 2-Tall) Down on one knee, everything around me that hadn't disappeared was muffled and seemed to be moving in slow motion. I felt like a block of ice drifting on a frozen lake. I was stunned. I didn't know how long I had been kneeling in the middle of my cell, but it felt like hours. I forced myself to sand and realized that I had been holding my breath. I composed myself enough to stop my hands from shaking. Looking down, I could see the words glowing mockingly from my tablet on the floor. I roared into the darkness. It was after 11pm, so the cell lights were off. Guys were either sleeping or bundled up in sweaters or jackets in the day room playing dominos, talking shit, or watching a late night movie on Bounce.My roommate was among the TV watchers, so I had the cell door pulled closed with a towel over the cell door window to block inquisitive eyes and signal to my roommate that I was busy. The one thing I feared the most had materialized. I had lost my QUEEN (mother). She was gone. I thought about the last phone conversation I had with her, only days before. My mother had cried, and that was rare. I can count the times I'd seen Mrs. Francis cry. Standing at a towering six feet, Mrs. Francis was a true amazon and she wore it well. Both beauty and amazon, my mother was understanding and caring, but she didn't play games. On countless occasions, I can remember walking into our apartment in Bradenton's page projects to find some unkempt stranger, an old friend who had fallen on bad times or was strung out on drugs. They would be at our smoke grey glass dinner table eating a healthy plate of yellow rice and turkey necks, buttered cornbread and sweet peas or leftover over baked macaroni and cheese, BBQ chicken and Hungry Jack biscuits. Everyone would be laughing and drinking and listening to Otis Redding or Barry White. Like clockwork, one of my three uncles would pop in to rile my mother calling out her childhood nickname, “Hey Tocka Head,” and then head straight for the kitchen. As soon as my mother heard the lid on a pot being removed, she'd scream, “If you don't get out of my damn pot without washing your dirty ass hands, boy I know something.” Mrs. Frances always said whatever was on her mind, so there was never much back talk. It was well known that my mother could curse the clouds out of the sky when she was pissed off. She'd lay down the law on man, woman and child if something didn't sit well with her. Especially if it was in regards to me or those she cared for. When I was eight years old, my mother, uncles, and some family friends were having a small get together. Kool and the Gang was booming on the speakers on the porch. All of us kids were playing Pac-man on the Atari, eating apple Now and Laters, Funyuns rings and drinking blue cream Nehi sodas. I don't remember exactly what jumped it off, only that it was in regard to my baby cousin, Jessica who my mom adored. Jessica's mom was good and drunk and my mother was not having it. She threw her sister Sharon through the screen door like a scene out of a western bar fight. How could she be gone? If my young mind could have registered the real consequences of stepping through that back door of the KFC with a snub nose 38 jammed into the small of my friend's back as he pretended to take out the trash, I would've run back to high school, basketball practice, or the recording studio with a new attitude and a respect for what life was really about. I would have made a different decision if I could have foreseen that one night I would be kneeling in a cold, dark cell trying to process a message that said my mother was dead. Gone before I could give her the keys to the house I promised to buy her when I was eleven years old.Instead, the prospect of what I thought would be a few thousand dollars to party with on my birthday lead me to squander the experience of sharing the gift of life with the woman who had given me so much of herself. She never got to see me be the person she knew I could be. So far, I had failed her and myself. There was no way I would allow the story of my life to end like this. Wherever great mothers go, I was going to make sure she would be able to say, ‘I told you he would do it.' and rest proudly. In our last conversation, my mother got on the topic of how she wouldn't be here forever and what to do if something should happen to her. I brushed it off and tried to change the subject like always. “Woman, you're not going anywhere.” This time, she stayed serious and on topic. “If I leave here boy, don't you start acting crazy.” “Ma.” “No, listen to me,” her voice thickened by emotions. “You do what you need to get your behind out of there. Promise me that if I leave here you're gonna get out of that place and live your life. And don't worry about me. I'll be with your sister, your grandfather, your aunty Cat, Angelo and my mother.” “I got you, Ma, I promise.” And I meant it.Looking around the dark cell, it felt strange thinking that my mom really wasn't here anymore. It didn't feel real. With mixed emotions, I left the cell to call my mother's husband. Rod had been a part of our lives for over 20 years. We were cool, but it hadn't always been good. As a family, we shared a history littered with frayed love and struggles. I witnessed him stand against anybody deemed a threat to my mother. Yet, I remember going into the kitchen one night and grabbing a butcher knife, because I heard him hit my mother. I was eleven and I never forgot this. I could hear the tears in his voice when he picked up the phone. I understood his hurt, his loss, and everything else I can't formulate into words. Calming himself, he recounted the details that lead up to him riding in the back of the ambulance with my mother before she passed, and her leaving a message telling me not to start acting up. Even in her final moments, she was more concerned about my wellbeing than her own. In a zone, I walked laps around the dorm listening to Tupac—Hold Your Head—on my MP3 player. I had to stay focused and away from people. I knew I was one wrong word away from doing who knows what. But I also knew that if I made good decisions, my time would come. In 1996, I was convicted of robbery with a firearm and three counts of kidnapping that I committed with three childhood friends when I was eighteen. I was given four life sentences on my first criminal offense, while my three co-defendants were allowed to go free without serving a day. That left a sour taste in my mouth, and in crucial moments such as this, I get frustrated because I feel alone and betrayed. I just want to say “Fuck it.” Then I remind myself that it's on me not to give up on my life, my dreams. To one day cross the stage at the Grammys, amongst the greats, and pay homage to the woman who rooted for me, no matter what. Only now, circumstances had transformed my dream into an unbreakable promise. I stopped at Bop's cell and put my face to the glass. He waved his hand in the darkness to let me know that he was awake. Stepping outside, he immediately asked what was wrong. Maybe it was the look on my face. I explained without going into detail what I was going through and to stop me from doing anything I would regret. With time standing still, I continued to pace and think. I knew without a doubt I would fulfill my promise to my mom, Mrs. Frances Andrew McNair.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Movie Lovers Unite
Dexter New Blood EP:2 Storm Of F.. Review

Movie Lovers Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:57


Hello Movie Lovers, welcome to the Dexter New Blood After Show. John and Charlie share their thoughts on Dexter New Blood EP: 2 Storm of Fuck. When a simple missing person case turns into a crime scene, Dexter's cabin becomes home base for the search and rescue. Terrible timing for Dexter, who is trying to reunite with his long lost son, Harrison. As Angela and Harrison become acquainted, Dexter struggles to keep his old and new worlds separate. Get 20% OFF + Free international shipping @manscaped with promo code “MOVIELOVERSUNITE” at Manscaped.com! Your Balls Will Thank You! #sponsored Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code MOVIELOVERSUNITE at Manscaped.com. That's 20% off with free shipping at manscaped.com and use code MOVIELOVERSUNITE Unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with MANSCAPED™. Imagine shaving with a sleek, well-designed, and optimized trimmer that makes shaving time your favorite time in the bathroom. I'm one of the first people to try the new 4.0 and I'm blown away by the performance. Follow us on Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/HouseNerdGeek/?ref=bookmarks Doing a fundraiser for St. Jude! If you like to help, please click below to raise money to go to St Jude Research Hospital. https://tlbodenhamer84.scentsy.us/party/15197126/st-judes-fundraiser?fbclid=IwAR3aUQArkoGULV3xpqP-heQIecqbJToctgH9PVZfbeMCcKApMkpzZNCKw9w If you want to donate to the show feel free to do so by going to https://www.gofundme.com/f/movie-lovers-unite-podcast?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1 For all of your entertainment news make sure that you check out www.movieloversunite.com If you want to be apart of our Patron feel free by clicking the link https://www.patreon.com/join/movieloversunite Follow us on Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/HouseNerdGeek/?ref=bookmarks If you want to get in touch with Movie Lovers Unite feel free to email us at movieloversunite@gmail.com If you want to leave us a voice mail message here's the link https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/movieloversunite/message

Turned Out A Punk
Episode 376 - Toby Morse (H2O, Hazen Street, One Life One Chance Podcast)

Turned Out A Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 107:21


Today we welcome one of the most positive forces in the hardcore universe to the show: TOBY MORSE! The author, podcaster & H20 front person is here to celebrate his lifelong love of punk. Join Damian as he reconnects with his one time tour buddy to discuss: the whiplash between Revolution Summer DC & NYHC, Kevin Seconds as a father figure, Verbal Assault being underrated, Chris Gethard's story from TOAP episode 51 & so much more!  DO NOT MISS IT! Also, don't miss Toby's brand new kids' book "One Life One Chance" OUT NOW on HE Creative or visit H2OMERCH.COM AND if you want one of the new Turned Out A Punk shirts, visit TURNEDOUTAPUNK.COM Also Touched On: 20 years of friendship Going to see Impact Unit “Never Mind The Bollocks” of 8-track Verbal Assault RULE Positive Outlook The Belly punk connection The Marginal Man cover Embrace Kingface East Coast surfing Not liking the “Anarchy and Fuck your parents” vibe 7 Seconds Meeting Milo and seeing the Descendents  The Chris Gethard story Moving to DC just in time for Revolution Summer Going hippies Moving to New York to hang with Token Entry Underdog Hanging with Sick Of It All Living beside  Living in Alan Cage's closet  “The Hick from Maryland” Walter plays the Sugarcubes and Smiths Rusty and Images Outcrowd Violence in NY The Warped Tour Generation Records The amazingness of Kevin Seconds Recording beside Axel Rose Not loving “Go” & SO MUCH MORE!!!!! BROUGHT TO YOU BY VANS

Podcast Under The Stairs
The Podcast Under The Stairs EP 318 - DEXTER: NEW BLOOD - EP 2 STORM OF F**K

Podcast Under The Stairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 35:54


Join your host Duncan Under The Stairs discussing all things Horror on The Podcast Under the Stairs. Dexter has returned to the small screen for the first time in 8 years for a limited mini series of 10 episodes dubbed Dexter: New Blood. Duncan is going episode by episode each week recapping the events and giving his thoughts to one of his favourite TV characters of all time. This episode features a review of Episode 2 - Storm of Fuck. Intro - 0 - 6mins 50secs Promo - 6mins 50secs - 8mins 20secs Episode 2: Storm of Fuck - 8mins 20secs - 32mins 35secs Closing out the Show - 32mins 35secs - End The grading follows the Netflix rating style of 1 = Hated It, 2 = Didn't Like It, 3 = Liked It, 4 = Really Liked It & 5 = Loved It Dexter: New Blood - Ep2 Storm of Fuck Duncan: 4 Our new RSS Feed: https://anchor.fm/s/13ba6ef0/podcast/rss BUY OFFICIAL TPUTS MERCH FROM http://tputscast.bigcartel.com Check out the show on Anchor, iTunes, TuneIn & on Stitcher Radio. Join our Discord Community. Please leave us feedback on iTunes, podcastunderthestairs@gmail.com and follow us on Facebook & Twitter.

Notorious Mass Effect
"SUMMER WALKER - STILL OVER IT"

Notorious Mass Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 16:41


Summer Walker doesn't know exactly what he did wrong. She just knows you need to leave him. Expeditiously. Still Over It, her sophomore album, is not here to be anyone's peace, with track titles like “No Love,” featuring SZA, “Constant Bullshit,” “Switch a Nigga Out,” “Unloyal” featuring Ari Lennox, “4th Baby Mama (Prelude), and “4th Baby Mama.” She really put it on there twice for emphasis. Along with single “Ex for a Reason” with JT from the City Girls, Still Over It features Lil Durk, Pharrell, and Omarion, with narration by Cardi B and Ciara. 2000s R&B collides with 2021 to break that icebox where our hearts used to be. “Summer Walker song Bitter gets me very angry …” Cardi B, patron saint of getting back with your ex, tweeted about the album on November 2. “Like it makes me relive all the drama bitches put me through … I forgive y'all but Fuck y'all !!” The track list is accompanied by 20 dates from the past year, teasing a narrative that only just ended on October 7, 2021. What's going on Internet, Analytic here aka Dreamz and I would like to welcome you to mine, which I call the Notorious Mass Effect Podcast! I am your Hip-Hop / Gaming News source with a little bit of R&B mixed in. FOR EPISODE 75: “BRUNO MARS & ANDERSON .PAAK - SMOKIN OUT THE WINDOW” “SUMMER WALKER - STILL OVER IT” “ELDEN RING” “KEY GLOCK - YELLOW TAPE 2” But before that make sure to Click my Linktree in my bio to access my social medias and follow, to keep up with my latest activities, if you want to financially support the show click my cash app link located towards the top of my linktree as it helps the show overall, also make sure to share this podcast rating the show 5 stars as this helps the show reach more people so we can grow together and effect the masses! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/masseffect/support

Rags To Dishes
Rags To Dishes 39: "Pay The Fuck Attention"

Rags To Dishes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 65:33


In this weeks edition of Rags To Dishes, Max & Dan are joined by one of Providence's premier chefs Jason Timothy. JT is the culinary director and part owner of PVD Powerhouse restaurant  "Troop" and the crew dissects and learns the story of how JT got to where he is. From Weekapaug, to the big apple and back, JT's experience in the game is truly inspiring as he names off some of his favorite spots to eat currently in PVD. Tune in as we "Rawdog" reality and have a few laughs along the way...Subscribe & Share   

Kara's Lipstick Diary
Kill...Fuck...Marry - Dan's Take Over | Daniel Rengering | Kara's Lipstick Diary | E1:20

Kara's Lipstick Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:51


Birthday Month Continues and #hotcop is back and this time he takes over the show.  Daniel Rengering sits in the host seat and interviews Kara and makes her play a game of Kill...Fuck...Marry.  Watch to see what ridiculousness they discuss.Dan rose to viral fame in 2017 during hurricane irma as #hotcop.  Since then he has appeared on Survivor and Get Away Driver and has graced the covers of multiple romance novels all while still being a cop.Set Flowers Provided by Alachua Flowers and Tuxedo RentalsYou can find them at www.alachua-flowers-and-tuxedo-rentals.busines.siteEPISODE 20 COCKTAIL RECIPE | Whiskey and CokeWhiskey and coke I don't know the ratios Dan made it.For all the latest contests and happening behind the scenes:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Karas-Lipsti... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karaslipsti...To view the antics subscribe to the YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE2P...#karaslipstickdiary​ #kidsABOUT KARA'S LIPSTICK DIARYKara Winslow is freelance on location makeup artist based in Florida that has worked in the entertainment and wedding/event industries for over 25 years.  She spent over a decade doing work at HSN both on camera and behinds the scenes for a cosmetic company.  After several years of being away from being on camera she decided to launch her podcast.

TwoBeezinaPod
Two Beez in a Pod- Fuck Buddy Checklist- Episode. 57

TwoBeezinaPod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 47:59


Welcome Back Bsquad!! In this episode the girls discuss their experiences with fuck buddies and what they require of them!

Orange Bowl Boys
Week 11 Recap vs FSU

Orange Bowl Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 46:45


Orange Bowl BoysWeek 11 Recap vs FSUShow NotesFUCK. FUCK. FUCK. FUCK. FUCK.You can find us on all social platforms under the handle: @orangebowlboysSponsors: Ed Morse Automotive Group, BeatinTheBookie.com, Caneswear & Draftkings SportsbookOrange Bowl Boys are owned and produced by OBB Media Inc. You can visit us online at www.obbmediainc.com. Copyright 2021.

Software Engineering Daily
fuck Mark Zuckerberg, he kept me from people I love for many years

Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 4:01


fuck you Mark Zuckerberg   not kidding fuck you I don't want to play cards with you. Maybe someday if you apologize and repent and shit. But even then I will keep a safe distance. Fuck you and fuck you and fuck those who took pleasure in your intimidation game (NOT imitation game, nobody wants The post fuck Mark Zuckerberg, he kept me from people I love for many years appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jim and Them
Is Drive A Christmas Movie? - #701 Part 2

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 113:18


Eternals: Jim has tales of Twitter adventures and seeing the latest Marvel offering ETERNALS!Supply Chain Is this some sort of false flag!? Are there no turkeys available for Thanksgiving this year or is this all a part of LOCKSTEP!? Is Drive a Christmas movie!?Aaron Rodgers: Everyone is mad at Aaron Rodgers, is it warranted?THE LIBYRANS!, BACK TO THE FUTURE!, CITY HALL!, TENACIOUS D!, MURDER SUICIDE!, AL PACHINKO!, AL PACINO!, ME RIKEY!, NOT RACIST!, ONE EYE!, RICE PADDY HATS!, EPCOT!, BRAND!, JIM ON HIS PERSONAL TIME ON TWITTER JIM!, TWITTER!, TROLLING!, MCU DIRECT!, ETERNALS!, DIVERSITY!, AUDIENCE APPROVAL SCORE!, LGBT!, GAY SUPERHERO!, REPRESENTATION!, BRYAN TYREE HENRY!, TRANS PERSON!, PROMINENT NAMES!, STIR THE POT!, PERFORMATIVE BULLSHIT!, LOKI!, GENDER FLUID!, MONEY!, STAR POWERED!, TYE SHERIDAN!, KILLING OF A SACRED DEER!, KINGO!, KUMAIL!, BARRY KEOGHAN!, EZRA MILLER!, MARVEL HUMOR!, REGAL UNLIMITED!, BORING!, FLASHBACKS!, 7,000 YEARS!, JUMBLE OF GARBAGE!, AVENGERS ENDGAME!, WEIGHT!, LENGTH!, FLY INTO THE SUN!, LOCKSTEP!, DUCKDUCKGO!, MIDDLE PART!, SUPPLY CHAIN!, FALSE FLAG!, LABOR SHORTAGE!, CARNE ASADA!, FREE REFILLS!, ALPHA MALE!, ASK A PERSON!, ORDER SIZZLING FAJITAS!, ATTENTION!, TIVOLI VILLAGE!, LOUD!, REAL THINGS!, USE THIS MORE!, EMP PAINT!, RICH PEOPLE!, WINDOW!, ARTIST!, MATTER IS CONSCIOUS!, FAKE TREE!, REAL TREE!, CHRISTMAS!, CHARLIE BROWN TREE!, DRIVE!, CHRISTMAS MOVIE?!, VIBES!, MUSIC!, PAUL MCCARTNEY!, DENTIST!, RUDOLPH!, MISFIT TOY!, BITTERSWEET!, SAD CHRISTMAS!, DENIS VILLENEUVE!, ENEMY!, PRISONERS!, SPIDERS!, ARRIVAL!, BLADE RUNNER 2049!, ALFONSO CUARON!, CHILDREN OF MEN!, PRISONER OF AZKABAN!, GRAVITY!, PASSENGER JUMPS OUT WINDOW ON NYC BUS!, REVERSAL!, HOMELESS!, CRAZY PERSON!, BITE!, PUSHED!, SHOVED!, TRASH SLEEVE!, FAKE PUSSY!, FLESHLIGHT!, DUMP!, LICK!, FUCK!, TAKE OUT DICK!, BEETLEJUICE!, STERN!, ARI SHAFFIR!, PATRICE!, AARON RODGERS!, NFL!, VACCINE!, MANDATE!, RULES!, JOE ROGAN!, FLATTEN THE CURVE!, NURSES!, DOCTORS!, HOSPITALS!, OVERRUN!, BABIES DIED!, TIKTOK!, F WORD!, TARGETTED!, SHOT IN THE SKY!, EDGY!, CHARACTER!, SALES!, FAST AND LOOSE!, BUFFER!, YO HO YO HO SONG!, KILLED THE NUMBERS!, AMMO!, DECATUR!, COMEDY!, IMPORTANT TO THE SHOW!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

All Fantasy Everything
Animals That Can Fuck Right Off (w/ Zach Harper, Sean Jordan, David Gborie)

All Fantasy Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 119:45


To quote the unparalleled Daniel Lavery on opossums - "MY FULL ENTIRETY OF A REACTION TO YOU CAN BE SUMMED UP THUSLY AND FOLLOWING: SHAVEN'T, NOT AS IN SHAVE-ENT BUT RHYMES-WITH-HAVEN'T. SHAVEN'T. I SHAVEN'T YOU. SHAVEN'T. YOUR WHOLE ENDEALMENT, I DON'T PRIZE." Guest: Zach Harper @talkhoops IG: @talkhoops Podcasts: Cinephobe | Count The Dings Support the show! Join the All Fantasy Everything Patreon for ad-free episodes, mailbags, and video pre-rolls. Check it all out at www.patreon.com/AllFantasy. Merch: teepublic.com/user/allfantasyeverything Follow the Good Vibes Gang on social media: Ian Karmel @IanKarmel IG: @IanKarmel Sean Jordan @SeanSJordan IG: @SeancougarmelonJordan David Gborie IG: @Coolguyjokes87 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Probably a Podcast
Fuck Me Back feat. Jalen Noble

Probably a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 58:57


The Uncurated Life Podcast
135 | Shit That's Annoying Me

The Uncurated Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 15:37


Sometimes I feel like Oscar the Grouch, and today is no different. Today I'm going on a (lighthearted) rant about some shit that's annoying me. Lighthearted is the emphasis here my dudes. DISCLAIMER Colorful words may be used. don't be alarmed. NEWSLETTER https://view.flodesk.com/pages/61525a85337f1c2aacf52f6d Etsy Shop is open! https://www.etsy.com/shop/CGBPrints FIND ME ON ALL THE THINGS Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/cindyguentertbaldo YouTube - https://youtube.com/c/CindyGuentertBaldo Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/llamaletters/ Discord - https://discord.gg/Rwpp7Ww Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/llamaletters/ Website - www.cindyguentertbaldo.com STUFF I MENTIONED Work Planner Setup - https://youtu.be/4dM7YsxI2jo Maintenance Phase Celery Juice - https://maintenancephase.wixsite.com/home/episodes/episode/4cfde6d6/celery-juice Livestream (puke story) - https://youtu.be/mdCd5fS3iZU Inquiries - cindy@cindyguentertbaldo.com   TRANSCRIPTION Hello friends. Welcome back to the uncurated life podcast today. I'm glad you're here because I need someone to listen to some shit. That's annoying me. My name is Cindy Guentert-Baldo welcome. If this is your first time here. And do you like what you hear then? I hope you subscribe. We've got new episodes every Monday.   And if this is not your first time here, I hope that you like what you hear and you stick around because that makes me happy quick. And before I get into the episode, I do want to let you know, in case you didn't know already that this week on the 11th, November 11th, 2021 in my Etsy shop, I will be offering a limited run of 2022 calendars, their wall calendars.   They have a mixture of. My fuckery flowers from both series, then old series series one in the new series series two. These will be limited because I can only get so many of them before I lose it. So make sure you head on over there to pick up a calendar or three, they make excellent gifts, blah, blah, blah.   But anyway, I want to make sure to remind you of that because the there'll be dropping on the. If you are on my newsletter, you will get the heads up when they go live. And if you are a patron, your access comes tomorrow, November 10th. So just make sure that if there's something that you're interested in, I don't know how quickly they're going to sell out.   I've never done this before. So you may want to keep your eye on. Anyway, let's get into this because marketing also annoys me. So I've just got a handful of things that annoy me. I told you when I did my like I'm back episode, that I wanted to both handle some spicy topics and some light-hearted topics and talk about things I love and blah, blah, blah.   Well, a combination of lighthearted and spicy is some shit that's annoying me. And I've got a whole list of things that run the. And I just thought I would let you know to see if a they annoy you and B if they don't, you can always yell at me on Instagram at llamaletters, let me know in the stories. So let's just get into it because I love talking about shit that annoys me, apparently that I wonder if there's a personality test that tells you that I don't know.   First of all, is celery juice. I am so tired of seeing on Instagram. I am tired of seeing influencers talk about it. I am tired of seeing it in YouTube videos. I'm tired of it. If you want to have a deep dive on how bunk the whole celery juice thing is now that it's bad for you. It's not, but it's not like it's magical either.   Then listen to the maintenance phase episode on celery juice. They do a great job. I'll leave at link in, the show notes. If you haven't listened to that podcast, a 10 out of 10 recommend. However, my big hatred of celery juice comes from two sort of areas. The first one being like, what the fuck is wrong with just eating celery?   Like I don't even like celery all that much. I like it in soup. I don't really like it on its own. It's too stringy for me, but. There's like a segment of people who think that you have to juice it for it to be good for you, but doesn't that just remove all the fiber? I don't get it. Secondly, a lot of the celery juice, like the people who are enchanted with it kind of use the same language around wellness culture that I find to be really toxic.   And that's going to show up later on this list, but also in some later podcasts, but a lot of it has to do with like the idea of like, Hearing your chronic illnesses and detoxifying yourself. And I'm just going to say that whenever anybody suggests some new trendy thing to cure chronic illness, especially genetic chronic illness, which is what I have, it feels remarkably abelist and it feels really like, uh, I was going to say naive, but I don't think that's the right word.   Just sorta sort of. I don't know, bogus, like fucking no, dude, I have genetic kidney disease, celery juice won't help me. And secondly, anytime somebody tells me they're doing a cleanse or drinking the juice to flux out, flush out the toxins as somebody with failing kidneys. I want to slap them because you know what flushes your toxins, your liver and your kidneys.   So if they're functioning, they're doing it for. You don't need magic juice to do that. And if you're like me and have failing kidneys, Magic juice is not going to flush my toxins. You know what? Well, dialysis, sorry. I did say this was shit that annoys me. So sorry. Celery juice, but I am, I am moving on from you.   Number two, raisins in cookies. Now I know there are some of you who love a good fucking oatmeal raisin cookie, but for me, raisins and cookies are. The most disappointing thing that can ever happen. And the reason that this is like on my mind right now is recently I got surprised the other day thinking I was going to have a delicious oatmeal chocolate chip cookie.   And it was an oatmeal raisin cookie. And I'm sorry, that is not the business. I like raisins. I have nothing against raisins, but not in cookies and raisin bran. Fuck. Yeah, leave my cookies alone. Hashtag. Number three. And this one is actually very, very much relevant to me right now, because I have had to make so many doctor's appointments for both myself and my kid because of my chronic illnesses that have already talked about.   And because my kid has some health problems, we're trying to nail down, hold music. Now I would be fine if a company had like a serious XM station or something, or some kind of. Radio station. I don't know something where the music rotates, but when it's the same song over and over and over and over and over and over again.   And you're on hold for like eleventy million years. It's it makes my brains leak out my ears, like an ice pick to my temple and it's awful. And like, I understand that that's probably less expensive for a company than doing like a radio station, but dear God, dear. Oh. Oh, my God, I just can't. I can't it's it's grading.   Thankfully, at least one of the people that I had to call had the option for you to save your place in line and hang up and they'd call you back. And as much as I hate my phone and ignore it, I tried that and it actually worked. Most of the time I haven't trusted it, but I did try it and it worked. So I may go with that because that might save me from turning into Jack Torrance in Stanley Kubrick's the shining and having all work and no play makes Cindy adult boy, number four, I wrote this out and then the day I wrote this out, it was wrong.   So I'm still gonna tell you it, but. I was kind of shown up by it. And that is that they made the strawberry SAE refreshers at Starbucks seasonal. I have fallen for that with extra water and extra ice because it's too sweet for me. And then they disappeared because it was seasonal, but I don't think it's seasonal now.   I think it might just have been because of supply shortages because they came back. So I don't know. So that may not be accurate. So right now I'm annoyed by the fact that I was wrong.   Next is my seasonal allergies. I thought they would disappear when I removed, when I moved to Denver, because I never had them until I moved to Napa. And Napa is a micro climate and it is known among locals that when you move to Napa, you tend to get allergies, even if you never had them before. And like, everybody I know in Napa would have like the most miserable seasonal allergy situations.   I thought I would be rid of them when I moved, but apparently Napa just like imprinted them on me because I got to Denver and I still have them and it fucking sucks. And I just, I, it annoys me and this is a, should I annoys me? That annoys me podcast. I'm just saying. The fact that my Claritin only takes the edge off.   And the fact that anytime you sneeze or have a runny nose right now in the age of COVID, that everybody looks at you, like you're carrying the plague. And it's like, dude, I have fucking allergies. Like it just it's, it's one of those little things that like, I hated I've always hated, but with COVID it has just gotten more annoying and sure.   It's not as annoying as having COVID, but like, this is annoying shit. This is not catastrophic shit. Right. Speaking of COVID. The next thing that's annoying me is that I bought one of those home COVID tests because one of my kids had some symptoms after somebody at school had gotten exposed and I gave them the test and the test was negative and I was supposed to give them another test in 36 hours.   And I couldn't find it. This annoys me. I still can't find half of the shit in my house because we just moved and I put some stuff away. And now I don't know where anything is. And I know that that will be solved when I start organizing. And now that we live in a bigger house, there's just so many more places for shit to be.   I spent way longer than I needed to looking for the broom the other day, because we have too many closets and I know it's a first world problem, but like it's fucking annoying and referencing that I also can't find my AirPods and I really want them and could use them. I've been doing a lot of things recently where it would have been helpful to have my.   And I don't want to replace them because they're expensive. And on top of that, like I know that the moment I replaced them, they're going to come out with new ones. It's just, I have them there. They work perfectly fine and I just cannot figure out where the fuck they are. And I'm really annoyed by that on a completely unrelated note.   I am very annoyed by my new potassium. So as people who. I have chronic illness or people who take a lot of medications can probably understand. One of the things that can get really annoying is when you've been taking a medication for a long time, and then you change pharmacies or you change healthcare systems, or you change something and the brand manufacturer of your medication.   Especially if you're on generics and so like a different generic company, because there's all sorts of companies that make some of these medications, especially the ones that have lots of generics. I'm not talking about insulin because insulin doesn't have generics. And that's an entire thing that goes beyond annoyance into white, hot rage as this wife of a type one diabetic says, but for me, my potassium.   Has changed. I just, when I made, made the move, we swapped from the Kaiser system to a different healthcare system. And now I'm getting my prescriptions filled at Walgreens and the brand or the generic brand that is making my potassium is different. And for some reason, this new potassium, my gigantic fucking potassium pills that have take three times a day melt in my mouth.   Not in my hand, they start to dissolve the moment they hit my mouth. They kind of crumble when I dropped them into my pill minder, so that there's already little bits of potassium to dissolve into my mouth. And it is bitter and terrible. And I have chronically low potassium, which is really strange for someone in kidney failure.   Like I am, but because of that, I have to take, I have to eat Tassie and rich foods and take hella potassium. And the real thing that makes me sad is that the options that I have. To swap to, instead of this melt in your mouth, not in your hands, potassium are like infusions, which according to my sister, feel like molten lava in your veins or the liquid, which is even gnarlier.   So I'm stuck with it. And it's really goddamn annoying, especially since those pills are so big. I gag on them every time I swallow them and I have to do it three times a day. I am lucky that I haven't barfed on myself. Well, because of that, I have barfed on myself recently. That's an entirely different story.   Number nine is something that has been annoying me for a long time. And I am sort of subjecting myself to it and it still annoys me, but it's my fault because I'm subjecting myself to it. And that is discs for planners. It's helpful to have the disks for my work planner. I can take pages out and write on them.   It's cuter than. Using, um, a three ring binder and I wanted letter sized paper and having like a Filofax type situation for that size. It's harder to find. I love the cover. I love everything about my work planner, but the discs are really pissing me off because even though they're helpful for removing things and whatnot, random shit keeps popping off.   And every time it happens, I curse myself for putting myself in this situation because this is why I don't like this. But I'm gonna keep using them. And so I probably should shut up about it, but this is my podcast. I'm going to do what I want. Right. Number 10, back to the barfing. Nausea is getting worse and worse for me.   It happens when you get further into kidney disease. My sister warned me to keep a extra trashcan with a roll of bags in it, near the toilet for all of those times when it takes you over. And I wish I had known that. After I puked all over myself, I'll make sure to link the plan with me where I tell that story.   If you're really interested in it in the show notes, however, my nausea is getting worse and worse and the Zofran has stopped completely helping and instead just taking the edge off. And I know it's just going to get worse until I get a transplant. I hate being nauseous. You guys, I hate it so much.   Number 11 trader Joe's is discontinuing their curtains from what I was told when I was there the other day. And I just decided I liked them. So I'm bummed. I know this is like the most white girl thing to say about my trader Joe's product. That was discontinued. Trust me. I worked there for 12 years. I had to hear it all, but dammit, this crew Johns are good.   And then finally, the thing that's annoying me the most in the preview. If it's something you're interested in, please let me know in the stories at Lama letters. If you want to make episodes on it, because I'm really thinking about doing it. And that is talking about toxic wellness culture and deprogramming myself from some diet culture.   I have a kid who is dealing with some disordered eating right now, and it is really causing me to take a look at some of the things that I do. And it's annoying the shit out of me. And more than annoying me that I haven't set a better example. But on top of that, I've had some comments over the years, but recently I've had a few more of people being very well intentioned, but completely dismissing my experience as somebody with chronic illness.   And it's just making me more and more annoyed to the point of rage about toxic wellness culture. So if you are interested in hearing a podcast about that, please. Anyway, those are some things that I, that annoy me. I know this is not the most positive episode, but fucks shut. Sometimes shit annoys you. And sometimes you want to get off your chest and sometimes you get surprised by raisins and cookies, and sometimes you puke on yourself and we got to talk about those things.   If you want to share with me something just random, that's been annoying you lately. Let me know in the Instagram stories, just post at llamaletters and tell me about it because I'm curious to see, but the random shit that's annoying. You. Because it's fun for me. Don't forget to check out the Etsy shop on the 11th.   If you're interested in calendars and don't forget to thank my patrons. If you ever see one bop and about because they make these episodes possible. So thank you, patrons, www.patreon.com/cindyguentertbaldo. If you would like to find out more, you know, who doesn't annoy me, you all, and I'm glad that you're here.   So thanks for hanging out next week. I won't be quite as annoyed potential. But until next time, until that next annoying or not annoying time, stay safe because it'll annoy me. If you're not safe and peace out.