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  • May 25, 2022LATEST
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    Latest podcast episodes about Fuck

    Everyone's A Critic
    Ep 198: Silver Dollar Whoopsie

    Everyone's A Critic

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 66:06


    TODAY! THIS MORNING! We bring Branson Week to a dramatic conclusion, and Jess finds reviews for mouthwash that makes your tongue orange, ruins your taste buds, and damages your gums. We're keeping it LIGHT over here! FUCK! If you like the show, PLEASE TELL A FRIEND? That's our advertising for the moment.  Buy our shirts and cups: https://www.designbyhumans.com/shop/CriticEveryone/ Yell at us: foreveracritic@gmail.com Tweet at us: @CriticEveryone Allow conspiracies to fester with us: Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/Everyones-a-Critic-2327696304154655/ Listen to the other great shows on our network: https://xraypod.com/ I did really hug Tommy Wiseau once.     

    Accuracy Third
    S05 E24 - An Amazing Journey with Somebody Special

    Accuracy Third

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 72:18


    Anji Bear asks us to take some breaths. Dust people. The Poly Asylum. So, Bozo. Those motherfuckers. No one is camped here. All drug dogs are dumb drug dogs. All white men: 6:00 AM. THOSE KIND OF NERDS. Electric sex. Aussie rats. Canuck customs. Fuck you, Burning Man, fuck you, fuck you. Sacred medicine seeking behavior. #NarcCoin MUSIC: Jurgis Did & Fantuzzi "Love Warrior" https://open.spotify.com/track/4UGiCIfzt7MhPAoE1Mxuff?si=ddHKpEBOQpmDewq4c_SILQ&nd=1

    FROM THE NOSEBLEEDS
    Hosked The Fuck Out

    FROM THE NOSEBLEEDS

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 65:08


    It's the Seamus, Pat, and Bruce show this week. The boys talk Phillies and the recent rough stretch from JT and Rhys. Then they get into some Tyrese Maxey trade talk (definitive answer: naw), and the outlook on the Eagles season.

    UvA Radio
    What The Fuck Is That About, Ep. 9: Authenticity

    UvA Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 55:45


    Follow the POD INSTA: @wtf.isthataboutpodcast Your emotional support absolute nonsense vent mind dump besties are back with another episode. unique or authentic? neither and both. this week we are talking about “our aesthetics” or if that even is a real thing. Join us talking about growing up, trying to stand out, and how curated our social media image is.

    I Survived Theatre School
    Jeremy Owens

    I Survived Theatre School

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 95:45


    Intro: Final Draft is conspiring against us, Beastie Boys' Adam Horowitz, Doris the dog loves the vet, Jim Croce, The Cure. Let Me Run This By You: storytelling, Risk Podcast, The MothInterview: We talk to the creator and producer of You're Being Ridiculous, Jeremy Owens, about offending people, porn, Samantha Irby, Roosevelt University, University of Arkansas, The URTAs, King Lear, Greg Vinkler, Barbara Gaines, Plautus' The Rope, P.F. Changs, Kyogen, Threepenny Opera, Steppenwolf, Brene Brown, Marianne Williamson.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited): 2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand.3 (15s):At 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (34s):Yeah.1 (35s):It was one of these things where it's like, final draft will not let you restart your computer. I'm like, fuck you. Final draft. What did you ever do for me? Final draft writer, duet. They're all, they're all plotting against me,2 (47s):But what is, what is, what does final draft have to do with your camera working on this?1 (53s):So in order to, to be okay, the bottom line is I need a new computer. Okay. Let's start there second. Okay. That's the first level of problems. It's like the deepest level. And then we, if we go up a little bit into the level of problems, it is that final draft that I might camera in order to use my camera. Sometimes I have to restart my computer because it's so old. Right. So I need to restart,2 (1m 19s):You know, I want to do any one thing in the morning I got, are really rev my engine.1 (1m 26s):So like, I'm like, okay, well, in order to restart the computer, it's like not letting me restart it because final draft is this because probably final draft is so advanced and my computer is so Jack.2 (1m 39s):Totally. And that's how they get you mad. I feel like they all conspired to be like, okay, well let's make it. So this will work on this version. So then,1 (1m 49s):So anyway, I see you, you look great. I look like shit. So it's probably better my camera's up.2 (1m 57s):So a couple of things I keep forgetting to ask you on here, about how, how did it come to be that you were chatting in the parking lot with Adam Horowitz about your dogs, Volvo.1 (2m 12s):We never talked about that.2 (2m 14s):We did not.1 (2m 15s):Okay. So I rule up, so my dog, Doris, who everyone knows that listens to the podcast and by everyone, I mean, whoever listens to the podcast, you know what I mean? So hopefully it's growing and growing, listen and rate the podcast. Anyway, the point is I roll up to the vet, which I do oh about every other week, because my dog is a very high maintenance. And so she's just so she of course had an ear infection. Cause she has these huge ears that collect all this bacteria. So I roll up and there's an eye and because it's COVID and everything, you have to park outside and wait, but because it's LA all the windows are down and everyone's car and there's this dude sitting in his Kia has electric Kia.1 (2m 59s):Well,2 (2m 59s):My key.1 (3m 0s):Yeah, I know. I know. I did not recognize this human being. He looked like my husband, like fifties gray, maybe had glasses on.2 (3m 13s):Why would you like all our knowledge of them is when they were so, so young. Right,1 (3m 18s):Right. So young. And I like didn't, you know, keep up with the beast. So it was like, I had other things to do, you know? So I was doing other things. So I'm, I'm like trying to corral Doris out of the car. She's crazy. She's trying to get out. She loves the vet. The backdrop is my dog2 (3m 35s):Loves the,1 (3m 36s):Oh my God. She races towards the vet with a fury that is unmatched, loves it. I2 (3m 43s):Never once heard of this in my entire life. So1 (3m 45s):She's really, really excited about the bet. So she's an extra crazy. And I get her out of the carrier to let her sniff around in the parking lot. And I see this gentleman who is the interesting thing about him is that his leg is out the window. Like he's like resting his leg. And I'm like, well, that's kind of weird for like an older dude, but whatever, it's, it's LA like, you know2 (4m 8s):That sound's going to say, I imagine that kind of thing happens in LA.1 (4m 11s):Yeah. And plus he's probably weighed been waiting and waiting for his dog forever. And so, cause you, you have to wait out there, like they don't want you to leave in case they need you and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Okay, fine. So I, and I say, and he says, oh, a cute dog. And I'm like, oh, she's a pain in the ass. And then he's like, what's her name? And I'm like, oh, her name is Doris. And he's like, oh, that was my mom's name. And I was like, oh, that's interesting. And then we talked about the origin of Doris, cause it's from a Jim Croce song. And Jim Croce is someone, my husband adores the singer. The folks there yeah. Died when he was 29. Looked like he was about 60. When he died.2 (4m 47s):He was 29.1 (4m 49s):Yes. You know, he looks like David Abbott, Holly, if you ever look at me2 (4m 56s):Like a hole, I see it.1 (4m 59s):But just bringing it back to the old theater school. So, so yeah. And so he's like, we talked about Jim Croce and he's like, Jim Croce is the first person I remember dying. I had that album. And I said, yeah. And he said, that's in a Jim Croce song. And I said, yes, Leroy brown, Friday about a week ago, Leroy shooting dice. And at the end of the bar sat a girl named Doris and who that girl looked nice. And that's why we named Doris Doris. He was like, I don't remember Doris being in that song. So we get into that. Right. Okay. And then he's like, I'm like, oh, is your dog okay? And he's like, well, she, she, she got a cut on her neck and I'm like, oh shit. And I'm like, is that2 (5m 38s):A knife fight in a bar?1 (5m 39s):I was like, how did that happen? And he goes, I don't know. But like, you know, since I'm not a doctor, I figured I'd take, bring her to the vet. I'm like good plan, my friend, good plan. So he's like, I'm waiting for him and waiting for her. And I'm like, oh, okay. And then he said, what's wrong with your dog? And I said, oh my God, what? Isn't wrong with my dog? And I said, my dog has a dermatitis of the vulva and an ear infection. And he's like, wait, what? And I'm like, yes, she just she's out. She's got a lot of allergies because she's a friend. She and I did this to myself by getting a friendship. But like, yeah, she's got, and he said that his dog was really licking her butthole and he had dermatitis of the bottle. And I was like, it's the same I heard of my friend, Morgan has a Frenchie who has dermatitis of the butthole because all Frenchie owners talk about these things.1 (6m 26s):And he's like, oh, well, my dog has dermatitis of the bottle. I'm like, well, mine's got dermatitis of the Volvo. They both have, they both have like private parts itching. Right. And so then we started talking and we talked about a lot of things. Cause you have to wait forever. And then right. And so we talk and talk and talk and no clue who this person is. And he's like,2 (6m 47s):Did you say cut? There's something about that voice?1 (6m 52s):No.2 (6m 52s):No. Okay.1 (6m 54s):'cause he was kinda mumbly and also just looked so natural.2 (6m 60s):Aiming, sabotage.1 (7m 1s):No, not screaming and also not jumping around with his other two cohort. And then I just, I felt like, anyway, it just didn't cross my mind. And his shoelaces were untied. I don't know. It was like a real casual situation.2 (7m 15s):Yeah. Honestly, I would never assume somebody in a key is famous. That's my snobbery, but I wouldn't.1 (7m 21s):Yeah. I mean, I, it was a very, very, very nice camp, but it still, it was a key I said to you like, oh, that was her talking about cars. I mean, we talked about kids, cars, Manhattan. Then he said, I'm from it. I said, oh, I'm from Chicago. And he said, I'm from Manhattan. And I said, oh, I said, oh my God. I launched into this thing about how I could never live in New York because I was like to own like the most unhip like fat and ugly human and like, not in a bad way, but just like, kind of like I'm. So I just feel like, I didn't know what the fuck was going on ever in New York. Like, I didn't know which way to go, who to talk to, where to turn I was lost. And he's like, yeah. Do you know what I like about LA is like, nothing ever happens here.1 (8m 2s):That's not2 (8m 2s):True.1 (8m 3s):No. But I was like, what do you mean? He's like, I need to just like New York, like you have like a million things are always happening at any given time. Right?2 (8m 11s):Sure. It's a lot too. Like you have to do a lot of processing living in New York, you're taking your, you know, you're just taking in so much information1 (8m 19s):And that does not happen in LA and LA you're like sometimes starved for like,2 (8m 25s):Right.1 (8m 26s):But we talked about that. And then, and then by like end of conversation almost. I was like, oh, I'm Jen. I'm so sorry. And he was like, oh, I'm Adam. And I was like, okay, still, no, I had no2 (8m 40s):Adam common name,1 (8m 41s):Common name, whatever. And mom named Doris, whatever. Like, okay. And then we started talking, he said, his wife, what did he say? Oh, he bought a house in south custody. Anyway, all this stuff. He has a kid. And at the end I say, he was talking about what we, what we do. And I'm like, oh, I'm a, I'm a writer. And I'm like trying to write TV, but I also consult, I just started this business, but I wasn't, you know, I was a therapist and for felons and like, and then he got really into that. And then I said, oh, what are you doing? And he's like, oh, I was, I think he said I was in the I'm in the music business. I said, oh, that's cool. I thought he was like a producer, like maybe a classical composer or something. I don't know. That's where my mind went. And I'm like, oh, like, what do you do?1 (9m 22s):And then he said, I was in and I said, oh, what kind of music? He's like, I was in a rap trio. And I was like, wait a minute, a rap tree endorsed by this. By this time it was like, biting me. You know, it's like a whole, I'm like, oh, a rap trio. And I couldn't the only rap trio I could think of was run DMC. And I'm like, oh, he's not in that. You know, he's a white dude. There's no way. And I'm like, oh crap trio. And I was like, house of pain, Cypress hill. Like I couldn't get it together. And then I was like, and then it dawned on me. And I said, oh, and he said something, like I said, I don't remember how it came up. And he's like, oh, I'm Adam Horwitz. And I was like, oh, I was like, of course.1 (10m 2s):I said, oh my God. And then I didn't know what to say. So I just said, cause he just moved. He actually, he moved to south Pasadena, wait before I moved to Pasadena. But I said welcome to Pasadena.2 (10m 16s):Right. Because the minute, you know, it's a celebrity. It's like, it changes the ions. Wait. Yes.1 (10m 21s):Thank you. You welcome to you too.2 (10m 24s):So what I think is so interesting and must be so well, I don't know. I don't know if it's annoying or whatever it is, celebrities. You, they must have to always be in a process of deciding with when they're interacting with people, they don't know what are we going to do with this fact, like, do you know who I am? Do you not know who I am? If you know who I am, just, what does that mean? Is that why you're talking to me? And then, but he opened one of the first things you said that he said was that his mom's name was, I mean, I guess that's not unusual, but I was thinking to myself when you said that I was thinking, oh, was he hoping That would confirm not that his dad is famous.2 (11m 10s):His dad is1 (11m 10s):Trail horo. Israel.2 (11m 12s):Yeah. He's a kind of a terrible guy though.1 (11m 16s):I heard is there. I think they're both dead. I mean, from what I got, I don't know. I know he has a sister. I don't know. But like he seemed like the kind, yes, you're right. Like it must be so weird. And also I literally was so into my own world. It's like, so Los Angeles, like I, when I found out that he was, I was super excited because I wanted to say, oh, I saw you at the Metro in Chicago and stuff like that. But then I was like, oh, I can't. And so I got excited, but I also, it was literally like talking to your husband or my husband in that they're old people. Like I wanted to be more excited about the, the youthful version.2 (11m 56s):Right? You want it to be 19 year old, you eating Israel, horrible1 (12m 2s):Adam Harz and being like, let's go on a date or something. But that is not what I, that was not my inclination this time. And also his he's married to this amazing punk hero, Kathleen Hanna from bikini kill who I adore. And I know that, but I didn't bring that up either. But anyway, the point is we exchanged information because we were like, let's walk our dogs. His dog is Terry. It really hairy dog, little girl, dog named Terry. And I said, well, what kind of dog is Terry? And he goes, I don't know, very hairy. And I was like, okay, well, okay. So we may go on a dog-walking adventure. I have no idea, but lovely human, but just like soup. We are super middle age.1 (12m 43s):This is what the moral of this thing was actually not the celebrity. Part of it was the, what hit me the most Gina was the middle age in this of it all. So the other thing is like, nobody gives a shit now about the things that we give a shit about. So the BC boys, I was talking to my niece, she didn't know who that was. And so I was like, oh right. Meaning I still care who they are, but2 (13m 16s):Right. Yeah.1 (13m 17s):Time moves on timeframe.2 (13m 20s):Yeah. Periodically we have kids periodically, they'll come up to you and they'll be like, have you ever heard of this bay? Or like, my son was listening to something and I'm like, and I go, he goes, oh, I've got to play this song for you. It's this band. This is like obscure band or something like that. It was the cure. I go, are you kidding me, dude? I put white face makeup on and wore black and tried to hang my two years in junior high. I knew the cure is okay. So that was one thing. And the other thing was last time.1 (13m 52s):It super nice though. I got to say, if anybody cares, he was not a Dick head.2 (13m 56s):I care. Yeah. That's nice. I'm happy to hear that. But just one last thing about that whole, like being a celebrity, you're damned if you do, and you're damned if you don't, because on the one hand you, you could have somebody say, oh, it's like pretentious to not say who you are. And on the other hand, people would say, you know, you can't win. You can't, you1 (14m 14s):Can't win. That is the bottom line. Yeah. Yeah.2 (14m 17s):So the other thing was last time we talked, you said, oh, I want to save it for the podcast, but about showcase. So you were talking about getting your kids ready for showcase.1 (14m 28s):Okay. So here's the deal with that. So I, because of this podcast, I'm like, okay, is there a way to make a showcase? Not the shit show that I feel it was now, there may not be, it might be inherent in the thing. Okay. But so I'm teaching fourth year. I like, basically don't even, I don't know what I'm teaching at this point, but not even teaching anymore. I'm done. And my, my, my, my co-teacher took over, but I started noticing as I always do that, that, that the students are like, you know, crazy nervous about the showcase and also crazy nervous about agents and managers and all the things.1 (15m 9s):Now, there is no showcase in LA. There was only a quote meet and greet. There is no showcase in New York. There was only quote, a meet and greet. Look, it gets weirder in Chicago. There was a live showcase and a meet and greet. Now, I don't know what went down, but the bottom line is the ball has been dropped so many times about this showcase and about graduation and about launching that at this point, the ball is just dead in a heap deflated. Okay. So I said, okay, well, what can I do to make this fucking situation better? Because I know what it's like to be there and be like, oh my God, I'm falling behind. What if so then I'm like, okay, everybody, here's what we're going to do.1 (15m 52s):I am going to email everyone I know in LA and everywhere and say, come to this showcase and watch your digital link. They have a virtual showcase. But the problem with that is nobody. If nobody gets sees it, it doesn't matter. And so it was made in a form beans where it looked like spam. So it went to everybody's spam. So no casting directors and no agents got the fucking link. And I realized that because I told a student of mine, I said, listen, you want to be repped by this one agency, let's create a letter to them. Let's pitch them. And so then I get a call from the agent saying, we loved this letter.1 (16m 33s):Also, thank you for including, we didn't think there was a showcase.4 (16m 37s):Oh my gosh.1 (16m 39s):And I said, what's,2 (16m 41s):This has to do with just the fact that like, there's been all this administrative,1 (16m 45s):I think it's, COVID meets the problem with conservatories, which is that they do not think that launching their students is an important part part of their job. Right? Right. So it falls to nobody. And so the person in charge bless her heart is one marketing person that knows nothing. I don't believe about acting or the entertainment industry at all. There is no Jane alderman. There, there is no, at least. So I stepped in to be like the proxy, Jane alderman with another adjunct. And we were like, okay, well, how do we do this? So I am happy to say that after literally making maybe 43 phone calls, everyone has the link.1 (17m 26s):People are coming to the showcases. Now my thing is to do the meet and greet in LA to try to get people there because these, these kiddos are coming to LA, there is no showcase. I'm like, well, we, what are we doing? Like we have to have something like, so, and I also just, you know, and I know these kids, like these are my students. So like, I want to meet them. And then, so now I'm getting everyone I know to come to the meet, greet in the business and2 (17m 51s):The money thing. Like, they're like, oh, well we have, we can do it online. And so we don't have to pay for, to rent the space for,1 (17m 59s):So they wouldn't even tell me, they wouldn't even tell me. They didn't even want to give me the invite to the LA thing. I had to like fight to get the, I don't understand what is going on. But I was like, listen, all right,2 (18m 11s):DePaul, I'm going to tell you something right now in DePaul. You want to be well-regarded you want to be number one. You want to always talk about your, your alum or even not your alum. People who, who went and got kicked out about their great successes. And you don't, but you don't want to do anything to get there. And that is not how it works, how it works is you put a lot of energy and I'm not saying at the expense of teachers or whatever, but you put a lot of energy and effort into not just hyping your students, but hyping your school.2 (18m 51s):Like it should be that your school is saying, have we got a crew for you? Yeah.1 (18m 56s):And which is what I then stepped in and had to do and be like, these kids are dope. Come see this, look at this link and then come to the thing. And so all the casting and agents in Chicago are now coming. Thank God, because guess who, there was one person RSVP2 (19m 14s):Girl, and you need a bonus1 (19m 16s):Stroke. Here's what we're doing. So then I said, okay, because I'm always thinking, I'm like, okay, well, here's what I'm doing. I'm developing a launching curriculum, which I think I told you about, like, I'm developing a day, one BFA for day one of the fourth year. Here's what we're going to do to launch you. And it's not just about the showcase. It's about mentorship. It's about how can we hook you up with somebody that's in what you want to do? How can we do that? And I'm going to pitch it. I'm going to say, here you pay me $120,000. And I will sell you this program and, and hook you up with teachers and people. I know that can step in and do this with me. Like you like people in the business, like people who are on different coasts, like duh, and then we will.1 (19m 58s):So, and if you don't want to buy it, DePaul theater school, we're selling it to Northwestern or NYU or any anyone.2 (20m 4s):Well, I was going to ask, do you know, if other conservatories are doing showcases and doing,1 (20m 9s):And they are, and they are doing it and they are, they are doing it. I, from what I can see, Gina, they're doing it better. I don't know if it's, you know, how good it is. But I do know that like other showcases released their digital showcase because of the pandemic on actors, accessing and town and casting networks, which DePaul did not do. Oh2 (20m 30s):My God.1 (20m 32s):So here's, so that is not okay with me because I went there and I, I do care about it because of this podcast. I also know that these kids having watched them at, you know, 21 year olds, 22 year olds, max, they're busting their ass, just like you. And I we're busting our ass. Like, look, they're busting their ass more than we were, but you and I busted her ass too. And I feel like we didn't get what we needed from the launch process. And what, what will happen is no one will people and people stopped going to theater school. Is that what you want? Or do you want to upgrade like level?1 (21m 13s):Let me run this by. There's a lot of people I hate.2 (21m 24s):Exactly, exactly. Okay. So the thing I wanted to run by you is about storytelling. I signed up for this workshop in my town. We have a little community theater and they sometimes have little workshops and I did improv there one time. And actually by the way, doing improv there, I I'm, I still am terrified of it. And I still don't feel like I'm I do well, but add it. But I reduced my fear somewhat by just aging within, and then we had a performance and my whole family came and yeah, it was, yeah.1 (22m 3s):Why don't we talk about what2 (22m 5s):She like two years ago or three years ago, actually. Yeah. Three or maybe even four years ago now. But anyway, on Sunday I went to, they ha they had a workshop led by a storyteller from the moth and she taught us, you know, how to, so there was only five of us there. One person, only one person absolutely knew when he came in. Exactly what story he wanted to tell. The rest of us were like, I have certain things that are coming to mind. Of course my thing. And I said, I was, I just owned it from the beginning was I've written essays. And I've, you know, written a lot about my life.2 (22m 46s):And yet I somehow feel like I don't have a story to tell. And she said, that's so common. She was telling this great story about somebody. Cause she does corporate stuff too. She was telling the story about somebody in a workshop, in a corporate workshop who just kept saying, I just, I don't have a story. I don't have a story. The day goes on. And he goes, well, I might have something, my family and I fled Vietnam right before this. And she goes, yeah, that's a story. That's a, that's a story you could tell. Anyway, point being, we're putting these stories together and we're going to perform them on Friday.2 (23m 34s):And the I'll say there is something about the process of working on it. That has been, it's not exactly healing, cause this is not a, for me at all. It's something I'm telling a story about when I lived in that apartment on Lil and Libby got me this job at the bakery and while we were, and she was very assiduous about being to work on time. And1 (24m 9s):I remember the, was it the red hen? Oh, we shouldn't say it out loud.2 (24m 12s):I actually, I really don't remember the name. I think it might have been called great Plains. I don't know. Okay. I don't think it's there anymore. And one of the things that was our task was to deal with the mice that inevitably came into the, in the flour sacks and stuff like that in the back. And, but I never she'd said to me, we have to deal with the mice, but I somehow, I hadn't really, really thought that through. And the way we were meant to deal with the mice was hit them over the head with a shovel.1 (24m 47s):Oh. So, so murder of the mice2 (24m 50s):Were into the mice. And so my story is about watching this five foot tall, gorgeous little, just, I mean, she looks like a bird, this girl, woman now, but she was a girl. Then I'm just swinging the shovel over her head and bringing it down. And then just very like with, with zero expression, taking paper towels and picking it up and throw it in the trash, washing her hands and making it back to the register in time for the next customer who came in. And my point of it, of the story is that's. That was one of my most important lessons about the difference between being poor and being broke because I was broke, you know, and always looking for jobs and always working through school.2 (25m 35s):But if it came to smashing a mouse over the head with a shovel, I'm just going to quit that job and go find another job, selling clothes at express. But Libby did not have such luxuries. She had to take the jobs that she could get. And she had to guard them with her life because as even, even with the amount of time she worked, there was a period of time where she would tell me, like, I'm going to bed hungry a lot of nights. And I couldn't help her, you know, because I was broke. I just, I didn't have we bought ramen. I mean, we right. Like six days a week.2 (26m 16s):And so it's about that. And so there's something about, but, but the fact that it's about this epoch in my life yeah. Which I haven't really written that much about, I've written about my childhood and I've written about things that are more contemporary, but you have a lot of experience with storytelling. And I'm curious to know what role that has played in sort of, you know, for one thing, the ability to string together, kind of the, of your life into a cohesive narrative. If, if1 (26m 47s):That's2 (26m 47s):Something that has been helpful or if maybe you have healed in some way, maybe from your one person show,1 (26m 53s):I am Gina. What comes to mind? Like what first came to mind when you were talking about your experience with this storytelling thing? Is it, what, what is the coolest thing to me about storytelling? Like this live lit as we like to call it in Chicago, just because I, storytelling people think it's like, we started calling it live live because people thought it was like, you know, Renaissance fair storytelling. Right. We had like a cheese ball, it's it doesn't matter. It's storytelling. So storytelling, bridges the gap for me. And maybe you have acting and writing. So it is both performance and writing, which I think is brilliant. I think acting is for the birds.1 (27m 35s):Like I just do. I think acting is really hard. I'm not very good at it. Not because I'm not a good person, but that's what I'm saying. I'm not very good at it because I don't like it as much as I like telling a story. That's my story. That also has a performance aspect to it. And it heals the acting thing for me. So you are acting, you are acting, you're not like you in your kitchen, just like when we do a podcast where there's a part of us, that's acting, it's not, you know, it just is what it is. So I think that that is extremely healing. And what, I wonder if it's extremely healing for you, because I feel like in terms of the acting thing, I know that post-graduation from an acting conservatory, you talk about just completely shutting down, completely not shutting down to the acting part of yourself.1 (28m 25s):And I think like through your son and then through this podcast and through writing television and now through storytelling and like your dip into improv, you're, you're healing, the actor part of yourself.2 (28m 37s):That's right. That's right. It1 (28m 38s):Wouldn't surprise me. If you went on to do acting like started acting in plays and stuff. Again,2 (28m 44s):I'm not going to lie. I'm really thinking about it at this point in time. I still feel like it's a bridge too far, just because I have nobody to spell me at home. You know, I can't ask my husband to leave his job so I can go to a play. But at some point, I mean, you know, they're not going to be this age forever. At some point I will be able to do that. And I do have designs on doing that actually.1 (29m 8s):Yeah. And I think, and I think you, I think this storytelling is brilliant because I think the cool thing about storytelling, as well as like you could go to New York city and do them off one night. It's not a, it's not a commitment like the play. In fact, you could do the risk thing that I did in New York. Like the rest of the podcast is live performances in New York. So all this to say that I think storytelling is a fantastic way to heal the part of ourselves that wants to be a performer, but definitely doesn't want, is not ready to take all the trappings and bullshit. That is a professional acting career, which is garbage. Like I got to say, like I just tell my students is to like the part of the business, which is why this is so fraught because it's garbage.1 (29m 55s):That's why you don't like it. But that doesn't mean it's not worth it to you. If you can find a way to make it worth it to you, the competition, the rejection, the then go for it. But what if that is bothersome? And like, you don't want to deal, like what about live lit? Like what about improv? What if there's so many other things? And so like, wouldn't it have been awesome. Gina. If someone had come to us fourth year and been like, Hey, you know what, maybe you get really nervous and that panic attacks when you have to audition. But what about like writing this thing and telling your story on, you know, on a stage somewhere where you get to hold the piece of paper2 (30m 34s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to Jeremy Owen. Jeremy is a storyteller and the creator of a storytelling show called George being ridiculous, which is premiering ask Stephanie, I think tomorrow or the next day, check it out. Please enjoy our conversation with Jeremy Owens. Wow. Congratulations. Jeremy Owens. You survive theater school. I want to hear this fabulous story. I missed the beat.1 (31m 11s):Yeah. So Gina, miss the beginning. So I was just basically saying that everyone's rusty and it's really good. We're talking about this because also Gina's performing storytelling this weekend and we were just talking about rusty. It was, everyone was after two years of not doing live lit stuff. And then Jeremy tells me that he did a show and of course we can, you don't have to use names and all that, but like did a show and it went south and by south, he's going to tell us what that means. It really went south. So7 (31m 41s):It really, when up it's like so complicated. Okay. So I was doing a fundraiser first off. I was like, I there's no way, like, who wants to watch me talk on zoom? Like we're doing that all the time. Like who even cares? How can this benefit anyone? But it's a fundraiser. My sister-in-law asked me amazing. I love it. Amen. Let's go. Let's do it. So we're doing it. And I, okay. I was not as cautious. And as careful as I should have been the show, I mean, you done the show, you did a show. I don't know if I can talk about your story, but you like got your tooth knocked out. That's1 (32m 22s):Oh, I believe me. I did. I gave a blow job and my back lower fell out. Yeah.7 (32m 28s):That's a story2 (32m 28s):Story. I7 (32m 31s):Share that story, but That's good. That's the, but that's like kind of the fuel it's like, you don't know what's going to happen. Some things are like, you know, super lovey Dubby. Sometimes somebody tells a story about a blow job and their tooth gets knocked out. It's like not a big deal. Like this is the world we live in. But I mean, if you're doing a corporate fundraiser for someone and I just, Alex, if you're listening, I love you. I just was not clued in. And that's my fault. That's not her fault. It's my fault. I accept responsibility for all those things. This is my disclaimer for my, for my sister-in-law. I accept all the responsibility for that. I just should have been more cautious.7 (33m 11s):Right. So if you're up for doing show or tea, fall out from low jobs, it's not that maybe not the best for like a board. Like those are the stories that people,1 (33m 20s):I7 (33m 20s):Didn't know1 (33m 21s):It is. If I'm on the fucking board, I'd probably not get,7 (33m 24s):I know, same for me. I mean, we went to theater school and I've decided like, as that has passed me by that we're not the same as like Bob down the street who is like wildly offended by anything, you know, sexual or1 (33m 42s):Anything2 (33m 42s):You ever get used to that, by the way, I, I I'm always like, oh really? We have to do this thing where I have to pretend like I'm talking to my grandma. Like you're a full grown adult standing in front of me. What's that?1 (33m 53s):What's your story about, please tell me something amazing. Gross, please.7 (33m 56s):I didn't even get to my story. That's the thing. Okay. So It wasn't even me. I wish it were me. It was like six or seven people. And I think we got like three or four in. And so as they're happening, I'm like, oh wow. That person said, fuck, oh no, this person's talking about porn. Oh, wow. Like things that like, just don't register for me. Right. Because I guess theater school. It's like, none of that registers for me. I'm not offended by anything other than like racist, white assholes.7 (34m 38s):Anything else? It doesn't register me. I don't. I know. I just don't care. I'm not bothered. So2 (34m 45s):Charity though. I mean,1 (34m 47s):It was like, there was it like the nuns of like a sister.7 (34m 50s):Oh, I don't want to say there. I don't want to say their name. I'll tell you1 (34m 54s):What Sater7 (34m 56s):Well, they're like1 (34m 58s):Healthcare, charity. He doesn't want7 (35m 1s):. Yes. I mean, it's a great charity. They do wonderful things. It's awesome. Right. But they weren't ready for1 (35m 12s):Me. So what happened? It just went blank.7 (35m 15s):Like we're just plopping along and I'm like so excited. Cause it's like July 20, 20. I have only been like talking to my dog and my husband. Right. So this is happening and I'm listening to stories. I'm having a great time. This is like amazing loving life porn who cares, you know, whatever. And then all of a sudden it stops working. Like I don't see anything. And I'm like, oh my God, this is my brother-in-law. I was like running the tech. I'm like, oh no,1 (35m 44s):He thought it was a tech thing. Of course.7 (35m 46s):I was like, well, this happened to me. I was taking this class online this weekend and the internet I had and I was like, oh shit. Like in the middle of class, I'm like, great. So now they think I'm an asshole. I just left class early. So I'm just like, this is dead. Right. Then they come, my sister-in-law calls me and tells me what's happening. And they're all furious. And they just, instead of like a conversation or something, or like this is coming or we're so disappointed, it was just like, this is over now. Like just totally dead. The bad part about that is that none of us knew. And there was no communication with me. Other if it hadn't been my sister-in-law, I don't know if I would, I would still be here on my computer.7 (36m 31s):Probably.1 (36m 32s):That's hilarious right there. Like, are you there yet?7 (36m 36s):Hello? Hi. Hi. They just didn't communicate at1 (36m 40s):All.2 (36m 43s):We're like, really? I'm getting irritated about this. Listen to the story is like, I don't know any of the players, but I feel like, I feel like we're the people we're pretending people are pretending that they don't watch porn or that they don't swear or, you know, like, why do I have to do this? Pretending I just love unless there was children in the audience and maybe there were,7 (37m 4s):I don't think so. Like, you know, it's like, I had like friends who1 (37m 8s):I curated it. Where you did you7 (37m 10s):Find, I mean, it's all, basically this entire thing is my fault. But like1 (37m 15s):You, you found everybody.7 (37m 17s):I found everybody, I got everybody. This was like a great in my mind was this is like a greatest hits. This is like, awesome.1 (37m 24s):It's the one time I'm so grateful. I was not asked to do anything. Like7 (37m 29s):It was just so weird. And there's like, I don't know it. Yeah, it was. But again,1 (37m 37s):I do the story for the ages. I love it. All of a sudden, it just goes blank.7 (37m 41s):I'm in the home. This is a story I'm going to, I just went blank. I didn't know what to do. Everything was gone. Just talking about those things. It doesn't, I don't find that if, when I say porn, I'm not like, this is the butthole. Like it wasn't like, you know what?2 (37m 59s):I7 (37m 59s):Watched porn. Right. That's not offensive to me.1 (38m 5s):I'm not sure. I'm not sure. Yeah. Like Gina was saying like we're okay. So that went south. Like if did you feel I'm really concerned? Like, cause I would have probably had to check in somewhere because I would have been like, I curated this motherfucker and now I caused this whole fucking7 (38m 23s):I'm still like T like we have a show coming up in like a week at Steppenwolf. And I had one of the storytellers from that show sent me a is doing the show at Steppenwolf. And I like had a moment because his story is like, because of that. And because I'm like wildly triggered, I was like, Hey, maybe you could do this story about tennis or whatever. And he's like, do you need a PG story? Like what's going on? And then I was like, and then I re-read a story. And I was like, I do not his stories about sex.7 (39m 5s):I do not find this offensive. This is okay. I'm person totally traumatized. And then I had to go back and be like, oh God, remember that thing that happened in 2020, I'm just totally melted from that. And your story is great and everything's fine. I'm just having a moment. I'm going to calm down2 (39m 24s):And see what happens to me though. When I hear w whenever my antenna go up, whenever I hear like, oh, that's offensive to me. That just automatically means you're doing behavior that you feel really ashamed of. And so you want to shame me instead of just own the truth of whatever it is you're doing. This is exactly what happens on the Handmaid's tale. You know, it's all about the Bible, but then they're just like holding people down and raping them. So I just think it's a little bit of a soft sign for you've got trouble. If adults are saying that referencing the fact that there is porn is7 (39m 58s):Troublesome. Yeah.1 (40m 2s):Oh my God. I can just, okay. I would have been so traumatized. So I hear you. And I also think that, like, it's interesting, I've had a similar thing where like, on this podcast, I've mentioned my husband's job. I have mentioned. And so Gina and I always talk about, well, we will not always, but we've had to talk about this of like, what is the, and it's like a bigger thing in our society right. In the world. Like, where do I draw the line of like, can I stand behind this? I guess that's what it is. It's like, can I stand? If I'm called to the carpet, whoever God, the board, whoever, and say, stand behind this show. These words can.1 (40m 43s):And that's when, if I can stand behind it and I am willing to answer for it. And I'm like, I'm all in. If I feel like I'm wishy washy, then I feel like it's going to go south. And then I it's weird. It's a weird thing. It's like when to cut, when to not cut, now, you didn't have the ability I'm fucking lives to do7 (41m 6s):That. What1 (41m 7s):Happens in live television, right? When someone who goes bonkers or has a stroke, God forbid, or it's like, you don't know what to do. So live is a different thing. Like it's different with a podcast. We can cut. We can, but like a live show, whether zoom or on stage, there is this moment. So when I did my solo show, Samantha Irby, Sam Irby opened for me. Right. Ramus. Now wasn't famous then. But it was always a Reverend and a bad-ass right. But data story at my show and my uncle were there about SAC,7 (41m 38s):Right.1 (41m 38s):Eight leakage and fluids. And I was like, oh. And then I thought, oh, I wanted to run on stage and be like, ah, this is too much. But then I thought you invited this person. This is their jam. This7 (41m 54s):We love. Right.1 (41m 58s):What, what, okay, sit, sit, and just deal with it. And if my uncle and my uncle was really offended and like, fuck that. Okay. So, but it's hard to do. I was squirming. So you must've been squirming when you, when your, when your person called you and was like, cause you, you found these people. But I think sometimes we squirm, right? Sometimes we squirm,7 (42m 21s):Oh my God, I was dying. Cause it's like, I don't, I don't want to disappoint any of, either of you, this computer, this desk. And I just want to make everyone so happy all the time. And I don't want anyone upset with me or like, I don't want to cause any problems, nothing. I want you all happy.1 (42m 42s):And sometimes despite our best people, pleasing efforts, like shit goes south. Like that is the story of shit going south. Despite Being a good person, having gone to college, go to it, shit still goes south. So7 (42m 55s):I vote like1 (42m 58s):You're very active, like socially.2 (43m 2s):So let's, let's talk about you and your experiences. Did you go to DePaul?7 (43m 7s):I wish I had gone to DePaul, but I, from listening to this podcast, I get that. I don't know. I went to Roosevelt university for grad school.2 (43m 17s):Cool. Tell us everything. Tell us, like, when you decided you wanted to be an actor and when you decided you wanted to go to theater school, tell us everything.7 (43m 25s):Well, for me, I grew up in Arkansas. So I went to the university of Arkansas and I started out as like a journalism and a political science major. But then they, the department, the journalism department had us take a speech class. Like how does speak in theater class, you know, to get rid of your accent basically. Cause we're all Arkansans. We sound like, you know, we're in God, but the wind or whatever. So we took this class and I had growing up and like my small town, I always loved theater. I'd done community theater and the whole thing. So when I took that class and like, everyone in there is like, you know, so alive and so like interesting and like, like real, I was like, well, this is going to be a problem.7 (44m 17s):So then I, like, I signed up for, you know, the second semester of the class. And then I was like, oh, I'm gonna audition for these one acts. And then so slowly I just migrated into the theater department and completely dropped journalism, political science, all of it. And disappointed my parents ruined their lives, you know, the whole thing. So I didn't really understand, like by the, by the end of my time in undergrad, I was like, I don't really, it's like, you're young. It's like, I don't understand grad school. I don't know. But that seems to be thing that I, there was a grad program that had just started there, like, like near the end of my time there.7 (44m 59s):And I was like, I guess that's what I'm supposed to do. And so everyone told me to go to Chicago. I hadn't ever been to Chicago. I knew nothing about it. Never even visited, but I was like, okay. They're like funny people should go to Chicago. And I'm like, oh, I'm funny. So I guess that's where I'll go.1 (45m 15s):You are funny. So it's good. You went there.7 (45m 17s):Thanks. So, so I auditioned at IRDAs and did that whole thing. And then I got a call back from them and I, it was like weird. Like I thought there was going to be like some like bigger process or something. Like, am I going to, I was like, ready, you know, with like my other, like, do you want 16 bars? Do you need other other monologues? Like, well, what's the deal? And it was just kind of like a done thing. So I was like, Yeah, it's like at the callback, there was like, it was an IRDAs. And it's like, you'd go to the person's hotel room, which now seems really creepy what, with a couple other people.7 (45m 57s):And it just seemed like I liked the person who did the interview and I was like, they're in Chicago. This seems great. I2 (46m 7s):Like to act in a hotel room. I've never7 (46m 9s):Done. Like, the audition was in, like, I don't even know where it was like the ballroom. It was like, there was like a black box sort of like made up situation. So you audition and then like the next day or a few hours later, you get like a sheet with a little list of the schools that want to like talk to you or whatever. And we have been like through the ringer with my undergrad teacher and she's like, okay, you need to have, like, you had like your folder with your monologues. And like, if someone wanted a song, like your whole thing, it's like bootcamp and you're ready. So I'm like prepared for somebody to ask me to do anything. And I don't know, I got called back to like a lot of places, which I was like, oh my God, none of them asked me for anything.7 (46m 54s):Which maybe looking back, maybe that was like, not a great situation. I don't know what that means.2 (46m 60s):They were just the, and the call back. They were just meeting you. Right. They were just wanting to know if you were like,7 (47m 4s):Yeah, I guess1 (47m 6s):You're acting probably wow. Like really? They probably would have if they were on the fence, but that probably wasn't that they probably wanted to do what, you know, they, they, a chemistry breed or whatever the fuck they call it. Right.7 (47m 18s):Yeah. I guess. But this meaning with the person at Roosevelt, it's like, she was nice. It was great. It felt good. So I was like, all right, maybe that's where I'm going. And I knew I wanted to get Chicago. So like, that was, that was the deal.2 (47m 36s):It's an undergrad. You were not thinking this at all. I'm guessing you don't come from a performing family or you, you weren't doing this in high school.7 (47m 44s):Oh my God. Well, there was like the junior play or whatever that like pays for the prom, you know, like that kind of a situation. But otherwise, like I did community theater and I'm from a town of like 10,000 people. So there wasn't like really a community theater. I did Annie and Mike, I don't know, 10th grade or something.1 (48m 3s):Amazing.7 (48m 4s):Really upset. I couldn't be Annie. I was like a Senator. And like the apple salesman. I was like that guy I'm like running around doing whatever anybody wanted me to do.1 (48m 20s):Funny. That's why he could do a lot funny.2 (48m 23s):Yeah. Interchangeable. Okay. So day one, you're at Roosevelt. Is this the education that you thought you were going to get7 (48m 32s):Funny? You should ask. So this, when I went, which was, this was 2000 yes. 2000. So it was their first year of their MFA program.1 (48m 44s):Oh shit.7 (48m 46s):Oh shit is right. They accepted 30 people take that in verse1 (48m 54s):307 (48m 55s):MFA. Oh yeah.1 (48m 57s):It's too many people that just like five.7 (49m 0s):Thank you. I think that if I'm being kind, I think they accepted a huge amount of people thinking that, you know, with everything going on that like maybe 10, which is still too many would accept. So there were 30 of us. So we're there on the first day. And I'm just like, this seems , I don't know anything about what this experience is supposed to be, but 30 people that's like, that's like an entire MFA program, you know, that's like three years of people or more So immediately.7 (49m 44s):I was just like,1 (49m 45s):Hmm,7 (49m 47s):This doesn't seem right. But you know, I was like 24. So I'm like so happy to be there. I'm living in my friend's base. My friend's mom's basement until I find an apartment just like, you know, desperate twenties times. So immediately. I was like, I, this is hi. All right.1 (50m 11s):I think I should get off this rollercoaster right now, but it's already going, right?7 (50m 16s):Yeah, totally. I just like was on. And because I didn't have like necessarily the support of my parents where this entire thing, I was like, fight or flight. Like I will do this. If I have to hang on to the side of the building and sleep like that, or like, whatever it is, I'm gonna do this. So I did it.2 (50m 49s):And is it a typical curriculum, voice and speech and movement and all that stuff?7 (50m 54s):Yeah. I was sort of surprised by all of it. The program that I did in undergrad, I felt, I don't know. I guess everyone in undergrad, if you're doing theater stuff there, you think that like, what you're doing is like enough and great. And that's how everything's going to go. So to spend like three hours a day in a movement class, suddenly when you're like, God damn it, let me do a monologue or a scene or sing a song. Like let me work. You know, I understand that that is also work and it's fundamental, but it was really shocking to me.1 (51m 37s):You know, what's interesting is like, and you're not the first person that I've, I felt this, that we've had on the show is like, what I would eat. Like you should have maybe gone right to second city and just done that call that five-year conservatives And gotten the fuck out, but it's not accredited. It's not like a real university that would probably make your parents even more like unhappy. And so, but like you needed like a professional program, like there's conservatory training for actors and then there's professional programs. And I wish I had done, so. Okay. But you're in this. How long was the Roosevelt MFA program?7 (52m 15s):Three years. Oh,1 (52m 16s):Fuck. Right.2 (52m 18s):And was it the thing where you can't perform the first year, but then you do and you're in the casting pool with VFS.7 (52m 26s):Yeah, I, we couldn't perform in the first year though, at the end of the first semester, they opened up an audition to be an intern at Chicago Shakespeare, which was like super exciting. So I auditioned and then I was doing the second semester, I got to be an intern and be on stage and do king Lear, Chicago, Shakespeare. I mean, I was like, you know, a dude, a homeless person running around. Oh, we got it. Yeah. So then I was like, oh no, this is great. I'm like with like these amazing people that I don't know who they are yet, but I will.7 (53m 9s):And there, those people are amazing2 (53m 12s):In that7 (53m 13s):Greg VIN CLER.1 (53m 15s):Oh yeah. was Barbara Gaines directing7 (53m 18s):Barbara Gaines director.1 (53m 20s):Yeah. She's amazing. She's she's famous for, for me, for my one audition I had there, she yawned during my whole model to be fair, but to be fair, it was really boring. Like, it was really boring. She was basically doing what I wish I could have done. It was boring. My shit was boring. She was like this. Can't see. But yeah, she was rude, but apropos I sucked anyway. Okay. So you were, you got to work at shakes and so you were like, okay, but did you make friends? What was the vibe like? BFA was the BFA program established at that time?7 (54m 2s):I think so. Oh, and that part. Okay. Like whatever I'll say about Roosevelt, which I don't have, I don't know necessarily great things to say about the program. It doesn't even exist anymore, PS, by the way. But the BFA program, the program for undergrads, I thought that was like, excellent. Like, I was like happy for those kids. Like that seemed like good. And they were having a good time, but for us it was just, I don't know. It just felt kind of sad and different.2 (54m 26s):So your parents were psyched about the idea of you being a journalist. That's what they thought you were going to.7 (54m 32s):I think the imaginary plan was that I would, or what I sold them at the time was I'm gonna get this journalism degree and then I'm gonna go to law school.1 (54m 43s):Oh,2 (54m 45s):Right. That's everybody's, catch-all hilarious.7 (54m 48s):So that's what I'm going to do. But then I was like, but these plays, these people, it's really the people that are purchased more fun.2 (54m 57s):I actually got dressed so many people in for exactly that reason. It's just something that's like tribal feeling that you don't know that you don't have it until you find it. And then you go, oh my God.7 (55m 8s):Yeah. It was really, it was really all encompassing. I was like, well, I can't not be with these people.2 (55m 15s):What kind of shows did you do there at Roosevelt?7 (55m 18s):I all right. So, so there was that first year experience. And then I don't know. I let's see, I did my last year.1 (55m 30s):Yeah. It just sticks out in your brain7 (55m 33s):Threepenny opera. And then there was this weird Asian adoptation of the rope by whatever old Greek guy,2 (55m 47s):Asian adaptation.7 (55m 48s):So here's one of the weird things about the program. So there were a couple of classes that made zero sense that we were taking as actors. One was, we all had to take a stage management management course. I don't know. Did you guys have to know1 (56m 5s):I7 (56m 5s):Was like1 (56m 5s):Crew, but I don't even know. No.7 (56m 8s):Well, yeah, like working on a cruise, like that's normal, but in an entire semester demo devoted to stage management just seems kind of rude.2 (56m 18s):It sounds like they needed stage managers for their shows1 (56m 22s):Teachers. Yeah.7 (56m 25s):And then there is a professor there who white lady who loved Asian theater. And so, yeah. Pause for that1 (56m 37s):PF chains of, she was trying to be the PF Chang's PF J7 (56m 44s):God lover. I mean, yes. I'm interested in Asian theater too, but everyone was required as part of the MFA program to take an Asian theater class. So, which is interesting. I'm not knocking like any of that, but the PA I don't know the possibility of me being in an Asian.2 (57m 7s):Yeah. Like what's the really,1 (57m 11s):It just sounds like she had a thing for her thing was Asian theater and she wanted everyone else's thing.7 (57m 16s):Total your thing. She had studied in, I don't know, Japan, I think, and had done this whole program and it was like her, she may even have like a PhD on it. I don't really know, but that was her thing and good for her. Awesome.1 (57m 31s):Why are you teaching? But it's7 (57m 33s):Not practical. Yeah. It just seems like weird. So the play I did, I did the, the rope, which is like a Greek play. Never2 (57m 42s):Heard of it.1 (57m 43s):I wish you had done the rain anyway.7 (57m 48s):So she translated the play into a Kyogen style thing, which is a very specific Asian theater style play. Not only that, not only that, but like, I have always been openly unapologetically sort of who I am, which means, hello, I'm a homosexual and it's clear and I'm not like afraid of that as an actor or a person. So I played the, yeah, get ready. I played the, I don't want to call it like the evil sister, but I played like the villain in the play, which was like an older, which type woman in the play.7 (58m 40s):And that was supposed to be hilarious.1 (58m 48s):That's really where we're headed in the arts. I'm also saying the arts in the logs shit went down. Not that7 (58m 56s):Some weird shipments out. Yeah. So it's like thinking about that now you would like wants to like light all of Chicago on fire. Right? Correct. But at the time, this I guess was like, cool, cool. And inventive to make the one gay guy that you were Sure was gay play a woman Asian drag. Oh my gosh. The whole thing is like Asian themed rides. and the whole thing I don't, I can't say for sure, but I don't think1 (59m 39s):So. What the fuck?7 (59m 42s):So just a bunch of white people running around and kimonos speaking in a very like, you know, meter to style Asian thing. And I'm a woman also.2 (59m 53s):I wish we had a video. I really want to watch this play. I mean, just like for a snippet, because you know, when you think of yourself and how seriously you took a role when you were young and you and you, and you just in your mind's eye, even if there's no video and you just imagine, like, what does this actually look like? And that's always looks funny, no matter what or sad. If it's a comedy, it looks sad. And if it's True. So that was one. Did you have any roles that you liked?7 (1h 0m 29s):I mean, kind of, well, there was like a, a directing project that one of my friends did. It was like a Steve Martin one act. And I was like, yeah, right. Like it was like a legit play that was like funny and good. And I had like the lead and I was like, it was like us, like a straight man that I was playing. And I like felt excited because it felt like I was like reaching. I'm not reaching, but you know what I mean? You're like, oh, this is a play. I'm like, yeah. I was like, do a thing. And I like am working for this goal to do. And I felt like I was successful in it and it felt good.7 (1h 1m 9s):But like, that was probably the one, even in my thesis role, which was like, I was like a random chorus person in Threepenny opera, literally it's my third year. I'm like, Hmm. I have to write 30 pages now on yeah. That's, it's like that.1 (1h 1m 27s):The thing like that, I just, and maybe you guys could chime in. And in terms of the curriculum, there doesn't seem to be an actual curriculum for these programs. Like now that I'm teaching, I'm like, wait, what, what is the7 (1h 1m 42s):Tactical?1 (1h 1m 43s):And what is the piece of paper that you can point to, to say, this is the mission of these three years for these MFA actors. There is no plan. What is the plan? That's what I feel about a lot of this is, and it's still to this day in, in conservatories, what is the fucking plan? Because there doesn't seem to be one and there's not a plan. We shouldn't be charging dollars to these people. I just, I, it should be, then it should be camp, a freak out where we go when we, I don't know. Anyway. So2 (1h 2m 15s):I mean, honestly, like it's, it needs to be treated a little bit more like a school and pass fail, right?7 (1h 2m 23s):Yeah. Like the goal it's like, if you're a journalist, like, can you do these things? Can you write a bituaries? Can you write a news story? Can you do the, you know what I mean? So it's like, when I leave this place, am I going to be able to get a job? And I know that like, everyone's like, theater's like, oh gosh, you're never going to work or whatever, but that, it's just not true. It's like, everything is the same. There are basic skills. Do you have them,1 (1h 2m 50s):There are milestones to meet along the way. And if you, I mean, anyway, I it's just, the more we interview folks, the more I'm like, oh, this whole higher ed situation, fine arts needs a whole overhaul. I don't know what it's going to take, but we'll probably be extinct on the planet before it happened. So I just feel like maybe that's the way it's going to go and okay. But like, okay, so you graduate, you then are like, okay, I have this MFA. Then what happens to you7 (1h 3m 21s):By the end of the program? I was really like, I don't know. I feel like it kind of, it kind of broke me because things like that were happening, which in a way is like, I mean, at the time we didn't have the language for like, you know, playing an Asian woman in a play, like it's offensive. And it's like, not furthering me. It's racist. It's not furthering me as an actor. I'm not going to leave here and like run around and Komodo and place for the rest of my life. It just kind of broke me. And a lot of the, I would say some of the teachers, the whole situation just didn't make me feel good.7 (1h 4m 4s):So at the end, I was like, you know what, maybe? Hm. I don't know. I need, I needed a break from that whole world. I mean, I did audition for awhile, but the shortest while1 (1h 4m 21s):How short,7 (1h 4m 26s):Maybe it was a couple years1 (1h 4m 28s):Because we have Gina's trajectory and mine, mine too. Like I stopped after I stopped after three.7 (1h 4m 35s):Yeah. I was probably three years. Like slowly, just petered out. I mean, I got to the point where I'm like going. So I went on a few theater auditions in the beginning and then I had an agent and I would go on these, like on camera calls. And I would just be like, oh my God, I'm in this giant room with a hundred people that are dressed and look just like me. This is the most pressing thing. Like, I just was like, I can't, this isn't, this doesn't feel good either.2 (1h 5m 6s):I want to hear how eventually, how we get to storytelling. But before we do, I just, I didn't want to leave the whole Roosevelt thing without, I don't think I've really asked anybody this before, but you're not the first person who basically says to us, like, I'm gay. They didn't know what to do with me in theater school. Right.7 (1h 5m 30s):So2 (1h 5m 32s):I don't know if this is a question or a comment or what, or like just a prompt for discussion, but what is the barrier there? I mean, it seems like what you're saying about this role that you got cast, it's like, you're gay. So you'd like to wear drag. Is that what the thinking was?7 (1h 5m 47s):I don't know. For me, it's two things. It's like, there's the gay thing for sure. But also I'm funny. So if you're in a serious theater program, please understand I'm doing some heavy air quotes because every theater program thinks they're a serious theater program. They really do not know what to do with people who are fitting into the definition of serious. And so I think yes, there is like me, the stereotypical gay person or whatever, if I am so there's that person, but that's usually a funny person.7 (1h 6m 28s):And so then they don't like it totally. This is serious. We're doing real serious work here. How can this work?1 (1h 6m 38s):It makes that, that makes me, it makes sense. And it also makes me so angry, just Raging, also like fucking pick different motherfucking material. You've that fits your mother fucking class. You dumb fucks. That is what we're supposed to be doing is picking material that highlight our students and help them grow in a way and not the pick different place.7 (1h 7m 3s):Well, that's really where in that and the whole situation, I feel like that's, that's what sort of killed me is that there wasn't a place for me. No one cared to create one and you are, I already felt like I don't fit here. I don't belong. And so it's just like that slowly, just really like sinks in. So you've got that going on. You've got your there with 30 actors and it was kind of, honestly, it was sort of like easy to just like hide, you know, unless I'm being called to play the Asian lady on the play. So it's just like a kind of just was like, eh,1 (1h 7m 43s):Yeah, you gave up. But they gave up on at first.7 (1h 7m 48s):It is honestly,1 (1h 7m 50s):We give up when people give up on us first, especially as young people.2 (1h 7m 53s):That's true. That's true. So you're in audition rooms after school. You're, you're feeling like this is depressing. There's 5,000 mess and we all look the same. How, how did, how did you evolve from that to what you're currently doing, which I'm going to go on a limb and say is fulfilling to you artistically fulfilling to you what you're doing?7 (1h 8m 13s):I would say yes. Okay. How did that happen? I mean, after, you know, just deciding I'm not going to go on these calls anymore. I just, like, I was like, okay, then I'll, I'm working in a restaurant. So that's what I'm, I'm gonna work in. I work in restaurants now. That's what I do. And I did that for a while. And then I was just like, okay, but wow, this can't be it. Like, even if you, as an actor, like whatever level you achieve as an actor, I think there's always that part of you. Who's like, yeah, but like, can I talk somewhere?7 (1h 8m 54s):And people just like to listen to me or just let me tell, you know, just get really enthusiastic with storytelling at a party. Or like, whatever. I, I didn't know about the moth or a storytelling or any of that stuff. I really was just like this theater experience, grad school was so bad for me. And I'm too afraid to go to second city to do improv because I had sat through, you know, the first year of friends doing that. And I was like, well, I'm not doing this terrifying. So I thought, Hey, what if I get some actors together?7 (1h 9m 37s):And we will write monologues, which is how I thought of it at the beginning, it'll be like loosely based on a theme and we'll do a monologue show. I think I had just seen Nora Ephron's play love loss and what I wore. And so there's all these women on stage telling this like, story. And I was like, oh my God, I'm not a playwright. I can never like, make this happen necessarily. But like, if there are people on a stage and then they're just like one by one, like telling a story based on a theme, like, oh my gosh, this is revolutionary. I've just invented this whole new thing. So that is sort of where I started.1 (1h 10m 14s):When was that? I

    MDMALifestyle Wave
    FactCheck Podcast Episode 87 The Fuck Everybody Episode

    MDMALifestyle Wave

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 69:44


    Twitch : @mdmalifestylewave IG : @mdmalifestylewave IG : @410Fonzi IG : @cmbwavegangnino EMAIL : factcheckpodcast@gmail.com WEBSITE : www.factcheckpodcast.com SOUNDCLOUD : @mdmalifestyle YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com/channel/UClMjR4YfE5R2PAKoSWhDGnA

    Bachelor of Hearts
    [PREVIEW] Ancient Kisstory: Fuck Week (Bachelor AU S1 E12)

    Bachelor of Hearts

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:48


    This is a preview episode for our recap of the twelfth episode of The Bachelor Australia's first season! To find the full episode, head to our page on Patreon and subscribe to Bachelor of Hearts: Extra Credit. https://www.patreon.com/bohpod

    Lacey & Flynn Have Sex
    55. Fuck the fear away

    Lacey & Flynn Have Sex

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 42:44


    Have you ever tried to fuck the fear away? We've been going through a chronic dry spell (well, chronic for us). The only time we've had sex in the last month was when we drove to another country, got a hotel room and had sex. And in a way, we left ourselves there, and it's time to go back and get “us.”  Recently, we've been vacillating between moments of pure joy and gratitude and the other extreme of scarcity and conversations around the projection of our future - how do we get there, how do we solve all of our problems - and it's had an effect on our sex life (and not getting enough sleep as parents of two certainly hasn't helped).  In today's episode, we're trying to fuck our fears away. We discuss the reasons behind our recent dry spell, our intentions for today's episode, and explore some of our own limiting beliefs as we try to find the right balance between aggressive and gentle in order to open our hearts and crack the armours that we've put up.  So, grab your headset, tune in, and get ready to learn how to remedy your fear and have a profound embodied experience by fucking the fear away.  Get all the juicy episode notes at laceyandflynn.com/podcast/55-fear  Find out more about School of Whole, Lacey's 12-month coaching and channelling collective to help transform you from an Uninitiated Woman lacking confidence, turn-on and self-worth into a Sexually Liberated Woman who's healed from the past, aligned to her truest desires and living a wildly satisfying life on her terms.  If you're ready for some hot tips on how to truly connect with your partner, then grab a seat at our FREE class: 5 Steps to Connected Sex, where you'll dig deeper into some of our best teachings like sex beyond the mood and pleasure over orgasm. Join us today at laceyandflynn.com/freeclass!  Ready to work with us to elevate your relationship? Email us at hi@laceyandflynn.com or head to laceyandflynn.com/coaching to get started.  Learn more about Sex Elevated, our online course to amplify your intimacy, supercharge your sex, and slingshot you into a new dimension of pleasure, connection, and love in your relationship.  Chat with us on Instagram. Send us a DM and tell us your experience in sex and listening to the episode. 

    100 Things we learned from film
    Episode 73: Piranha 3D (2010)

    100 Things we learned from film

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 58:57


    Well look who came crawling back... John returns for swimming with Porn Stars, Body shots, unfortunate yachting accidents and John's Quiz Piranh-Ya or Piranh-Na! --- Piranha 3D is a 2010 American 3D horror comedy film that serves as a loose remake of the comedy horror film Piranha (1978) and an entry in the Piranha film series. During spring break on Lake Victoria, a popular waterside resort, an underground tremor releases hundreds of prehistoric, carnivorous piranhas into the lake. Local cop Julie Forester (Elisabeth Shue) must join forces with a band of unlikely strangers—though they are badly outnumbered—to destroy the ravenous creatures before everyone becomes fish food. Directed by Alexandre Aja, the film stars Elisabeth Shue, Adam Scott, Jerry O'Connell, Ving Rhames, Jessica Szohr, Steven R. McQueen, Christopher Lloyd and Richard Dreyfuss. A sequel, Piranha 3DD, was released in 2012. Piranha 3D received generally positive reviews, with film critics praising it as a fun and entertaining B-movie. --- Transcription: Hello everyone, and welcome back to a hundred things we learned from film, The podcast with me and with my co host John. Welcome back, big man. Guess it was back back on crack. I'm a man. How are you doing? I'm all right. It's been a long time. It's been there. There's been something mess in my life and it was that's some Prann has, but that's was definitely more messing than life. Yeah, I would argue so, but you've been busy with your new job, so you're you're still doing that. So we'll see what happens with this over the next few months, but we will certainly be providing you with some filmatic action trainings. Nearly, almost back than straight training day. Oh God, if it was great, done it really agree virgin media? It got shit on me. Yes, so we're the PODCAST. God, it kind of remember what we do where the podcast stress little a hundred things from every film that we talked about. John watched it, I watched it, we made some notes and we tried to come up with a hundred things make you laugh, make cry at possibly this film out of you Middle Tie. It's like a ran and you're a John. What do we watch? Yeah, de Thosan tens, very under or over rated, Rana, D, Perrana D. now, first of all, before we even get started anything else, the D in this right, as on Netflix? I that you were some Netflix as well. Right. Yes, the D on this has not been scaled particularly well. So they've just basically flattened the D to make it look like the shunkiest effects in the world. As bad. It's really bad. Yeah, loose shut a place, everything's place, because it's maybe d but it's just rubbish. Yeah, absolutely, he had had a couple, had a couple of high points. Yeah, Oh, yeah, yeah, definitely. I enjoyed myself. What else could we have been talking about in two thousand and ten? So we've got a few. Body done two, then ten bar. What we could have watched was I am and to Super Oh that's pretty grim. Yeah, pretty grim and Golivers travels fucking out Jack Black, right, the beginning of the end for Jack Black. Question Mark. Yeah, certainly was a low point. And gaget Lord Thant it the last airbender PSC Jackson in latent, the Od Chez, Oh God, did yeah, because there's a lot of them and those classies titans. There is one of the NARNIA farms documented one time and one I really enjoy it. I'm probably need go back to is shot island. Yeah, now and know the ending. I don't think I need to go back to it, but I'm going to going to give an because there's a couple were things of Senna, a couple of sort of things. You may have mass and it's intrigue. Mission going to go on O goal. Okay, on on, and that's two thousand and ten smashing. Let's run through it, right. We Start Open with this mess of Messathlific era dig site. Right, so I was kind of like, Oh, the mess of Mesolithic era, that's quite interesting. Yet so a Dick site is basically what they're doing is they're looking for fossils, but there's nobody there and there's nothing happening. Instead, in a boat there's a bloke showing singing, show me the way to go home. It was a bit on the fucking nose for me. There's really as an it kin, southern that was made famous by drawers. Yeah, and it was rectual grevous. Second it Richard Drive for singing it. Yeah, at the the song is by Mitch Miller. Right, yeah, Bitch. Miller was a famous musician. Reached number one in the US with yellow rows of Texas and number one in the UK with Senor, Senor Sena. He died on his ninety nine birthday. While there you guys, I've seen him. Well, couplay someone's it was written in nineteen twenty five by role their songwriters, Jimmy Campbell and Reggie Connelly. All right, yeah, so's the bag. It's can't imagine anything as Popul one nine hundred twenty five than that song. To be honest, I'm saying a few times when a way back, if we bloody problems, and I from from the drinking, drinking and brilliant, it's really strange that it's the one thousand Nin hundred and twenty five song, yet they're all singing that in like one thousand nine hundred and seventy eight. It's jewels. So, yeah, right, weems like fifty years old at that point, because I was looking at the facts and all, look at look at up itself, and it just says was famous and needed really fire, but then had a resurgence after joys and it wasn't it. There read that, but thought that should drefous. Oh my God, that's turning doors and a yeah, I are too on the nose. Yeah, he's pished and he's fishing. He's doing this fishing and I was kind of written here. Wink. Aren't we filmmakers so clever? Yeah, as ours. It's a shame. Is Real, because the phone itself, there's a lot of talent and the film. But yeah, just seems must be the pacheck. There's plenty of talent in the film son. He hooks a fish but drops this beer bottle in which, strangely, butterfly effects an earthquake from barely even touching the like the ground like it's so lightly touched. Yeah, yeah, I've got a scraping that doing your coincidence, to be honest, gonna put down bad d yeah, this is the first the effects that looks really, really shit in to d as the earthquake starts, this typhoon type thing. This will pool, will pool. Yeah, and then did the bath, the used to certain we in thee. The bath and the piranha all come out of this huge kind of crack in the earth and it looks really shit as they eat him. Yeah, yes, and they don't know. They don't like a sense effect the fit. They don't know whether it did, but it made it red and mid on the black stand. Oh, no, they did. Yeah, yeah, yeah, they didn't affect that was it. That was a good spot. Actually, I didn't think about that. We go to the titles. Perana, we learned that it's spring break. WHOO, spring break. We point one, yeah, which I looked up when it doesn't exist. Not, not a real not a real radio station. Now Spring Bake, screet, Spring Bake on man, I wish it was spring bake. That would be amazing. Some pies please. Spring break is a real thing. This year it was the twelve of the third to the nineteen of the third. However, I initially wrote down it was the the third of the twelve of fucking else, Spring Baker Christmas. We know American calendars. Yes, according to travel dot US Newscom the ten best spring break destinations are as follows jump cancoon, Miami Beach, Cabo St Lucas, Mordere, the Bahamas. Play at the Carmen Dante seventh circle of hell, Camden market on a bank holiday, Monday, firefest and Jeffrey Epstein's island. Ha, Ha for owing you. Just in just missed a government market. Now, didn't Miss Happen. Messed out. The barrels closing by the landlover, lower, lower, lower. FIREFEST, man, I've got to watch that again. I've been is neither locations, but you've even firefest. I've been the hall, the CAN can. Yeah, they do common in order mode, but govern govern as. Where this is filmed is lake. Lake Victoria is what it's supposed to be, but the real location was lake have a suit in Arizona. Now, John, question for you. Do you remember when we discussed lake have a zoo and it's very, very famous. English bridge? London Bridge is London Bridge. But what film did we talk about Arizona? A character goes there on a work trip. One of your favorite impressions a John as a deaf as. Hey John, I'm going to Lake Ava. Sue Do some shooting. That's five man. That did me back. Yeah, well, long, long time ago. Attendance during spring break as take the down turn in recent years. I would just shoot covid the city is declined to issue permits to large party organizers. I can wow. What is still popular, though, is the Will Jet Ski Finals and the previously hosted chilling and swilling beer festival. I'm Bob God the chill and swollen better fast of all, shout out to drunk theory, previous guests. It hasn't taken place. It's pre covid most American sounding trailer park thing ever. That man is an I is. I looked up that lie like Victoria and as a link Victoria bits in Michigan, but it's all like look at this, it is two point seven square kilometers. That's the really big at all. Actually, no, you wouldn't want it. You wouldn't want your spring bait breaking mission going to be fucking Baltic. Well, I mixed that out for that properly, so will properly a lake. Victoria is one of the African's greatest leaks and there is sixty, doesn't eight hundred, descriptilomas. Okay, well, that victory false? Of course. Yeah, especially when she's drunk. And it was it was named. It was actually been in by Queen Victoria when the was called originally, but she renamed it. Of course you did wonder way she got it. Queen Linked Victoria? Maybe she'd heard the name previously? Who knows? All these awful teens which I instantly thought, I can't wait to see them die. Oh yeah, and then, as I watched the second time, I can't wait to see them all die second time in four days. Elizabeth shoe is the sheriff. You'll seelizabeth shoe a lot these days, do you really don't? Choosing a lot of good forms and the time and say the other classmakers is amazing. Is that you're going to say, as exactly what I was looking like. Yeah, and there's one. Is it Topchica with Vlk Volcla? I'm sure she's top secrets. I don't Jack, I'm I'm sure she's in. She's the origin maming about man. She's the original girlfriend in back to the future. Yes, yes, she's ticketing this drunk driver and he hits on her, but she's got these Jiu jitsu moves. This is great, and she offers to taiser him. Now, before you say anything, John, we're not doing tasers again. No, not, but off of with dears. That that did. They can stand down, John, stand down. Jake is the sun. Kelly is his school friend. Now I'm gonna get really confused, he because instead of writing down Danny, the character's name, I've written down Kelly, Kelly Brook actors. So I yeah, I'm going to fuck this up a little bit. So listen as if you seen the film. Deal with it otherwise, John, keep me, keep me rendered. And she's, yeah, there's another person called broken as real. Yeah, she's she's going to spring break stuff. And he's not because he's not cool enough. He likes the PIXIES. Nobody likes the PIXIES, of course. Apparently, this two thousand and ten. He has this t shirt death to the PIXIES. It's an album, best of album from one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. What's your favorite prixies album, John? I'm going to see none of them good. I would say that what I would say the best of the Beatles. This album actually made it to number six in ultra pop flanders chart. That's also pop flanders chart. I don't know what people from Belgium sound Belgium sound like Tintin. It just waffled in. That's the content I've been missing. That's she's doing all the spring breaking thing with this, with this guy who's promised backstage tickets to a thing. Kelly Brooks, talking to Laura, which is Jake's little sister. She says I like your boobs. My brother Jake would like your be later as fuck you. Now he's he's seventeen. Keep that, just keep that for now. He's seventeen. And she says they all like Bar boobs, Gafnor Dick Upene, terrible. I would leaves, but CHEBS. So you know, yeah, it's the chips. She's got the chips. She had there jasons Treatham as me on belly's Shin seed Billy's Ane, when he was going through his sean connery in Zados. There is the book of the exact same look at him engaged. Were pretty much exact same minute time, were they? But partly she brought them both off Juican fathom apart with skin and belly's in. Wanted Ay moved timmy and again she's refused him. Wow, right, okay, she likes his shirt and he likes her tits, but not her act him. She's a big PIXIES Fan, and I've written. Yeah, course you are. Pat Course, if you are still real, Brittanni, your back, it's gonna Kelly Brooks Fahm Sexiest Woman of the year two thousand and five and was in every Fahm Sexiest Woman Top one hundred, from one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight to two thousand and fifteen. That fact is brought to you by Misogyny. You know, just Y, you're away, Derek, is this character Jerry O'CONNELL, right, and he's photographing them. He's dressed like the man from del Montey, by the way. No, I really hasn't. He's a slain bowl. Yeah, but great, great fun in everything is in Oh, I don't know, progo go. Is it slavens? He was, I've rins. I fucking love sliders until I didn't, until I found out that your man, yes, Davis, is really fucking right wing. After you go see some resmoke. There was that? Yeah, why, he's also really right right John R Davis is really right wing. You'll have my acts as long as you're not Asian. No, what did you? Because bad date. That's a great boy. He browned up in that film. So right, so he obviously is a racist. He is the classically trained. Did Him Davidson's DAS Christ. It's already it's only been fifteen minutes, John, I know, already letting the back again toilet. No, Oh, let's kill the podcast now. So he's doing this wild wild girls thing. It's based on a TV show, VHS thing, called Girls Gone Wild. Oh, yeah, remember that? That was and it was where they yeah, this pervs and like a bravel. Thank you, you, stipulos. Rather Joe Francis started in one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven, and so vhs videos of young women almost always wasted, getting the tits out in exchange for things like free hats and teachers and because, yes, a big members oh Godmin has it. This did a lot in it. Or they had was beats, the gift throwing it beads. Yes, so I went to I went to our friends Josh and Amander on this one, because they are professional southern Americans. That's what they do, that's that's their job, professional southern Americans or leans. That's what yeah, and they went and they've been. They've been the Mardi Gras, they've been in New Orleans. Just came back to me and said, Mr Plant, we did a tour of the Mrdy Graham Museum. Really Sound Lik him there. And the tradition came from Europe. The beads were glass and you're supposed to give out beats to people who exhibited the traits. The color of the beads represent it. Green, gold, purple, they all mean something. They started chucking them at Mardi Graarre in the states one thousand eight hundred, probably because they were drunk and or high, and probably though thought there were snakes trying to kill them. Then somehow the women lifting their shirts became a thing, probably in the s of s, because free love and all that Shit. Now the plastic beads have been found to majorly fuck up the environment, so that's something else we got going for us. Oh thanks, Josh for giving us a little bit of insight there into Josh one way or to Joshua's man, it's the vhs we need to see. It's the VHS we threw out urvcs for we had just seen that just anute or remembers. Bro Just had already crazy things on it. Then to ye there. Yeah, each's lots of man. Now it's now you are taking me back. You are taking me back to video in a lot of Shit in the early two thousand. Yeah, easily. Yeah, man height. The Mont was long. Plead tips used to get absolutely it was a shape, but there was always the best bit ruined on the tracking because you'd paused it, but you could never get a proper look. Never got problem. Still. What was up? Sharon stone skirt because of the tracking was knackered because you'd paused it on there too long or somebody dipped over over at least at Eva Jerch on explains that he's photographing them and he needs someone local to take to the best places on the lake. He agrees to let Jake do that. That's Jake's job for tomorrow. Yeah, mother mom walks in on him watching the wild world girls website you mentioned. He's not doing anything, but she walks in on him and it's embarrassing. He's babysitting tomorrow. He's sister and I didn't realize this kid was a brother because they never really introduced him. But I was just a neighbor's kids. So that, but bast like, you're voting your book bibber scenting the cans to life. Look like the fucking children of the damned, though, ever been all fucking Aryan pair of children. That, I all, really was a masterstrate the end. Yeah, all your secrets. We know you've been rodgering the fishwife. So that night she meets up with Deputy Fallon. The always brilliant ving raimes is back for his guy third instant. Yeah, so the dead something else. And now this. Couldn't place it. Listeners put us in our place. Yeah, could. I couldn't place it my up, but he's brilliant and he's funny as fucking this. Later on he's playing it very, very seriously. Oh yeah, always, there's always into the clear, really is. So then they're looking for dry fust because he's missing. They find the boat. There's this team of seismologists incoming tomorrow to check in the quake and she's got to take them on the lake. She's reaching for the boat on the jetty. It collapses, this rotten old jet and it collapses and she falls in the water and you're like as you're gonna get paranad but she doesn't. She gets dry, for skips dry first. I lads just like this in enjoys when it when the the the dismembered body, comes into yeah, you know, you kind of like or this is a bit beat for Bee at times. She wants to close the lake because she's much better than the mare in Jews and Boris Johnson, who, of course, wanted us all to get covid and we've all had it now, John. Yeah, all at it now. Those a lot anyway. So it's anything that we heard done it. He had the immunity. But yeah, there's bad but heard of you did something, something, shitting in the bed. Could someone else do the work on that when I can't, kind of do. You know what I'm gonna I'M gonna put it out there, because I don't really seen it the back because not, who gives a fuck? Everyone's got hot take on it. I hope they're both sentenced to fucking death. The Johnny Twen book is a fucking monster and she's she's all just quite terrible human. Yeah, they're just rotten, rotten people. And they tell that thing with the fucking dogs in Australia. I still haven't got over that. That doesn't let that Sen yeah, we knew how dogs could be killed if we snook them into a country. We think we're being there rules, ever, in the proper apology right another it was not a proper apology and I love dogs. I wouldn't kill them, but I might have killed dogs just to kiss those two of that would have been good anyway. Moving them. The next day this guy jumps off a cliff. It's look and it's nothing. It's a nothing things in the morning jumps off the cliff into the water point and just a blood felt with Spurs. That's done and done. The kids are bribe by Jake Sixty Bucks and he gives them rules. Don't answer the phone or leave the house and don't say I'll be right back. A scream. That's I just watch that new one of them. Did you really? I we watched it a few weeks ago. That is like it spends the whole film nudging you in the ribs, going Ah, do your M do you remember? It's like a fucking Peter came. Thank do you remember the other film? You remember that? Can you think about a film you liked a lot more than this one? Think about it? Yeah, yeah, do you remember when before Monica from friends ruined a fucking face? Do you remember? Ladies Ladies, whatever you want to do with your faces is up to you. I'm just just making a an observation. Got See this all Bein pennel John, while you've been working, Ikond of leave you for any fucking chill out. The seismologist here. One of them's Adams Scott from parks and wrecks, because, as before, before he started playing the drive cool gay. Because unless it is a bet, was a couple of things, it's here, then it's a couple of things. It is obviously will probably looking at they're gone. Why the hell did I see that? I'm sad, mayor of ICETOWN, Adam scar yeah, at the boat. Jake runs into Kelly and she joins them on the boat. Yeah, they're going to take photos, but only after they've slid to a different dimension. First and now again, let's make a point. She's seventeen right, yes, before we go on. So there's a lot of fucking dodgy stuff in this. Back at the House the kids get this canoe to go to sand island to fish. Right now, Samd island isn't even a fucking island. It is like lips about. Thank yeah, it's a sad. The girl says I'm going to bring my trombone and he says no, you can't. You trum both stupid. And she says when I'm a rock star, you'll be sorry. He's like whatever, you play trombone and I'm like, listen, kid, have you never heard of SCA? You can get rich being a skin a scar band, as long as you don't mind split in your any money that you get fifty ways with massive Kelly Brooks all over him. Yeah, and he is seventeen years old, as I said before. So I look this up. In Arizona it's illegal to have sex with a something new, right, it be a teen. So she's a Peter. What's exactly book blood my mains that and and the STAS or the states. And either you're going to be sexteen or eighteen. Yeah, but you can and drink when your twenty one. I know. Yeah, I know, it's for seen. Yeah. And then so in some states you can get married at fourteen. She is parents permission. Yeah, crazy. You need be in some state to get minforting old trombone. I miss trombone. Trump bone comes from the Italian word Tromba, which means trumpet, plus the Suffix One, which means big. So it means it's big trumpet, which is my wrestling name. ha ha ha. Made it beg Google. So the kids get on this tiny embankment, she's absolutely nothing, and the canoe gets away from them. It does. Yeah, just like that bloke from Hartlepool. They're doing this swimming thing right, with this character crystal, yeah, and Kelly Brook, who's not, who's not a character, who's barely got a fucking line in the film, and the doing this this bit for flower duet. Oh Yeah, yes, the music. Yeah, this classical piece of music. So I know, I mean that's when it done, really see, but our character this, this is something about hundre. or She's too young. I'm still thinking that. Or too young, they do. Yeah, she was only seventeen years old. The Flower Day is a piece of music from the First Act of Leo Delhi Bearz Opera. Like me, it's debuted in Paris in one thousand eight hundred and eighty three and used in true romance when Christopher Walkin fucks up, Dennis hop so Jesus, that's a how what is that? I've actually youtube that copy things just didn't just remember. It's just such a beautiful scene. I haven't killed anybody since one thousand nine hundred and eighty four. They done so much fucking. Yeah, brolliant and your cantalog, it's good. The kids are trying to wave down a boat and the little girl gets a feet on these sharp stones. Fuck that make just a nice I was. That was the bit that hurt me the most in this world. Thought Stones in my lovely soft feet. Give it if the other actually looked up to see what's the most sort of common things and link them at the endor can leat so with the seeing the dear cleanups. So I was spending Bo from last when, all looking at the things that've gotten as the top five, pretty much, it seems, yours. Cigarette Butts, plastic bold and ball caps, food packaging, plastic bags and aluminum cans. See, you know, you are very good, son, and plastic beads. Buddy washes from body. I love she says. I love the fact that you that you said I thought it would be from broken glass. And it will know, because any Lennox isn't walk in unbroken for his real corner and you would actually he come to Pranas just as she cuts it like a foot and nothing comes of that again. But she steps out in time. She's okay. Adam Scott explains out of fucking no idea what this guy's characters called. Explains it's opened up a lake under a lake, and Paula this again not involved in this film at all. The lot of yeah, yeah, Igio, whatever she's called from starship troopers previous episode, of course, dives with her partner Sam. You should see this. It's unbelievable. And I was like, I'm looking at the d version of the day. It's unbelievable, all right, here as Tis need that's farm whatsoever. Pandora, it's not. Jesus. Can you believe there's another one of those? There's another two or three of those fucking films coming out, probably not in D. No, yeah, that's that's dead near that medium. Monus done. Yeah, yeah, well, not if lot of camera has anything to do with it. Let's be honest. It's one of our one of our greatest filmmakers. Anyway, they get into this cave and by doing them up with thirty five minutes into the film. Here we've only had two deaths. Yeah, but you already at this point. Yeah, we're doing not so bad. In the cave he disturbs this nest of x. What are they doing in this cave? And they saving a tie soccer team. Tie Boys soccer team. Did you see? We were swimming into the eggs. It's like, who gives a shit? It's so maybe you are a pedofile fucking electric car whanka. Anyway. Yeah, disturbs all these eggs and we see this alien like embryo in the egg with a little jump scare. Yeah, pretty sure that looks shot in d but it lights a flare and then get set up by by hundreds of them. So almost like that bit where the last he lights the flare in the film about the monsters underground where they're pothole is. Oh Man, there's the sit like that, Claire, and they're all there around through all of that to watch that girl over. I kind of get enough of that. Just just put from one tall phone Gim to another. Thener wod the thoughts for lunking with be RISKII. Well, you're not going to catch me down. In fact, if you do, I'll be the the one eating peace. Are you been like Kell? And everybody needs to umbrager. So he gets absolutely destroyed trying to escape. Paula gets mauled, including losing an eye. Adam Scott Saves her, or at least a course, and the piranha that's attached to her meet me. While Derek's pressure in Kelly doing body shots off crystal. Right then Jake's going to do a body shot off Kelly. So Kelly's pissed up, right, yeah, but he licks the Tequila out of there. I mean that's so like. Let's the stars, and then blind belly button for the tice, and then works his way up to get the line. Now all I could think was as a as a big fat man, there'd be a lot of you could keep a lot T QUILA in my belly, but you can, along with all the fluff and the one. I'm the one. I'm smile the worm out the bottom of the bottle. Fucker. And just as he's about to take the line out of her mouth, she she runs over to the end of the boat to throw up in D and we see the hell. Yeah, she does, cities and Kane. It ain't the sheriff of Adam Scott head to see Mr Goodman and with these aquatic store. Who was Mr Goodman? John don't Brown? It was done rose great Scott. Sureff, it's okay. Barty also on it, but your kid sheriff. They're on a sound bank. The fucking idiots. They don't know how to tie a fucking clown. The one, not the he's wife, who's got like one line of the whole thing, was like, Oh yeah, baby, alligators in New Jersey, all in the stewards in new chest enjoys the what? That's not a thing. Don't follow a minute. They've done that. Brilliant, brilliant alligator. Yeah, and them. Watch that. Hit My cloud. Nine hundred and eighty Robert Forster film. God, I loved Robert Foster, m most of them. I love that, though. I watched that shut myself. One thousand nine hundred and eighty two, a two foot alligator was found swimming in the Westchester County Reservoir that's part of the New York cities water supply. It is illegal, John, to own or buy or sell a gator in New York state. WALKROC so duff, ha ha dif're thinking about it, I just going to see the day. Even getting myself a couple this fine for selling this gator in New York is going to financially ruin. Remember, God, remember the heady days of lockdown, when we met. What is that old it and know they're get readied, but there was the idea, isn't it? Gatory, you owe, you are not allowed. In the voice, he explains that Pyra centrist Nai Karati used to which is that after shave your UNs, this is. Finally, every year used to swim the Colorado River, and this is and that the that they survived by cannibalism while there was nothing else down there. Now a little bit here that I wasn't so sure about. PIKARATE's as the original Perana. It's definitely a real type of Perana, but not the ancient one. So they've just come up with a name, but the fobs off and just done it again. John. Why must films lighten us? Why? So, at that's point in the time, I think it's stayed for the quas big when, oh so, least they learn to the whole point of this quiz. So my put my quizes as so the QUAIS is called pretend. Yeah, as in yes, or PRETTA print her run NAH. Okay, get it right. So, yeah, yes, yeah, problem. Yeah, for Runna. Yes. So, so I'll be looking at a hundreds of stuff. So you're right, a bit of cannibalism, thing about branders in each other, but this is that's his. I'm going to give you a couple of things that have come to left field that I found. It brands and you need to tell me if it's true or folks. Okay, got you got a run yeah, it's true. For Nah, there's no good right. So first one right off the bat, here and Aaron's. HEARN's like the frozen food shop here, and I'm gonna say, yeah, like the birds, I'm gonna say Arn's aren't native to South America. So I'm going to say Kuran Nah, right, which is it's true. That's when you've got, all right, lovely crocodiles, rember, the Amazon. Yeah, Puran Nah, because they're their skins too hard. Yeah. Or okay, rate. So what arms one, that sea words, Peran Ya, ten asn't. That's all. They don't fucking goats. Peranna. That's true. No, no, it's that. You're right, that's right. Seeds, seeds, Perran Yah, yeah, and that's all we got. So that Queen Street switch. Because, YEP, so crocodiles, cocadails and herons are there, breathers, all our herons. There's a sense here in speed for the face. While we're on it, couple of little things about perannas. Let's do a fact dump. They are omnivorous. They will eat plants if there is no other food about, as you've just told us, but not plant he's no. They are indigenous to South America. They have one of the strongest bites of all the Bony Fish, bony relatives of the body size, which is usually between five and fourteen inches. If you're in Peru, you can eat them grilled. Give that a gun. Yeah, and there is a six month to four year term in the jail if you try and import them into the Philippines. Wow, he's just a bit of a fact dump there for you. But let's get all the Parana shape. But the we are largest planet of our court was sexteen sexually, six pounds and fifteen ches, as it sounds, of aut verbs. Is that as a lot of barbs? Yeah, Oh, yeah, be it. And my billy gya money. Hell yeah, we watched USTIN powers three. It does ipposed to. I supposed to the other night. It kind of holds up the really bad stuff in it, but still so fun on in this still fun. Yeah, we watched the Pentavera and we worked our way back through that. Even watched the power or started that. I watched the UST episode and enjoying that. The colonel you'll eat my chicken. Yeah, it's a bit disappointing. There some disappointing bits in it, but yeah, yeah, it's funny. Give give that man all the money to make all the films. I don't care he's got ideas. I gonna give him a fucking contract to make films. I missed him so much. Really have the love. Good. It really killed it for him. Then I've never watched it. Doing Future episode because I just rew end up ridette resentment. Horrible. Back on the lake there's this parasailing woman. She she going for in. She older. Yeah, she's a she's a gin, know, makings a big girl and she yeah, right, yeah, so I just looking on imddy on the work day. Yeah, listeners, don't look up the titles of her films on Imdi on your work computer, but the sleepomstars in this the is they're really I wouldn't know, John. But well, if it's so fiet, so there is, so cirstye tells. So this custal, which is a Rainley Steel, does that one you're talking about, which is Jenna makles. But there's some records a Chelider Ashland Brook. Okay, but she must not watched your badles. Almost you know, but she apparently she's in its. Well, three Pondstar. Okay, right, okay, that's triple your triple the fun. But everyone, but she'd really she really gone for it, David. Yeah, yeah, Hi'm the she's like higher, higher, because I'm going high enough, and the sucking Frat boys then go a bit fast and take a higher and sit. All the fucking legs have gone. Now I've got to say it's really inconsistent as to what these piranhas can eat. Yeah, so sometimes they can eat bone, sometimes they can yeah, yeah, yeah, so in her instance they wait, they went. They went through the bone. A little bit later on with a character. They just leave that, which looks fucking great. By the way. Jake spots his sister and brother on the island. He's looking at them through these massive. He's pops, which is kind of like how you manage that or never look as were, weird, and the medal destines and that. Yeah, and if you remember that the little island was literally like a tiny amount of like a really short stretch of water from their house. Yes, they were looking at it from their house, and then this guy was million miles away from the house. Is Pope. Someone got five for that blunder. He justs, he justs. So we go back to the dock and there's this wet t shirt competition hosted by renew old piece of Shittyl Rock. He goes from UBIN's been yere as it has been het to those case come up and cherries try to close the lake. No one's listening till deputy fire some shots in the air and then you don't give a funny carry on the water. Yeah, at Sand Island they get the kids and as the leaving the get caught in these weeds. Derek Blames Jake and starts good in the engine. Back at the dock, these these kids on inflatables all getting nibbled on, including this chick on an inner tube. Yeah, swet. Yeah, we're like jam out of a donut that act as a contolitionist. I found out what she's a circus contortion. All right, they all get on this floating stage except for one. Last year gets Perrana Nadoed to death, which is there's too many people on the stage to the stage starts falling apart, and this it probably one of my favorite bits. This cable whips these two women. Yeah, that was that, and it looked really good until it didn't, and you see the cartoon torso fall apart and then it just goes all gray and Manky, as if like the shittiest cartoon in the world. Look Europe in the sick. There's a lot of good death ideas and there's a rest as absolutely Adam Scott to the rescue at this point. He shooting PIRANA with a shotgun. The sheriff uses to Citi is as one specific flesh cover been singled out. Wrong place, wrong time. Eli Roth Gets Kirsty mccold between these two se yeah, you just com bag you all. This guy jumps in the speed but murders about thirty people driving it. Those love interest when he's at preck anymy when it's chef. I was at the loving tess this last he gets her hair stuck in the propeller and he just eat guns it and it ends up ripping her hair and a scalp in the face, on which she looks like one of the the aliens out of they live. That all males attacks. That's good and it made me of that. Poor last got scart rapped from that blood the road coster some lasting did Shit y the barn. I pushed up. Go your few. Yeah, it's a good, good death. So they're back on the boat, the Barracuda. The boat, by the way, the Barracuda. These barracuda boats are an actual model of kind of speed boat that you can get the Nice one book. It's made by Benetto and it's the Barracuda nine and there's one for selling Esbourn at the minute, John, if you want it, a hundred and twenty nine thousand, nine hundred and fifty pounds and it's called the fair ride. Oh whys Kelly. But as Kelly brick ond it crystal and Derek Fall in crystal gets eaten from outside a face by this piranha which didn't look any good because it was meant to be three day Danny and Jake Save Derek kind of, but he's had his legs and he's Dickie. Yeah, he's clearly lying in them. Cut Out bit of the budget. Yeah, just these little really thunb really quickly. Then he's uncle Oh in and I'm calm. Yeah, the roo kind of skeleton legs in the Piranhas are argument over. His ball be the one spatter. The average weight John Awful Penis will be is a hundred and sixty grams. Yours, of course, ways of metric ton as well. It's say, it's it's new other wheat. So that the motion in the oceans. That so back at this doc thing. There's loads of really good visual effects here, missing limbs, bits of Shit. There's this woman being carried out by two people and then it brush apart. Yes, it doesn't, doesn't really work, but it does work, and most of pros sticks were by the Great Greg Nicoto. You know him from walking dead, nightmare, ELM streets eve there too, and that particular scene where they're all dying. Ninety four hours of special effects prep. Wow, you love to see it, don't you love to see it? Now? That's wrong. There was some. There were some good ones. It is reminiscent in it. We're doing the the donated the in the cine amount of people that actually had listens the stuff. I would love to do someone that just to see her it. So I done. But name is nick. Your plus irs is creasy in madness and it oh absolutely thing. Range gets this boat engine, murders hundreds of them before he gets eaten himself. Just takes it off the boat and he's like zombies ate. My Neighbor's kind of while AGN'T SHERIFF JULIE GETS A call from a son, Jake, explaining the boat is sinking. They'd hit some rocks. She heads to the boat with Adam Scott to get them and at the BARACUTA she throws him this rope and climbs across Kelly stuck below deck and the waters rising. Yeah, yeah, yeah, but which I mean? If they just called Elon Musk, you would have got that little submarine in together that he keeps going to a problem. I remembent a little stuff for gratual using all the money from my father's blood diamond having the right battery in a paper clip. Now she says I'm going to take the kids across and come back for you? Is this like the problem with the chicken and the Fox? I know where you can't. You can't leave the chicken and the Fox at the same time. Yeah, I don't think grain. You know, don't really and in fact, dad for I was going to see four people under up. It's in pain. But KARRY Brittny mass of war pressure talking at least sex people in that role. She was smuggling right, said Fred, deeply dipping after had a few big breakfast of him joy. So as she's climbing across, she the Paranas all of a sudden conjump, which it happen Alt to do yet until now, and her hair gets Perrana and then she gets Perana and then she's took rain the eyes. She got one the eyebowl, which a thod get one of the eyeball, yeah, one, it's get across. So that's this. The Sheriff, Jake takes the corpse of Derek, or almost corpse, as he takes the started do him in the water and is a short t shirt and then dies. Th last words of wet Tshirt hoison into the water as a distraction before swimming to get Kelly with the rope around him radio's Adam Scott to basically pull on the rope using the boat on his signal. Ten seconds sets at this rudimentary bomb with a flare, the Benitiser to the radio, which I'm wondering way that I don't know why it tied. Is the radio at all? And then the gas cylinders. He lets them go. So they're kicking out all the gas and as they pulled them away, the gas stat and it's killing the piranha in this massive kind of explosion, under water explosion, shot waves. Yeah, Kelly and Jake get back on at the boat at all. The kind of Perana corpses float to the top. I've written here was to put it in, just as I couldn't fit Elizabeth shoe wipe out world champion, which is quite across the room. Oh Yeah, dudd you do do do cal radio's the sheriff to report that the one that they're left with him is a baby. It's not got any reproductive, grown up, reproductive ordomns, Adam Scott says. So where are the adults? Then, just as this massive one jumps out of the water, some titles and that's it. And see absolutely there's no after sing clits? No, absolutely not. Did we have any? Did you have anything else to Ale? So top ten overboard motors are I know you re all rice as the seven marinet. I'll start. I'll do it from a bottom. Okay. So do do? Do Do? We've got the Yamah if three, five or see, there's a Suzuki DTH five boy mercury Vernado four hundred Yamaha if four to five, exto and we have the other one. Is it death between that the other Yamaha Mercury rising forty five are there's a seven marine five to seven. There's a seven marine five, seven, seven and a seven marine sex to seven. There you go. That's it. Well, don't. You're not getting ten for that. I'll give you to all right, really fucking dry. Well, we take it to my top ten. I've always largest lakes right, okay, okay, so I've got so that's his mat ness, my problem. So I dead look up the day largely the wrong like no, not that they're actually put in the Caspian. See down there's a lake. There's a lot of disproute whether as asn't, and I'm so looking at it. I'm I'm going to see Lake Superiors, the biggest league world, because it's a proper lake. You Go. I look now that's my great fantastic you can. We've gone to that. Will we'll get you. Will get you, we'll get you in with the greatest like mine, of our rage what they're forever rate. So I'm looking. I was looking up and or talk to reports. Right, okay, apparently, and the all just can tear your cause of death immediately, but you need a full report to act the tending exactly how he died and when. Well, that's I think. We usually teach up to two weeks to come in because or earlier and says we've got there. Or Talk to support. The only letter took a D and a half. So of two days. So it comes at they're align ring. Your Vision under water is limited duty whatever as for how you are, but the seeing it, the sort of average visibility under water. Is it in eaters, which I think there's a lot. It just sound like a lot of the ring. So you be goot guns that were used on it. So short guns, Miss Big Five hundred fan favors, and be right, hand guns. Were looking at Smith and Western model sixty five and you've got an x, twenty six tieser and I think, buddy, that as me done. Okay, there's a section where Kelly's on this floaty seat, you know, this inflatable seat, having a we drinking a little bit of some time. You get one of those one thousand four hundred and ninety nine on Ebay. Should you want to go on? Lock Loman with that job, but I don't know. The cart around the corner front. You don't know. Look at the Ford inflation and all that. Canoe. The word canoe came into English from the Spanish Portuguese word C Noah. I don't know how keen welcomes into that. There's a bit. There's a bit in the hat near the house which says a no wake zone. Yes, vessels expected to struggle very slowly to minimize the motion of the Ocean. It's like Water Bay, least slow children crossing. They okay. They mentioned the Arizona State cheerleading team being there. The Arizona State cheerleading team is the Asu spirit squad, which sounds like a knockoff ghostbuster hollow spait squad, wait at one, or the son devil cheering squad, which sounds like a cheering squad that the ghostbusters would go and have, as in the Chians squad. Couple of other things are Miss Gioconda says, podunk town. Oxford dictionary defines podunk as a hypothetical small town regarded as typically dull or insignificant. I've lived in a few of those. Allowa don't location Scout Hollywood pay. According to Oklahoma Film and TV Academy Websites, one can expect salary range from forty five thousand dollars to a hundred sixty five thousand dollars. In that position, not great, not terrible. Yeah, that I think. Oh, there's there's a cut, a coup, I think. So the kids, the main kid in this is he's name is? Did you catch the actor's name? or it's McQueen and it is a summer queen. Right, yeah, and I've written. No, not that one, but also not that one. Steve Arm Steven Armer Queen, Steve McQueen's grandson. Yeah, take me with you. I can see. Also, his cousin is UN Raka and glaze know. Yeah, what family you can be my Hel me me. So you don't need me to tell you John, because he his biggest roles in listener favorite TV show vampire diaries. Oh God, really, six seasons? Jesus, I've got to be honest with you. I watched it once, but I've mistaken it for Red Shoe Diaries. So the Matlablong was in that one. One of them Fox more death was reading. The more morning swe wasn't. Yes, red sauce, DAD's Max loblong. It's brutal. Get Out. I said, I'm not even that. Let's just got daddy's on it, and daddy's what they mentioned. House arrest famous house arrestees. John Dr Dre was at how under how's arrest for sorting good producer, Bernie Mado for being a Robin Bastard. Mikita Krushchev, seven years died in his home. Well, the last Queen of Hawaii, and I've written this down for Netckalick, so I get it right. Leally Okolani and Winny Mandela Y. Yeah, Special Aka did not record a song. Ask You, Verrd, to be like Bouney. Yeah, so I am out of here. Like, how many did you think we got? While I took them? It was a real short farm and it's been the most as you've done this. So I'm going to see per run. Yeah, Seventy to Oh, little bit lower. So certainly it's a little bit sexier than that. It's seventy seven, seventy, seventy, thirty six, name. Fuck, you know, yes, it's the way number sixty nine. There's real hend and I know. Yeah, yeah, well, look, you know, we're out of we're touch, we're we're out of practice, out, I know. Well, we're probably gonna back the better phone, because it wasn't the best. You know what's just something that was randomly watching. I thought, fucking know, let's let's do something stupid, let's do something to let's do this. Yeah, so that's that's where we are, John. We're gonna do something special for a couple of weeks. That we yeah, yeah, but we're going to we're going to obviously get together, called collaborate together, and this seemed property stop collaborating. Listening plant, he's back with a brand new vinition. Yeah, we are. We're gonna DO WE'RE gonna do the next one that live and together. I might put this out yet just in case it doesn't work. But yet we're going to do the video van. Oh, yeah, really have lost our way. Yeah, that's right. Yeah, so we will do some video. Let last one, last one with beastmaster, won't it was me? Yeah, single, single figures as a singer. Well Guy. So, listeners, if you like this, we've got a whole back catalog of this thing that you can do. Alternatively, you can catch me on everything we learned from the SIPSON's podcast where with Tom I talk about a different episode of the citizens every couple of weeks and try and make it all about northern England. None is no the north. Remember, Jean. Do you want to say goodbye the little guys? It's been so long but it's good being back. I've I've been building up Oma, my dog, don't bad jokes, for the last sex or seven weeks. It's been horribles. Thank you for letting me in part your years with the dog jus. Thank you so much. Fantastic. Yet just to reminder, please do tell your friends about the podcast. We're not so bothered about reviews. Could doesn't seek to do too much on the algorithms. Find as on all the socials. Just look up just things you learn from film. But yeah, tell a friend about us, get them to listen. Just anything that they like from their film. Yeah, fum back catalog, and that helps us to get to loads of other people and eventually start made all look the crows coming in Netflix or need to do that again? Well, we'll do that for episode of hundred. So hopefully still when we finally get to episode of Hundrack, Terry, we've got people calling for that. We got people called but people have been calling for you, John, and calling for my head. So I nobody guessing as long as you killy, but I'm going to get the people they think they want to hear. People's job. Get to the job. Yes, Right, lovely, Ladies Gentlemen, I well, I see you again next week. See Ye, see you, guys. All right,

    69 Whiskey
    66. Milf Munchin'

    69 Whiskey

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 63:22


    This week on 69 Whiskey we get very kinky as Eric tells us his experience meeting members of the kink scene in the Tri State Area. He also details his experience visiting a BDSM sex dungeon and some new safety tips he learned along the way in regards to fire cupping. Not only that, but he describes what can only be called the drive home from hell, and the very rough day that followed. Plus, Matt bring back the fan favorite Fuck, Marry, Kill game Mother's Day Edition, as we make our picks in two rounds of some of the most popular milfs of the past and present.Remember, if you enjoy our show, we encourage you to leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform, and by doing so we will read your feedback live on air!Keep a close eye on our social media sites for news on what we are doing during the break and when we will be back!All our links: https://linktr.ee/69whiskeypodcastThe Balldo Join the ballsex revolution now! Your balls will thank you!Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

    VitaMelanin Podcast
    F**k, Marry, Kill (Actor Edition)

    VitaMelanin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:45


    Let's take it back and play a childhood game with a little adult spice to it, shall we?! This week on VitaMelanin, Taylor and Ciara play a game called Fuck, Marry, Kill. Play along too and let us know you would FMK....   Black Business: Paint N Sit ATL   Connect with us! We'd love to hear ideas and feedback! Email us: vitamelaninpodcast@gmail.com   Follow us on IG @vitamelaninpod and Facebook @VitaMelanin Podcast Follow Taylor on IG @isanity and Ciara @cee_thespian *We do not own the copyrights to any music/sounds used in this podcast

    [Podfic]
    Not a Mounted Dildo but a Fuck Machine - Chapter 5

    [Podfic]

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:21


    A Good Omens fanfic by NaroMoreau & summerofspock. Music: Werq by Kevin MacLeod (filmmusic.io standard license) For tags and other details, to leave kudos and comments, please visit the corresponding post on archiveofourown: https://archiveofourown.org/works/38021266! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/literarion/message

    Decanterbury Tales: The Podcast
    Keep it Trill-It's F#%K It Friday

    Decanterbury Tales: The Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 60:55


    Join us for the trillest mini-sode as the pals interview wine influencer, Meaghan @trillwinewife and celebrate her unofficial weekly holiday "Fuck it Friday". Do what you want because we made it through the week! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/decanterburytales/support

    Live Like the World is Dying
    S1E41 - Casandra on Mediation

    Live Like the World is Dying

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 64:20


    Episode Notes Episode summary Margaret and Casandra talk about the importance of learning mediation skills, what mediation is and what different processes look like. Guest Info The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Links Mediate.com The Little Book of Conflict Transformation (little books series also has books on different types of mediation and restorative Justice) Getting to Yes The Promise of Mediation Transcript Margaret 00:14 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret, Kiljoy, and I use 'she' or 'they' pronouns. And today we're going to talk about something that everyone has requested. Just kidding, no one actually bothers request this because they don't know they need it. That's actually not true. People actually haverequested this. We're gonna be talking about conflict mediation, and we're going to be talking about when conflict mediation isn and isn't the way to handle different types of situations. And when we'll be talking to Cassandra about that. And I'm very excited to hear what they have to say. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show in the network. Margaret 01:40 Okay, if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns, and then I guess kind of your background, both professionally and non professionally with what we're gonna be talking about today with conflict mediation. Casandra 01:52 Yeah, my name is Cassandra, I use 'they' or 'she' pronouns. I'm a volunteer mediator at a community mediation center. I trained in mediation...What year is it right now? I don't know, eight years ago? Margaret 02:08 It's 2022, right now, Casandra Johns 02:09 Nine years ago, something like that. And I also worked at my local mediation center, at the beginning of the pandemic, as program coordinator for one of the counties. Margaret 02:25 So what is conflict mediation? This is when when you don't like someone, you just respond passive aggressively to them and or cancel them, right? Casandra 02:36 Yep, and block them on Twitter. Margaret 02:39 That's important. Casandra 02:42 Conflict mediation is where a third party is called in to be present during discussion about a conflict. So, in its most basic form, that could mean asking a friend who isn't like a stakeholder in a conflict to come sit in while you talk with someone who you have issues with. Through the mediation center, like on a, on an organizational level, we deal with all different sorts of conflicts. So community conflicts, like neighbors disputing property lines. We also do family mediation, parent/teen, stuff, things like that, we do a certain amount of mediation through the court system. So people in my area can opt to do mediation instead of going to like small claims court, which is pretty cool. Margaret 03:32 So like if you're mad at your neighbor for hitting your car with their bicycle. I don't know that's not a good example. Instead of suing them, you can, like go hash it out with someone. Casandra 03:49 Yep. Yeah. Margaret 03:50 How do you then maximize your personal profit? Casandra 03:54 Well, that's a good question. I mean, the chance if you go before a judge, there's a chance that they'll say, Nope, you don't get this money. Whereas in mediation, you get to talk to the person and explain to them why you need the money, and they explain to you why they can't pay the money, and then you work out a plan, which usually benefits both people. Margaret 04:14 Well it just doesn't lead very easily to feeling righteous and better than everyone, though. So it seems like a disadvantage. Casandra 04:21 Yeah, I mean, I think if you want to feel righteous, you should probably just sue someone and okay, and not worry about mediation. Yeah. Margaret 04:29 So what were you gonna say before, i said weird sarcastic things? Casandra 04:32 The center where I work, also has this really cool program, where we do restorative justice processes for youth offenders. So, rather than going through the usual punitive process, some juvenile offenders have the option to do restorative justice instead. Margaret 04:52 Give me an example of like, not a "John did this," but I like what that might look like? Casandra 04:59 Yeah, Let me think. I have to be vague. So I'm remembering a case where one teenager punched another teenager, like the, I think they were at the movies or something, this was pre-pandemic, and was charged with assault. And so rather than having to go through a punitive process and have that assault charge on their record, they have the option to do this restorative process instead. So that would look like sitting down with the person who was harmed or with a proxy, we use proxies as well, if the victim doesn't want to be present, and talking about the impact of their actions and then coming up with a plan for making amends, which can be really varied. Like it can be, It can be as simple as like, "I will go to therapy." Or it can be direct remediation, like "I will pay you money or do yard work for you," you know, it, people get really creative. But it's a cool option. Margaret 06:04 Okay. What is the difference between, outside of a legal or court system, what is the difference between conflict mediation and restorative justice? Like, when is one thing appropriate? And when is the other thing appropriate? Casandra 06:20 Yeah, I think of mediation as a part, like an aspect of larger alternative justice processes. So it's like a tool you can use in alternative justice processes. But alternative justice processes are intended for instances where harm has been caused. So it's not just a you and me on equal footing having a conflict or disagreement, actual harm has been done. Does that make sense? Margaret 06:46 Yeah, so like, basically, if I'm trying to...if someone within my same social circle sexually assaulted me, and then I don't want to go and sit down have a like samey samey conversation with them about like, how we all have feelings. Instead, I can....instead restorative justice as the more appropriate thing, then specifically, mediation in that circumstance. Is that what you're saying? Casandra 07:11 Yeah, or probably transformative justice. But yeah. Margaret 07:15 What's the difference? Casandra 07:17 Sure. So. Margaret 07:19 Sorry. Casandra 07:20 No, that's fine. Restorative justice was developed, I think in the 70s, I want to say, and that's what the mediation center where I work...that's what we use in conjunction with the court system. And it's dealing more with individuals. So, this individual has harmed that individual, and we're going to figure out how to make amends as best as possible between the two of them. Transformative justice, I think, was developed in the 90s. And it's a more systemic approach. So it's acknowledging that people often cause harm. Because of trauma, because of a lack of resources, you know, it acknowledges that we're all a part of these larger systems of oppression. And so through this transformative process, it seeks to heal both people. Often communities are brought in as part of that as well. Margaret 08:22 Okay. So like, everyone who's involved with the thing shows up, and has a say in it. Casandra 08:31 Maybe not for all parts. But, you know, the hope is to bring in as many people as possible, because the idea is that, that creates more sustainable change. Margaret 08:42 So how does one...How does one go about doing this, right? Like to focus maybe more on mediation than restorative and transformative justice? We obviously within our communities come up with like ad hoc means quite often, and we just sort of try weird things all the time. And sometimes those things don't work very well, like passive aggressive notes. Or, you know, Casandra 09:11 Wash your dishes! Margaret 09:13 Yeah, totally. Yeah. You know, like, how does one do this? Like, if I'm starting to feel like I'm either having conflict with someone that I'm in community with, or I'm watching a conflict develop within the community that I'm part of? What are some steps to notice that that's happening and work to resolve it? Casandra 09:35 I feel like that shouldn't be a big question, but because we're so conditioned to be conflict avoidant, not just on an interpersonal level, but like, society, you know, we live in a....part of liberal democracy, part of representative democracy is like creating these abstractions when it comes to conflict and creating institutions to deal with it, instead of even acknowledging that the conflict exists. Now I have to remember what your question was. Margaret 10:09 So what the fuck do you do when you're like, really pissed off that your roommate won't do the dishes, and is like, snubbing you at parties and this pretending like you don't exist. But they think that it's happening because you borrowed their guitar without asking. Casandra 10:31 I mean, mediation doesn't have to be a big formal thing, right? Like, you can just ask a mutually trusted friend to be...Well, first of all, you can just talk to them. So, so mediation is just a tool in our toolkit. But there's something about having a third person present, who isn't like a stakeholder in a conflict. And even if they don't say anything, just having a third person present and witnessing is sometimes really helpful. One of my favorite mediators at the center rarely says anything. He just has this presence, he'll sit there with his hands in bold and just like exists, and somehow people are like, Oh, well, shit. Now I have to... Margaret 11:13 Just like quietly judging you? Casandra 11:16 No, just like, holding this like, calm space. He's, yeah. Margaret 11:23 Quietly judging you! Because like, well not in a bad way, right? Because like, yeah, if I'm like, if I feel really, like, justified and you know, like, bah, blah, blah. But then as soon as I realized I'm saying it to a third party, I'm like, "Oh, this might not make sense." Like when I say to a third party? Yeah, yeah, no, okay. Okay. Casandra 11:41 Yeah. And anyone can do that. Right? Anyone who isn't a stakeholder and who's comfortable being around, conflict can be in that role. Obviously, there's more that you can do to like develop those skills. That's why trainings and mediation centers exist. Margaret 12:00 Most of the time, I've tried to do this. It's gone very badly when I've been asked to mediate things, but I think that's usually because the people...because I did everything, right, and the people involved id everything wrong. But, it seems like people got really defensive and kind of entrenched in their positions. And it stayed a really like, "No, I'm right. Fuck, you," "No, I'm right. Fuck you," kind of thing? How do you break that up? Casandra 12:31 Yeah. Have you heard the analogy of like, if you draw a heart on a piece of paper, and place it between two people, and they're like standing on opposite sides of it, and ask them to describe what they see, they're going to describe totally different things, but they're looking at the same image, you know? Margaret 12:50 Oh, because it's like, not symmetrically positioned between them. Casandra 12:53 Yes. Margaret 12:54 Okay. Casandra 12:55 I think that...Well, first of all, I think it's okay for people to just not agree, tight? Part of getting over our conflict avoidance, as a society, I think is acknowledging that, like, we're not going to agree and that's not only okay, but positive. Like we need to have people around us who we disagree with, in order to like, examine our own opinions and things like that. But, the second thing is that conflict isn't bad or scary. Like, I feel like part of people's fear around not agreeing with someone is that the assumption is that if you and I don't agree, then we can't have any sort of relationship or function. Like we're so conflict avoidant, that if we don't agree, we just simply can't function. Margaret 13:46 Oh, yeah, totally. And then we just like ice each other out completely. Casandra 13:49 Yeah, which is really common and unfortunate. And obviously, like, there, I'm gonna disagree with a Nazi, right? Margaret 13:58 Right. Casandra 13:59 We're not just going to agree to disagree, but I'm gonna ice them out. But, that doesn't have to be the case for everything. Margaret 14:06 No, that makes sense. I kind of...I kind of do this thing where I have, like, one set of values that I hold myself to, and one set of values that I hold other people to, you know, so like, I'm trying to come up with a good value to to use this for. I don't want to get...Okay, so like, but if there's if there's something that I believe I shouldn't do, it doesn't necessarily mean...even though kind of in the abstract, I wish no one would do it. Like okay, like lying, right? Like I have a very, very strong sense of never lying to anyone that you're not trying to control or hurt, right? And I, I will, like live or die by this as a person, but I recognize that not everyone I surround myself with holds the same value, and it like rubs me the wrong way. But, I can agree to disagree about it because I recognize that this is a value that is not shared by everyone. Um, and I'm on my own, like, wing nut paladin and kick or whatever. Andk but then yeah, like, there's other values like, you know, "don't be like", I don't know, "don't be fucking, like racist or whatever, like, don't be a fucking Nazi," that or...is that kind of what you're kind of what you're saying, like learning to have different standards for yourself versus other people or I guess that's not just the only way to...how do you how do you personally decide which things you are allowed to disagree about and which things you're not allowed to disagree about? Casandra 15:39 Oh, I don't feel like I'm in total agreement with anyone, like literally anyone. And that's great. Yes. The world would be really fucking boring. If I was. There's this, there's this essay called "In Defense of...." shoot, am I going to forget it while we're recording? No. In Defense of Arguing. Margaret 16:05 Okay. Casandra 16:05 Like an anarchist theory of arguing or something like that. And the author talks about these like larger things, like how social democracy...how the how liberal democracy as a larger structure encourages us to to not be in direct communication, and to avoid conflict. Margaret 16:24 Well, okay, so, how does this I guess my question is like, okay, we know that Nazis are on the far end of one...you know, like, God gave us Nazis, so that we have enemies. You know, there's this, like pure representation of bad right, that most of society used to agree on and it's no longer the case, but like, we have this pure representation of bad over on one end, and then you have like, you know, "John Barrows, my guitar without asking sometimes, and thinks it's okay, that he does." Or someone is has a different interpretation of some political analysis or, you know, like, like, shit that I might feel really directly personally strongly about, but is at the end of the day, not a big deal. You know, so that...Is the answer, "Everyone's just gonna draw those lines in different places?" That's my instinct is that everyone's going to draw the lines of like, well, I can be in community with someone who I don't know, like, sometimes as a like grouchy libertarian on some issues. Or some other people will be like, "Oh, I can be in community with Marxists," or something, right? And then other people will be like, "No, we've seen where Marxism leads to. So fuck them." So people are going to draw these lines in different places. Is it just, is it just alright, that people are going to draw those lines in different places. Casandra 17:53 Yes. And that, thank you. Yeah. So it's alright, that people are going to draw this lines in different places. And that reminds me why I brought up that article, which is what...not only is it okay to draw those lines, but having actual dialogue about where we draw those lines and why, and how they might be different from where other people draw those lines is ultimately productive. Margaret 18:15 That makes sense. Casandra 18:18 Because that's how we, you know, interrogate our own boundaries, right? And our own ideology. Margaret 18:26 It was interesting. I was like, this thing is gonna be very, like nuts and bolts episode Are we like talk about like, really specific practices, but... Casandra 18:32 I mean, we can but... Margaret 18:33 No, we should do it too, but I, what I really like thinking about this stuff around...Yeah, the how we build diverse communities and how we avoid, you know, I would argue that echo chambers are one of the things that destroys communities of resistance more effectively than even sometimes outside pressure. You know, as soon as everyone starts...go ahead. Casandra 18:55 Oh, I was just gonna say that like moral homogeneity is also what leads to these like, fundamentalist movements that were opposing, right. . Margaret 19:04 Yeah. And then yet, like, people were like, well, you know, you can't let 'something something' in because it's a slippery slope. And I'm, I'm on this like, crusade against slippery slope as a useful phrase, because, well, it's a useful phrase, be like, "Hey, that's a slippery slope," should mean like, so be careful when you walk it not like boarded up, none shall enter like, you know, maybe like put handholds along the way to like, help people like navigate complicated ethical terrain. Casandra 19:31 Cautionary signage. Margaret 19:32 Yeah, exactly. Like instead of being like, well, everyone who likes the following philosopher who died 100 years before Nazis came about is a Nazi, even though like, you know, both Nazis like this guy and some Nazis hated this guy and some non Nazis hated this guy. I'm actually not trying to defend Evola right now at this time. That's not the path I'm trying to go down right now. Maybe Nietzsche is how I'm trying to...But I don't even want to defend Nietzsche... anyway. Casandra 20:04 They can both go to the sun as far as I'm concerned. Margaret 20:08 But like, but you know, where we draw these lines might be different about like, okay, so like, fuck this guy, but is it fuck everyone who is inspired by this guy? And is it fuck everyone who's inspired by people who were inspired by this guy, you know? Because, like how many how many layers removed from something do we still hate it? You know? Casandra 20:33 Yeah. Yeah, totally. Margaret 20:37 So nuts and bolts of conflict resolution? Casandra Johns 20:42 Can I first... Margaret 20:43 Yeah, please do. Casandra 20:44 Before we move into specifics. I think the like overarching stuff is really important because every so often I see these pushes in radical spaces to develop more skills around things like transformative justice, but no one talks about conflict resolution, no one talks about mediation, which is wild to me. Like, the reason I trained as a mediator is because I saw it is like one of the building blocks of these larger structures. But it's just not something that seems to be valued or discussed on the left for the most part. And that's baffling to me, considering how much divisiveness we face and how we all seem to agree it's a huge issue. But haven't put in the work to develop the skills to like, deal with it. Margaret 21:35 So what we're doing is we're jumping straight to the like justice framework, which is, you know, far more, it's not inherently punitive, but like, it's more antagonistic and implies far more heavily that there's like harm that's been done. And it's one directional, right like, which is often the case, I'm not trying to claim that this is not the case quite often, but but we're jumping to that rather than a lot of things that could be headed off way before they get really intense through mediation, or even things that are really intense are still a mediation type thing rather than a transformative justice type thing is that right? Casandra 22:12 So yeah, even just as abolitionists, if we're talking about divesting from the current system as a whole, people don't just go to court because they've been abused, you know, they go because they're in conflict with someone and want an authority figure to decide who's right and who's wrong. And so that's something we have to replace as well. Margaret 22:36 Yeah, I know that makes sense. Casandra 22:36 And ideally without the authority figure. But even like, it doesn't have to be some intense formal, heavy thing. You know, like I've mediated for friends, and it's just been like a very casual conversation. I think that normalizing it, talking about it at all would be great as the left, but then normalizing these practices, Margaret 23:02 Just normalizing going to your roommate, your housemate, the third person and being like, "Hey, like, we keep arguing about the fact that I want to leave my socks in the living room." Casandra 23:16 Will you just be present while we chat through this? Margaret 23:18 Yeah, Casandra 23:19 Like yeah why not? You know. Margaret 23:22 Okay. I'm coming up with silly examples, but I'm like, mostly because I'm just not feeling very imaginative off the top my head, but Casandra 23:28 I've had housemates, I know how it goes. Margaret 23:31 It starts feeling really personal at a certain point. Casandra 23:33 It does! Margaret 23:35 Yeah, and sometimes it's really easy to be really, really angry at this, like, heavier stuff than the larger framework of what's happening. Casandra 23:46 Yeah, totally. I have a child, I understand that. I'm taking your lack of folding your laundry personally at a certain point. Margaret 24:01 That's because you're the authority. No, I don't want to get into that that's a different conversation. Casandra 24:07 Abolish bedtimes? Margaret 24:12 Yeah, okay. So like, well, actually, I mean, I mean, this would be an appropriate, like mediation would be an appropriate thing to do with, like, between you and between a parent and a child at various points also, or is that? Casandra 24:26 Yeah, yeah, one of my favorite types of mediation that I do through the center's parent/teen. There are different types of mediation. And the type I was trained in was..is somewhere between what's called facilitative and transformative mediation. So, in some scenarios, we're just hashing through a specific problem. And the people aren't going to have a relationship after that. And then in other scenarios, we're actually trying to shift the relationship to make it healthier, which I prefer. And Margaret 24:58 Yeah. Casandra 24:59 The Family mediations tend to go in that direction. But there's a power dynamic, right. And so part of the mediators job is to level out power imbalances, which can be really tricky. But also really cool to watch. Margaret 25:17 Well that's cool, because I think that critiques of power are necessary, but there's always going to be different types of relationships between people with power imbalances, right? Even when, like two adults are dating, you know, there's going to be power imbalances based on like, different levels of societal privilege, or, you know, heterosexual relationships have a massive power imbalance to start with that they have to deal with...either overcome or like learn to address. So it makes sense to, like... Casandra 25:46 I think personal history and like communication style cnn create that Margaret 25:52 In terms of like, if someone has a more aggressive communication style, and another person has like a style that is triggered badly by that style of communication, is that kind of what you're getting at? Casandra 26:03 Yeah, things like that. Margaret 26:05 Okay. I remember thinking about how this has to, like, sort of be taught and developed, I remember being at a workshop once at a conference about this issue....Pardon me, as I pull a tick off of my head and cut it with a knife Margaret 26:23 But ticks aside, you know, the way the way that this needs to be taught was really laid clear to me, I was at this, this workshop, and we're going through and, you know, the person teaching the workshop was teaching about conflict resolution and things and, and a friend of mine, who was a, I believe, a kindergarten teacher, I'm not entirely certain worked with very young kids. And my friend was explaining it was like, "oh, when two kids get in a conflict, like they both want a toy, you know, it's recess, and only one of them gets the toy. And they, they both want it, they get really excited, and they run up and they're like, "Teacher, Teacher, we have a conflict, we have to resolve it."" You know, and it was this really amazing heartwarming story. And, unfortunately, most of the people at the workshop, because they didn't have enough context for what was being told in the story were like, Ah, yes, this is the wisdom of children. You know, we should all just learn from children. And then my friend came up to me later, and was like, that was really frustrating. The kids do that, because we taught them how to, Margaret 26:23 Oh God! Casandra 26:29 Yeah, yeah. Margaret 26:33 And it... And there was a certain amount of like wisdom of children, and that they hadn't specifically developed other bad habits, like, you know, I have a lot of bad conflict habits that I don't love about myself that are ingrained to me for various purposes. But, it seems like we still have to, like...go ahead. Casandra 27:47 Even that approach, that they were excited to talk about it...like they knew where to turn. They knew where their resources were, and they were excited to resolve it. Like imagine feeling that way about disagreeing with someone. One of my teachers says that every mediation is a success, meaning that regardless of whether or not people come to an agreement, the fact that they've shown up to talk about it shifts something in their relationship. And that is in and of itself a success. Margaret 28:16 That makes a lot of sense. And then also might lead to kind of my next question, which is like, when? Well, as I had a phrased was like "when conflict resolution fails," you know, but it seems like sometimes you would go and be like,"Oh, we've heard each other out. And we fucking hate each other. or we're fucking mad about this thing." Casandra 28:39 We've heard...like feeling hurt, being able to say your piece to someone, and knowing that you're in this contained space where they have heard you. And then still not agreeing with them is still a form of resolution, you know, like, we're not going to agree on this. But, I've had the opportunity to, like, say my part. And that's something. Margaret 29:03 Yeah. No, that makes sense. It's like, asking nicely before you ask meanly, in terms of like, on like, a social change level, right? You know, we're like, "Hey, give us our rights." And they're like, "No, we don't give you your rights." and we're like, "Well, we asked, now, we're not asking anymore." And that. And that's sort of assuming one person is like, right in this mediation whereas theoretically, probably both parties think they're right, but I don't know. Yeah, I feel like sometimes I've been asked to kind of mediate informally, which i don't have nearly the background you do, but I like rambling. And I've kind of ended up leaving with this result with like the, you know, no one's really asking my opinion, necessarily, but I'm like, oh, probably the answer is that they hate each other. That the answer is that like both people feel totally justified and from their own perspective, they are totally justified. And probably this won't be settled and they should stay away from each other.I don't know. Casandra 29:59 Which like, at least they knew that afterward, you know? Margaret 30:02 Yeah. Casandra 30:03 Yeah. I mean, I've had many...or I've been present for.... I've been present for many more mediations than I've actually actively mediated just because of the job I had. Which is awesome, because I get to see the way other people mediate and learn from that. But I've witnessed really shocking mediations where it seems like the people walk in hating each other, and they don't come to an agreement. They're not going to agree. But they... the sense in the room at the end is peace. You know, they're like, "Ah, well, we both know, we're not going to agree and why. And at least we know that." Margaret 30:43 Yeah. Yeah. Casandra 30:45 Which is real. Right. Yeah. Margaret 30:49 No, I like that. Because it's like, it's not trying to... Casandra 30:53 Kumbaya? Casandra 30:53 I've already said this but, yeah, they're not trying to solve everything, you know, like some things just don't get solved. But, but at least everyone knows what's happening. Casandra 31:04 And there's that detachment to, you know, the idea that one person's right and the other is wrong is something that if you're mediating, you can't, that can't be in your brain. It's not your job to decide who's right and who's wrong or to even have an opinion about it. And there's something freeing there, because suddenly, you can see why both people feel they're right, like where the rightness is in, in both stories, which is pretty interesting. Margaret 31:30 Well does that end up leaving the mediator like, hated by both sides often? Because like, this person, this staying neutral when clearly I'm right? Casandra 31:31 No, and maybe this is important to talk about, but like part of, especially in a formal setting, when I open to mediation, some of the things I explain include, like confidentiality and mandatory reporting stuff, but I also explain that my role is to be neutral. I'm not going to take aside, I'm not going to make decisions or offer opinions or advice, like, all I'm there to do is to help them communicate productively. Yeah. Margaret 32:07 And I actually, I would guess, that the average, not...no training mediator of the things that you just said that they might fail at, would be the not offering advice part, right? So it's not like showing up to the council of elders or whatever the people who are going to, like, offer their wisdom down onto you. Instead, it's really just about helping the people involved, develop their own communication as relates to it. So it's not a...you're a no way like a judge or an arbiter. Is that kind of what you're saying? Casandra 32:39 No, there are. So there are different types of mediation. Arbitration is involved in certain types, but not the type I do and not the type that I think is useful in like, community and interpersonal settings. Yeah, and it is hard sometimes to not give advice. Margaret 32:59 Yeah, I know when I'm like, I think people might have failed that. I'm like, No, that's probably what I failed at.When I have attempted to mediate things, because I'm like, " Ah! I now, see, because I have all of the information. Now I will clearly explain because I'm so wise." And then I'm like, "Why isn't this working?" Casandra 33:13 Okay, no, it's it's really hard. And it takes a lot of practice. Honestly, the...when in mediations where I take a more active role, because in some mediations, I don't have to people are...people don't really need much guidance sometimes. But, when they do, I find myself almost like teaching healthy communication skills through example. And there's really not any time for me to think about offering my opinion or something like that. I'm like, so busy trying to help them untangle the communication. Margaret 33:50 Okay. Which seems like, in a similar way that like facilitating consensus in a large group is absolutely not about your own opinions about what should happen. And basically by being a facilitator in a large group you like, kind of like, get your own voice removed from that particular decision. Casandra 34:12 Yeah, I see it as a spectrum of skill sets, the like facilitator, the mediator and then whatever we want to call these transformative or alternative justice. Margaret 34:21 Judge Dredd? No, we have no movie about that. Okay. Okay, so which brings me to this idea like, right, you're like, oh, you know, you're gonna come in assuming neutrality as mediator, not that both sides are equal, but assuming your own neutrality to help foster communication. What about when it is...like, this sounds like it would be really unhealthy if I was forced to do it with an abuser, right? And so I'm under the impression that you would not use this in situations of abuse is that? Casandra 34:59 Mediation? Margaret 35:00 Yeah. Casandra 35:01 Yeah, yeah. And, and maybe before that, it's expected that if a mediator doesn't feel that they can maintain appropriate neutrality, they just don't mediate the case, they pass it to someone else. So that's, you know, people are gonna have strong opinions, and feel triggered by different scenarios. And that's real and fine. Margaret 35:27 Oh, I meant I meant as a participant, I wouldn't, you know, I wouldn't want to be called...am I wrong in thinking that it would, that I wouldn't want to be called into mediation with my abuser, you know? Casandra 35:42 Well, I mean, the easy answer is no. But both restorative and transformative justice, have mediation type processes, that can be a part of these larger processes. Margaret 35:59 Okay. Casandra 36:00 So, and maybe we don't call it mediation, maybe we call it like, a facilitated dialogue or something? Margaret 36:06 I don't know. Casandra 36:09 I think it's, it's a tool, right? Like mediation is a tool. And you have to do it differently when there's a vast power imbalance like that, or when harm has been caused. But.. Margaret 36:25 So I guess...how do you judge...How do you judge when to use mediation versus transformative justice? Like, how do you decide when a given thing is the right means? Casandra 36:42 That's a really big question. Because ideally I don't, right? So I can tell you at the Center, how it works, which is that if the courts contact us and are like, "We have decided that someone harmed another person, therefore this is going to be restorative process." Like that's how we know. Margaret 37:00 Right. Casandra 37:01 But in this larger project on the Left of developing these these alternative systems, that's something we have to figure out. And I don't think it can happen without intact communities. Because, I don't think it would be an individual process. Margaret 37:21 Yeah, okay. Casandra 37:23 But as a mediator, if I'm in a session...maybe this is a much simpler way to answer it, If I'm in a session, and someone says something about, like, causing physical harm to the other person. That's a like, "Oh, we got to stop this and shift" moment. Margaret 37:39 Okay. That makes sense. That is kind of one of my questions is like, do you ever like, yeah, escalate up the like, response ladder? It's a terrible way of phrasing it. But yeah, Casandra 37:53 There are plenty of cases that get called...so that so the Community Mediation Center, it's all free, right? Like anyone can call in with anything and be like, can you help me with this, which means there are plenty of cases that we can't mediate, that we say, "Oh, that's, that's not an appropriate topic for us. But here's some other resources." Margaret 38:11 And that would be usually cases of like, clear harm having been caused? Casandra 38:15 Yep. Or like certain types of conflicts, just because of the way the legal system is set up. Like, custody disagreements, we don't do it our center, it's just bureaucratic bullshit. But I think it would be similar in a community setting where different mediators are comfortable mediating different types of cases. And if something comes up within a mediation that either signals that harm has happened or that isn't suitable for that particular mediator, you just stop and find someone else to help. Margaret 38:49 Okay. Casandra 38:50 Like, we all have different skill sets, you know, Margaret 38:52 And what you said about it requires an intact communities to be able to, to effectively do this kind of thing, as a, you know, the more transformative justice element of it. It's kind of interesting to me, right? Because then that's something that... it seems to me that intact communities relies on conflict, resolution, and conflict resolution, and mediation and all of the things we've been talking about. So it's sort of a... Casandra 39:19 Chicken, egg? Margaret 39:20 Oh, I was thinking almost of a like, like, building a building, you know, like, a pyramid, a traditional representation of hierarchy. But, in this case, representing bottom up, you know, where like, the strong base of a community is not it's like justice system, but instead it's like, conflict resolution and the ability for diverse opinions to coexist. And there's the general ability for people to coexist, because people implies diverse opinions unless you live in some hellscape. Ideological bubble. Casandra 39:54 Yeah, yeah, that makes sense. Margaret 39:57 Now, it's interesting because then this answers the question of how do you supplant the justice system? which is an important question. Casandra 40:05 You support people in developing skill sets like this, which I was thinking about it before this interview and remembering when I was...so I don't get paid to mediate as part of the neutrality, nut the initial 40 hour training, I took cost money, because it's a non profit, very poor mediation center. And you're one of the people who who you gave me like 50 bucks or something. Margaret 40:32 No. Casandra 40:32 And you said, you messaged me, you said something to the effect of like, "Oh, I'm giving you money. This is like a skill that I think we need in more radical spaces." And I was like, "Fuck, yeah, this Margaret person seems really cool." Margaret 40:44 Cool. Yeah, I don't remember that. But, I believe you. I don't remember a lot of things, dear, listener. That's one of my skill sets is that I don't remember things. Casandra 40:59 That can be a blessing, I suppose. Margaret 41:02 Sometimes, it's like I, you know, it helps me really live in the present, you know, because it's all just fog in front of me and behind me. I have impressions, impressions of what's ahead and impressions of what came before. No, that's great. I mean, how common are these types of organizations? Like, you have one in your town? Is it? Do I have one in my...well, I don't have one in my town. There's 500 people who live in my town. Casandra 41:28 I'm only really familiar with my state. So, I'm in Oregon. And we have a network of Community Dialogue Resource Centers [CDRC]. I'm so bad at acronyms. There's a whole network all over Oregon. And each center works, to some extent with the current justice system, depending on where they are in the resources, but they also offer free community mediation, and it's really easy in my state to get training. Like at my center, you can, if you speak Spanish, and are willing to volunteer, as a bilingual mediator, you can get training for free, like it's a pretty accessible thing, but I'm not sure about other states, like the agreement we have with the Justice System to do these restorative processes for youth offenders is pretty unique, apparently, like it's a it's a test...test run, that's been going on for years. But I don't think that's necessarily common. Margaret 42:31 I mean, it's so basically, a way that some elements of the Justice System are trying to move towards an actual reasonable model away from the incarceration and punitive model is that right? Casandra 42:43 Yep. Yeah. And it's been because people at these Community Dialogue and Resource Centers have pushed really hard for the state to implement these programs here. But it's also...I mean, mediate.com has really good classes, you can just take on mediation. You can get, I have a whole...I'm looking at it, I realized this is not a video recording, but I have a whole bookshelf full of books on mediation, AK has presses put out...you know, there, there are lots of resources on mediation that are accessible. If people want to explore the skill set. Margaret 43:22 Would you be able to provide a few of those links for our show notes? Casandra 43:27 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Margaret 43:29 Thanks. So okay, my last question, I want to I want to take with take you on this journey, where we imagine you know, a society without the state, whether because we win or because we lose, depending on how you know, like, like, Casandra 43:47 How you want to look at it? Margaret 43:48 Yeah, I mean, you know, obviously, like, this is a, it's not gonna be like some wingnut thing for people, for me to suddenly be like, "What if there was an apocalypse?!" right? Y'all are listening to Live Like The World Is Dying. I kind of want to ask you about the role of, and I know a lot of it's implied, but we talked about, but like, the role of conflict resolution in terms of community preparedness, if you have like thoughts around that? [That] didn't really end with a question mark. Casandra 44:18 That's fine. That's hard for me to answer because it feels like a given. Like, community preparedness means that we need functional, intact communities, which means we have to have systems that could look all sorts of different ways, right? But we have... Margaret 44:34 Like passive aggressive notes? Casandra 44:36 That's one way. But we have to have systems for working through conflict or else we do not have functional communities. And maybe different communities choose to do that in different ways. This is just like one particular tool or skill set that's very adaptable. Margaret 44:54 So if the state is abstraction of power, right, away from ourselves, basically the existence of the state, the long standing existence, the state is probably a huge part of what leads us to this conflict avoidance that you talk about, like causes these problems, we're so used to relying on the state to handle our conflicts for us by calling armed people who like putting people in cages. And so basically...do you ever have those moments where like, you've been an anarchist for a long time, and then you still end up with these, like, obvious epiphanies that like, seem really obvious when you say them out loud, but still feel like epiphanies? That's what I'm having right now about this, because I'm like, "Oh, this is everything. This is the foundation," which is also what you just said, I'm saying this back to you. Casandra 45:39 That's why it's so baffling to me that I've searched for years for collectives, groups, any, any individuals, anyone offering these skills in radical spaces, and it's so hard to find. And that's wild to me. It's so wild. And that doesn't, people aren't doing it. Margaret 46:00 Right. Casandra 46:01 But it just doesn't seem to be of high value. Margaret 46:04 I wonder if it's like, because people...because I have seen a lot of groups, and I'm glad there are groups that focus on transformative justice, right, but that's the top of this pyramid of needs...my hierarchy of needs that I've created because I love hierarchy. Casandra 46:19 Such a good anarchist. Margaret 46:21 I know. I wonder if it's kind of similar to how like, it's a lot easier to find like armed anarchist organizations that will teach you how to shoot guns and like harder to find ones that'll teach you how to like immediate conflict resolve, like someone angrily comes into your...you know, I and often I'm...the individuals do this, right? Like, there was a time. I don't know if this person listens to this podcast, but a friend of mine was at some anarchist screening at some info shop and some angry guy comes in and starts yelling this and that about I think trans people. And my friend who's trans was just like, "Hey, man, you want to go outside and have a cigarette with me?" And just like, went outside and talked to the guy. And he calmed down and left, and like, and my friend carries, right. But like, it's so much easier to find information about the nuclear option the the, you know, the escalated version than it is to find resources about the "Hey, man wanna step outside with me and have a conversation." Casandra 47:26 Yeah, those soft skills are really devalued because of the way our society... Margaret 47:32 What?! What if there was like a word to describe type of...We should call it patriarchy? Casandra 47:38 I mean, who did people used to go to? Right? Was it like, grandma? Or like, gr... you know, the people, we devalue? e? Margaret 47:53 Yeah. Margaret 47:55 Well, I, you know, it's hard. I don't know where to go from, okay like, now we understand the entire basis of an anarchist society, without the state, basically means that we have to learn how to stop putting this not on other people, because obviously, we need other people, we need society to help us do this, but stop putting it on this, like, legalized abstraction that's off in the distance. Casandra 47:55 Yeah. Casandra 48:23 So there, I mean, there are interpersonal skills, we all need to develop right around communication? But if we're talking about people actually filling these roles that we need, we have to actually figure out how to support people in developing those skills and like value their skill set. Margaret 48:40 Yeah. So how do we how do we do that? Casandra 48:44 Well, you did it for me, I was like, Hey, Internet, I need money for this training. And you were like, "Here's 50 bucks. This is important." I was like, "Thanks!" Margaret 48:58 Best part is that was probably a couple of years ago when I had substantially less ...and like I've, since I think people who listen to this know that I've since like, started a nonprofit job and like, have more money than I used to. Casandra 49:09 Oh, this was like 2016. Margaret 49:11 Yeah, okay. Yeah. Okay. But okay, so like, so people can go and get trainings and people can bring this kind of information to their communities, both by doing it, but also by maybe like spreading the skills that people could be setting up like informal collectives or formal collectives are something to kind of like, work on fostering these types of skills like what else can we do? Casandra 49:38 Just talking about it more. I mean, I remember who was I...Oh, I guess I can't talk about this on the internet. I was doing seasonal labor that grants one a lot of spare time to talk and the people I was doing this.... Margaret 49:53 Blueberry harvest. Casandra 49:55 Yes, blueberry harvest. The people that I was doing the seasonal labor with were like, "Hey, what if we listen to Rosenberg's lectures on non violent communication and practice, because we got time to kill." And we were like, "Alright," so we all... I mean, and there's a lot to say about NVC and its flaws, but we agreed to do this as a group and she sat around and practiced arguing using NVC until we got comfortable like, I, it's hard to, it's hard to, like, write us a prescription for people to normalize something like this, right? But the, the solution is that we have to normalize it somehow.. Margaret 50:35 No, that makes sense. Do you have any any final thoughts on conflict resolution or things that we didn't talk about that we should have talked about? Casandra 50:46 Um, it's really important, we won't function as a society without it whether it's mediation or some some similar skill. I don't know, Google "mediation centers" where you are. Chances are there there's one somewhere in your state, or wherever you're listening from. Margaret 51:08 Yeah, I think we sometimes try to reinvent the wheel all the time, within radical subcultures. I can't speak to other ones besides the anarchists ones, because it's the one I participate in the most. But, we I think sometimes we like only look to existing anarchists projects as like, the realm of what's possible. And that seems nonsensical. Casandra 51:29 Yeah, actually, that reminds me...so that the center where I work is not politically affiliated, right. I'm like the youngest person there. It's mostly a bunch of retired folks of various political leanings, which we don't talk about. And there's something to be said, for working in spaces like that, and learning these skills in spaces like that, because we don't live in an anarchist society right now. Which means that we need to be able to navigate conflict with people who aren't anarchists. And so if two people are in conflict, and they aren't anarchists, and I approach them and say, "Hey, I'm an anarchist mediator," then suddenly I'm not neutral or like a useful resource, right? Margaret 52:16 Right. Casandra 52:17 So it's not that I think we shouldn't have anarchists mediation collectives. I'm just saying that. I don't think people should shy away from these a-political resources, because they really valuable still. Margaret 52:31 There's this thing I learned yesterday while doing research for my other podcast that you can check out, it's called Cool People Who Did Cool Stuff that comes out every Monday and Wednesday. Okay, and um... 52:41 I know what you're going to say, and yes. Margaret 52:43 Yeah, well, okay. So like, I learned about this thing where, you know, I have infinite respect for the Jane Collective, right, the people who in the late 60s, early 70s, in Chicago were in this collective that ended up including more than 100 different people; women working as Abortionists illegally before Roe v. Wade. And for some reason that's on a lot of people's minds right now. But then I discovered looking back that in the 1920s and early 30s in Germany...Cassandra's already heard this...there was all of these non politically affiliated organizations of illegal birth control advocates and Abortionists all over Germany. There's more than 200 of these groups, and they were non politically aligned. But it was almost all syndicalists, anarchist syndicalists coming from a specific union, the acronym of which I forget off the top of my head. FAUD actually, I now remember it. And it's like the Free Workers Union of Germany or something. And even though they did a lot of organizing and propaganda as anarchists in the rest of their lives, the abortion clinics, were not an anarchist project, because that wasn't the point of it. And they weren't there to recruit. And they weren't...they were just there because people needed to have access to birth control and abortions. And I could imagine mediation....you know, if I was forming an anarchist mediation collective, if it was like, "We are the anarchists mediation collective," it would maybe be for the anarchists, but if it was like, "We are anarchists doing this mediation collective and we're willing to tell you, we're anarchists, but it is not about anarchism." I don't know is that? Casandra 54:23 Yeah, totally. I mean, I remember during my first training, going up to one of the directors and asking, I don't remember what question I asked, but it was something about like, "What we're talking about sounds like prison abolition," you know, and like, there's a particular mediation center in my area that is politically affiliated, and I was asking him if I should try volunteering with that center or with one of the non affiliated centers, and he said, "Definitely one of the non affiliated centers because the whole point of this if we're actually abolishing the prison industrial complex is to get everyone to divest from it, which means everyone needs access, which means we don't want to turn them off because we say we're liberals or anarchists or whatever." Margaret 55:17 Yeah. Casandra 55:18 I say liberal because he was probably a liberal, but surely, yeah. Margaret 55:23 Yeah. No, that that makes a lot of sense to me. It's interesting challenges a lot of like, the presuppositions I have about like when it isn't, isn't useful to identify projects politically. But, I think that makes a really strong case. Because, the point has never been, from my point of view to create little weird pure bubbles, cause, as we talked about creating weird pure bubbles is just....they're just going to destroy themselves, much like bubbles, when you blow bubbles, they don't last. Casandra 55:54 Well and even like if you create this weird pure bubble, what if someone..what if you're in conflict with someone outside that bubble? Is that person going to trust a mediator who is strictly inside that bubble? Margaret 56:08 No, then we'll just go break their windows, no matter what happened. Even if our friends are the one at fault. Casandra 56:15 You know, if I get in an argument with my Catholic, Republican, anti-semitic neighbor across the street, even if I might prefer an anarchist mediator, that's not something he's going to agree to, therefore, the mediation won't happen, and therefore it's not productive. Margaret 56:33 Right. Yeah. And, and even then, like, if you have a mediator who specifically there to be on your side, you don't have a mediator, you have an advocate, I guess. Casandra 56:42 Which is important. Advocates are really important. But that's different. Different skill set. Margaret 56:50 Yeah. No, totally. I mean, and then you get into the like, since you can't enter someone into transformative justice, if they don't want to, and if they're not part of a community, you know, sometimes like, I remember there was an instance where to abstract this as far as I possibly can with the story is still making sense, where an anarchist went on a really bad date with a guy who wasn't an anarchist, and then, like 30, people in black bloc, showed up outside his house with megaphones, and scared the everLiving shit out of him. And I think he was a little bit more careful from then on. But... Casandra 57:28 Different techniques for different scenarios, right? Margaret 57:31 Exactly. Exactly. Like, not everything should resort to violence or the threat of violence, but also, not everything...I think that is...I think that's one of the things that turns people off from a lot of mediation is that I think that people see it applied at times when sometimes like,"No, maybe just like direct conflict is the actual answer to certain types of problems," you know, but not that not that many of them. Casandra 57:56 Well in mediation when it's done well, I see the same argument around nonviolent communication, which I think Rosenberg was brilliant, I think that...or is? he like... Margaret 58:07 I don't know. Casandra 58:08 Anyway, I don't know, I think the way it's applied often is horrible. But, I see this a similar argument around mediation and NVC and where those tools can be utilized to like tone police or silence people, etc. But mediation, one of the foundations of mediation is that it's a consensual process. Which means that if someone's in a mediation, and is like, "Oh, this doesn't feel good to me anymore. This is like some boundaries been crossed, or I'm not comfortable with the way I'm being asked to communicate," or whatever. They just stop the process. That's it. Margaret 58:50 Yeah, no, that makes sense. Yeah, I wish I could have done that with like...I have such negative connotations for NVC, because I feel like the times it just gets use...it's, it's just been like weaponized against me by people who are like, making me cry and then asking why I'm communicating so meanly while I'm crying because of the things that they're saying to me or whatever, you know? Casandra 59:10 Same, same. When I when I actually read Rosenberg, I'm like, oh, yeah, that's not what he was describing. Margaret 59:20 Yeah. Casandra 59:23 Yes, yeah. Margaret 59:24 And the spirit of the law, the spirit of the idea often gets stripped away and left with the letter of it. Casandra 59:31 I've also had so many jobs where I've had so many bosses who were like, hippies using NVC to just like gaslight the shit out of you, you know? Like, "Yeah, I hear you feel this way. But I'm still your boss and will fire you." You know? Margaret 59:52 Yeah. All right. Well, I think we've covered every single thing about mediation and... Casandra 1:00:01 Ever. Yep. And even can go and mediate now I'm sure. Margaret 1:00:04 Yeah, totally. Just make sure to stick your own opinions in. Anyone is free to leave at any point all they...they will just be excised from the community. And, passive aggression is the logical response to everything. What else, did we cover everything? Casandra 1:00:20 Gossip with your friends about everything you hear in a mediation so they can cancel each other. Margaret 1:00:24 Oh, yep, definitely. And it's really good to not only block people on social media, but then yell at everyone else to block the person on social media. Getting anything? I sarcastically make fun of things that people do in order to defend themselves from really bad things that happen. I understand why people do these things sometimes. It just gets out of hand. Casandra 1:00:49 Different different tools for different scenarios. Margaret 1:00:51 Yeah, totally. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Is there anything you want to shout out or plug or draw people's attention towards here at the end of the episode? Casandra 1:01:05 Um, maybe this...I don't know publishing project called Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness. Margaret 1:01:12 Oh, are you part of a publishing project? Casandra 1:01:13 Have you heard of that? Margaret 1:01:15 Is it Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness at Tangledwilderness.org? The publishing collective that you and I are both part of? Casandra 1:01:24 Yeah, yeah, we could call that out. Margaret 1:01:27 Yeah, if...this podcast is published by Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, and we also publish a monthly zine. We're publishing a bunch of books this year. And we're really just...it's a project that's been around in one incarnation or another for about 20 years. But we're like really, kind of kick starting it. No pun intended with the company this year and trying to give it a good push and we have a bunch of stuff coming out. Casandra 1:01:54 If you like podcasts, now, there's an audio version of each zine each month. Margaret 1:01:58 Oh, yeah. What's it called? Casandra 1:02:01 Oh, shit, isn't it's just called Strangers [In a Tangled Wilderness]? This is our job. Margaret 1:02:10 We're very professional. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Casandra 1:02:18 Thank you. Margaret 1:02:19 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, you should learn how to mediate or don't learn how to mediate and just walk like a wrecking ball through communities and tell everyone what you think. I guess I've already made enough sarcastic jokes this episode. Mediation is really cool. And you should look into it. You can also support this podcast. The main way you can do that is by telling people about it. You can tell people about it on the internet, or in person. Those are the only two spaces that exist I think. But either way you'd be helping us out. You can also support us directly by supporting us on Patreon. Our Patreon is patreon.com/strangersInatangledwilderness, and depending we put up content every month, we have now two podcasts, this one and the podcast Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness. We publish a lot of fiction, we will be publishing some poetry's, and role playing game content, also some essays, memoir, history, you name it. And in particular, I'd like to thank Mikki, Nicole, David, Dana, Chelsey, Staro, Jennifer, Elena, Natalie, Kirk, Micaiah, Nora, Sam, Chris, and Hoss the dog. You all are amazing and make all this possible. Strangers...well, this podcast used to be just me. But now it's going to be coming out more regularly, thanks to all the hard work of all the people who work behind the scenes. So thank you for supporting them and thank you people who are behind the scenes for doing that also Anyway, I hope you're doing as well as you can with everything that's happening and I will be back soo Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

    Page Avenue Crew
    #88 - Welcome to My Wife (ft. Bobby Jaycox)

    Page Avenue Crew

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:10


    Never-ending hallways, dinosaurs, asteroids, cavemen. Fuck a credit score, I'm getting a Super Soaker. Mail-in emissions tests now available; pickle jar not included. They're dirty, their teeth are yellow, boobs look different... He was born in the 1900's, and then he woke up from a coma with no dick. Support Story of the Year on Patreon: patreon.com/storyoftheyear Get Story of the Year merch: storyoftheyearmerch.com Follow Story of the Year on social media: Instagram twitter Dan: Instagram twitter Adam: Instagram twitter Josh: Instagram twitter Ryan: Instagram Story of the year, page avenue, in the wake of determination, the black swan, the constant, wolves, until the day I die, Pabst blue ribbon, liquid death, emo, emo nite, emo's not dead, pop-punk, punk, screamo, warped tour, vans warped tour, Kevin Lyman, the used, Atreyu, my chemical romance, Yellowcard, William Ryan key, bayside, Silverstein, Shane told, Saosin, every time I die, Anberlin, Glassjaw, he is legend, destroy rebuild until god shows, 105.7 the point, toby morse, lead singer syndrome, prs guitars, Ernie ball, music man, A Day to Remember, Beartooth --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pageavenuecrew/support

    Swingers After Dark
    The Lost Eps 111 - Rebounding From a Break Up

    Swingers After Dark

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:49


    Choppin' up with Pia @ the ECE Christmas party in Ohio Feel free to donate to CashApp @ $nahsunthegreat or PayPal @ paypal.me/nahsunthegreat

    No Name MMA Show
    #92 - Jan v Rakic ends in injury

    No Name MMA Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 59:03


    More of the same just hanging out talking about the fights as well as John versus rockets ending in that ACL tear. Holly versus Ketlan is it going to be a dud or not? And finally we go over the racist remarks that Tony Kelley said in the corner of Andrea Lee --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nonamemmashow/support

    John Doe Bodybuilding Podcast
    The Fat Fuck Mentality

    John Doe Bodybuilding Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 40:13


    Get rid of the fat fuck mentality in the gym or forever get no results!

    Pod at the Montecito
    64. Seeking a Smegmaless Transaction (S3E15)

    Pod at the Montecito

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 80:57


    On this episode of the hit NBC television show Las Vegas, Danny forgets one of the core tenets of Training Day and risks it all to right a renal wrong; Sam and Ed need a poncho as a 5-star whale comes to town, bringing with him a mobile splash zone; and a nightmare of a palindrome-adjacent C-story drives your co-hosts to the brink. Speaking of those lovable idiots, they discuss root canal trauma, when and how to flex obscene wealth, and red flag hotel requests. Connect with these morons on Twitter @MontecitoPod using the hashtag #LasVegas4Peacock or shoot them an email at podatthemontecito@gmail.com. But if you expect electronic glad-handing out of them, make sure your digital* palms are dry, please. * Get it? Digital palms? Digits? As in your fingers? Fuck you, that was funny.

    Napalm Nanny and The Shack
    Napalm and Friends: Rubber Bullet Punk

    Napalm Nanny and The Shack

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 46:18


    Excited for this weeks guest as we crossed paths at warehouse/backyard gigs waaayyy before The Shack was even a concept, the incredibly humble and wild, Angel. We chat about his punk roots, documenting the Los Angeles punk scene, drug use, and so much more. As always, guests pick the playlist.   1. The Stains. (two songs) Canada. Political Scandal   2. Fatal Riot. Drugs I Adore   3. The Dictions. Ninos de la Calle   4. The Criox. Fuck the Cops   5. The Ramones. Chain Saw   6. Subhumans. Drugs of Youth   7. The Adicts. Don't Exploit Me   8. Tikis. Somebody's Son    Background: Gary Webb. Drum City