Podcasts about New Zealanders

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  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about New Zealanders

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Latest podcast episodes about New Zealanders

RNZ: Morning Report
Commonwealth Games holds closing ceremony

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:45


The Commonwealth Games' closing ceremony is underway at Birmingham's Alexander Stadium. It began with an homage to the city's place in the industrial revolution as dancers carrying items such as levers, bricks and chimneys, stoked the crowd's enthusiasm with this old banger from Dexys Midnight Runners. Right now, athletes from every participating country are assembling at the stadium. The New Zealanders are being led by history-making cyclist Aaron Gate, who's coming home with four gold medals. Being the flagbearer, or Te Pou Hapai, is the "icing on the cake" of a successful games for the 31-year-old Aucklander. Sports reporter Felicity Reid spoke to Guyon Espiner from Victoria Square.

From The Valley Podcast
From The Resort #33 - Olivia Wensley - Mayor Candidate - Queenstown Lakes District

From The Valley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 44:17


Olivia has lots of word experience. Grew up in Waikato, Dublin. Studied law in New Zealand. Two internships in Sydney. Worked in Auckland and 3 years in Singapore. Last 10 years in Queenstown. Childhood hobbies :- Soccer & Art. Nominated for New Zealander of the Year in 2019. Advocate against abuse and bad culture in the workplace (legal). Mentors/ Heros include Bloomberg & Xero Founder Rod Drury. CEO of Startup Queensland Lakes - Capability, Connections & Capital. Excellent social media presence and campaign. Very good podcast.

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

The pandemic  of 1346–the Black Death–in some areas of Europe killed as much as 50% of the population. But this first outbreak, while the worst, was not the last. For three centuries it persisted, with at least 30 further outbreaks. Such numbers indicated that the Black Death resulted in unimaginable suffering and tragedy from which no-one was untouched. But the Black Death also brought about a cultural and economic renewal. Labor scarcity encouraged the development of new or improved technologies, like wind power, water power, and gunpowder. A growth in disposable incomes led to an increase in consumption of silks, sugars, spices, furs, gold, and slaves.  It was not despite the Black Death that Europe flourished, argues my guest James Belich, but because of the Black Death.  James Belich is the Beit Professor of of Imperial and Commonwealth History at the University of Oxford, and cofounder of the Oxford Centre for Global History. His books include a two-volume history of New Zealand, but his most recent book is The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe, which is the focus of our conversation today. For Further Investigation Belich's two-volume history of New Zealand is comprised of Making Peoples: A History of the New Zealanders from Polynesian Settlement to the End of the Nineteenth Century and Paradise Reforged: A History of the New Zealanders, 1880-2000 Most recently Belich wrote Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld, which as he mentioned in the conversation raised many questions in his head that required him to write The World the Plague Made We've previously talked about some of the more immediate consequences of the Black Death with Mark Bailey in Episode 207: After the Black Death. Another conversation which discussed disease and history and much more besides, from a very wide perspective indeed, was with Philip Jenkins in Episode 209: Climate, Catastrophe, and Faith

RNZ: Checkpoint
Commonwealth Games: What financial wins do medals bring?

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 4:42


Do precious medals - the type the NZ team has scooped up at the Commonwealth Games - actually convert into money in the back pocket of athletes? Cyclist Aaron Gate has bagged a wheel-spinning four golds across track and road cycling; the first New Zealander to achieve that haul at a Commonwealth Games. Right behind him was Ellesse Andrews - another cyclist, she has three golds. Unlike the Olympics, athletes do not get excellence or performance grants for making it onto the podium at these Commonwealth Games. So what other financial opportunities does a medal bring? Auckland University's Associate Professor Bodo Lang talks to Lisa Owen.  

RNZ: Morning Report
Commonwealth Games: Record-breaking gold medal haul

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:11


New Zealand has won two gold medals on a historic morning at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham making it a record haul of 19 golds now. Cyclist Aaron Gate became the first New Zealander to secure four golds at a single Games when he surged to victory in the men's road race. Hours later, our mixed doubles squash pair of Paul Coll and Joelle King thrashed English opponents in a one-sided final. It lifted New Zealand's gold medal tally in Birmingham to 19, which is our best at any Games - surpassing the 17 won when we last played host - in Auckland in 1990. Gate's triumph came after he scooped three golds on the track, making his victory in the gruelling 160-kilometre road race all the more memorable. Despite his leg muscles constantly cramping over the final stages, he found the energy to see off South Africa's Daryl Impey and Scotland's Finn Crockett. T he 31-year-old Aucklander told Sky Sport self-preservation became a focus over the closing stages. Coll and King needed little more than half an hour to see off English pair Alison Waters and Adrian Waller. It follows Coll's gold in the men's singles last week. He said teamwork was at the heart of the straight set doubles win. New Zealand also clinched two bronze medals overnight - through our women's sports teams. Both the Silver Ferns netballers and White Ferns cricketers beat England in their play-offs for third place. They were satisfying results after both teams lost to England earlier in the Games. Silver Ferns coach Dame Noeline Taurua said the importance her team's 55-48 win shouldn't be underestimated. The White Ferns also ended a mixed campaign on a high, chasing down England's target of 110 with 8 overs to spare. Captain Sophie Devine, who anchored New Zealand's innings with an unbeaten 51, says the result was positive but she was disappointed not to reach the final. Currently, the women's beach volleyball pair of Alice Zeimann and Shaunna Polley are leading Vanuatu opponents in the bronze medal playoff.

RNZ: Morning Report
Commonwealth Games: Two golds, two bronze overnight

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:47


New Zealand has claimed two gold and two bronze medals on the penultimate day of competition in Birmingham. Cyclist Aaron Gate won the road race to snare a fourth gold - the first New Zealander to achive that at any Games. He told Morning Report about the challenge of riding on his own while English riders were using team tactics in an attempt to drop him over the closing stages. And this morning, Paul Coll and Joelle King needed barely half an hour to win their squash mixed doubles final over England opponents. Coll earlier won a men's singles gold medal but King surprisingly missed out in singles. She said it made the doubles title even sweeter. The Silver Ferns netballers and White Ferns cricketers both beat England to win bronze medals overnight. But our beach volleyball pair of Alice Zeimann and Shaunna Polley have just fallen short in their playoff for bronze against Vanuatu. RNZ reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe spoke to Guyon Espiner.

RNZ: Morning Report
Aaron Gate on record-breaking gold medal win

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 6:00


Cyclist Aaron Gate has won the men's road race in Birmingham to become the first New Zealander to win four gold medals at a single Commonwealth Games. Gate also won three track cycling golds: in the points race, and the individual and team pursuits. Gate and former professional road cyclist Julian Dean spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Morning Report
Commonwealth Games: Fourth gold for Aaron Gate

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 8:14


Cyclist Aaron Gate has surged into New Zealand Commonwealth Games history - winning the men's road race to claim record a fourth gold medal at the Games in Birmingham. After collecting three golds on the track last week, Gates produced one of this country's great sporting moments when crossing the line after 160-kilometres of intense racing. He becomes the first New Zealander to win four golds at one Games. Despite his leg muscles constantly cramping over the final stages, he found the energy to see off South Africa's Daryl Impey and Scotland's Finn Crockett. It was New Zealand's 18th gold in Birmingham, which is our best-ever Commonwealth Games return, surpassing the 17 won when we last played host - in Auckland in 1990. On the track, Gate won the points race, individual pursuit and was part of the victorious men's team pursuit. The 31-year-old Aucklander said self-preservation became a focus over the closing stages. New Zealand have won two other medals overnight - both via our women's sports teams. The Silver Ferns claimed netball bronze with a meritorious 55-48 win over England, a team who had beaten them handsomely earlier in the Games. After a heavy loss to Jamaica in the semi-finals, New Zealand coach Dame Noeline Taurua explains what third place means for her. The White Ferns also ended a mixed cricket campaign on a high, clinching third place after chasing down England's target of 110 with 8 overs to spare. Captain Sophie Devine, who anchored New Zealand's innings with an unbeaten 51, says the future is looking bright for women's cricket. New Zealand could win another gold on Monday, when Paul Coll and Joelle King contest the mixed doubles final. Reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe spoke to Corin Dann.

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin
Nicola Willis: National deputy leader on her vision for New Zealand's future

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 8:48


National Party Deputy Leader Nicola Willis has laid out her vision for the future of New Zealand.  Speaking at the party's AGM in Christchurch, Willis addressed the challenging economic conditions our country is facing and how a National Government will lead New Zealanders forward.  Nicola Willis joined Francesca Rudkin.  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Canterbury Mornings with Chris Lynch
John MacDonald: Two commentators, one message - Luxon is struggling

Canterbury Mornings with Chris Lynch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 5:44


If the honeymoon isn't over yet for National Party leader Christopher Luxon, I think it's about to be. Because, in the past 24 hours, I've read two political opinion pieces - one by a left-leaning commentator, the other by a right-leaning commentator - which are both saying pretty much the same thing. That Luxon is struggling and Nicola Willis might have been a better bet. I remember getting quite a bit of flack a few months ago when I said I thought Nicola Willis should be leader. I even predicted that she would be by the end of the year. And nothing since then has given me any reason to change my thinking on that front. The thing about Luxon is that he was never, ever going to be another John Key. I know alot of people thought he was. But I think that was pretty superficial thinking based on the fact that both of them come from impressive business backgrounds. The difference was, John Key had been a trader - and traders thrive on chaos. Which is good if you want to be successful in politics. Christopher Luxon, though, had impressively worked his way up the ranks to become a chief executive. But chief executives hate chaos. Chief executives talk alot about pivoting and all that but, when it comes down to it, they prefer things to be organised and planned and structured and well thought out. Chief executives are terrified of surprises. That's why they employ swathes of people to manage risk. And so you've got John Key who thrived on chaos and was quite prepared to make a clown of himself and didn't hide the fact that he had truckloads of money and holidayed in Hawaii and played golf with Barack Obama. And people loved him because he was authentic. And then you've got Christopher Luxon who is actually very reserved and considered as any successful chief executive probably should be - and, because of that, he doesn't thrive on chaos (like John Key did), which I think must make politics a very difficult thing for him to be involved in. Certainly as leader of a party. So I was very interested to read these articles about Christopher Luxon by two people at each end of the political spectrum, both saying they don't think he's up to the job. Let's start with Shane Te Pou who comes at things from the left. In his piece on the nzherald.co.nz website he says that when he expressed the view back in April that National may have got it wrong making Luxon leader and not Nicola Willis, his National Party friends accused him of stirring. But fast-forward to today and when he says the same thing to the same people today, he's finding there's less eye-rolling and “a lot more flickers of acknowledgement” as he puts it. Shane Te Pou's criticism of Luxon is largely focused on recent performances in the media - accusing Luxon of scoring own goals left, right and centre. The most recent example being a TV interview where Luxon tried desperately to avoid answering the questions that were actually asked. Using a trick known as “block and bridge”. An example of “block and bridge” is where a politician might be asked a question about something and instead of answering it they trot out a line saying New Zealanders don't really care about that, but they do care about what it's costing to fill the tank, buy petrol and pay the mortgage. And we saw Christopher Luxon do it the other week when he was asked about the Facebook post saying he was in Te Puke when he was actually in Hawaii. He acknowledged it was a mistake by his social media team but when a reporter asked him something along the lines of whether the muck-up was keeping him awake at night, he said it was the cost of living in New Zealand that was keeping him awake at night. Block and bridge. And Shane Te Pou finishes the article by saying this: “At what point will Luxon's CEO credentials and superficial plausibility give way to the recognition he is just not very good at this?”. So that's the view from the left which, I can think we could all agree, is hardly surprising for that very reason. Shane Te Pou is a left-leaning commentator and, of course, he's going to take every opportunity to throw potshots at Christopher Luxon. But then today, we've got Matthew Hooton - who comes at things from the right. He's polar opposites of Shane Te Pou politically but his thinking is strikingly similar. His article today on nzherald.co.nz starts with this headline: “”Peak Chrostopher Luxon now firmly in the past”. Hooton says since taking over as leader, Luxon has offered nothing new. He says the only thing of any significance has been a promise to cut taxes. But, as we've seen, that's been played down by National's finance spokesperson Nicola Willis who is saying the tax cut thing was just an idea National was putting forward for this year's Budget. Matthew Hooton thinks one of the most damaging things Luxon has done is criticise New Zealand businesses and call them soft during his recent overseas trip. As Hooton says in his article, sole traders and small business owners who have battled through Covid would have heard those comments and assumed he was talking about them. He writes: “They might legitimately ask if the softest corporate job in New Zealand is the one Luxon himself held: chief executive of a state-owned airline that gets bailed out each time it goes bust.” And he goes on to say that Jacinda Ardern - who he describes as “the more experienced and nimbler political operator” - is likely to have the edge over Christoher Luxon at next year's election. He writes: “Unless he has a lot more in the tank than is apparent so far, Luxon is starting to look more like a Todd Muller or Andrew Little than a Key or an Ardern.” And I couldn't agree more.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Hamish Kerr on historic gold medal win

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:42


Hamish Kerr became the first New Zealander to win a Commonwealth Games medal in the men's high jump, when he won gold in Birmingham on Thursday. It's one of three medals New Zealand has won in field events so far these Games, with several more chances still to come to add to the tally. Kerr spoke to Corin Dann.

Off The Record

Currently on tour with the Jordan Luck Band, Paul McMillan from the band Pipsy gave us a call to chat about touring Aotearoa with great New Zealanders, the influence of Foo Fighters, Unknown Mortal Orchestra and Split Enz on their sound, and to play us their new song All You Ever Wanted. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Question Time for 4 August 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 54:54


GREG O'CONNOR to the Minister for Building and Construction: What recent reports has she received on competition in the market for residential building supplies? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Revenue: Can he confirm that the reason overseas New Zealanders have received the cost of living payment is that "the Inland Revenue Department has a New Zealand address for that taxpayer rather than an overseas one"; if so, how many people does he estimate fail to change their address with Inland Revenue when they leave the country? CAMILLA BELICH to the Minister of Education: What support has the Government contributed to help schools to provide learning environments for their students that are warm, dry, and fit for purpose? Hon PAUL GOLDSMITH to the Minister of Justice: Does she stand by all her statements and policies? CHLÖE SWARBRICK to the Minister of Education: Does he agree with the Prime Minister's statement that "education is the greatest enabler in society"; if so, has he seen the People's Inquiry into Student Wellbeing, which found thousands of tertiary students are living in poverty? TAMATI COFFEY to the Minister for Maori Development: What recent reports has he seen on the Maori economy? BROOKE VAN VELDEN to the Minister of Housing: How many KiwiBuild houses were built in June 2022, if any, and was this more or less than the number of KiwiBuild houses built in January 2022? Hon LOUISE UPSTON to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she agree with the Prime Minister that "it does matter to us as a Labour Government that we have people in the dignity of work"; if so, why are over 50,000 more people receiving jobseeker support as at the June 2022 quarter compared to the September 2017 quarter? SHANAN HALBERT to the Associate Minister of Health: What announcement has the Government recently made about HIV? ERICA STANFORD to the Minister of Immigration: Does he stand by the former Minister's target of ten working days for job checks for Accredited Employer Work Visas; if so, can he confirm that only 20 percent have been processed in that time frame? TANGI UTIKERE to the Associate Minister of Education (Pacific Peoples): What recent work has the Government done to enhance Pacific languages and bilingual learning in Aotearoa? PENNY SIMMONDS to the Minister of Education: Does Te Pukenga have a detailed plan focused on the underlying financial issues facing some of its subsidiaries; if not, why not?

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast
Kerre Woodham: Who bears the cost if people have to abandon their homes?

Kerre McIvor Mornings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 7:44


I do not remember the weather making so much news when I was growing up. Of course, back then we didn't have a voracious 24-hour news cycle. The media wasn't a beast that needed fodder thrown down its gaping maw every minute on the minute, every hour of the day.  But extremes in weather are nothing new. They've been reported by communities as far back as soon as people could put quill to parchment, they were writing about the extremes of weather. And of course, they feature prominently in the mythology of ancient civilizations, so weather extremes are nothing new.  What is new is that over the past decade, probably 20 years, is that extreme weather events have become politicised and monetised. And so you might believe that the science around climate change is all bunkum, you might believe it's all part of a UN agenda, you might believe that climate change is a crisis, that it is this generation's nuclear free moment in the words of the Prime Minister. Or you might believe that climate extremes have always occurred on the planet - it's just that the length of time between these extremes is shortening, making it hard for flora and fauna to adapt.  So whatever you believe, it actually doesn't really matter, because what matters is that governments have subscribed to it, and accordingly, we're already paying for climate change, as Governments introduce policies around it and businesses respond to the legislation.  Some communities have already had to pack up and leave. The community of Matata was devastated by flooding in 2005. By 2019, all but one resident had left the township, in what the Government then called a managed retreat. There was much controversy around the Matata retreat, and so the climate change adaptation plan was released as a blueprint for how to deal with climate change, how to evacuate coastal towns. But yet again, this is a report short on detail and the vital questions of how much it will cost and who will pay has been left unanswered.  Many coastal communities are going to have to face up to whether they stay or go, and for some it will be dependent on whether they can live without insurance. If you can afford to live in a coastal property without insurance, you should be fine. If you can't then you'll be stuffed. At least 10,000 houses across NZ, four major coastal cities are at risk of becoming uninsurable within the next 30 years, so not long. And yet, they're selling at stonkingly high prices. New Zealanders still want to buy coastal. And it doesn't matter about the risk. So who should bear the cost if within the next 30 years someone has to abandon their home due to rising sea levels? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jono & Ben - The Podcast
FULL: The Pet Food Nightmare...

Jono & Ben - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 66:31


Today on the Jono and Ben podcast, we chat to a lady who had an absolute disaster with a condom and a pet food box... the boys do a parody of Jack Harlow's 'First Class' and we met Debbie the great New Zealander who shuts down scammers!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Surprise as NZ unemployment rate rises slightly

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 3:49


It may not feel like it, but wages are rising at their fastest rate since late 2008, whipped on by labour shortages in almost every sector. All the pundits predicted we'd see record low unemployment as a result - but unexpectedly, the number of out-of-work New Zealanders actually rose slightly in the last quarter. Ruth Hill looks into what's going on.

Gala Loves Everything
A Hot Manifesting Secret I Guarantee You Don't Know!

Gala Loves Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 13:13


In this episode, I'm going to tell you about a manifestation technique I created when I was a little girl which I have been using my ENTIRE life! I think you're going to absolutely love it. Let me know: have you ever tried this?! And if not, will you give it a shot today?!

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Sue Bradford and Ben Thomas

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 24:30


Today on the second half of The Panel, Wallace and panellists Sue Bradford and Ben Thomas speak to a New Zealanders in Taiwan following Nancy Pelosi's visit. Plus, they discuss firearm prohibition orders and they hear from an expert who will settle the question once and for all- are New Zealanders bad drivers?

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Question Time for 3 August 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 63:39


CHRISTOPHER LUXON to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all of her Government's statements and actions? Dr LIZ CRAIG to the Minister of Housing: What actions is the Government taking to increase the supply of housing outside the main urban centres? KAREN CHHOUR to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she agree with the statement in yesterday's report on the Oversight of Oranga Tamariki System and Children and Young People's Commission Bill by Jonathan Boston and David King that "locating the Monitor so close to the centre of power creates the risk of a vicious cycle of increasing levels of abuse and the potential for abuse to be swept under the carpet", or does she agree with Minister Davis's statement that for those who submitted against the bill, it was "just another thing to grizzle about"? ANGELA ROBERTS to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: What progress has been made on supporting people into jobs in the regions? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Revenue: Has Inland Revenue advised him why some people who haven't lived in New Zealand for several years have received the cost of living payment, and will Inland Revenue be investigating what specific errors have led to these payments being made? IBRAHIM OMER to the Minister for Trade and Export Growth: What progress has the Government made on its Trade for All agenda? Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by all his statements and actions around the health workforce? ANNA LORCK to the Minister for Economic and Regional Development: What recent announcements has he made on Government support for regional economies? Hon LOUISE UPSTON to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she agree with the Prime Minister that "it does matter to us as a Labour Government that we have people in the dignity of work"; if so, why are 55 percent more people receiving jobseeker support for longer than one year as at the June 2022 quarter compared to the September 2017 quarter? Hon EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries: Will he commit to further action in New Zealand's exclusive economic zone to protect vulnerable marine ecosystems, such as seamounts, in light of the United Nations workshop under way in New York and relevant United Nations resolutions, including 6472, 6668, and 71123? TAMATI COFFEY to the Associate Minister of Health (Maori Health): What recent announcements has he made regarding the roll-out of Kaupapa Maori primary mental health and addiction services? MARK CAMERON to the Associate Minister for the Environment (Biodiversity): Does he stand by the exposure draft of the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity that objectives, policies, and methods developed under it "must, to the extent practicable: enable new occupation, use and development of Maori Lands"; if so, will he extend the same criteria to all New Zealanders with significant natural areas on their land?

RNZ: The Panel
The Panel with Sarah Sparks and Chris Clarke (part 2)

RNZ: The Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 24:53


Today on the second half of The Panel, Wallace and panellists Sarah Sparks and Chris Clarke speak the the creators of the Commonwealth Games' Birmingham Bull. Plus, they discuss New Zealanders being digitally excluded from society and those working to convince Wallace to try Outward-Bound.

The Morning Rumble Catchup Podcast
SPECIAL - Old Looking Young New Zealanders - Tom And Ange

The Morning Rumble Catchup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 8:17


We are on the hunt for New Zealanders oldest looking young Kiwi and we spoke to Tom and also Cam's mum Ange. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Christopher Luxon blasts Cost of Living Payments roll out

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:18


The National Party leader Christopher Luxon says the Cost of Living payment is a shambles. The first of three payments was made to people this week, including to some New Zealanders living overseas.  The Prime Minister has said it isn't worth chasing those people to get it back. But Christopher Luxon told Morning Report the payment roll-out was an 'absolute joke'. National is proposing tax cuts to increase household income.  

RNZ: Morning Report
Salvation Army on Cost of Living Payment impact

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 4:59


Just over $116 landed in the bank accounts of 2 million New Zealanders yesterday, the first of three cost-of-living payments from the government for those earning under $70,000. But what are they spending it on? Does it do enough to close the gap with the rising cost of living? Salvation Army senior policy analyst Paul Barber spoke to Corin Dann.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Barry Soper: Jacinda Ardern calls for diplomacy and dialogue with China

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 5:22


Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says New Zealand is again opening its arms to tourists and students from China, as the borders fully re-open today under Covid management. She said she is looking forward to the resumption of ministerial visits with China as Covid allows, and she hoped to lead a business delegation herself "to renew and refresh in-person connections". In a veiled reference to China's threats of "resolute and forceful measures" over a possible visit by US Speaker Nancy Pelosi to Taiwan, Ardern called for "diplomacy, de-escalation and dialogue". She also called on China to use its interest in the region to deal with climate change and to use its influence with Russia to end the conflict in Ukraine. Speaking at the China Business Summit in Auckland this morning, including Chinese ambassador Wang Xiaolong, she said New Zealanders were natural hosts. "Manaakitanga streams through our veins and we open our arms to tourists and students including from China – which prior to 2020 was New Zealand's largest source of international students and second largest source of tourists. "To those looking to make the journey, haere mai, we welcome you." New Zealand's borders have been undergoing a phased reopening, with today being the first full day of open borders since Covid closed them in March 2020. China's borders, however, remain restricted as it pursues an elimination strategy. Ardern spoke about international rules, norms and institutions being under threat, and pointed to Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern meets China's President Xi Jinping during her last visit in April 2019. Photo / Supplied "As history shows us repeatedly, when large countries disregard sovereignty and territorial integrity with a sense of impunity, it does not bode well, particularly for small countries like New Zealand. "And that's why, as a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, and in line with its commitment to the UN Charter, we continue to urge China to be clear that it does not support the Russian invasion, and have called on China to use its access and influence to help bring an end to the conflict." The implications of war were global and were felt far from Europe, including in the Indo-Pacific. "In response to increasing tensions or risks in the region – be they in the Pacific, the South China Sea or the Taiwan Strait - New Zealand's position remains consistent – we call for adherence to international rules and norms, for diplomacy, de-escalation and dialogue rather than threats, force and coercion." Pelosi is leading a congressional delegation to the Indo-Pacific, including to Singapore, Japan and South Korea, but early plans to include Taiwan in the itinerary have been met with fury in China and unspecified "serious consequences". In reference to other recent tensions, China's security pact with the Solomon Islands and bid for a wider Pacific agreement, Ardern said that the priority of others outside the region should be climate change. "My message to all who wish to extend support and influence in any way to any region outside their own, is to extend that support first and foremost to tackle the violence of climate change. "This is how we as an international community can make a lasting difference in bringing about the security of a stable planet." She referred to managing the differences between New Zealand and China, which this year mark 50 years of diplomatic relations. "Managing the differences in our relationship is not always going to be easy and there are no guarantees," she said. "But, as a government, we continue to work hard – through dialogue and diplomacy. "We will never take our relationship for granted, but nor do we assume that it will not evolve." As China's role in the region grew, its views and actions naturally reverberated with great significance. "But even as China becomes more assertive in the pursuit of its interests, there are still shared interests on which we can and should cooperate." She said New Zealand had been firm and consistent in its commitment to the one-China policy, and more recently in the implementation of the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership. But the two countries had their own world view, shaped by distinct political systems, histories and cultures. "New Zealand's approach has been consistent. We have, over decades, had a fiercely independent foreign policy driven by our assessment of our interests and values. In an apparent reference to human rights, she said there were areas that mattered deeply to New Zealand. "In all of these areas, we are willing to engage – consistently, predictably and respectfully. But we will also advocate for approach and outcomes that reflect New Zealand's interests and values, and speak out on issues that do not. "New Zealanders – and an independent foreign policy – demand nothing less. Repeating a message from the same summit last year, she said: "Our differences need not define us but we cannot ignore them." - by Audrey Young, NZ HeraldSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Fifth swimming medal at Commonwealth Games

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 6:35


The national anthem has been ringing out across the Commonwealth Games pool and velodrome once again this morning. New Zealand has just won a fifth swimming gold medal after Andrew Jeffcoat powered to victory in the 50-metre backstroke. The Aucklander forged a lead early in the one-length race and held off the challenge of South Africa's Pieter Coetze to win in a national record time of 24.65 seconds. New Zealand's track cyclists stockpiled two gold and two silver medals overnight to finish the leading nation at the velodrome. Ellesse Andrews, who had already won two golds and one silver at the weekend, crossed the line first in the women's Keirin this morning. She told Sky Sport she's exceeded her own expectations at the Games. Andrews is not the only cyclist to be bringing three golds home from the Birmingham Games - her teammate Aaron Gate has also topped the podium three times. Gate was awarded his third gold this morning, after finishing first in the points race. Fellow New Zealander, Campbell Stewart, followed him over the line to win silver. Gate told sky sport that the relationship is really strong between himself, Stewart and the rest of the team. The first medal of the day came even earlier in the velodrome, with cyclist Michaela Drummond winning silver in the women's scratch race. The track cycling is now over for the Games, with the New Zealanders finishing with a whopping 13 medals in the velodrome - eight of them gold. New Zealand sits third on the medal table, with 24 medals overall -- 13 of those are gold. Sports reporter Felicity Reid has been at the aquatics centre in Birmingham.

RNZ: Morning Report
How can New Zealanders live with the climate crisis?

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 3:54


Storms and flooding driven by climate change have caused massive damage in recent weeks and will only become more common. Ahead of the first national strategy for dealing with the effects of global heating, climate reporter Hamish Cardwell looks at the options for living with the climate crisis. He starts his story on a particularly vulnerable part of the capital's coast.

Data And Analytics in Business
E111 - Mazen Kassis - Bringing Together Existing Technology & New Technology for Data-Driven Decisions

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 76:35


This new technology will change everything about how you work in your business! At least, that's what they say. With how quickly technology is advancing everyday, how do you decide which shiny new piece of technology is either right for your business… …or a huge waste of an investment? Even worse, once you find that perfect new technology, how do you implement it in a way that works for everyone? Meet Mazen Kassis Mazen's Role as a Data Analytics Leader at Foodstuffs North Island Mazen Kassis is the Head of Data & Analytics at Foodstuffs North Island Limited - a cooperative made up of 24,000 kiwis working hard to make sure New Zealanders get more out of life. They serve 2.7 million kiwis each week through their 330+ PAK'nSAVE, New World, Four Square and Gilmours stores and have donated 9m meals to Food Rescue. In 2020, Foodstuffs won the Large Retail Employer of the Year award, and their Four Square banner was a recipient of Aon Hewitt's Best Employer award in 2018. This year, Foodstuffs North Island marks its 100 year anniversary. Mazen's Other Work in Data Analytics and Privacy Besides his work with Foodstuffs North Island, Mazen is a Training Advisory Board Member with IAPP - the International Association of Privacy Professionals. IAPP is the largest privacy association in the world and a leader in the privacy industry. They provide resources for practitioners to develop and advance their careers while helping professionals and businesses navigate the complexities of the evolving environment and how to define and manage privacy issues. Having spent his career journey in research, privacy, and data & analytics capacities in ANZ, Asia, Africa and Europe, Mazen has learnt important lessons about different ways and means that data can be turned into actionable insights. Synthesising data to inform decision making ignites his passion and creating ecosystems where this can be done at scale drives him further. Data Driven, Business Decisions, and New Technology In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Mazen shares: His work as a Training Advisory Board Member with the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Idiosyncrasies between the ANZ region and other regions His role as the Head of Data & Analytics at Foodstuffs North Island Efforts to ensure all business decisions across the organisation are data-powered and customer-driven Developing good data culture amongst data users Organisational structure: Centre of Excellence vs distributed teams What would happen if business decisions were not powered by data How to know which new data analytics technology is worth bringing into the organisation The process of bringing in a new data analytics technology from start to finish Reasons behind less than ideal outcomes when procuring new technologies Reflections on an approach to introducing new data and analytics tech that had unintended consequences Desirable skills for the modern data and analytics professionals His suggestions for those looking to introduce new technologies in their organisations If you are interested in getting a glimpse into the world of data and analytics inside one of the most significant organisations in New Zealand, this is the episode you do not want to miss. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Paying it back: cost of living payment

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 5:53


A New Zealander living in London who's receiving the cost of living payment says she wants to opt out, but it's not a simple matter. From today - anyone who earns under $70,000 a year, and is not eligible for the winter energy payment, will see $116 appear in their bank account - the first installment of the $350 payment over the next three months. So far 56 people have contacted IRD to opt out of the payment. Susie speaks with London based IT worker, Laura, who left New Zealand in 2014.

RNZ: Morning Report
All Blacks sevens team lose to Fiji at Commonwealth Games

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 5:26


It may have been a winning start to the Commonwealth Games for New Zealand, but those athletes competing overnight have so far been unable to add to Aotearoa's medal tally overnight. There was heartbreak for the All Blacks sevens team in Birmingham, when they were beaten 19-14 in their Commonwealth Games semi-final against Fiji in extra time. New Zealand was down to just five men by the end of the match. They'll compete for the bronze medal against Australia just after 7am on Monday, shortly after the Black Ferns sevens team play for third place against Canada. It wasn't just on the field where the New Zealanders came up short - there was also some disappointment on the velodrome, and in the triathlon mixed relay. Reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe is in Birmingham. She spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Morning Report
'Vast majority' of Cost of Living Payment recipients meet criteria - Ardern

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 8:00


The Prime Minister admits the government knew some ineligible people would receive the $350 cost of living payment. The first instalment of $116 will be paid today to tax residents who earned less than 70-thousand dollars last year. The National Party says some New Zealanders living overseas have also been told they qualify. Ardern told Morning Report that is the case but says the 'vast majority' of recipients meet the criteria. She said the Government moved quickly to implement the payments that were announced in the May budget.

Gala Loves Everything
My New Daily Routine For Health, Wellness, Beauty & Manifesting!

Gala Loves Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 25:47


Hello, my name is Gala, and I'm obsessed with daily habits and routines to make life better. Here are some of the new things I'm doing every day that are making me feel more creative, beautiful, and sleep like a log! (Links to everything below!) P.S. My new book, MAGNETIC MINDSET: How To Make Love To The Universe & Manifest Anything, is out now! https://amzn.to/3c4UBXa Cacao Clarity: https://amzn.to/3zgPxag Owaken Daily: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrEGO53nhw8 Vegan Rocky Road Overnight Oats: https://amzn.to/3Sbkzca Skinny Confidential Hot Mess Ice Roller: https://shopskinnyconfidential.com/products/hot-mess-ice-roller Skinny Confidential Pink Balls Face Massager: https://shopskinnyconfidential.com/products/pink-balls-facial-massager Proven skincare: http://bit.ly/galaproven Rose spray mist face tanner: https://amzn.to/3bf4Ec4 Charlotte's Magic Serum: https://amzn.to/3vqGVwA Aquaphor: https://amzn.to/3OMkjgX Vital Proteins Moon Milk Collagen Latte: https://amzn.to/3SbkEfY HigherDose Infrared PEMF mat: https://higherdose.com/products/infrared-pemf-mat DMH Aesthetics LED Light Mask: https://dmhaesthetics.com/website2015/product/light-shield/

Michigan's Big Show
* Amelia Garvey, Professional Golfer, three-time All-American at USC, New Zealander and Jake Harris, Michigan Lottery

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 8:31


SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Amelia Garvey, Professional Golfer, three-time All-American at USC, New Zealander and Jake Harris, Michigan Lottery

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 8:31


Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
Oral Questions for Thursday 28 July 2022

Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 53:04


Questions to Ministers CAMILLA BELICH to the Minister of Education: What reports has he seen about trends in training and apprenticeships? SIMON COURT to the Minister of Transport: Does he stand by his statement, "I regularly reinforce my expectations that Waka Kotahi and other agencies spend money in a proportionate and reasonable way"; if so, in which cases, if any, have these expectations not been met? TANGI UTIKERE to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: What announcements has she made regarding He Poutama Rangatahi? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Finance: Does he consider that fiscal and monetary policy decisions in the past two years have in any way exacerbated the cost of living crisis; if so, how? GLEN BENNETT to the Minister of Revenue: How can eligible New Zealanders ensure they receive the first Cost of Living Payment on 1 August? CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Housing: What was Kainga Ora's net surplus or deficit after tax for the third quarter of the 2021-22 financial year compared to forecast, and is she satisfied with the performance of Kainga Ora? RACHEL BROOKING to the Minister of Conservation: What recent announcements has she made regarding the Milford Opportunities Project? PENNY SIMMONDS to the Minister of Education: Does he agree with comments made by the former chief executive of Otago Polytechnic, Phil Ker, about the Government's polytechnic reform that "Not a single dollar has been put into improving outcomes for learners, not a single dollar to strengthening the regional providers, and so the issues that we had before Mr Hipkins started this misguided venture are not only still there, they're worse"? Hon JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister of Transport: Does he stand by his statement, "The time for fine words on climate change is over, we actually need to start the transition"; if so, how does the Government's transport policy reflect this? SHANAN HALBERT to the Minister of Transport: What recent announcements has the Government made about supporting public transport users? SIMON WATTS to the Minister of Local Government: Does she agree with the Prime Minister's statement that "it will not be the policy of any government I lead to embark on another substantial reform of local government or governance unless it is sought and unless there is broad consensus amongst local government about the need for and the direction of change"; if so, does she believe there is broad consensus among local government on her Three Waters reforms? Dr ANAE NERU LEAVASA to the Minister for Youth: What recent announcements has she made about Youth Parliament?

The Living Waters Podcast
Ep. 77 - Hamming It Up with Ken Ham

The Living Waters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 41:41


Today, the guys share a special interview recorded at the recent NRB Conference!  The episode features not only theological and practical discussion, but a healthy dose of ribbing between an Australian and out resident New Zealander.  Who is the Australian, you ask?  He is none other than Ken Ham, CEO and founder of Answers in Genesis and a key figure in the development of the Ark Encounter and the Creation Museum!  Oscar and his producer friend Eddie Roman caught up with Ken at the conference, and first asked him what the problem is in being a Christian and believing in evolution.  The problem, Ken explains, boils down to the need to take God at His Word and uphold the authority of the Bible.  If we work man's view into our worldview and rework God's Word to fit it in the area of creation and evolution, what is to keep us from doing the same elsewhere?  Even now, we're seeing the generational impact of compromising worldview formulation, and the undercutting of Genesis 1-11 - the foundation of everything else to come - is leaving people open to question the rest of the Bible, too.   Moving forward, Ken, Oscar, and Eddie consider whether or not Christians are anti-science.  This question, Ken argues, requires careful definitions of terms.  There is a distinction between observational and historical science, and both Christians and non-Christians generally agree on the observational side of things.  Along the historical vein, there is frequent disagreement, but both the Christian perspective and the non-Christian “scientific” view require forms of faith.  Evolutionists, after all, believe in things that they cannot see or scientifically prove.  Ken roots the willingness to accept the wild notions of naturalism rather than affirming that God spoke and created in human nature and sin before wrapping up the interview with a connection to CRT, updates on the Ark Encounter and the Creation Museum, and an introduction to his new book, Divided Nation. Thanks for listening! If you've been helped by this podcast, we'd be grateful if you'd consider subscribing, sharing, and leaving us a comment and 5-star rating!  Links:Visit the Living Waters website to learn more and to access helpful resources!Check Ken's books, Divided Nation and Creation to Babel.Learn more about Answers in Genesis, the Ark Encounter, and the Creation Museum.Learn more about NRB and its recent conference!You can connect with us at podcast@livingwaters.com. We're thankful for your input!Learn more about the hosts of this podcast.Ray ComfortEmeal (“E.Z.”) ZwayneMark SpenceOscar Navarro

Full Story
Why is Jacinda Ardern more popular overseas than in New Zealand?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 17:58


In 2017, Jacindamania swept the world. A young, charismatic New Zealander led the Labour party to victory. But lately, Ardern and the New Zealand Labour government have slumped in the polls. In this episode of Full Story, Gabrielle Jackson talks to Mike Ticher and Bonnie Malkin about the challenges facing New Zealand's government and Ardern's enduring appeal abroad

RNZ: The Detail
The rest home nursing crisis that will only get worse

RNZ: The Detail

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 20:37


A surge of elderly New Zealanders will require rest home care at the same time as a crisis in aged care nursing. 

RNZ: Checkpoint
IRD still needs thousands of bank accounts for cost of living bonus

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 4:32


Tens of thousands of New Zealanders could miss out on the government's cost of living bonus as the IRD does not have their bank account details. The first of three instalments is due on Monday for an estimated 2.1 million people. Some of those eligible do not have their bank accounts registered with Inland Revenue. Revenue Minister David Parker tells Lisa Owen the government has been pushing the message.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Hackers jeopardise patient privacy

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 14:02


International hackers are increasingly turning their attention to hospitals and manufacturers of medical devices, attacks that not only cost them ransom money, but also jeopardise patient privacy and even surgical procedures. While technological breakthroughs in medicine has revolutionised the way patients are diagnosed and treated, the proliferation of medical devivces connected to hospital networks offer cyberattackers new opportunities to access healthcare organisations IT systems. While deeply concerning for patients and staff, the consequences of malware and ransomware attacks on hospitals can also be fatal. Justine Bone, a New Zealander based in the US, is at the forefront of medical cybersecurity. She's the CEO of a private company called MedSec based in Florida. It offers hospitals a way to manage the security of every medical device they own.

RNZ: Morning Report
Manly player boycott a 'sad outcome' - Former Warriors chairman Peter Macky

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 4:12


Seven rugby league players, including three New Zealanders, will sit out Manly's NRL match against the Sydney Roosters this weekend, because Manly will wear a special rainbow jersey in support of LGBTQIA+ communities. The players say the jersey is in conflict with their cultural and religious beliefs. Manly's coach, Des Hasler, has apologised to the boycotting players, admitting they weren't consulted and he's concerned for their welfare. Former Warriors chairman, Peter Macky, who is gay, says this is a sad outcome when Manly's jersey is simply celebrating inclusivity. He spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Science: Air pollution + poor health

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 10:25


Science correspondent Laurie Winkless joins Kathryn to talk about a new study which has looked at the effects of air pollution on the health of New Zealanders and calculated the 'social cost' of human-made air pollution at $15.6 billion per year. Astronomers have spotted a mysterious radio signal that is pulsing "like a heartbeat" in deep space and dogs really can "see" with their noses, researchers have found a link between the areas of a dog's brain that handle smell and vision. Laurie Winkless is a physicist and science writer.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Mongolian Derby underway, NZers in the lead

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 4:42


The one thousand kilometre long Mongolian Derby started on Saturday and two New Zealanders are in the lead. We speak to Sam Edney's step-mum about her progress so far.

Cooking the Books with Frances Cook
How to spot greenwashing in your investments

Cooking the Books with Frances Cook

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 36:18


Each week BusinessDesk and the NZ Herald's Cooking the Books podcast tackles a different money problem. Today, it's how to avoid getting tricked by dodgy "ethical investing" claims. Hosted by Frances Cook. Kermit the frog taught us that it's not easy being green, and boy was he right.  The ethical investing sector is booming, and many investors say it's important to them that their money is going into companies doing the right thing.  A recent survey by Mindful Money found 73% of New Zealanders want their funds to be invested responsibly, and 56% say they would consider switching KiwiSaver funds to avoid irresponsible companies.  Unfortunately greenwashing is rife, with many companies and even investment funds trying to claim socially responsible credentials, without having put in the work.  It is an area that the money police are keeping an eye on, with the Financial Markets Authority and New Zealand Stock Exchange saying it's a key focus, while Australian watchdogs including the Securities and Investments Commission are also zeroing in on it.  But that relies on companies getting caught, and besides, there are plenty of ways to bend the rules without breaking them.  Frankly, we're all pretty busy, so we want to get through this issue without having to spend ages on it.  For the latest podcast, I talked to Eliot Hastie from Stake, and Barry Coates, founder and CEO of Mindful Money. If you have a question about this podcast, or a question you'd like answered in the next one, come and talk to me about it. I'm on Facebook here, Instagram here, and Twitter here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gala Loves Everything
How To Manifest Really Big Things (Like, Say, A Pink Lamborghini)

Gala Loves Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 34:07


BABY! My brand new manifesting book, MAGNETIC MINDSET: HOW TO MAKE LOVE TO THE UNIVERSE AND MANIFEST ANYTHING is out today! https://amzn.to/3c4UBXa In this episode, we're talking about manifesting really big things. Sizeable things. Chunky things. And I'm going to use my pink Lamborghini — known around here as the GLAMBO — as an example. Here's the coolest thing... There is no order of difficulty in miracles. So let's dive in!

Launching The Pilot
Flight Of The Conchords (2007)

Launching The Pilot

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 30:38


Episode 309 is Flight of the Conchords (2007) Brett and Jemaine two New Zealanders live in New York trying to make it as a folk-rock band. "Sally" At Dave's party Jemaine falls for the most beautiful girl in the room, who also once dated Brett

Runners only! With Dom Harvey
Next full episode out Monday: Kane Brisco (Farmfit NZ)

Runners only! With Dom Harvey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 2:24


Kane Brisco is a Taranaki dairy farmer who has gained a huge following on social media with the “Farm Fit” movement he started in 2019, to help improve physical and mental fitness with an emphasis on the rural community. In April he ran 100km in his gumboots and in the process raised over $20,000 for I Am Hope. His brand-new book, “Tools for the top paddock” will be out in August.  He truly is a great New Zealander, and I am excited to share his story with you guys on Monday morning. Follow Farm Fit on IG:  Farmfit_NZ Learn more about Kane's brand new book: https://tinyurl.com/5n6mzr9c

The Race IndyCar Podcast
Dixon's weird season gets back on track + Palou saga update

The Race IndyCar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 76:45


This week's The Race IndyCar Podcast examines the latest in the Alex Palou saga, as McLaren and Ganassi continue to fight over his services in 2023, and provides reaction to Scott Dixon's composed Toronto victory - a win which gets his season back on track. Coming into the weekend, Dixon had finished in the top 10 in all but one race this year but it wasn't until Sunday that he finally reached the top step of the podium again, capturing the 52nd victory of his career to equal Mario Andretti on the all-time list. Hosts Jack Benyon and JR Hildebrand discuss the New Zealander's topsy turvy season to date and what this victory will do for him going forwards. Colton Herta's fresh start is also assessed as he delivered a second-place in the kind of scenario he's lost out before through mistakes, while Graham Rahal, David Malukas and Callum Ilott are also discussed after interesting weekends. And of course there's plenty of chat about Alex Palou, including reaction to the Spaniard's pre-race comments on his contract situation, plus debut IndyCar podium finisher Felix Rosenqvist's comments after the race that Palou may not even race next year. And finally, Jack and JR reflect on the previous episode which ranked the top 10 drivers of the first half of the season. Follow The Race on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook Check out our latest videos on YouTube For IndyCar news, analysis and must-read features visit the-race.com

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Wellingtonians love their baby talk

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 6:43


A new study has found that Wellingtonians are big into their baby-talk! The research found that many people around the world naturally pitch up their voices when they talk and sing to babies, but no one quite as much as New Zealanders. To tell us more about her research Jesse interviews one of the lead authors of the study, Courtney Hilton from the Department of Psychology at Harvard University.

95bFM
The National Party's Dr. Shane Reti: July 19, 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


For Casper's chat with Dr. Shane Reti this week they discussed the recent inflation figures and what should be done to ease the cost of living burden on New Zealanders.