PRI's The World

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Host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories that remind us just how small our planet really is. PRI's The World, the radio program, is heard every weekday on over 300 public stations across North America.

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    • Dec 8, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 46m AVG DURATION
    • 432 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from PRI's The World

    Brits brace for new omicron-related restrictions

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 47:33

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson denied that a Christmas party was held at 10 Downing street last December during a pandemic ban on indoor parties, despite new video evidence. It could undercut the impact of an announcement of new omicron-related restrictions in England. And US President Joe Biden is holding a virtual "Summit for Democracy" this week as part of a White House effort to advocate for democracy as a governance style recently on the decline. Plus, we hear new music from an ensemble of musicians from Iran, India and the US. Their project, “This Pale," features an open interpretation of the love poetry of Rumi, the 13th-century mystic and writer. Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible!

    Biden and Putin hold high-stakes security meeting

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 47:09

    US President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin met on Tuesday via video conference. At the top of their agenda: the conflict between Russia and Ukraine. In recent months, Russia has been building up its military presence on Ukraine's border. And on Wednesday, Germany gets a new chancellor and a new coalition government. After 16 years, Angela Merkel will be replaced by Olaf Scholz as the country's new leader. Plus, billionaire Michael Steinhardt has surrendered 180 stolen objects worth $70 million and has been barred for life from buying antiquities. This comes after a four-year multinational investigation found that his illegal purchases had been smuggled from 11 countries via 12 illicit networks. Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by being one of 515 supporters giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible!

    US imposes diplomatic boycott on Beijing Olympics

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 47:31

    The White House has announced a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Olympics, slated to begin on Feb. 4. The decision was due to China's “ongoing genocide and crimes against humanity in Xinjiang.” Also, the most prominent political leader in Myanmar, 76-year-old Nobel prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, was given a four-year prison sentence on Monday. Hours later, the head of the military junta lowered her prison term to two years. Plus, before the Beatles invaded the United States, their record label attempted to get them to sing two of their big hits in German. They did well — it turns out they could speak passable German and French — but grudgingly. Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by being one of 515 supporters giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible!

    Coronavirus Conversations: The challenges of vaccinating people in conflict zones

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 72:44

    Efforts to vaccinate people to stop the spread of the pandemic in conflict zones, including Syria, Yemen, Afghanistan and Ethiopia — where even basic humanitarian aid is often hard to come by — continue to be hampered. The coronavirus pandemic has made the situation worse, with lockdowns and overstretched services affecting efforts to reach vulnerable populations. As part of The World's regular series of conversations on the pandemic with Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health, reporter Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with a panel of experts about the difficulties of vaccinating populations in conflict areas. See more discussions in our series here: https://www.theworld.org/categories/coronavirus-conversations.

    Coronavirus Conversations: Children's mental health during COVID

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 46:44

    A UNICEF analysis of various studies has revealed “higher levels of depression, fear, anxiety, anger, irritability, negativity, conduct disorder, alcohol and substance use and sedentary behaviors, compared with pre-pandemic rates” among children and adolescents from mostly high and upper middle-income countries from around the globe. As part of The World's regular series of conversations about the pandemic, reporter Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with Karestan Koenen, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, to discuss the challenges surrounding the mental health impacts of the pandemic on children. See more of the Coronavirus Conversations series here: https://www.theworld.org/categories/coronavirus-conversations.

    How far will the US go in its relationship with Vietnam's military?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:18

    The US Navy has become a steady presence in Vietnam. It's part of a strategy to help Vietnamese forces stand up to China, which is beefing up its military presence in the area. But just how far will the US go in its relationship with Vietnam's military? Also, in the past few weeks, we've been hearing a lot about the migration crisis in Europe. At the center of the storm are Iraqi Kurds fleeing the semi-autonomous region in northern Iraq. Now, many are being flown back to northern Iraq and having to restart their lives with very little. Plus, the new director of Interpol is the former minister of the interior from the United Arab Emirates. Critics want him removed for his spotty record policing his own country with allegations of abuse, even torture. Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by being one of 515 supporters giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible. 

    US boosts access to at-home COVID testing

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 47:06

    In Britain and other parts of Europe, at-home COVID-19 tests have long been available for free and have become a part of everyday life. Now, US President Joe Biden is trying to beef up access for at least 150 million Americans with private health insurance. And, Russia has been moving thousands of troops to its border with Ukraine in recent months. Tensions between the two countries are now at a high point. Also, fighting around Yemen's oil-rich city of Marib has intensified. The last northern Yemeni city loyal to the Saudi-backed Yemeni government is surrounded on three sides by Houthi forces, which may be a critical turn in the yearslong civil war.  Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by being one of 515 supporters giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible. 

    Omicron emerges amid historic pandemic treaty agreement

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 46:43

    The new omicron variant of COVID-19 is a reminder to the world that the pandemic is far from over. At the same time, nearly 200 countries reached a historic pandemic treaty agreement on Wednesday, focused on global preparedness and response. Also, Lebanon has 18 recognized religious sects and sectarianism is built into the Lebanese political system. We hear about how some Lebanese people involved in the protest movement are advocating for a different path. Plus, historians consider Riverside, California, as the birthplace of the Korean American community, known as Pachappa Camp. It's a little-known story now getting attention in an exhibit at the University of California at Riverside. Thank you to everyone who donated on #GivingTuesday! There's still time to make your gift. So many have already answered the call and donated to ensure our nonprofit newsroom can continue our work for another year! But we still need 230 more donors to donate $130, or $11/month, to reach our funding goal before the end of the year. And every gift takes us one step closer to our goal. Donate today to add your name to the list of listeners who are #WithTheWorld.

    Germany grapples with vaccine hesitancy

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 47:48

    Germany has one of the lowest vaccination rates in Western Europe. The country is now edging closer to mandatory vaccines for the coronavirus with lawmakers set to vote on the issue before the end of the year. And, five years ago, Colombia's government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) signed a peace agreement. Since then, deforestation has been on the rise as cattle ranchers, loggers, miners, subsistence farmers and criminal groups move into areas formerly controlled by them. Plus, at midnight, Barbados removed Queen Elizabeth II as the head of state and installed Governor General Sandra Mason as its first president. We hear from Barbados's poet laureate Esther Phillips about the Caribbean nation's efforts to grapple with its brutal colonial past. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    Omicron variant sparks new travel ban debate

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 47:07

    It might seem intuitive to limit travel to curb the spread of the new omicron variant. But researchers have found that these kinds of standalone bans may do more harm than good. And, Honduran leftist candidate Xiomara Castro held a big lead early Monday as voters appeared to oust the conservative National Party after 12 years of rule. Also, Saudi Arabia recently announced a sudden ban on all Lebanese imports in response to critical comments made by the Lebanese minister of information about Saudi Arabia's role in the war in Yemen. Now, workers in Lebanon are feeling the pain.  Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    WHO says newest COVID variant has many mutations

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:16

    The World Health Organization has announced after a meeting on Friday that the new omicron variant of COVID-19 “has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning.” Also, a major resurgence in vinyl is putting a strain on the few record plants left to press them, as well as the chemical used to make the vinyl. And, many people are wondering where their purchases are as they get stuck in the backlogs of global supply chains.

    Happy Thanksgiving from The World

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 48:43

    Chef Eric Ripert of the famed New York restaurant Le Bernardin doesn't just prepare food, he has a spiritual experience with it. Ripert tells host Marco Werman about how his Buddhist practice influences his cuisine. French winegrowers are feeling the impact of heat, drought, and other changes in weather patterns. The taste of water is often glazed over. But a growing group of professional water sommeliers is hoping to bring the world's attention to the different kinds of water. And, a columnist in The Washington Post met a firestorm of online protest this summer when he dismissed Indian cuisine by describing it as "based entirely on one spice." Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    Fauci on gathering safely for Thanksgiving amid COVID surge

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:08

    Thursday is Thanksgiving, a time for families to gather, but COVID-19 is surging across the US, and many parts of the world. So, is it OK to let our guards down for a meal? To answer that, and give us the latest on all-things-COVID, we turn to the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci. Also, kids here in the US were always taught to say "thank you." But a well-intentioned thanks is not always the same in other languages and cultures. And, when you think of samosas your mind might go to India or the Middle East. But in East Africa, they are a popular treat from Kenya, to Somalia, to Uganda. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    Advocates seek better alternatives to immigration detention

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 56:38

    Many immigration rights advocates want an end to detention at facilities. But proponents and current immigrants under surveillance say alternative methods, like ankle monitors or cell phone tracking apps, have taken a toll on their health. Also, when the Beatles swept the world in 1964, it didn't take long before Argentina's local bands began imitating its sounds. Argentine rock musicians, inspired by the Beatles, started to speak up against human rights violations taking place in the ‘60s and ‘70s. And, we hear from Afghanistan's first female commercial airline pilot, Mohadese Mirzaee, who is now living in exile in Bulgaria.

    Lebanon faces critical electricity shortage

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:32

    Lebanon's electric company is only able to provide power to residents for a few hours a day. For the rest of the time, people have no choice but to rely on private generator businesses, which in turn, has created its own set of problems. And, ahead of Chile's presidential elections next month, far-right candidate José Antonio Kast and leftist Gabriel Boric will compete for the position. Plus, American popstar Justin Bieber is performing in Saudi Arabia next month. Saudi youth are celebrating the concert as a sign of their country's increasing openness, but some analysts say the kingdom may be whitewashing its human rights record.

    IOC announces plans for trans and intersex inclusion in sport

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 46:32

    The International Olympic Committee has announced a new framework for transgender and intersex athletes this week. In part, the guidelines say no athlete has an inherent advantage just because of physical appearance, gender or intersex identities. The guidelines also move away from using testosterone levels alone to determine eligibility. And we hear the personal story of Sofie Lovern, a Mexican American standup comedian from Oakland, California, who converted to Islam as a young adult. Plus, Shohei Ohtani has been called the Japanese Babe Ruth. Now, the Los Angeles Angels' player has won the American League's MVP award, making him the second Japanese-born player to score the big win.

    North America leaders' summit convenes

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 47:31

    Leaders from the US, Canada and Mexico are holding their first in-person meeting on Thursday in the first summit of its kind in five years. Each brings conflicting interests in issues of migration, trade and the pandemic. And capitol rioter Evan Neumann is wanted by the FBI for his involvement in the Jan. 6 insurrection. Neumann recently turned up in Belarus hoping to seek asylum there. Plus, climate change and environmental degradation are two ways that China is paying a price for its fast-paced economic growth over the past 20 years. In Shanghai, a Chinese performance artist has some unusual ways of raising awareness about pollution. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    New Delhi struggles with smothering smog

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:34

    Soaring pollution levels in New Delhi, India, have prompted officials to indefinitely close schools and some coal-based power plants. We hear from a climate analyst about the health implications and causes of the smothering smog. And, the Biden administration has announced a major new investment in vaccine manufacturing, with an aim to help address global inequalities. But critics say it doesn't get to the root of the problem. Plus, since the 1950s, Mexican painter and intellectual Frida Kahlo has been revered as a feminist icon. One of her famous self-portraits just sold for nearly $35 million — more than any other work of art from Latin America.

    Poland-Belarus border tensions escalate

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 47:47

    Migrants remain stranded at the Poland-Belarus border, attempting to cross into the EU and seek asylum. What does the escalating tension mean for Europe? And the virtual meeting between US President Joe Biden and China's Premier Xi Jinping was big news in China, with state media calling it a success. We hear reactions from China. Plus, archaeologists in Israel say an amethyst ring they uncovered recently was likely used as a hangover cure in the third century. We hear about a few other hangover remedies that have gathered faith over time. Thank you to everyone who has already donated to The World's fall fundraising drive! The coverage we provide on the air, on the web, and via the podcast is free and accessible to everyone thanks to listener support.  When you donate $130 or pledge $11/month during our fall drive, host Marco Werman will personally thank you on the podcast. Make your gift today to help us reach our goal and unlock a dollar-for-dollar match! 

    COP26: Gaps between ambition and action

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:45

    The UN climate summit wrapped up this past weekend, issuing a set of agreements that use the strongest language yet to convey the gravity of the climate crisis. But nearly every climate envoy or minister at the meeting left Glasgow saying more still needs to be done — and fast. And Britain's terror threat level has been raised from "substantial" to "severe" following an explosion outside a hospital in Liverpool in the UK on Sunday morning. One man died at the scene and four men have since been arrested. Plus, master djembe player Weedie Braimah has a new album, “The Hands of Time,” where he shows off the djembe's range and power.

    COP26: What's next?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:46

    COP26 President Alok Sharma has said that the summit will be a success only if it keeps the target of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius alive. But it's extremely unlikely that countries will commit to those kinds of carbon cuts at the summit. Also, Nov. 13 marks the sixth anniversary of the coordinated terrorist attacks at the Bataclan concert hall and six other sites in Paris. This year, it comes amid a major trial against the 10-man group that carried out the attacks. Plus, ever wonder what happens if a large asteroid goes on a trajectory to hit planet Earth? NASA is now testing a solution called the Double Asteroid Redirection Test — or DART — and they say it's the world's first planetary defense mission.

    EU countries consider border walls to deter migrants

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 48:15

    The crisis along Poland's border with Belarus has escalated over the last few days with thousands of migrants stranded there in near-freezing conditions. Barbed wire separates the two countries. Polish authorities are now planning to build an 18-foot wall along its border, and 12 other EU countries are also considering border walls. And, we take a look at a day in the life of a climate negotiator from the island nation of Palau, as he fights for his country's future at the UN climate summit in Glasgow. Also, the US marks its first Veterans Day following the war in Afghanistan. We hear reflections from one US veteran who fought in the war there. 

    Who pays for damages due to climate change?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:03

    For years, developing countries have been lobbying for money through the United Nations system to pay for damages and losses from climate change. Where does the finance issue stand now? And, Dearborn, Michigan is home to many immigrant populations, but especially Arab Americans. Last week, the city elected its first Arab American Muslim mayor, Abdullah Hammoud. Plus, forced migration can be the most painful experience of one's life. Thousands of Afghans have experienced this since last August, when the Taliban took over. They all made last-minute decisions about what to leave behind or take with them. We hear from two women and their final decision. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom. Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    Migrant crisis continues on Belarus-Poland border

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 47:48

    On the border between Belarus and Poland, there's been an ongoing standoff between thousands of migrants — mostly from Africa and the Middle East — and Polish border guards. EU countries like Poland have been steadfast in their attempts to deny entry. And, this week, many foreign travelers were finally allowed to enter the US, after a year and a half of intense travel restrictions. But New Zealand remains one of the most closed-off places in the world — even for citizens to reenter — proving most challenging for separated families. Also, the Biden administration has approved the sale of 280 air-to-air missiles for the Saudi air force. Bomb sales to Saudi Arabia are still on hold, but the US is reluctant to block all weapons sales as leverage to encourage Riyadh to improve its human rights record or end its war with the Houthis in Yemen.

    EU climate chief calls for reaching headline Paris agreement goal

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:11

    The European Union's climate chief said during the ongoing COP 26 conference in Glasgow that talks must focus on meeting the headline goal of the Paris agreement. Former US President Barack Obama spoke on the sidelines of the conference on Monday, saying President Joe Biden's climate package will be “historic,” while welcoming the efforts of bipartisan US support in working toward slowing down global warming. Also, pressure is building for more Haitians to migrate by sea, as The World's Monica Campbell shares first-hand accounts of the latest. And, an app at a Swiss university tries to use augmented reality to help people overcome arachnophobia. Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom.  Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    Chinese tennis star silenced after #MeToo accusations

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 48:20

    The latest high-profile #MeToo case in China involves a tennis star making accusations against a former high-level Communist Party official. The Chinese government has attempted to silence the tennis star, but activists within China and the diaspora continue to share the story. And, a monthslong drought in parts of Kenya is endangering the livelihoods of millions of people who rely on livestock. Scientists say drought occurs more often due to climate change. Kenya, like many African countries, is requesting more climate finance to help communities at the COP26 conference in Glasgow, Scotland. Plus, we get a taste of the first-ever Habibi Festival of contemporary Arab music, with a special song by Alsarah and the Nubatones, written in 2019 in solidarity with fellow Sudanese protesters.  Every day, the reporters and producers at The World are hard at work providing you with relevant, fact-based and human-centered news from across the globe. From the initial pitch, to the chase, to interviews, to writing, to production, to broadcast, every story from The World requires careful input and touches from many different members of our nonprofit newsroom. The story you just read is available to read for free because thousands of listeners and readers like you generously support our nonprofit newsroom.  Become one of 515 donors to make your gift of $130, or pledge $11 monthly before Nov. 30, and you'll help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000. We need your help now more than ever — give today!

    US diplomat and hostage negotiator heads to Myanmar

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 48:29


    Veteran US diplomat and hostage negotiator Bill Richardson traveled to Myanmar this week, raising hopes for the release of American journalist Danny Fenster, who's been detained by the military junta for five months. And thousands of Afghans are still trying to flee Afghanistan or are somewhere en route to a new home. The US and Canada have historically been the world's two leading countries for refugee resettlement, but they've struggled to meet the needs of this group. Also, in Russia, the number of daily COVID-19 cases and deaths have increased across the country, with new record highs in both categories. Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a nationwide nonworking period to curb the spread of the virus.


    Haitians deported from US focus again on migration

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 47:57

    Less than two months ago, thousands of Haitians were encamped under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, just at the Mexico border. Some migrants were eventually let into the US, but the majority were deported to Haiti, often after living away from the country for years. And in Afghanistan, Afghans desperately need foreign aid to get through the winter. But the international community doesn't want to prop up the extremist Taliban government, which presents a moral dilemma. Plus, how many times over the past 19 months have you been asked, “How are you?” A lot. We hear how answers to that question get expressed around the world. Help The World unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by donating to our fall drive before Nov. 30! It takes a village to run The World, and that includes listeners like you who provide critical financial support to our nonprofit newsroom. With your support, we can continue to bring you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you won't hear anywhere else. Give today.

    France and UK's fish dispute

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 47:46

    France and the UK have been caught up in a bitter dispute — about fish. Each government accuses the other of contravening the trade deal on fishing licenses in the English Channel. The French are threatening to block British fishing boats disembarking into the country unless the UK does something to resolve the matter. And, Saudi Arabia says it will plant millions of trees and capture carbon to combat climate change. As one of the world's top oil producers, the country has also pledged to cut down its greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2060.  Plus, Russian, Chinese and European tourism agencies are planning on bringing tourists back to Syria next year. But how ethical is it to visit a country still officially in a state of civil war?

    At COP26, world leaders warn of a climate catastrophe

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:27

    The first day of the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow was loaded with urgent warnings and a slew of pledges from developed countries to help mitigate the effects of climate change. Also, at least 5 million people have died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, according to the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center. We hear from a health expert who helps contextualize this number. Plus, Ado Campeol, the so-called “father of tiramisu,” died on Saturday aged 93. Campeol was a restaurant owner in Treviso, Italy, close to Venice, and is given co-credit for inventing the dessert back in 1969. But Alda Di Pollo, his wife, originally came up with the idea. Help The World unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by donating to our fall drive before Nov. 30! It takes a village to run The World, and that includes listeners like you who provide critical financial support to our nonprofit newsroom. With your support, we can continue to bring you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you won't hear anywhere else. Give today.

    UN climate summit kicks off in Glasgow

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 48:15

    The 26th UN climate summit, or COP26, begins on Sunday. It's frequently called the “last, best chance” to stave off the worst impacts of climate change. In Sudan, civil disobedience continues against the military coup and arrest of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. Doctors have gone on strike along with other professionals. Mass protests are planned for Oct. 30. Also, thousands of homes have been destroyed on La Palma, one of the Canary Islands in Spain, due to the Cumbre Vieja volcano which has been erupting for more than a month.

    Africa GDP predicted to dip due to climate change

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 47:01


    The World Meteorological Organization is warning that sub-Saharan Africa could see a 3% drop in the gross domestic product by 2050 as a result of climate change. The UN agency says changing precipitation patterns, rising temperatures and more extreme weather will contribute to mounting food insecurity in Africa. And Sudan's ambassador in Washington, Nureldin Satti, says he will "resist the military coup" back home. The Sudanese military seized control of the government in Khartoum on Monday, detaining top government officials. Plus, as President Donald Trump's top Russia adviser, Fiona Hill had a ringside seat for G20 gatherings in Rio de Janeiro, Hamburg, Germany, and Osaka, Japan. Hill joins The World to preview this year's G20 gathering and discusses the significance of “no-shows” like China and Russia.


    Haiti fuel shortage intensifies

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 47:55

    Haiti is running out of fuel. The severe fuel shortage has intensified because gangs are blockading fuel supplies at ports located in areas controlled by them. And we hear from Osama, who grew up in the West Bank during the first and second intifadas. A chance encounter with a group of Jewish people made him question his own prejudices and he now works for peace. Plus, a court in Madrid has ruled that a couple, now separated, will have joint custody of their dog. The ruling recognized the people as "co-carers” so that Panda, the dog, will now alternate between two homes.

    Protesters defy military coup in Sudan

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 48:17


    Demonstrators have taken to the streets of Khartoum, Sudan, in an attempt to bring down the top military generals who seized power Monday. And, we hear from Dean Issacharoff, who could hardly wait to join the Israeli army at age 18. The beatings of Palestinians made him question his allegiances, but when he spoke out against the attacks, the military turned against him. Also, later this month, the United States will challenge a UK judge's ruling on Julian Assange's extradition to the US. The judge originally rejected the extradition over concern for Assange's mental health. 


    Sudan's military takes power in coup

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:16

    The armed forces in Sudan have detained the country's prime minister along with other top officials and dissolved the joint civilian-military government that was steering the country toward democratic reform in an apparent military coup. And Afghanistan will restart nationwide polio vaccinations after more than three years. The new Taliban government agreed to assist the campaign and will allow women to participate as front-line workers. Also, jump-rope contests are popular entertainment on Chinese TV. Now, parents are sending their kids to jump-rope cramming schools for another reason — gaining an edge on their test scores.

     Israeli prime minister takes his first trip to Russia

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:31

    Over the past decade, the Israeli government has been cozying up to Moscow. On Friday, new Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett traveled to Russia for the first time and met with President Vladimir Putin at a resort in Sochi, Russia, to discuss Israel and Russia's “special relationship.” Also, the Netflix series “Squid Game” is a dark comedy about a competition that emerges from Korean culture, but has widespread appeal. We speak to a psychiatrist who explains why the new show resonates so far and wide beyond South Korea. And, since the summer, Belarus strongman Alexander Lukashenko has been sending Syrian and Iraqi migrants across its borders into EU countries such as Lithuania, Latvia and Poland. The Lukashenko regime has also continued to clamp down on political dissent, this week raiding one of the few independent news outlets, Novy Chas.

    Controversial TV pundit shakes up French politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:03

    So far, many have considered France's presidential election next April a close race between President Emmanuel Macron and far-right candidate Marine Le Pen. But recently, far-right columnist and TV commentator Eric Zemmour has been soaring in opinion polls, throwing the race wide open. And, court battles are keeping the Biden administration from completely undoing the Trump-era "Remain in Mexico" policy. It's kept thousands of asylum-seekers waiting in Mexican border towns while their asylum petitions move through US courts. Plus, blues-rock musician Pascal Danaë and his trio, "Delgrès," has a new album called “4 a.m.” Danaë tells us about how his ancestors in Guadeloupe, and seeing his great-great-grandmother's affidavit of her freedom from slavery in 1841, influenced the trio's new album. 

    Bolsonaro accused of crimes against humanity for COVID negligence

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:21

    A Brazilian Senate Commission investigating President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the COVID-19 crisis in Brazil issued its final report on Wednesday, accusing him of crimes against humanity. The 1,200-page report details malfeasance, the blocking of needed health measures, and the illegal use of public funds. And in Syria, two roadside bombs that detonated under a bridge hit a bus in Damascus on Wednesday, killing 14 people. It's a sign that despite the Assad government's recent efforts to normalize relations abroad, Syria's civil war still rages. Also, after days of speculation, North Korea says it had test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine in order to enhance its undersea capabilities. It's the first such launch since 2016, and it comes as the US, South Korea and Japan meet to discuss restarting talks with Pyongyang.

    US envoy to Afghanistan resigns 

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:48

    Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad spearheaded the Trump administration's negotiations with the Taliban that forged an agreement for the withdrawal of US forces. Critics say the talks were a fig leaf, offering cover for a quick US withdrawal. And Russia is ending its diplomatic engagement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The move by Moscow is in retaliation for NATO's expulsion of Russian diplomats from its Brussels office earlier this month. Plus, filmmakers Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin tell us about "The Rescue," their documentary about the massive effort to save 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand.

    American missionaries held hostage in Haiti 

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:31

    One of the most notorious gangs in Haiti is holding hostage a group of American missionaries, including children. The country has the highest kidnapping rate in the world. The threat of being taken hostage is one that Haitians— rich and poor alike — face every day. And when people in the US and the UK donate clothes they don't want anymore, those clothes end up for sale in a massive secondhand market in Accra, Ghana. But the boom in quickly made, inexpensive clothing around the world has led to an environmental crisis in countries like Ghana. Plus, TikTok has come a long way from its lip-syncing days for Generation Z. Now, innovators are using the app to help teach and spread the word on Indigenous languages across the globe. 

    British MP murdered while meeting with constituents

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:10

    In the United Kingdom, Conservative Party Member of Parliament David Amess was stabbed to death on Friday in his constituency of Leigh-on-Sea, England. The 69-year-old father of five had served in Parliament since 1983 and was known politically as a social conservative and prominent campaigner against abortion. Also, in the last chaotic days of US operations in Afghanistan, Najibullah Quraishi was there reporting as the Taliban took over the country. Quraishi, whose documentary, “Taliban Takeover,” just premiered on Frontline, gives us an unvarnished view of the new Afghanistan. Plus, The Wizard of New Zealand, Ian Brackenbury Channell, is out of a job. The Christchurch City Council has decided to stop paying him to provide public acts of wizardry.

    Violence in Beirut over blast investigation

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:31

    Gunfire erupted on the streets of Beirut on Thursday, killing six people. The violence erupted when armed supporters of Shiite militant and political groups, Hezbollah and Amal, marched through a Christian neighborhood in protests against the judge presiding over the August blast investigation. And police say a bow-and-arrow attack in Norway Wednesday night in which a man is suspected of killing five people appears to be an "act of terror.” It's the worst attack in Norway since Anders Breivik, the far-right extremist who killed 77 people in 2011. Plus, The World remembers Irish musician Paddy Moloney, master of the uilleann pipes, slide whistle and penny whistle, and co-founder of the Chieftains.

    US-Mexico border will reopen

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:00

    The Biden administration announced on Wednesday that it will lift travel restrictions at Canadian and Mexican borders to tourists, shoppers and casual visitors who can show proof of vaccination. This will boost business on the Mexican side of the border, as people are free again to drive into Mexico from the US. And, the European Union pledged 1 billion euros in aid to Afghanistan on Tuesday, earmarked for humanitarian assistance and stabilization efforts for Afghanistan and its neighbors. Also, we speak to Nobel Prize-winning author Abdulrazak Gurnah about his commitment to telling migrants stories of injustice and cruelty. Gurnah says the ongoing trauma of colonialism and themes of exile and belonging continues to inform his literary work.

    UN biodiversity summit kicks off in China

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:39

    Delegates from around the world are meeting this week in Kunming, China, in the first part of a high-stakes UN biodiversity summit. The goal is to create a kind of Paris Agreement to protect the globe's plants and animals over the next decade. And, a harsh new bill is being proposed in Ghana that would punish members of the LGBTQ community as well as their supporters and advocates. Also, dozens of State Department nominees are being stalled in the US Senate. Only about a quarter of national security positions have been filled to date.

    Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:55

    The US is grappling with its identity today. Is it Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day? Or neither? Depends on where you live. In Spain, there's little doubt — Columbus Day is a massive celebration, referred to as the National Day of Spain. This year in Madrid, the right-wing government is spending more than $1 million on a two-week long festivity with dozens of events. Also, Poland has ruled that its constitution takes precedence over EU Law. That has raised the possibility of Poland leaving the 27-nation bloc. Or, more likely, a standoff over whose law reigns supreme. And, whether it's called soccer or fútbol, the sport unites immigrant children in the US from diverse backgrounds. Yet, it doesn't always provide equal opportunities for all of the kids.

    Nobel Peace Prize shines a light on freedom of expression

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:56

    For the first time since 1935, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists: Maria Ressa of the Philippines, and Russian independent journalist Dmitry Muratov. The award honors their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression against the growing threats against it. And it's election time in Iraq, where a high-stakes parliamentary vote will take place on Sunday. The election was called a year early in response to major protests in 2019. Plus, for nearly two centuries since Ludwig van Beethoven's death, his 10th Symphony sat unfinished and largely untouched. But with a little help from modern technology — that's about to change. 

    Abdulrazak Gurnah wins 2021 Nobel Prize for literature 

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:25


    The Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize for literature to novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah. The author of numerous novels who grew up in Zanzibar, Gurnah was selected for his "uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism." And, many in the US are asking what went wrong in Afghanistan after two decades of war ended with Taliban rule. Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth is calling for a 9/11-style commission to look at the past 20 years of US involvement in Afghanistan.  Also, traffic in Indian cities can get really noisy with car horns and sirens blaring nonstop. Now, India's transport minister is working on a new law that would replace them with the soothing sounds of tablas and other Indian instruments.


     ‘Historic' malaria vaccine proven safe for kids 

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:32

    The World Health Organization announced on Wednesday that a vaccine against malaria has been found to be safe and effective — including for kids, who account for the vast majority of malaria deaths. And for decades, an international network of clergy sexual abuse survivors and their advocates have been pushing for more accountability within the Catholic Church. We hear from accountability experts about how an inquiry in France may reverberate worldwide. Also, 14% of endangered coral reefs were lost between 2008 and 2019. But one oceanic expert says there's still room for hope in conservation.

    French victims of childhood sex abuse in Catholic Church speak out

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:27

    The Bishops' Conference of France has released a report documenting more than 300,000 cases of child sexual abuse within the French Catholic Church. The independent commission is the first of its kind anywhere in the world. Also, El Salvador's citizens have faced multiple traumas in the past decades: war, gang violence, natural disasters and now, COVID-19. We hear from a group of ambulance workers in El Salvador about how they cope with daily tragedies with few mental health providers in the country. And the recent Facebook outage impacted small businesses around the world. Hear about how the outage disrupted a grocery delivery business in Accra, Ghana, and what is being done to prepare for future outages.

    The hidden riches of Lebanon's leaders

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:11

    The “Pandora Papers” are being called the greatest-ever leak of secret deals and hidden assets. Top Lebanese officials are among the powerful whose secrets are revealed in the leak. And, confidence in British police has been shaken following the sentencing of a serving police officer for the kidnap, rape and murder of Sarah Everard in London last March. Advice to women on how to handle their fears of male police officers has proven “laughable” by some women's rights groups. Plus, The University of Liverpool is launching a master's program on one of the most popular bands of all time: the Beatles. The program will focus on how attitudes toward the ever-popular group have changed over the decades.

    Haitian migrants in Mexico caught in legal limbo

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:06

    In the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, tens of thousands of migrants hope to reach the United States, but are caught in legal limbo. They hail from different countries in Central and South America, but many are from Haiti. Also, when a massive earthquake and tsunami hit eastern Japan 10 years ago, with a subsequent nuclear disaster, nearly 20,000 people died. Some found healing in sashiko, a traditional art form that helped ease the pain among survivors. And, Spain's flamenco guitar legend, the late Paco de Lucía, is receiving an homage this week in his hometown. Capping off the honors is a decree to play his famous song, "Entre Dos Aguas,” or "Between Two Waters," from the town hall carillon twice a day.

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