Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

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This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Each episode features con…

Liz Covart


    • Nov 23, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • every other week NEW EPISODES
    • 52m AVG DURATION
    • 335 EPISODES

    Listeners of Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History that love the show mention: bfw, early american history, colonial, franklin's, liz is an excellent, ben franklin, liz always, liz and her guests, enslaved, history related podcasts, particularly interested, liz brings, liz's, american revolution, interviews with historians, interested in american history, world is one, liz is a great, williamsburg, full name.



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    Latest episodes from Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

    316 Kathryn Olivarius, Yellow Fever, Immunity, & Early New Orleans

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:18

    In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory from France. This purchase included the important port city of New Orleans. But the United States did not just acquire the city's land, peoples, and wealth– the American government also inherited the city's Yellow Fever problem.   Kathryn Olivarius, an Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University and author of Necropolis: Disease, Power, and Capitalism in the Cotton Kingdom, leads us on an exploration of yellow fever, immunity, and inequality in early New Orleans. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/316 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 174: Thomas Apel, Yellow Fever in the Early America Republic Episode 295: Ibrahima Seck, Whitney Plantation Museum Episode 301: From Inoculation to Vaccination, Pt 1 Episode 302: From Inoculation to Vaccination, Pt 2 Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    315 David M. Rubenstein, History & American Democracy

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:18


    What has enabled the American experiment in democracy to endure for nearly 250 years? What is it about early American history that captivates peoples' attention and makes them want to support the creation of historical scholarship and the sharing of historical knowledge? David M. Rubenstein, the co-founder and co-chairman of The Carlyle Group and a great student and supporter of history and history education, joins us to explore his patriotic philanthropy and the history of American democracy with details from his book, The American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/315 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 018: Danielle Allen, Our Declaration Episode 038: Carolyn Harris, Magna Carta & Its Gifts to North America Episode 078: Rachel Shelden, Washington Brotherhood Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison's Hand Episode 141: A Declaration in Draft Episode 143: Michael Klarman, The Making of the United States Constitution Episode 285: Elections and Voting in the Early Republic   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    Bonus: The Object of History

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 41:14

    The Massachusetts Historical Society has a podcast! In this bonus episode of Ben Franklin's World, we'll introduce you to The Object of History, with a full-episode preview of "Episode 4: A Miniature Portrait of Elizabeth Freeman." For more information about this new podcast and how to subscribe visit: https://masshist.org/podcast.

    Bonus: Colin Calloway, Native Americans in American Cities

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 18:30

    We rejoin Colin Calloway, Professor of History and Native American Studies at Dartmouth College, in this bonus episode so he can answer more of your questions about Native American experiences in early American cities. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/314 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    314 Colin Calloway, Native Americans in Early American Cities

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 64:45

    Have you ever considered early American cities as places where Native Americans lived, worked, and visited? Native Americans often visited early American cities and port towns, especially the towns and cities that dotted the Atlantic seaboard of British North America. Colin Calloway, an award-winning historian and a Professor History and Native American Studies at Dartmouth College, joins us to investigate Native American experiences in early American cities with details from his book, “The Chiefs Now In This City": Indians and the Urban Frontier in Early America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/314 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation LightStream Loans by SunTrusk Bank Complementary Episodes Episode 029: Colin Calloway, The Victory With No Name Episode 132: Coll Thrush, Indigenous London Episode 139: Andrés Reséndez, The Other Slavery  Episode 223: Susan Sleeper-Smith, A Native American History of the Ohio River Valley & Great Lakes Region Episode 264: Michael Oberg, The Treaty of Canandaigua Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    OI Reads: Carolyn Eastman, The Strange Genius of Mr. O

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:57

    Welcome to OI Reads, an occasional series on Ben Franklin's World where we introduce you to new books that we'll think you love and that are published by the Omohundro Institute. Using details from her book, The Strange Genius of Mr. O, Carolyn Eastman, a Professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University, acquaints us with James Ogilvie, one of early America's first bonafide celebrities. For more details about The Strange Genius of Mr. O: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/MrO Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Purchase your copy of the Strange Genius of Mr. at a 40-percent discount. Promo Code: 01BFW   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    313 Mike Duncan, The Marquis de Lafayette

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 69:50


    You know “America's favorite fighting Frenchman” is the Marquis de Lafayette. But what do you know about Lafayette and his life? How and why did this French-born noble end up fighting in the American Revolution? Mike Duncan, a self-described history geek, public historian, and the podcaster behind the award-winning podcast The History of Rome and the popular podcast Revolutions, joins us to investigate the life of the Marquis de Lafayette with details from his book, Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/313 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Bonus Episode: The Marquis de Lafayette and the Hermione  Episode 071: Bruce Venter, Saratoga & Hubbardton, 1777 Episode 203: Joanne Freeman, Alexander Hamilton Episode 208: Nathaniel Philbrick, Turning Points of the American Revolution Episode 311: Katherine Carté, Religion and the American Revolution Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    312 Joshua Rothman, The Domestic Slave Trade

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 64:14

    The transatlantic slave trade dominated in North America during the 17th and 18th centuries. But by 1808, a different slave trade came to dominate in the young United States, the domestic or internal slave trade.
 Joshua D. Rothman, an award-winning historian, Professor of History at the University of Alabama, and author of the book, The Ledger and the Chain: How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America, leads us on an exploration of the United States' domestic slave trade and the lives of three slave traders who helped to define this trade. 
 Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/312 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Save 40 percent with code 01BFW on Carolyn Eastman, The Strange Genius of Mr. O  Inside Ben Franklin's World Event with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania LightStream by SunTrust Bank Loans  Complementary Episodes Episode 063: Megan Kate Nelson, Ruin Nation: Destruction and the Civil War Episode 118: Christy Clark-Pujara, The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island Episode 135: Julie Holcomb, The Transatlantic Boycott of Slave Labor  Episode 142: Manisha Sinha, A History of Abolition Episode 176: Daina Ramey Berry, The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave Episode 281: Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    311 Katherine Carté, Religion and the American Revolution

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:07

    Investigations of the American Revolution often include explorations of politics, ideology, trade and taxation, imperial control, and social strife. What about religion? What role did religion play in the American Revolution? Katherine Carté, an Associate Professor of History at Southern Methodist University and the author of Religion and the American Revolution: An Imperial History, joins us to investigate the role of religion in the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/311 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 025: Jessica Parr, Inventing George Whitefield Episode 134: Spence McBride, Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America Episode 152: Origins of the American Revolution Episode 214: Christopher Grasso, Skepticism & American Faith Episode 307: Michael Hattem, History and the American Revolution Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    310 Rosalyn LaPier, The Blackfeet: A History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 62:56

    To understand early American history, we need to investigate and understand North America as an Indigenous space. A place where Native American populations, politics, religion, and trade networks prevailed for centuries before and after the arrival of Europeans and enslaved Africans. In this episode, we travel into the heart of the North American continent to explore the life, history and culture of the Blackfeet People with Rosalyn LaPier, a University of Montana professor, historian, ethnobotanist, and award-winning Indigenous writer. Rosalyn is a member of the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana and a member of the Métis, one of the three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/310 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Robert Parkinson's Thirteen Clocks: How Race United the Colonies and Made the Declaration of Independence Complementary Episodes Episode 286: Native American Sovereignty  Episode 290: The World of the Wampanoag: Before 1620 Episode 291: The World of the Wampanoag: 1620 and Beyond Episode 301: From Inoculation to Vaccination, Part 1 Episode 302: From Inoculation to Vaccination, Part 2   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    309 Phillip Reid, Merchant Ships of the Eighteenth Century

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 63:22

    By the eighteenth century, the Atlantic Ocean had become a busy highway of ships crisscrossing its waters. What do we know about the ships that made these transatlantic voyages and connected the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world through trade, people, and information? Phillip Reid, a historian of the Atlantic World and maritime technology and author of The Merchant Ship in the British Atlantic, joins us to explore the eighteenth-century British merchant ship and the business of transatlantic shipping. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/309 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 008: Gregory O'Malley, Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619-1807 Episode 012: Dane Morrison, The South Seas & the Discovery of American Identity Episode 015: Joyce Chaplin, Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit Episode 099: Mark Hanna, Pirates & Pirate Nests in the British Atlantic World Episode 140: Tamara Thornton, Nathaniel Bowditch: 19th-Century Man of Business, Science, and the Sea   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    308 Jessica Marie Johnson, Slavery and Freedom in French Louisiana

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 60:46

    The story of freedom in colonial New Orleans and Louisiana pivoted on the choices black women made to retain control of their bodies, families, and futures. How did black women in colonial Louisiana navigate French and Spanish black and slavery codes to retain control of their bodies, families, and futures? Jessica Marie Johnson, Assistant Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University and author of the award-winning book Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World, joins us to investigate answers to this question and to reveal what viewing the history of the Atlantic World through the histories of slavery and gender can show us about what life was really like for colonists, settlers, and the enslaved. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/308 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost Episode 120: Marcia Zug, A History of Mail Order Brides in Early America Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 232: Christopher Hodson, The Acadian Diaspora Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky's Revolt Episode 289: Marcus Nevius, Maroonage & the Great Dismal Swamp Episode 295: Ibrahima Seck, Whitney Plantation Museum Episode 303: Matthew Powell, La Pointe-Krebs House   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    Bonus: A History of American Revolution Histories

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 19:51

    In Episode 307, Michael Hattem helped us investigate the role history played in the American Revolution and the ways early historians used history as a tool to unite Americans as one people after the Revolution. This bonus episode brings us back together with Michael Hattem so we can explore a few topics we didn't have time to explore in our full-length episode: A listener question about how British Americans thought about the British Empire's responsibility to protect them and historical schools of thought, how schools of thought develop, and the different schools of historical thought when it comes to the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/307 Become a Subscriber! https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/subscribe

    307 Michael Hattem, History & the American Revolution

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 69:50

    The story of the founding of the United States is a familiar one. It usually (but not always) begins with the English settlement at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, describes the founding and development of thirteen British North American colonies that hugged North America's eastern seaboard, and then delves into the imperial reforms and conflicts that caused the colonists to respond with violent protests during the 1760s and 1770s. Then there is the war, which began in April 1775 and ended in 1783. The adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. And the story of how against all odds, the Americans persevered and founded an independent United States. Have you ever wondered where this familiar narrative came from and why it was developed? Michael Hattem, a historian of Early America who has a research expertise in the age and memory of the American Revolution, joins us to investigate the creation of the “grand narrative” about the Revolution and the United States' founding, with details from his book, Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/307 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 031: Michael Hattem, Benjamin Franklin and the Papers of the Benjamin Franklin Editorial Project Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison's Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention Episode 245: Celebrating the Fourth of July Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 Episode 306: The Horse's Tail: Revolution & Memory in Early New York City Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    306 The Horse's Tail

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 63:49

    The words of the Declaration of Independence are not the only aspect of the American Revolution that carry power. Visual and material objects from during and after the Revolution also carry power and meaning. Objects like monuments, uniforms, muskets, powder horns, and the Horse's Tail, a remnant of a grand equestrian statue of King George III, which stood in New York City's Bowling Green park. Historians Wendy Bellion, Leslie Harris, and Arthur Burns join us to investigate the history of revolutionary New York City and how New Yorkers came to their decisions to both install and tear down a statue to King George III, and what happened to this statue after it came down. This episode is sponsored in part by Humanities New York. The mission of Humanities New York is to strengthen civil society and the bonds of community, using the humanities to foster engaging inquiry and dialog around social and cultural concerns. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/306 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 058: Andrew Schocket, Fighting over the Founders: How We Remember the American Revolution Episode 136: Jennifer Van Horn, Material Culture and the Making of America Episode 144: Robert Parkinson, The Common Cause of the American Revolution Episode 185: Joyce Goodfriend, Early New York City and Its Culture Episode 245: Celebrating the Fourth Episode 277: Whose Fourth of July   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter  

    305 Erik Seeman, Speaking with the Dead in Early America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 53:51

    Death is one of the few universals in life. Everyone who is born, will die. How do the living make peace with death? While different cultures make peace with death in different ways, Erik Seeman joins us to investigate how white, American Protestants made their peace with death during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Erik Seeman is a Professor of History at the University at Buffalo. He's an award-winning historian who has written three books on death practices in early America, including his most recent book, Speaking with the Dead in Early America.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/305 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 125: Terri Snyder, Death, Slavery, & Suicide in British North America Episode 182: Douglas Winiarski, The Great Awakening in New England Episode 214: Christopher Grasso, Skepticism & American Faith Episode 231: Sara Georgini, The Religious Lives of the Adams Family Episode 301: From Inoculation to Vaccination, Part 1   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    304 Annette Gordon-Reed, On Juneteenth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 53:50


    Juneteenth is a state holiday that commemorates June 19, 1865, the day slavery ended in Texas. Over the last decade, a push to make Juneteenth a national holiday to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States has gained momentum. What do we know about Juneteenth and its origins? Annette Gordon-Reed, an award-winning historian at Harvard University and Harvard Law School, is a native Texan and she joins us to discuss the early history of Texas and the origins of the Juneteenth holiday with details from her book, On Juneteenth. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/304 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 067, John Ryan Fischer, Cattle Colonialism Episode 115: Andrew Torget, The Early History of Texas Episode 117: Annette Gordon-Reed, The Life and Ideas of Thomas Jefferson Episode 139: Andrés Reséndez, The Other Slavery Episode 209: Considering Biography Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 Episode 281: Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky's Revolt   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    303 Matthew Powell, An Early History of the Mississippi Gulf Coast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 54:43

    The Mississippi Gulf Coast was the home of many different peoples, cultures, and empires during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. According to some historians, the Gulf Coast region may have been the most diverse region in early North America.
 Matthew Powell, a historian of slavery and southern history and the Executive Director of the La Pointe-Krebs House & Museum in Pascagoula, Mississippi, joins us to investigate and explore the Mississippi Gulf Coast and a prominent family who has lived there since about 1718. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/303 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 283: Anne Marie Lane Jonah, Acadie 300  Episode 295: Ibrahima Seck, Whitney Plantation Museum Episode 298: Lindsey Shackenback Regele, Manufacturing Advantage  Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    302 From Inoculation to Vaccination, Part 2

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 52:54

    Before its eradication in 1980, smallpox was the most feared disease in many parts of the world. Known as the “king of terrors” and the “disease of diseases” the search for a way to lessen and avoid smallpox was on! How did vaccination come about? What are vaccination’s connections to smallpox inoculation? And how did news and practice of vaccination spread throughout North America? These questions will be our focus in this second, and final, episode in our “From Inoculation to Vaccination” series. In this episode, we join experts Dr. René Najera, Farren Yero, and Andrew Wehrman for a journey through the history of smallpox, the creation of the world’s first vaccine, and first mass public health initiative.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/302 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop The World of the Wampanoag series Complementary Episodes Episode 005 Jeanne Abrams, Revolutionary Medicine  Episode 116 Erica Charters, Disease & the Seven Years’ War Episode 174 Thomas Apel, Yellow Fever in the Early American Republic Episode 263 Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination Episode 273 Victoria Johnson, David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Early Republic Episode 276: Stephen Fried, Benjamin Rush Episode 301 From Inoculation to Vaccination    Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    301 From Inoculation to Vaccination, Part 1

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 46:46

    Smallpox was the most feared disease in North America and in many parts of the world before its eradication in 1980. So how did early Americans live with smallpox and work to prevent it? How did they help eradicate this terrible disease? Over the next two episodes, we’ll explore smallpox in North America. We’ll investigate how smallpox came to North America, how North Americans worked to contain, control, and prevent outbreaks of the disease, and how the story of smallpox is also the story of immunization. In this episode, we join experts Dr. René Najera, Farren Yero, Ben Mutschler, and Andrew Wehrman for a journey through the history of smallpox and the world’s first immunization procedure: inoculation.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/301 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop The World of the Wampanoag series Complementary Episodes Episode 005: Jeanne Abrams, Revolutionary Medicine  Episode 116: Erica Charters, Disease & the Seven Years’ War Episode 174: Thomas Apel, Yellow Fever in the Early American Republic Episode 263 Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination Episode 273: Victoria Johnson, David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Early Republic Episode 276: Stephen Fried, Benjamin Rush   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    300 Vast Early America

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 65:13

    What do historians wish more people better understood about early American history and why do they wish people had that better understanding? In celebration of the 300th episode of Ben Franklin’s World, we posed these questions to more than 30 scholars. What do they think? Join the celebration to discover more about Early America and take a behind-the-scenes tour of your favorite history podcast. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/300 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    299 Janine Yorimoto Boldt, Colonial Virginia Portraits

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 41:14

    What can a portrait reveal about the history of colonial British America? Portraits were both deeply personal and yet collaborative artifacts left behind by people of the past. When historians look at multiple portraits created around the same time and place, their similarities can reveal important social connections, trade relationships, or cultural beliefs about race and gender in early American history.  Janine Yorimoto Boldt, Associate Curator of American Art at the Chazen Museum of Art and the researcher behind the digital project Colonial Virginia Portraits, leads us on an exploration of portraiture and what it can reveal about the early American past.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/299 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 024: Kimberly Alexander, 18th-Century Fashion & Material Culture Episode 084: Zara Anishanslin, How Historians Read Historical Sources Episode 106: Jane Kamensky, The World of John Singleton Copley Episode 136: Jennifer Van Horn, Material Culture and the Making of America Episode 292: Glenn Adamson, Craft in Early America    Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    298 Lindsay Schakenbach Regele, Origins of American Manufacturing

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 61:20

    Have you ever stopped to think about how the United States became a manufacturing nation? Have you ever wondered how the United States developed not just products, but the technologies, knowledge, and machinery necessary to manufacture or produce various products? Lindsay Schakenbach Regele has. Lindsay is an Associate Professor of History at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and the author of Manufacturing Advantage: War, the State, and the Origins of American Industry, 1776-1848, and she joins us today to lead our exploration into the early American origins of industrialization. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/298 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 098: Gautham Rao, Birth of the American Tax Man Episode 113: Brian Murphy, Building the Empire State Episode 140: Tamara Thornton, Nathaniel Bowditch Episode 281: Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery Episode 292: Glen Adamson, Craft   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    297 Claudio Saunt, Indian Removal Act of 1830

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 60:39

    The history of Native American land dispossession is as old as the story of colonization. European colonists came to the Americas, and the Caribbean, wanting land for farms and settlement so they found ways to acquire lands from indigenous peoples by the means of negotiation, bad-faith dealing, war, and violence. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 is deeply rooted in early American history. Claudio Saunt, a scholar of Native American history at the University of Georgia, and author of the book Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory, joins us to discuss the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and how Native Americans in the southeastern part of the United States were removed from their homelands and resettled in areas of southeastern Kansas and Oklahoma. 
 Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/048 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 034: Mark Cheatham, Andrew Jackson, Southerner Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army Episode 162: Dunmore’s World Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America Episode 286: Elections in Early America: Native Sovereignty Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    296 Serena Zabin, The Boston Massacre: A Family History

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 56:24

    Is there anything more we can know about well-researched and reported events like the Boston Massacre? Are there new ways of looking at oft-taught events that can help us see new details about them, even 250 years after they happened? Serena Zabin, a Professor of History at Carleton College in Minnesota and the author of the award-winning book, The Boston Massacre: A Family History, joins us to discuss the Boston Massacre and how she found a new lens through which to view this famous event that reveals new details and insights. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/296 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Seizing Freedom podcast Complementary Episodes Episode 159: Serena Zabin, The Revolutionary Economy Episode 228: Eric Hinderaker, The Boston Massacre Episode 229: Patrick Griffin, The Townshend Moment Episode 230: Mitch Kachun, The First Martyr of Liberty Episode 294: Mary Beth Norton, 1774: The Long Year of Revolution Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter  

    295 Ibrahima Seck, Whitney Plantation Museum

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 62:52

    What does it take to create a museum? How can a museum help visitors grapple with a very uncomfortable aspect of their nation’s past? Ibrahima Seck, a member of the History Department at the University Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal, author of the book, Bouki Fait Gombo: A History of the Slave Community of Habitation Haydel (Whitney Plantation) Louisiana, 1750-1860, and the Director of Research of the Whitney Plantation museum, leads us on a behind-the-scenes tour of Whitney Plantation and through the history of slavery in early Louisiana. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/295 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 017: François Furstenberg, When the United States Spoke French Episode 124: James Alexander Dun, Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America Episode 125: Terri Snyder, Death, Suicide, and Slavery in British North America Episode 137: Erica A. Dunbar, The Washingtons’ Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 281: Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    294 Mary Beth Norton, 1774: The Long Year of Revolution

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 56:13

    When we think of important years in the history of the American Revolution, we might think of years like 1765 and the Stamp Act Crisis, 1773 and the Tea Crisis, 1775 and the start of what would become the War for American Independence, or 1776, the year the United States declared independence. Award-winning historian Mary Beth Norton, the Mary Donlan Alger Professor Emerita at Cornell University and the author of 1774: The Long Year of Revolution, joins us to discuss another year that she would like us to pay attention to as we think about the American Revolution: the year 1774. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/294 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Seizing Freedom podcast The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Bonus: The Boston Stamp Act Riots  Episode 112: Mary Beth Norton, The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 144: Robert Parkinson, The Common Cause of the American Revolution Episode 160: The Politics of Tea Episode 161: Smuggling and the American Revolution Episode 229: Patrick Griffin, The Townshend Moment Episode 243: Joseph Adelman, Revolutionary Networks   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    293 Christine Walker, Jamaica Ladies: Female Slaveholding in Jamaica

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 65:44

    How did Jamaica grow to become the "crown jewel" of the British Atlantic World? Part of the answer is that Jamaica’s women served as some of the most ardent and best supporters of the island’s practice of slavery. Christine Walker, an Assistant Professor of History at the Yale-NUS College in Singapore and the author of the award-winning book, Jamaica Ladies: Female Slaveholders and the Creation of Britain’s Atlantic Empire, leads us on an investigation of female slave holder-ship in 17th and 18th-century Jamaica. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/293 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Get 40 percent off of Jamaica Ladies with code 01BFW The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 008: Gregory O’Malley, Final Passages  Episode 036: Abigail Swingen, Competing Visions of Empire Episode 070: Jennifer Morgan, How Historians Research Episode 236: Daniel Livesay, Mixed-Race Britons & Atlantic Family Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    292 Glenn Adamson, Craft in Early America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2021 56:59

    What was everyday life like for those who lived in early America? To understand the everyday lives of early Americans we need to look at the goods they made and how they produced those goods. In essence, nothing explains the everyday as much as the goods in people’s lives. Glenn Adamson, author of Craft: An American History, joins us to investigate craft and craftspeople in Early America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/282 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 050: Marla Miller, Betsy Ross and the Making of America Episode 130: Paul Revere’s Ride Through History Episode 160: The Politics of Tea Episode 207: Nick Bunker, Young Benjamin Franklin Episode 234: Richard Bushman, Farms & Farm Families in Early America Episode 243: Joseph Adelman: Revolutionary Print Networks  Episode 288: Tyson Reeder, Smugglers & Patriots in the 18th-Century Atlantic World Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    Bonus: The Plimoth Patuxet and Tomaquag Museums

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 8:17

    This episode is a companion episode to the 2-episode World of the Wampanoag series. This bonus episode allows us to speak with two guests from the World of the Wampanoag series: Jade Luiz, Curator of Collections at the Plimoth Patuxet Museums, and Lorén Spears, Executive Director of the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island. Both Jade and Lorén help us explore their museums and what it will be like when we visit them in person. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/290 Become a subscriber! https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/subscribe

    291 The World of the Wampanoag, Part 2: 1620 and Beyond

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2020 55:25

    Before New England was New England, it was the Dawnland. A region that remains the homeland of numerous Native American peoples, including the Wampanoag.  When the English colonists arrived at Patuxet 400 years ago, they arrived at a confusing time. The World of the Wampanoag people had changed in the wake of a destabilizing epidemic. This episode is part of a two-episode series about the World of the Wampanoag. In Episode 290, we investigated the life, cultures, and trade of the Wampanoag and their neighbors, the Narragansett, up to December 16, 1620, the day the Mayflower made its way into Plymouth Harbor. In this episode, our focus will be on the World of the Wampanoag in 1620 and beyond. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/291 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Mass Humanities National Endowment for the Humanities Complementary Episodes Episode 104: Andrew Lipman, The Saltwater Frontier: Native Americans and Colonists on the Northeastern Coast Episode 132: Coll Thrush, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire Episode 184: David J. Silverman, Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America Episode 220: Margaret Ellen Newell, New England Indians, Colonists, and Origins of Slavery Episode 235: Jenny Hale Pulsipher, A 17th-Century Native American Life  Episode 267: Thomas Wickman, Snowshoe Country   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    290 The World of the Wampanoag, Part 1: Before 1620

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2020 46:53

    Before New England was New England, it was the Dawnland. A region that remains the homeland of numerous Native American peoples, including the Wampanoag. Over the next two episodes, we’ll explore the World of the Wampanoag before and after 1620, a year that saw approximately 100 English colonists enter the Wampanoags’ world. Those English colonists have been called the “Pilgrims” and this year, 2020, marks the 400th anniversary of their arrival in New England. T he arrival of these English settlers brought change to the Wampanoags’ world. But many aspects of Wampanoag life and culture persisted, as did the Wampanoag who lived, and still live, in Massachusetts and beyond. In this episode, we’ll investigate the cultures, society, and economy of the Wampanoags’ 16th- and 17th-century world. This focus will help us develop a better understanding for the peoples, places, and circumstances of the World of the Wampanoag. This two-episode “World of the Wampanoag” series is made possible through support from Mass Humanities.  Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this episode do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/290 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Library of America, Plymouth Colony: Narratives of English Settlement and Native Resistance from the Mayflower to King Philip’s War Mass Humanities National Endowment of the Humanities Complementary Episodes Episode 104: Andrew Lipman, The Saltwater Frontier: Native Americans and Colonists on the Northeastern Coast Episode 132: Coll Thrush, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire Episode 184: David J. Silverman, Thundersticks: Firearms and the Violent Transformation of Native America Episode 220: Margaret Ellen Newell, New England Indians, Colonists, and Origins of Slavery Episode 235: Jenny Hale Pulsipher, A 17th-Century Native American Life  Episode 267: Thomas Wickman, Snowshoe Country   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter  

    289 Marcus Nevius, Maroonage in the Great Dismal Swamp

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 63:07

    The name “Great Dismal Swamp” doesn’t evoke an image of a pleasant or beautiful place, and yet, it was an important place that offered land speculators the chance to profit and enslaved men and women a chance for freedom in colonial British America and the early United States.
 Marcus Nevius, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Rhode Island and author of City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Maroonage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856, has offered to guide us into and through the Great Dismal Swamp and its history, so that we can better understand maroons and maroon communities in early America and learn more about how enslaved people used an environment around them to resist their enslaved condition. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/289 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears!   Programming Note Episodes in December 2020 will run on December 8 and December 15. BFW will be back with new episodes on January 5, 2021. Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 133: Patrick Breen, The Nat Turner Rebellion Episode 176: Daina Ramey Berry, The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave Episode 226: Ryan Quintana, Making the State of South Carolina Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 Episode 263: Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    288 Tyson Reeder, Smugglers & Patriots in the 18th-Century Atlantic

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 63:38

    In what ways did the Atlantic World contribute to the American Revolution? Empire, slavery, and constant warfare interacted with each other in the Atlantic World. Which brings us to our question: In what ways did the Atlantic World and its issues contribute to the American Revolution? Tyson Reeder, an editor of the Papers of James Madison and an affiliated assistant professor at the University of Virginia, is a scholar of the Atlantic World, who will help us see how smuggling and trade in the Luso-Atlantic, or Portuguese-Atlantic, World contributed to the development and spread of ideas about free trade and republicanism. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/288 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Ben Franklin's World Gift Subscriptions Complementary Episodes Episode 090: Caitlin Fitz, Age of American Revolutions Episode 099: Mark Hanna, Pirates & Pirate Nests in the British Atlantic World Episode 121: Wim Klooster, The Dutch Moment in the 17th-Century Atlantic World Episode 161: Smuggling in the American Revolution Episode 229: Patrick Griffin, The Townshend Moment Episode 254: Jeffrey Sklansky, The Money Question in Early America Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    Our History Has Always Been Spoken: Trailer for Massachusetts, 1620 Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 3:37

    Join the Omohundro Institute and Mass Humanities for a special two-episode series about the World of the Wampanoag before and after 1620. The Wampanoag’s history has always been spoken. Hear it on Ben Franklin’s World in December 2020.

    Bonus. Listener Q&A: The Early History of the United States Congress

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 18:22

    This special bonus episode previews the Ben Franklin's World Subscription program and its monthly bonus episode for program subscribers. In this bonus episode, Historian of the United States House of Representatives Matt Wasniewski and Historical Publications Specialist Terrance Rucker answer your questions about the early history of the United States Congress. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/202

    287 Elections in Early America: Presidential Elections & the Electoral College

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 61:56


    For four months during the summer of 1787, delegates from the thirteen states met in Philadelphia to craft a revised Constitution that would define the government of the United States. It took them nearly the entire time to settle on the method for selecting the President, the Chief Executive. What they came up with is a system of indirect election where the states would select electors who would then cast votes for President and Vice President. Today we call these electors the Electoral College. In this final episode of our series on Elections in Early America, we explore the origins and early development of the Electoral College and how it shaped presidential elections in the first decades of the United States with Alexander Keyssar and Frank Cogliano. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/287 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Reader Election Series Bibliography  October 28, 2020 at 8pm eastern: Join Holly, Joe, and Liz LIVE in the Ben Franklin’s World Listener Community  Production of this episode was made possible by a grant from the Roller-Bottimore Foundation of Richmond, Virginia Complementary Episodes Episode 040: Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon, For Fear of an Elective King Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison's Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention Episode 131: Frank Cogliano, Thomas Jefferson's Empire of Liberty Episode 143: Michael Klarman, The Making of the United States Constitution Episode 179: George Van Cleve, After the Revolution: Governance During the Critical Period Episode 193: Partisans: The Friendship & Rivalry of Adams & Jefferson Episode 279: Lindsay Chervinsky, The Cabinet: Creation of an American Institution Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    286 Elections in Early America: Native Sovereignty

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2020 56:36

    Who is American democracy for and who could participate in early American democracy? Women and African Americans were often barred from voting in colonial and early republic elections. But what about Native Americans? Could Native Americans participate in early American democracy? Julie Reed, an Assistant Professor of History at the Pennsylvania State University, and Kathleen DuVal, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, join us to investigate how the sovereignty of native nations fits within the sovereignty of the United States and its democracy. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/286 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Reader Election Series Bibliography  October 28, 2020 at 8pm eastern: Join Holly, Joe, and Liz LIVE in the Ben Franklin’s World Listener Community  Complementary Episodes Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army Episode 162: Dunmore’s New World Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America Episode 223: Susan Sleeper-Smith, A Native American History of the Ohio River Valley & Great Lakes Region   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    285 Elections in Early America: Elections & Voting in the Early American Republic

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 70:11

    Independence from Great Britain provided the former British American colonists the opportunity to create a new, more democratic government than they had lived under before the American Revolution. What did this new American government look like? Who could participate in this new American democracy? And what was it like to participate in this new democracy? Scholars Terrance Rucker, a Historical Publications Specialist in the Office of the Historian of the U.S. House of Representatives, and Marcela Miccuci, a curator at the Museum of the American Revolution, join us to investigate the first federal elections in the United States and who could vote in early U.S. elections. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/285 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute October 28, 2020 at 8pm eastern: Join Holly, Joe, and Liz LIVE in the Ben Franklin’s World Listener Community benfranklinsworld.com/facebook Election Series Bibliography  Complementary Episodes Episode 107: Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand Episode 151: Defining the American Revolution Episode 179: George Van Cleve, Governance During the Critical Period Episode 202: The Early History of the United States Congress Episode 203: Joanne Freeman, Alexander Hamilton Episode 260: Creating the First Ten Amendments Episode 277: Whose Fourth of July   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    284 Elections in Early America: Democracy & Voting in British North America

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 51:43

    The British North American colonies formed some of the most democratic governments in the world. But that doesn't mean that all early Americans were treated equally or allowed to participate in representative government. So who could vote in Early America? Who could participate in representative government? Historians James Kloppenberg, the Charles Warren Professor of History at Harvard University, and Amy Watson, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, help us explore who democracy was meant for and how those who lived in colonial British America understood and practiced representative government.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/284 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute OI Reader Election Series Resource Guide The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 038: Carolyn Harris, Magna Carta Episode 143: Michael Klarman, The Making of the United States Constitution Episode 243: Joseph Adelman, Revolutionary Print Networks Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 Episode 255: Martha Jones, Birthright Citizens   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    Bonus: A Brief History of the United States Supreme Court

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 10:38


    On Friday, September 18, 2020, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, died. Justice Ginsburg's death has caused a lot of debate about whether the President should appoint a new justice to fill her seat and, if he does appoint someone, whether the Senate should vote on the President’s nomination before the election. This short bonus episode offers a brief history of the Supreme Court and how it functions within the United States government. Our guest for this episode is Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/259 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute


    283 Anne Marie Lane Jonah, Acadie 300

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 62:44


    2020 commemorates the 300th anniversary of French presence on Prince Edward Island. Like much of North America, the Canadian Maritime provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island, and Prince Edward Island were highly contested regions. In fact, the way France and Great Britain fought for presence and control of this region places the Canadian Maritimes among the most contested regions in eighteenth-century North America. Anne Marie Lane Jonah, a historian with the Parks Canada Agency, joins us to explore the history of Prince Edward Island and why Great Britain and France fought over the Canadian Maritime region. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/283 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 064: Brett Rushforth, Native American Slavery in New France Episode 104: Andrew Lipman, Europeans & Native Americans on the Northeastern Coast Episode 108: Ann Little, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright Episode 167: Eberhard Faber, The Early History of New Orleans Episode 189: Sam White, The Little Ice Age Episode 232: Christopher Hodson, The Acadian Diaspora   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    282 Vincent Brown, Tacky's Revolt

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2020 60:22

    Between 1760 and 1761, Great Britain witnessed one of the largest slave insurrections in the history of its empire. Although the revolt took place on the island of Jamaica, the reverberations of this revolt stretched across the Atlantic Ocean and into the British North American colonies. Vincent Brown, the Charles Warren Professor of American History and a Professor of African American Studies at Harvard University, joins us to investigate Tacky’s Revolt and how that revolt served as an eddy within the larger current of Atlantic warfare, with details from his book, Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/282 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute SaneBox 2-Week Free Trial & $25 Credit Complementary Episodes Episode 052: Ronald A. Johnson, Early United States-Haitian Diplomacy Episode 124: James Alexander Dun, Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America Episode 133: Patrick Breen, The Nat Turner Revolt Episode 164: The American Revolution in the Age of Revolutions Episode 236: Daniel Livesay, Mixed-Race Britons & the Atlantic Family Episode 281: Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    281 Caitlin Rosenthal, The Business of Slavery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020 53:24

    We live in an age where big businesses track our shopping habits and in some cases our work habits. But is the age of data new? When did the “age of the spreadsheet” and quantification of habits develop?
 Caitlin Rosenthal, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of Accounting for Slavery: Masters and Management, leads us on an investigation into the origins of how American businesses came to collect and use data to manage their workers and their pursuit of profits. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/281 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 137: Erica Dunbar, The Washingtons’ Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Episode 140: Tamara Thornton, Nathaniel Bowditch: 19th-Century Man of Business Episode 173: Marisa Fuentes, Colonial Port Cities & Slavery Episode 176: Daina Ramey Berry, The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave Episode 253: Susan Clair Imbarrato, Life & Revolution in Boston & Grenada Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    280 Rick Atkinson, The British Are Coming

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2020 62:30


    The American Revolution is embedded in the American character. It’s an event that can tell us who we are, how we came to be who we are, and how we can strive to be who we want to be as a nation and people. Rick Atkinson, a three-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, a journalist who has worked at The Washington Post, and the author of The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777, joins us to explore how the War for Independence has impacted and shaped the American character. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/280 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 122: Andrew O’Shaughnessy, The Men Who Lost America Episode 123: Revolutionary Allegiances  Episode 128: Alan Taylor, American Revolutions: A Continental History Episode 130: Paul Revere’s Ride Through History Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army Episode 175: Daniel Mark Epstein, The Revolution in Ben Franklin’s House   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    279 Lindsay Chervinsky, The Cabinet: Creation of an American Institution

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2020 72:40


    As the first President of the United States, George Washington set many precedents for the new nation. One of the biggest precedents Washington set came in the form of the Cabinet, a body of advisors from across the U.S. government who advise the president on how to handle matters of foreign and domestic policy. Today, we investigate Washington’s creation of the Cabinet and how it became a government institution with Lindsay Chervinsky, a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute for Thomas Paine Studies, a Senior Fellow at the International Center for Jefferson Studies, and the author of the book, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/279 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 040: Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon, For Fear of an Elected King Episode 137: Erica Dunbar, The Washington’s Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Episode 193: Partisans: The Friendship and Rivalry of John Adams & Thomas Jefferson Episode 202: The Early History of the United States Congress Episode 203: Joanne Freeman: Alexander Hamilton Episode 265: Lindsay Chervinsky, An Early History of the White House   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter  


    278 Sarah Pearsall, Polygamy: An Early American History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2020 54:31


    Polygamy is not a practice that often comes to mind when many of us think about early America. But it turns out, polygamy was a ubiquitous practice among different groups of early Americans living in 17th and 18th-century North America. Sarah Pearsall, a University Teaching Officer, Fellow, and Historian at the University of Cambridge, joins us to discuss the surprising history of polygamy in early North America, with details from her book, Polygamy: An Early American History. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/278 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 013: Rachel Hope Cleves, Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America Episode 027: Lisa Wilson, A History of Stepfamilies in Early America Episode 045: Spencer McBride, Joseph Smith and the Founding of Mormonism Episode 120: Marcia Zug, A History of Mail Order Brides in Early America Episode 223: Susan Sleeper-Smith, A Native American History of the Ohio River Valley & Great Lakes Region Episode 225: Elaine Forman Crane, The Poison Plot: Adultery & Murder in Colonial Newport Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    277 Whose Fourth of July?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2020 72:06


    On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered a speech to an anti-slavery society and he famously asked “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” In this episode, we explore Douglass’ thoughtful question within the context of Early America: What did the Fourth of July mean for African Americans in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries? To help us investigate this question, we are joined by Martha S. Jones, the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University, and Christopher Bonner, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/277 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Derrick Spires, “Dreams of a Revolution Deferred”  Suggested Readings: “Slavery and the American Revolution”  Complementary Episodes Episode 018: Danielle Allen, Our Declaration Episode 119: Steve Pincus, The Heart of the Declaration Episode 141: A Declaration in Draft Episode 157: The Revolution’s African American Soldiers Episode 166: Freedom and the American Revolution Episode 245: Celebrating the Fourth Episode 255: Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizens   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    Bonus Listener Q & A: Young Benjamin Franklin

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2020 16:01


    This special bonus episode introduces the Ben Franklin's World Subscription program and a new monthly Listener Question & Answer feature for subscribers to that program. In this preview, award-winning historian Nick Bunker answers your questions about the life of young Benjamin Franklin. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/207 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 086: George Goodwin, Benjamin Franklin in London Episode 112: Mary Beth Norton, The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 160: The Politics of Tea Episode 169: Thomas Kidd, The Religious Life of Benjamin Franklin Episode 175: Daniel Mark Epstein, House Divided: The Revolution in Ben Franklin's House Episode 207: Nick Bunker: Young Benjamin Franklin Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter


    276 Stephen Fried, Benjamin Rush: Founding Father

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2020 65:30

    Who gets to be a founding father? “Founding Father” status goes to men who helped found the United States. That means the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence, those who led the Continental Army, and the 36 delegates who signed the Constitution. We’re talking about more than 100 men and yet, we don’t really talk about more than a handful of these “founders” as Founders. Stephen Fried, an award-winning journalist and author of Rush: Revolution, Madness, and Benjamin Rush, the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, joins us to explore the life and deeds of one founder we don’t always talk about, Benjamin Rush. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/276 Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop The Ben Franklin's World Reading Group Complementary Episodes Episode 112: Mary Beth Norton, The Tea Crisis of 1773 Episode 169: Thomas Kidd, The Religious Life of Benjamin Franklin Episode 193: Partisans: The Friendship & Rivalry of Adams and Jefferson Episode 209: Considering Biography  Episode 263: Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination Episode 273: Victoria Johnson, David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Early Republic   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    275 Ingrid Tague, Pets in Early America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2020 25:18

    What kinds of animals did early Americans keep as pets? How did early Americans acquire pets? What kinds of animals did early Americans keep as pets? Ingrid Tague, a Professor of History at the University of Denver and the author of Animal Companions: Pets and Social Change in Eighteenth-Century Britain, joins us to answer your questions about pets and pet keeping in Early America. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/275 Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Virtual Public Event: Equality: A Historical Perspective Complementary Episodes Episode 067: John Ryan Fischer, An Environmental History of Early California & Hawaii Episode 077: Rinker Buck, The Oregon Trail Episode 168: Andrea Smalley, Wild By Nature: Colonists and Animals in North America Episode 234: Richard Bushman, Farms & Farm Families in Early America   Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter *Books purchased through the links on this post will help support the production of Ben Franklin's World.

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