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Public research university located in Oxford, Ohio, United States

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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
Miami University

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Best podcasts about Miami University

Latest podcast episodes about Miami University

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
634: Hunting for Answers to Explain Unexpected Chimpanzee Behaviors and Tool Use - Dr. Jill Pruetz

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 45:55


Dr. Jill Pruetz is a Professor of Anthropology at Iowa State University and a National Geographic Society Emerging Explorer. In addition, Jill is the founder of the non-profit organization NeighborApe that she founded in 2008. Jill is an anthropologist who studies chimpanzees as a model system to understand behaviors in species that are related to us that existed millions of years ago. Jill loves being outdoors, whether it's spending time with chimpanzees in the field or hiking near home. She also enjoys traveling traveling to tropical places, reading books, and spend time with her three dogs. She received her BA in Anthropology from Texas State University and her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Jill then conducted postdoctoral research at Miami University before joining the faculty at Iowa State where she is today. Jill and her excellent research have been featured by NPR, BBC, CBC, National Geographic, New Scientist Magazine, The Today Show, and others. She is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.

Major Insight
How to Architect a Sustainable Future

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:18


As an architecture major, Julie Bohlen ‘22 is passionate about community-focused projects that champion sustainable designs. Her work recently earned her 1st place in the 2021 American Institute of Architects Ohio Student Design Awards for her project called “Eviction to Empowerment: Shared Housing in Milwaukee's Inner City.” Julia is also a member of the Miami University Botanical Society, and she's a great example of how college can help students combine creative thinking with an analytical mindset to help solve important problems. Featured Majors: Architecture, Sustainability    Featured Organizations and Internships: American Institute of Architecture Students, Botanical Society, Chi Omega

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU
E130: Beena Sukumaran - Foster Diversity in Engineering

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 35:03


Learn more about Beena at:(2) Beena Sukumaran | LinkedInLearn more about Miami University at:Programs Archive - Miami University Program Finder (miamioh.edu)

Speaking and Listening
Being The Change In Your Professional Learning Communities With Beth Rimer

Speaking and Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 30:47


In this episode of Write Answers, we talk to Beth Rimer (again!) about how we can be the change we wish to see in our Professional Learning Communities. We discuss what we should hold on to, what we should let go of, and where we might empathize to better understand the struggle. Beth also talks about a really cool teaching practice called "Breather Routines"! Find Beth Rimer on Twitter: @BethRimer Find Noah on Twitter: @MrWteach Find OWP on Twitter and Instagram: @owpmu If you are interested in starting a student-led writing center in your high school, Betsy Woods from Milford High School in Milford, Ohio is hosting a small group for an informal discussion and tour on Monday, December 6 from 12:00-1:00 at Milford. If you are an educator in southwest Ohio who can get release time from your school on December 6, contact Betsy at woods_b@milfordschools.org to join the small group. The Ohio Writing Project specializes in professional development for teachers. OWP does on-site PD with schools as well as virtual, hybrid, and in-person courses teachers can take for college + CEU credit. The Ohio Writing Project also features a masters degree program for teachers through Miami University. Featuring the renowned “4-Week”, the OWP's Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program is both practical and transformational. If you have a great idea that we should feature in a future episode, email Noah at noah.waspe@gmail.com. We would love to hear from you! Learn more about the Ohio Writing Project + Programming: http://miamioh.edu/cas/academics/departments/english/academics/graduate-studies/ohio-writing-project/ GET INVOLVED! Want to be kept in the loop for future OWP events? Email us here: ohiowritingproject@MiamiOH.edu

Dr. Sheryl's PodCouch
Episode 048: Navigating the Insane College Admission Process with Dana Ponsky and Whitney Fisch

Dr. Sheryl's PodCouch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:20


Dana Ponsky (pictured) began her career in education and advocacy more than 20 years ago. Her first professional experiences were at the University of Michigan, the University of Miami, and Barry University as a career counselor and then as an assistant director and director of orientation, leadership, and first-year programming. After working with first-year college students, Dana began to wonder how students were being supported in their high schools and what they were doing to be prepared for college. After realizing to be successful in college, students need excellent guidance while in high school, Dana transitioned to work as a school-based college counselor. She has served as a high school director of college counseling and has volunteered for nationally-recognized college access programs. You can find her at her website ConsultWithDana.com. Whitney Fisch, MSW started her career working on college campuses as the Jewish Student Life Director at Hillel at the University of Georgia and now as the Executive Director of the Hillel at Miami University in Ohio. She graduated from The University of Michigan School of Social Work and spent the next decade as a school counselor and Director of Counseling working in partnership with teens, families, and administration all in advocacy of the student. Now, she uses her years of training as a counselor and student advocate to help schools + other youth-focused community organizations to build comprehensive health + wellness programs, parent education, as well as helping families successfully navigate the college process from beginning to end making sure the student's needs never get lost in the process. You can find her at her website WhitneyFisch.com.  

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers
Getting Started in Sports Social Media w/Memphis Grizzlies' Lexi Ross

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 38:52


Given the immense competition to land sports social media positions in major professional leagues, it is noteworthy when someone fast tracks their career and bypasses those stepping-stone positions. Lexi Ross, Memphis Grizzlies' Social Media and Digital Content Producer and our guest on the WorkInSports Podcast, is one such person. Lexi earned her Bachelor's in Sport Leadership and Management from Miami University in 2019. Fast forward two years, and she's gone from studying in Oxford, Ohio, to managing social media for an NBA team. Clearly, the Memphis Grizzlies saw something in the creative content that Lexi was producing. In addition to her direct role with the team, she also builds content for the Grizzlies' G-League affiliate, Memphis Hustle, their esports team, Grizz Gaming,, and FedEx Forum. This rising star joins the WorkInSports Podcast to chat with VP of Content and Engaged Learning Brian Clapp to share some sports career advice regarding: How she built up her resume while attending Miami University. What made her decide to pursue a sports social media career. Which memories she recalls from interviewing with the Cleveland Indians out of college. How she keeps fans engaged on social media during a pandemic. How she continues producing fresh content for many different areas of the franchise. Enjoy this episode!

Major Insight
Finding the Social Support to Succeed in Sales, Finance, and in School

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 18:23


As a first-generation student, Clinton Ransom ‘22 came to college with a background that was different from many of those he would meet on campus. But that didn't stop him from pursing his interests in business and finance. After an internship at Rocket Mortgage landed him a job at the Chicago real estate firm Marcus & Millichap, Clinton knew that sales was the right career choice for him. On this episode, we talk about learning how to thrive in a new and unfamiliar environment, the networking benefits of Greek life, and why it's so important to take care of your mental health. Featured Majors: Finance Featured Organizations and Internships: Rocket Mortgage, Marcus & Millichap, Delta Chi Fraternity

A Cork in the Road
Episode 5.1 - Katie Rice, VinoTeca

A Cork in the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 40:02


We kick off Season 5 with Katie Rice, owner of VinoTeca in Inman Park. She moved to Atlanta in 2001 after graduating from Miami University (the Ohio one) and found her first fine dining job with Van Gogh's in Roswell, GA. The wine program was stellar, the staff was seasoned and well-educated, and they took her under their wing. This experience planted the seed for hospitality and wine that would lead to other opportunities managing restaurants furthering her interest in wine. Fast forward to 2014, Katie partnered with Gretchen Thomas of Barcelona Wine Bar to develop VinoTeca - a boutique shop with a tasting component that strives to not only sell great bottles, but also to educate through weekly tastings, monthly classes, and supper club. In 2019, Katie was given the opportunity to take over the shop and split from the restaurant only to continue the mission of finding a wine into everyone's palate. Follow @shopvinoteca for events, photos, and "Casual Friday" IG Lives. You can also check out www.shopvinoteca.com to browse their inventory and shop online. Recorded October 20, 2021 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/acorkintheroad/support

Let's Talk Tri Delta
“Gentelligence” - What It Is and Why It Matters

Let's Talk Tri Delta

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 14:28


Fresh off her LEADDD Keynote for Tri Delta, we're pleased to have Dr. Megan Gerhardt on our podcast! Megan is a professor of management and director of leadership development at the Farmer School of Business at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She began her work on “gentelligence” following her TEDx Talk “Why I Like Millennials and You Should Too.” This concept reframes how people think about generational differences in the workplace and personal relationships, and how to apply what we know about diversity in other realms to generations of people. She also discusses the opportunities for “mutual mentorship” and intergenerational learning in both directions, providing the ability to exchange ideas for everyone's collective growth. Be sure to check out Megan's TEDx Talk, book and other articles on her website, profgerhardt.com!Follow Megan on Instagram: @profgerhardt

KERA's Think
Teach students to think for themselves

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:12


Students take in facts with their heads, but they learn with their hearts. José Antonio Bowen is an author and former dean at Miami University and Southern Methodist University, and former president of Goucher College. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss why he believes education doesn't do enough to foster independent thinking and why he'd rewrite the 3 R's to relationships, resilience, and reflection. His book is called “Teaching Change: How to Develop Independent Thinkers Using Relationships, Resilience, and Reflection.”

Reframe from Miami University
Why an Unscripted Education is Vital for a Democratic Society

Reframe from Miami University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:15


We often think of education as something that happens in schools, and where a curriculum is nothing more than a structure for lessons and learning. But Thomas Poetter, a professor of education leadership at Miami University, would challenge this as an extremely limited view. Education is about much, much more than schooling, and he argues that having a deeper, richer understanding of curriculum is critical for a thriving democratic society.

©hat
Miami University Copyright Conference Episode

©hat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


You are tuned in to Copyright Chat. Copyright Chat is a podcast dedicated to discussing important copyright matters. Host Sara Benson, the copyright librarian from the University of Illinois, converses with experts from across the globe to engage the public with rights issues relevant to their daily lives. Sara: Welcome to a fun and exciting and unique episode of Copyright Chat. Today, I am here at the Copyright Conference at Miami University, live, creating an episode of Copyright Chat along with Will Cross. We've been talking about the Scholarly Communication Notebook and my podcast's involvement in it, in teaching and learning. And our audience has live, live polled, decided that what we're going to talk about today is potential liability under the CASE Act and sovereign immunity, which is a very timely topic. So I'm very excited to talk about this. There's a lot going on at the Copyright Office with the CASE Act and their proposed rules. So I would love to see if a member of our audience has a question they'd like to start us off with, about either sovereign immunity or the CASE Act. Yeah, someone just posted that the October 4th deadline is weighing heavily on them. It's September 29th and we have until October 4th to respond to the call for comment. Will, have you made any comment to the Copyright Office in response to that call? Will: That's a great question, Sara, and I wonder if it would be useful to give a very quick, like 30-second overview of the topic just so people know what they're thinking about. I see several hands raised as well. So I'll, I'll say that, that very quickly, yes, I've been involved with several, several groups including the EUIPO that I know you are part of as well, and Sara, you released a really nice ALA-sponsored resource in this area. So yeah, we've been thinking about this issue a lot. We did a webinar last week talking to a bunch of different librarians as well. So I see several hands raised. Sara: Yeah, I think Alvin, would you like to ask a question? Alvin: I work at a land-grant, and we should, should, enjoy sovereign immunity. Does that immunity extend to librarians and the scope of their job? Sara: That's a really good question. And, so, sovereign immunity generally would protect individuals who work there in the scope of their employment, at least protecting them from large damages. So I'll use an example. I think most of us on this call are aware of the Georgia State University case, right, where Georgia State was sued for their E-reserves policy, where they said that a flat percentage could be copied from a textbook for E-reserves use. And of course, we know that there's no flat percentage that equals a fair use. And the court actually said that at one point in the case, which was helpful to us copyright librarians. So, that doesn't mean that they're immune from suit. It does mean that they would be immune from the large damages, because that's what sovereign immunity protects, right, from copyright damages. So what they could obtain, in that instance, is an injunction, telling folks to stop doing whatever they're doing that is potentially violating the law. And that's what the plaintiffs, Oxford University Press was one of them in that case, sought. The word of caution about that case is, it lasted a really long time. So even though in the end there were no damages at stake, the case kind of went on and on, and of course, during that time, you incur attorney's fees and other things. So, and I would add as an aside, and someone posted in the chat also, under the CASE Act, state and federal governments are also immune from liability under the CASE Act, presumably following sovereign immunity. However, and one of the things that is a little unclear is, does that extend to employees? And it really should. But if you read the last US Copyright Office proposed rule, they made some really weird claims about agency law, which seemed to make a distinction and say, well, they didn't say employees when they talked about opting out, so maybe they aren't talking about employees when they're talking about state and federal governments? I don't know. I personally think that probably employees shouldn't be held liable under CASE Act either under principles of sovereign immunity, but as we all know, it doesn't prevent you, even in federal court from being sued. It prevents you from incurring damages. It would then say, okay, well, they have less incentive to sue you because they're not going to get those big statutory damages, but they could still sue you and go for an injunction. Will, that was a long answer. I'm going to let you clarify or add your two cents or correct me if I said anything wrong, cause Lord knows I do sometimes. Will: Well, there's two of us, so hopefully between the two of us we'll be okay. No, I think you said it really well. It's important at the outset to say that these are two, sort of parallel aspects of the law, that sovereign immunity specifically says if you are a public institution, a state institution, those damages are not available. But exactly as you say in Georgia State, the, the plaintiffs were not really interested in damages. They were interested in coercing people into accepting a blanket license, right? That was the endgame for them. So that's the first piece. The CASE Act is specifically the Small Claims Tribunal that you described, that is there, in theory because copyright lawsuits are so expensive and complicated, right? The number that's being thrown around a lot, is what, $276,000 or so, is what it costs to, just to basically begin a suit in federal court. So, so, that speaks to the, both the cost of suing somebody and potentially the cost of being sued, even if there are no damages, as those attorney's fees can certainly add up from there. The question then about whether individuals can either opt out or just say, “I'm an employee acting within the scope of my duty, I shouldn't even need to opt out. I'm, I am covered in this case under basic, sort of fundamental principles of agency law.” That, I think, is the heart of this, this comment that's coming up due October 4th, is how we think about library employees in that space. And I, and I think several people have said this and it's absolutely right. Libraries can't do anything without librarians, right? The, the building doesn't get up and walk around and scan books or whatever, right? It's the people doing the work. So, any sort of opt out or exception that said, “The library is immune from suit, but all the individual people can be sued.” is sort of illusory. It doesn't do anything useful, right? So, from my perspective, it's hard to make a good faith argument that librarians shouldn't be considered, sort of, protected by both sovereign immunity and the broad sort of limitations that the CASE Act provides as well, when they're acting within the scope of their employment. And we can have conversations about scope, scope of employment, and that sort of thing as well. But, but to me, that's the, that's the baseline piece of it. The other thing I wanted to say at this stage is it's important, I think, to articulate the sort of privileged nature of libraries and librarianship generally, that this is a core principle in copyright law, that what libraries do is society serving. It meets the mission of the progress clause. So, libraries have this whole, you know, set of copyright exceptions in Section 108. If you've ever put that weird notice on your photocopiers or scanners, that's what you were doing in that context. So, so not only is it a weird reading of agency law to say, “We want to protect the institution, but not any of the people doing the institution's work.” It also sort of flies in the face of the core policy judgment that Congress and the courts have made in terms of saying, “Libraries are really important. The work they do promotes the progress of science and the useful arts. We need to make sure they have the space to do that good work.” So that's, that's my soapbox that I was on for a long time. Sara: I get that. I think, whenever you engage in advocacy with a public body, right, you're not usually, your name is attached to it. And if you're stating what you do for a living and you know, you're, you're potentially letting them know what you do and why you do it. At my library, and this may not be true of others, my name is already out there and what I do is already out there, right? I'm listed very publicly. My resources, my library guides have my name on them, right? So, to me, it didn't raise any specter of liability that I wasn't already kind of dealing with. I think the title copyright librarian kind of indicates, oh yeah, I do have to make fair use assessments and people do come to me and ask questions about copyright information. Of course, I don't make other people's fair use assessments, but I guide them and empower them into making their own. I would say the person who posted here said that they are engaged in interlibrary loan. Again, I, I know what interlibrary loan is, right? That means that you are scanning copyright protected works. That's the nature of the job. And I think most people know that as well. And so to me, hopefully that doesn't really raise any additional liability on your part when you submit something. But of course, I can't promise that there aren't copyright trolls out there, right? Unfortunately, they already exist. I think the benefit in us submitting these comments is that we're trying to let the Copyright Office know that this will impact our daily work. And the goal here, at least for me, in calling for large collective action, is that I want the Copyright Office to understand the impact, that this proposed ruling would have, right? The proposed rule that they put forth about the opt-out provisions said, you know, yes, a library or an archive can opt out, one time, of the CASE Act or Small Claims Act proceedings, and then they never have to worry about it again, right? If someone tries to sue them, they, they opt out automatically. And the benefit of that is that if you forget to opt out, you can get a default judgment against you, right? And then all of a sudden you have damages. And so that's why that was, as Will said, libraries are protected and archives are protected if they do this one time, right? Because our society and our Congress understands that what we do is important. That what we do shouldn't be interrupted constantly by little lawsuits, right? That the library can't function in that way. But what they don't understand, what the Copyright Office doesn't understand, I think, and what Will said quite brilliantly, right, was the library isn't making the scanning. The library, you know, the library is just a building. It doesn't do anything. The library only does things through its employees, and if the employees are constantly being sued, guess what, the library might as well shut down. And so, if Congress really wants to protect libraries from being sued constantly and having to remember to opt out constantly, they should also protect employees from the same. And so, this is what, um, this is why I encourage advocacy. And my real sincere hope is that we will move the needle on this. This was a proposed rule by the Copyright Office. It's not final. And I'm really hopeful that through collective action we're able to convince the Copyright Office that they got it wrong. And if we do that, then our goal has been met, right? Having your name on that document is not going to subject you to any potential liability because you, when your library opts out, it will also cover you. And that's the goal. Can I promised that goal will be met? No. Unfortunately, advocacy is always like that, right? You, you do your best and you hope that it makes that impact. But I do think it's worth doing. I think advocacy is worth doing, even if it does mean that we have to put our name on a public document. Will: Totally agree. And I see we've got an anonymous question I want to address in just a second, but before that, I just want to jump on what you're saying and plus one it as well. There are a surprising number of cases where some larger sort of legal policy fight is happening and librarians can sort of get swept up in it in different ways. I think about the Kirtsaeng case a few years back, where there was this large and sort of technical conversation, about, you know, whether works were lawfully made under this title and what that meant geographically. I don't think most people were thinking about libraries when that litigation was happening. But several library organizations wrote amicus briefs to the Supreme Court and said, “Don't forget about us while you're weighing all these other policy questions, please don't let us get sort of squished underfoot for these big other conversations.” And not only did we get the outcome we wanted, we got some language in the opinion that basically said that “The work of libraries is important, a different ruling in this case would have an adverse effect on libraries and librarianship.” So that was part of our calculus. I think we have some nice case studies where we said, properly, “You might not be thinking about us, but please do in this moment to make a decision that recognizes that.” Sara: Great, I do see that question about whether you can make an anonymous comment. Do we know the answer to that, Will? Will: I think it was answered in the chat, which is that you can, but it's still recorded in certain ways. There was also a person wrote in and asked to, to ask a question here anonymously. So if it's okay, I'll read that one out. And then I see Jonah has his hand up as well. So the question is sort of a strategic one and it asks, is there a risk in, risk involved in stressing how much effect this might have on our daily operations, when we know that some folks in the Copyright Office seem to already think libraries are sketchy, and library users especially, are sort of sketchy edge users, like it does in a sense that confirm the, I think, wildly inaccurate, but existing bias, that like where “We were already sort of looking at you with side-eye and now you're coming back and asking for more protection. What's up with that?” And I think there's something to say around sovereign immunity with that. But Sara, I'm interested how you would respond to that question. Sara: So I think what you're saying is when you write this letter saying how it might impact your daily work, are you going to get kind of a, more scrutiny, I guess, into what you're doing. My answer would be no, but I also didn't, when I wrote in, I didn't write every single thing that I do on a daily basis, in very great detail, right? Because I first of all, like I just, I need to protect patron privacy. So like, that is foremost right? In everything we do, we all know this, right? So I would never say I scanned this thing for this patron or you know, a specific thing. But what I did say is that I routinely make fair use determinations for my own teaching and for my own library guides and my own educational outreach that I do on campus. And it would be hindered if I would have to respond to these lawsuits for everything that I did, right? It would just it, and it might also put me in a position where the risk gets higher and higher, right? I mean, fair use is a risk assessment every time. And so I don't think anyone would look askew at that, only because what I say that I'm doing is really typical. I mean, I'm not I'm not doing anything atypical. And I don't know what you could say that they would feel like is pushing it too far. I mean, I see, I see your point. Maybe if you get into, we're doing controlled digital lending and here's how many books we're scanning and all this, right? Maybe they would think that was pushing it far, but I even think there, many libraries are publicly stating that they're doing controlled digital lending. So that's not even anything super controversial. So I guess, I, I don't think so, but I wonder what you think, Will. Will: Yes, I mean, I think that's right, and along with what you said about fair use being a risk assessment, fair use is a muscle as well, right? And so I think, I personally think there's real value in getting on the record some of these concerns even if we don't win the day. So that as the conversations about the constitutionality of this stuff and other things are there, that that's out there. The piece that I do understand is that they're historically, the Copyright Office has not always been a library-first policy body, right, for better or for worse. So I, I, I could imagine somebody saying if I was talking to a judge or a legislature, they often love libraries, but this particular context feels different. The other piece I wanted to bring in is, we included sovereign immunity in this conversation because that's been kind of a third rail in this space and it's not the same thing, but I think in terms of the way policy folks are thinking about it, it overlaps. So just to quickly share that context, my state, North Carolina, relied on sovereign immunity for some pretty aggressive use of photographs of Blackbeard's ship, without, sort of going through the steps that they maybe should have done. That's for a court, and not for me, to decide. And last term, the Supreme Court upheld sovereign immunity. They said that sovereign immunity should exist. Even in this context where this doesn't seem like the best case study. Like, if I wanted to defend sovereign immunity, those set of behaviors or not, the model set of behaviors I would have brought forward. Sara: And just sovereign immunity means that a state or federal government cannot be sued in copyright for damages, for money. Not that they can't be sued, right? Because we all know that they could for Georgia State purposes, right, for maybe an injunction or, injunction means stop doing that, right? Whatever you're doing, stop it. But that they can't get those statutory damages. Sorry. I'm just interrupting you, go on. Will: No. Thank you. Sara: I like and I also love the fact that it was a pirate case. Will: Yes. Sara: Yeah, there's nothing better than a case about copyright that involves a pirate, just saying. Will: At last we find when piracy is the right statement, finally, when using the term so much. Anyway, one of the results of that is the court's opinion basically said, “Under current law, sovereign immunity stands. But if you have concerns, the legislature can do something about it.” So this large study was launched to try and determine whether or not we should revisit sovereign immunity. It, we could spend some time talking about that report. I think it, it, the people watching it came in with a set of expectations that weren't necessarily met by the data they found on the ground. But, at least to me, that creates a sense that people are sniffing around the broader concept of sovereign immunity and saying, “This, this blanket shield from liability makes me suspicious and skeptical.” And these larger questions about the policy values of that liability are being asked. I think there's a really overwhelmingly strong way to articulate why it's important to have that immunization and that protection both for sort of nerdy, you know, principles of federalism reasons, but also for actual on the ground work. But if there's already an environment where people are launching studies trying to undo or remove sovereign immunity, having the conversation about how librarians are treated under the CASE Act may touch that third rail in some places. So I, the thing that really resonated to me in that question was that, that sense of like, “These are stormy times, I'm going to be careful where I stick my umbrella.” Or something. Sara: Well definitely, and folks have been, folks being legislators, had been kind of attacking sovereign immunity. And the Copyright Office has done their own inquiry into it. And for now, at least, according to the Supreme Court and the Copyright Office, there is no viable evidence of you know, enough harm to individuals through sovereign immunity that we should breach sovereign immunity or get rid of it. However, yes, that's an ongoing thing and it kind of continues to poke, rear its head, right, because the Copyright Office will tell them, “Well, we don't have enough evidence right now, but come back to us in five years with another report,” right? I mean, that's kind of what happens. It's like “Gather some more evidence.” And they had a horror story, a parade of horribles of, you know, that poor individuals, and some of them I really did feel for, I have to tell you, I was there during the hearings and they were saying like, “The university stole this and made all this money. And then they told me to go away because the sovereign immunity,” and that does happen. I'm not going to lie it does, but I mean, that's not what, that's not typical. I mean, at my university, my general counsel joined me for the sovereign immunity hearings, and, you know, we consider ourselves good faith actors. Like, if we find out that a faculty member has done something illegal or copied something, put on their website, we immediately go take it down. We say, “Okay, we need to do something about this right away.” We don't just say “Too bad, we're not going to pay any damages,” right? So it's, it's just, it does happen. It's unfortunate. But I think that it's pretty rare. And I think that was what the Copyright Office concluded, that the evidence really just didn't show that it's widespread enough to create that kind of irreparable harm that we would need to pierce sovereign immunity. I see Jonah's had his hand up for a while, so Jonah - Jonah: So I've seen several commentators and Will just mentioned a moment ago that there was some question about the constitutionality of the CASE Act. I was wondering if both of you could expand a little bit about why people feel that the CASE Act might be unconstitutional. And also, I assume that unconstitutionality applies to the entire framework of the CASE Act and not just vis-à-vis, like library employees. Sara: That's right. And great question, and I'm not the most familiar with these arguments, so I'll let Will jump in, but my understanding is that it has to do with the tribunal, and that it's not an official court. And I think that's the concern, that you've got, not, not a real, it's not a real court, right? It's, it's appointed by, these are judges appointed by the Copyright Office to handle these claims. Over to Will. Will: That's exactly right. The Seventh Amendment talks about the right to trial by jury. And obviously you can opt out of your trial by jury in some cases. But the CASE Act, by creating this weird tribunal, that's not necessarily even in the article 3 constitutional space, that's where judges tend to live, generally, there's this question about whether people's rights are being impacted in some way. Because it's this sort of weird, made-up, quasi court where you don't have all of your rights and protections, but it does still seem to be bind right? You can't lose under a case tribunal and then just kick back to the federal court if you don't like the results. So are we locking people and especially through this, right, the, the, if you get an email or if you don't get an email because it went to your spam, telling you that you have been accused and you don't respond, you're stuck with whatever judgment they have. So if, you can, without getting any opportunity to trial by jury, or even in some cases, any opportunity to meaningfully understand that anything has been raised, and you're bound by that, there are, I think, serious constitutional problems there as well. People have also, I think, rightly asked some questions about whether this is described as a small claims process. Well, where I sit, $30,000 is not small claims, right? That's, that would be a real life-changer for me in some ways. So, from the perspective of a large international rights holder, $30,000 might be the thing you find in your couch cushion or whatever. But I think that the claim that “This is just for the little stuff, you know, up to $30,000,” feels a little maybe disingenuous or just out of tune with the way most people's lives and finances work. Sara: Right. And one thing that I struggle with is how this court would be compared with administrative judges, for instance. Because I think their argument on the other side would be like “This is just like an administrative court where we don't have all the same rules as, you know, regular court and you don't necessarily have a trial by jury, but we have delegated our rights to this administrative court judge.” You think that's going to fly here, Will? Will: I have stopped trying to predict the Supreme Court over the past year or two as it has continued to surprise me. If we could go this podcast without using the word Chevron at any point, that would make me super happy. I do not know, To me both the equities in the constitutional arguments seem pretty compelling in terms of questioning it, but it would, because that's where I sit and that's the world I live in and those are the issues I think about. So I, I would like to imagine that the Supreme Court would take a close look at this, but I would like to imagine a lot of things. Sara: Yeah. No, and I do think, that that's, I think that's going to be their response. And again, I don't, also don't know how that would turn out. I do also know, I think the Electronic Frontier Foundation is looking into this and very serious about suing, but they have to wait till they have a real case. So I think they have to wait until someone gets sued, and then they'll have standing to bring a lawsuit. Until then you don't have, so standing is, is one of the requirements we have to file a lawsuit. You can't say well, “Prospectively, I'm just mad about this.” You have to have some real damages happening to a real person, a real plaintiff. So I think that they're gathering up what they can in the meantime and all their arguments, and they're kind of waiting for the first plaintiff to come along who says, “Yeah, take my case and let's fight it constitutionally.” That's my understanding, and I'm, I'll definitely be on the sidelines cheering them on, or happy to help them if I can in any way. Will: Yeah, I feel the same way and I imagine there will be a certain amount of plaintiff shopping. Who is the most, you know, who, who is the best example of why this is problematic set of practices. Sara: Great point. Will: Something to watch. Sara: We have a question in the chat that other people are, are kind of saying “Me too!” So I'm going to read it out loud here. It says “I'm organizing an email to our library staff to alert them about the CASE Act so they can submit their own statements, and I'm pushing for an institutional statement. I'm wondering if I should reach out to faculty at my institution. Would this potentially affect faculty as well. Those working on OERs are using course reserves, for example. Or is this more librarian oriented?” So the opt out provision is for libraries and archives specifically. And so, generally, I would say, “Will the CASE Act impact faculty?” Probably so, right, and that also depends on whether you're a public institution or private institution because we again, don't know how the courts are going to look at sovereign immunity. And they've, they've allowed and said, state and federal governments can't be sued under the CASE Act, but we don't really know how that's going to play out in terms of individual employees. So there's that. But in terms of this opt out, if you're trying to have people respond about the opt out specifically, that is about library employees and archival employees. Will: Well said, I'll ask the follow-up question to you and if other folks want to jump in as well, what, if anything, are you going to do to prepare your non-library employees there? Are there a series of workshops coming out to say, “This is a wacky thing. It might never affect you, but if you're interested, here it comes.” Or how are we as a community thinking about educating beyond the libraries in this matter? Sara: That's a really good question. And, and for me, I feel like it's a little early, only because these proposed rules are still coming out. Like there's another proposed rule that came out just today. And I got it in my e-mail and said, “Okay, too long, didn't read yet, but will, right?” So I think it's such a moving target that I'm not prepared yet to reach out to faculty generally, but I do think it will be important once we kind of know where the playing field is and what's going on to have some, some strategic conversations. Like first, I'm going to have strategic conversations with library administration. Like, even if we are state and federal, a state or federal library, which we are at University of Illinois, if the opt-out provisions are extended to employees, I'm, I'm going to push that we just file the opt-out regardless, because it would cover our employees. That would be my ask to my administration, if we get what we're asking for in this push right now. Secondly, I would have to say, yeah, to faculty and say, “Let's have this conversation. What is this thing? What is this small claims court? What are the potential outcomes and how does this impact you?” And then again, big question mark, “We are at a state government institution, how does that impact employees?” And I would also really encourage them to understand that they can always opt out no matter what. So even if you can't opt out preemptively and do it once and it's going to apply to everything, which is, of course a good scenario, you can opt out for every single suit. And then that would say to the person, “Hey, sue me in federal court.” Now, we know how sovereign immunity works in federal court, right, at least currently. And so that would give us some measure of protection there if we're not sure about the CASE Act outcome. And so, you know, without giving legal advice, which I'm not allowed to do in my role as copyright librarian, I would try to let them know, like here are the options, right? The option is you go to this court and try to argue that because you're a state or federal employee, you know, they can't sue you, but, you know, I don't know how that's going to turn out. Or you can opt out and say, “Hey, you would have to come and sue me in federal court.” And we know that's pretty cost-prohibitive for them. And we also know that they can't get damages against you there. So I would let them know these are their options and of course, everyone has to make their own decision because I might have a faculty member who knows a lot about this and is like, “I'm really angry, really angry that they're suing me, they shouldn't be. So I'm going to fight this.” I mean, hey, more power to them, but like, I'm not going to tell them to do that necessarily. I'm going to give them options. Will: Thank you. Yeah, a couple of people, Molly Keener, and others have added in chat, and it sounds like they're doing basically the same thing. “We're keeping high level administration aware, we're talking to counsel's offices. But it's a little early.” I also wanted to, I think Nancy in the chat mentioned that if you're especially at a larger institution, the question I get sometimes is like “I work in the library, so I'm going to write on behalf of the library where, I work at NC State, so I'm going to write.” And at most institutions, especially as Nancy says, large institutions, there are pretty clear rules around who can and cannot speak and write on behalf of the institution. So if I submitted comments on behalf of NC State, our legislative advocacy people would murder me and you would never find my body, right? So, so be aware that there are a small set of people who can speak on behalf of the institution, and that there are probably people on your campus who have big feelings about who is doing that work. Sara: That's a really good point. And on the flip side of that, I've been really fortunate to work with those government outreach folks at Illinois to get their kind of permission, if you will, to speak on behalf of the library and the sovereign immunity instance, for instance. I'm, I coauthored a letter on behalf of our institution with our counsel's office. So if you go through the right channels, you can get those permissions, but you have to be aware that you need that. You can't just go ahead and do it. And also usually you need the Dean of the library to say it's okay, the counsel's office to say it's okay, the government relations folks to say it's okay, and just to go through a variety of, of processes. When things come up really quickly like this, this current call for responses, I just signed it on behalf of myself individually because I sometimes I don't have time to run through the chain of command, right? Like to know like, okay, I need to go to this person and this person then this. Like, just because you have permission to do it once doesn't mean it's kosher to do it again and again and again. So I had permission, like I said, on sovereign immunity to really speak up on behalf of the university. But I don't have that permission like as a blanket statement. It's a really good point. Any other questions? Take it away. Will: So Susan Kendall asks whether we can share some communication that you would have the library administration, that those of us who are not lawyers, can use with your administration. I don't have anything in my back pocket, but it seems like a great service. Some group, whether it's EUIPO or ALA, or whomever, could do is to say, “Here's some model language to let people know what's happening with CASE, here's some model language that's targeted towards faculty” and you know that there is a broad need for that. So that might be something that maybe somebody has already done. I'd love to learn about it. And if not, it would be great if somebody could do it. Sara: Will, I love that idea. And I think in terms of when we move forward, I think that we are, that would be a great service, right? To have some standard like “Here's language to communicate about CASE with your employees. Here's some if you're a public employee. Here's some if you're a private employee, here's some for libraries, here's…” something like that would be such a great thing. And I am a member of the ALA Policy Corps group and I think that would be an awesome project for us. And again, I would say it's a little early for that in terms of how we can, we can't predict the future about CASE. So we gotta wait a little bit and then I'm really, fingers crossed, that the lawsuit about constitutionality actually goes forward and we can get rid of all of these concerns, but it's just a moving target. And unfortunately, that's, that happens a lot with copyright, right? It's, it's, it's a moving target a lot of the time. So I do, I think we should have some sort of repository for that kind of information. And I, I, I think it's a great idea. There's a question, did the Library Copyright Institute create a sample of language that could be used? I don't think so, but I do know, you know, if you look at the comments that have been posted about the CASE Act, there's a lot of good information you can gather. It's all public. Will, do you know of anything that they created the Library Copyright Institute? Will: We did a webinar on this last week and we borrowed your language. We said “This is what ALA has provided. This is a nice way to, here's some specific verbiage you can borrow, but also here's a nice way to frame, sort of introduce the idea, provide your context, give specific examples.” So that's the thing that was circulating in those slides that should be available, the recording should be available at this point, but that's not LCI's credit, that's ALA's credit. We were just sharing their good work. Sara: You know, everyone has their own unique perspective and we all have different ways of looking at things, right? And so it's really good to get, just a variety of perspectives, about all the things that are happening in copyright world. Kenny is obviously a wonderful person to talk to always because he's just a really nice person. And I have a Copyright Chat episode talking with Kenny. So I recommend you listen to it if you're interested. He of course authored the famous Copyright Checklist, that most people use for fair use. I recommend it to folks all the time. And in our, in that particular episode, we were talking about the copyright guidelines in Circular 21 and how they're really outdated. Other questions? Audience Member: I do. So what is next? How should we proceed in the coming months, while we kind of wait to see what comes down? And once those things come down, the final rulemaking, what the court looks like, what are ways we can work together to move forward? Sara: That's a great question. I mean, I think one thing that I would recommend to everyone here, is to sign up for the US Copyright Office Notices. This is how I learn about what's going on with the CASE Act and the new rulings and things, right? Instead of hearing it from someone else, you can hear it directly from the Copyright Office. So I highly recommend that, and read, read the proposed rulings as they come out. And if you feel that there's something that you or your library could respond to, pass it up to your dean, pass it up to general counsel and keep them apprised of what's going on because things are definitely still moving along and not solidified yet. So keep on being engaged in that process because I think it's really important that we are aware of how it's, how it's moving. And then once, once we have some final idea of what's going on, hopefully the ALA Policy Corps or someone else can put out some really helpful, useful information. I'm thinking like the SPARC information that they have about the state by state laws on OER, right? They're just so good. I love their website and their tools. If we can come up with something like that, that's just really short, but really comprehensive, I think that we could be doing a really great service. So maybe come up with your own stuff and we can kind of put our heads together and come up with that documentation because I think we're going to need a lot of outreach to our faculty and to fellow librarians about how this might impact our work. Will: Yeah, that's, that's a great point. And the question that you mentioned a moment ago is, is if this constitutionally goes away next term, have we spent all this time getting people invested and raised all this awareness, and then suddenly it's like “What happened to that CASE thing you said was going to ruin the world?” “Well, it just went away.” So as, as we were talking about engagement with faculty, that's one of the issues that I'm really thinking about is, one, getting faculty to show up for a website on copyright Small Claims Tribunal can be challenging. So I'm, I'm wondering if other people are having that, like, is this something faculty and others aren't going to care about until they're being sued and it's too late. Like, is there a way to say “This might be nothing. It might be really important, but you need to know about it now. Because once you get a notification, it's probably too late for us to do anything about it.” Sara: Yeah, I mean, I don't think it's too late for us to do anything once they get a notification as long as they didn't sit on it. Because I, I just read, the one thing that I did read is that you have 60 days to respond to the notice under the proposed rules. Again, nothing final, which is quite a long time, if it got to the right place. Like Will was saying, if it got in your junk email or went to the wrong location, like that's just a problem. But if, if a faculty member does come to me and they have the notice in hand, I think that's a really good time to have that kind of “Here are your options” conversation, right? I mean, you could do nothing and then you could get a default judgement. That's not a good idea, right? Default judgment means “You didn't even bother to show up, pay these damages, because this is what we've decided.” So that's bad, and right, your options are, you know, opt out and decide to say, “Hey, you know, I'm not, I'm not engaging in this process. If you want to sue me, take me to federal court” or respond, right? And then you can respond with, “Hey, this was a fair use,” or “Hey, this is, I'm a government employee” or whatever your defense is, but of course you don't have any guarantees that how that's going to turn out because these are the judges, judges are not real, they're not federal judges, they're not necessarily trained. And even federal judges on copyright sometimes get pretty confused. They get a little turned around. So I've had experiences as a practicing lawyer that you wouldn't believe or I have a motion that I think is a slam dunk and I get denied. And then I have another motion that I think there's no way in heck, this is going to go through and the judge lets it through. So judges sometimes do wonky things. So it's important for people to know that too. Even if they're like, “I know I have a fair use. I know that this is permissible, that's so obvious.” That's why, yeah, judges sometimes make mistakes and I think these judges could too, right? Will: You would hope. And I'm sure the argument is, these judges are going to have that specialist training, so they'll be especially well-prepared. So then the question is, who's going to give them that training? Is CCC's version of a copyright webinar, is it ALA's, et cetera. So that specialization you're right, is a problem too. Sometimes comedic levels, at the federal level, whether the specialization that these judges have means they are more sophisticated or just more invested in one view of the doctrine is a different thing. Carla, please go ahead. I'm sorry. Carla: No, this conversation brings something to mind for me in that happened back when I was in college, which was during the time of Napster in the late 1990s. And I met one of my friends for lunch and he was looking very depressed. He had gotten notice from a music company and they said “We saw you've been sharing our music illegally online, that you can either pay $3,000” in the late 1990s to a college student, which was terrifying, “Or we will sue you.” And you know, something I was just thinking is, could we see with the CASE Act, copyright trolls saying, “Hey, we're going to see you in small claims court. But if you don't opt to do that, we're going to take you to federal court, or you can just make this all go away by paying us X amount of dollars and we'll leave you alone.” And the chilling effect that might have, do you think that's a possibility? Sara: I definitely think that's a possibility and I think that, that's part of the art, the goal of outreach, right? Is to educate people that they can opt out and that they don't have to pay that money, right? So yeah, it's, it's, it's definitely a possibility and, and if folks are just unaware of what this is, right, they think, “Oh, I'm going to go to court, I better pay this” and they don't even know. I know that the notice is supposed to tell you about the opt-out provision and all of those things. But, you know, some people just get really scared. You get a letter in the mail saying you have to pay this money. And you think, “Oh no, I have to do this,” right? You just want it to go away. And so I think that is a real possibility. Will: Yeah, I've, I've dropped the phrase, but somebody basically described the CASE act as a copyright troll factory. I think there's, there's something to that. Nancy, I saw your hand raised. If you'd like to ask a question or jump in, please do. Nancy: Yeah, I, I realized that what I was thinking about is, is rather tangential. But with respect to trolling, those of you who work in academic libraries may have seen some of this lately. I've seen an increase in people who put some kind of vaguely copyrightable measurement tool online. And then other people use it without permission, which is only questionably a copyright violation anyway, forms are not usually very copyrightable. But the people who made the form, some people really seem to have gone full trolling model on this. Their form is out there primarily to get people to use it. And then once people have used it, if they publish on the research they did with the tool, they are now threatening the authors with lawsuits. I don't know if they're getting payments, but they are getting retractions. Which is, I'm concerned about, just because that's not a correct legal response to this kind of, if it is a copyright violation, retractions are not the right answer. But, but I think that the over, as I said, this is tangential, that's why I put my hand down. But it is an illustration that the trolling model already exists, and has both some monetary drivers and some other weird drivers that I don't understand. Sara: Yes, it definitely does exist. And as Jonah was pointing out, there is someone who is licensing under Creative Commons and then using that to sue people, which is even worse in my opinion, it's like you're using Creative Commons to trap people into violating the whatever you put on there and then you're suing them. It's just mind-blowing. But yes, I think, I think unfortunately, some people are trying to trap people into using their thing and then suing them. But I would agree that a retraction is maybe not the way to go. And also someone, I wish someone, would just fight that, right? And get a court to say, “Hey, by the way, this isn't even copyrightable.” But the problem is, and we all know this, going to court is not free, right? You can't go, most people can't just go to court and say, “Okay, I'm going to be pro se.” You have the court filing fees, you have to show up and you have all these deadlines. It's a very complicated process, so it's not as easy as all that, although I wish someone would fund it, maybe EFF, and like, find out if there is someone they could defend and really push the issue. Because if this is happening again and again and again, it needs to be dealt with, in my opinion. Will: And good discussion in the chat on the, sort of the rise of copyleft trolls. There's an article in there documenting the practice, and then Creative Commons has been working recently on updating their license enforcement language to say, “It's your right, but what we hope the community will do is follow this set of practices.” Sara: Yeah, Nancy, Nancy is like “Exactly what academic author is going to say, “I'm going to defend this and see you in court, sue me” and then like get their own lawyer.” I mean, it's just so expensive, so we really would need an organization to take that on. Agreed. But it would be great. Other questions. This has been such a fun conversation. I just have to say this was a really fun thing to do. And I'm so happy that you all were so engaged. I just, the time has been flying by and I've been really enjoying it and it was fun for me to be on the other side, right? Not to be the one asking all the questions, but to get to answer some of them. So I really enjoyed engaging with you all. I hope this will inspire some of you to listen to other episodes of Copyright Chat and to give me your feedback about those and to get engaged with them. And maybe use the Scholarly Communication Network output that I come up with about teaching with Copyright Chat, or come up with your own ways to teach with Copyright Chat. I've actually used, that, that method with Gordon Spiegel before. And I did it live in a class. I played the episode and then I would stop it. And as I asked him a question, I would say to the class like, “What's your answer?” right? And have them kind of figure out if they knew the answer to a common copyright myth. And it was a really fun way of holding a live class. So you can even use the, the podcast live during class. There are just so many different ways to use it for teaching. So I really hope that some of you are inspired to do that. Will: Yeah, thank you for saying that. That brings us back to the sort of the SCN conversation at the top that this can be a “Your final assignment is create a podcast.” instead of writing a research paper that gets thrown away, it's there, or, “Take two podcasts and remix them in different ways.” All the pedagogical opportunities here, I think are really, really exciting and important. Sara: Or come up with a new module, right? “Find one of Sara's Copyright Chat podcasts that she didn't turn into a teaching module and come up with your own teaching module” and then add it in to the OER right there. Just so many, possibilities are endless, but I do love the idea of creating your own copyright podcast, which is kind of fun. Because I just think I've had assignments like that where I've gotten to create something myself and I always find them really, really engaging. And active learning is just, for me, a lot more rewarding. Any, any other final comments from the crowd or things you would love to hear a Copyright Chat podcast about? Because I'm always looking for ideas. If you have other topics that you just think, “Hey, you really should do a topic about this.” Oh, a music one, ooh, that's a really good idea. I should definitely do a music one. “Do you use videos from Copy Talk as part of educational material?” So I don't have videos on the Copyright Chat because it's a podcast, but I do have sometimes links to readings and sometimes links to other videos and things so, that I'll put with, so I always have a transcription of the podcast because obviously some folks can not engage with it, if they're hard, they have hearing struggles, so I always have a transcript available. And with the transcript is where I put additional materials. Will: I was just going to say, one of the things I really appreciated about this session is the way you've demystified the technical aspects. I think if you said to somebody out of the blue “Do you want to make a podcast?”, they'd go, “That sounds really complicated and difficult.” And I think this has been a nice demonstration that it's actually not as challenging and not as big of an ask as it could be. And obviously the opportunity to have some intro music from ccMixter, or right, you can sort of walk that copyright walk in terms of the way you build resources and, or rely on fair use to play a short clip from something. You could ask students to demonstrate their understanding of those concepts in the way they build the podcast. Carla: So, as we're nearing the end of the podcast, I just want to express my deepest thanks, first off to Will and Sara, for this wonderful and very informative discussion on the CASE Act. I know this has been in so many folks' minds and I am welcoming every learning opportunity I can get on this. And I think this has been an exceptional one. My deepest thanks also to our participants. It has really warmed my heart over the last few days to see how much you all are engaging with these presentations, the conversations going on in the chat. I just think this is so fantastic and the chat will be preserved. I know there's some questions about that, so you can download that, and I'm happy to pull links out of the chat, to put in a document that we can ask later. Before we close out, any final thoughts to share, Will and Sara? Sara: I would just say, I'm so happy to see so many people engaging with copyright here in this room today. And just keep on, keep on doing that, right? I mean, I'm always learning something new about copyright every day. And copyright is one of those fun things that changes a lot. Right, as someone was pointing out, “You should talk about music, cause there are a lot of new cases and it's changing a lot”, right? It is. And then the Music Modernization Act changed it even more, right? That's what makes it fun is that it's, it's a moving target, something that you can always learn something new about. I never claim to know everything about copyright because… Kenny Crews might know everything about copyright, but not me. But I always, I just have a passion for it. And I think that's what you need to have if you want to be a copyright librarian and if you're interested at all, reach out to me, we are a really great group of people. We are a really nice group of people and we help each other. It's been, it's been a fabulous career choice for me. I've really enjoyed working with everyone including Karla and Will, and Nancy on this call, and Emily. And I just really can't say enough about it as a career choice. So if you're thinking about it at all, feel free to reach out to me, and I'm happy, I'm always happy to chat with anybody, especially because I love Copyright Chat. Will: Yeah, I'll say the same thing, but not as well, as I've been doing for most of the session today. I, I, it's a really fun community to be part of, and I'm really excited about resources like Copyright Chat and the SCN, that sort of capture the community conversation. And it's not just like “This is the expert and we're going to shut up and listen to them.” It is, “Let's talk about this as a group and share different experiences.” I think we'll get a better and more robust and more invitational, and inclusive as well, understanding of what this body of practice is and can and should be. So I appreciate everybody adding your voice today and I'll second Sara, what she said, please reach out anytime. Questions like “I'm new to the field, and how do I deal with that?” or “What do you think about this?” We're all very happy to have those conversations. Sara: And shout out to Molly and Sandra. I mean, it's just a really fabulous group of people. I cannot say enough about my copyright colleagues. They are just wonderful people also. If you're at all intimidated and you say, “Ooh, it's law, I just don't want to get engaged,” like, talk to us, because really, really you can do it. And especially if you find it really interesting and fascinating and you know, you just really want to learn more. That to me is a sign that you're, you're interested, right? And so, even if you don't want to become a copyright librarian, if you're just like, “I'm going to be the go-to copyright person at my library.” Hey, everyone needs that. That's a certainty. So, and then, don't feel afraid to ask questions when you have them. Because again, I mean, we, we ask questions all the time, and no question is a bad question, and I'm always happy to engage with people, so please, please reach out, and thanks for joining us today. It was so much fun.

In the Suite
57. Innovative Marketing: Empowering Financial Advisors Through The Digital Referral Shift with Samantha Russell, Chief Evangelist at FMG Suite & Twenty Over Ten

In the Suite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:20


Today's episode of In The Suite with Samantha Russell is about creating your own momentum in the ever-changing world of technology, innovation, and social media. Samantha Russell is Chief Evangelist at FMG Suite & Twenty Over Ten, a leading SaaS company in financial services providing marketing automation and creative content for financial professionals. She's a mother of two, a voracious reader, and an articulate communicator who has delivered over 600 presentations since 2015 about how to use digital marketing to grow your business. Samantha is a 2020 Honoree for the InvestmentNews 40 Under 40 award and was also named to the "10 to Watch" list by WealthManagement.com that same year. She has a B.S. Cum Laude in Organization Communication from Miami University and has a decade of experience, but appreciates being a student of life. “I'm a lifelong learner, I read incessantly, and I love to just learn,” Samantha says. As she puts it, There is nothing she finds more inspiring than being able to empower advisors to market themselves effectively and who are enjoying returns on their marketing investment…In The Suite. She boldly evolves with the social media platforms, breathing life and fresh air into everything she touches. Listen to Samantha's episode to learn about examining who you're targeting with your pricing, facing the hurdles of compliance, the art of storytelling, and so much more.Referenced MaterialsSamantha Russell - Website Samantha Russell - TwitterTwenty Over Ten - WebsiteTwenty Over Ten - YouTubeFMG Suite - Website8 Ways Financial Advisors Can Use Google Search Console To Improve SEO - Twenty Over Ten WebsiteSamantha Russell Named to 2020 Class of 40 Under 40 by InvestmentNews - Twenty Over Ten WebsiteExcell Conference 2021 - WebsiteJustin Castelli - Website

Major Insight
Making Education Accessible for All Learners

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:26


Mary Culp '21 has deep convictions about making education accessible for all learners, and she is well on her way to becoming a special education teacher. In this episode, Mary talks about discovering her passion for teaching, the joys of working with students, her work with trauma-informed schooling practices, and the power of “learning by doing.”   We'll also talk about adjusting to college life after moving away from home, overcoming the need to compare yourself to others, and about how to focus in on the things that matter most. Featured Majors: Inclusive Special Education, Disability Studies Featured Organizations and Internships: Student Council for Exceptional Children, Access Miami

Stitch Please
A Sewing Chat with Rita Dove

Stitch Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:09


Thank you to volunteer sound designer for her work on this episode including the following music: “Chill Lo-Fi Hip Hop” by Skilsel; “News Corporate” by Skilsel; “Hip Hop Lo-Fi” by John Sib; “Hip Hop Funk” by John Sib and “African Percussion” by SofraMore about Rita DoveWhether she is crafting a line of poetry or stitching together her husband's lavender velvet wedding suit, Rita Dove is a master of storytelling. In this episode of Stitch Please, Lisa talks with former US Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, about her introduction to sewing, the relationship between poetry and sewing, and how to walk along the seam sewn by those who have come before us. After graduating from Buchtel High School as a Presidential Scholar, Dove went on to graduate summa cum laude with a B.A. from Miami University in 1973. In 1974, she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship from the University of Tübingen, Germany and later completed her MFA at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa in 1977 where she met her husband, Fred Viebahn. In 1987, Dove received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In 1992, Dove was named US Poet Laureate and served as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress—a position she would later hold again as a Special Bicentennial Consultant in 1999. In addition to being the youngest individual and the first African American to hold the position of Poet Laureate, Rita Dove is the recipient of 28 honorary doctorates and numerous awards, some of which include: Poet Laureate of Virginia, the National Humanities Medal presented by President Bill Clinton, the National Medal of Arts presented by President Barack Obama, several lifetime achievement awards, and the Gold Medal in poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Dove has published the poetry collections The Yellow House on the Corner (1980), Museum (1983), Thomas and Beulah (1986), Grace Notes (1989), Selected Poems (1993), Mother Love (1995), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), American Smooth (2004), Sonata Mulattica (2009), Collected Poems: 1974-2004 (2016) which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and her most recent work, Playlist for the Apocalypse (2021).  In addition to poetry, Dove has published a book of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985), the novel Through the Ivory Gate (1992), and the play The Darker Face of the Earth (1994). Rita Dove is currently the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. When she's not writing timeless literary gems, Dove might be found thumbing through High Fashion Sewing Secrets and creating her own wearable works of art.

Focus on Technology
Miami University licenses the manufacturing of psychedelic drugs (just without the trip)

Focus on Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:09


Psilocybin shows promise for treatment of anxiety, depression, PTSD, traumatic brain injury and possibly Alzheimer's disease.

Speaking and Listening
Rethinking Learning Loss: an Interview with Beth Rimer

Speaking and Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 26:55


In this episode of Write Answers, we talk to Beth Rimer about what we've learned from this strange time of pandemic teaching--and we push back on the idea of "Learning Loss". As we jump into season 3, we'll be exploring ways we can leverage the progressive teaching that came from this moment of necessity to transform the profession. Stay tuned! The Ohio Writing Project specializes in professional development for teachers. OWP does on-site PD with schools as well as virtual, hybrid, and in-person courses teachers can take for college + CEU credit. OWP also features a masters degree program for teachers through Miami University. Featuring the renowned “4-Week”, the OWP's Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program is both practical and transformational. Learn more about the Ohio Writing Project + Programming: http://miamioh.edu/cas/academics/departments/english/academics/graduate-studies/ohio-writing-project/ GET INVOLVED! Want to be kept in the loop for future OWP events? Email us here: ohiowritingproject@MiamiOH.edu Looking for a quick and easy writing invitation for your students...or yourself? Follow us on Instagram @owpmu Find Beth Rimer on Twitter: @BethRimer Find Noah on Twitter: @MrWteach Find OWP on Twitter: @owpmu

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
Under The Radar Book Club: Wil Haygood's 'Colorization: One Hundred Years Of Black Films In A White World'

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 22:52


This week on Under the Radar: From the moment D.W. Griffith's “Birth of a Nation” became a film sensation, racist portrayals of African Americans have been embedded in film history. Author Wil Haygood begins his history of Black films with white filmmaker Griffith's movie, documenting the setbacks and triumphs within the context of American Black history. His new book,“Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World” reveals surprising and shocking details left out of most film histories. Haygood is currently the Boadway Visiting Distinguished Scholar at Ohio's Miami University, following a 3-decade career as a correspondent both at the Washington Post and the Boston Globe. The Pulitzer Prize finalist has written eight other books including, “The Butler: A Witness to History” made into a feature film. “Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World” is our October selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.”

Major Insight
The Major League Potential of Connecting Business and Sport Analytics

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 16:25


Data is completely transforming the way we watch and play sports, and Caroline Brega is interested in how this “analytics revolution” connects her knowledge of business and her passion for sport. Outside the classroom, Caroline has worked with the Columbus Blue Jackets as part of Miami University's inaugural Sport Analytics Summer Academy, and she was selected by Major League Baseball to be a part of its Society for American Baseball Research. On this episode, she also talks about how her penchant for problem-solving helped provide a promising pathway forward. Featured Majors: Finance, Spot Leadership and Management (SLAM) Featured Organizations and Internships: NCAA Softball Player Performance & Scouting Analytics Intern, Sport Analytics Summer Academy, Women in Sport Leadership club, MLB Society for American Baseball Research

Beyond the Uniform
BTU #408 - 0 to 2,100 Employees (Alex O'Brien @ Cardinal Group)

Beyond the Uniform

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 44:28


Why Listen: I'm so grateful for the opportunity to have this conversation with Alex. I reached out to him via LinkedIn because I saw he was in Denver, and he was a Marine who has done incredible things as an entrepreneur and basically treated this interview as part two of a conversation with him. Here's a couple of things that stood out to me that I hope you benefit from this interview. At one point, Alex says, I don't know anything, pay me and teach me. I think that's such a great thought as he was taking different jobs as he was starting his company; such a great way to approach anything, which is find something that can make money and teach you a skill set. I really appreciate his lessons on patience. You'll hear that in his 15-year journey of building up a real estate company that spans so many different functional areas now, but it wasn't an overnight success. He also talks about pounding the rock. It's not a single pound that cracks the rock. But it's the repeated relentless intention of showing up every day. I think there's a lot there that I can learn as well going along with that his story really has these threads of constant improvement. And I'm just appreciating his thoughts on inclusivity and how creating an incredible place to work really depends on understanding each unique person, their history, and what they're wanting out of life. And then you can create and craft an environment that's right for them. It was really powerful to think of that from a cultural standpoint.    About Alex: Alex is the Chief Executive Officer at Cardinal Group Companies, a fully integrated real estate investment, construction development, marketing, and management firm specializing in opportunistic and value-added investments throughout the United States. Alex started out at Miami University after he served in the Marine Corps for four years as a Logistics Officer. He started the Cardinal Group out of the Marine Corps, and over the last 15 years, has bootstrapped his company. For those of you that are unfamiliar with that term, bootstrap means he did not bring on outside investment. He bootstrapped his covenant over 2100 employees, somehow finding time to earn an MBA at Chicago's Booth School of Business along the way.

Conversations at the Washington Library
211. Revitalizing Myaamia Language and Culture with George Ironstrack (Summer Repeat)

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 72:10


In the eighteenth century, the Myaamia people inhabited what are now parts of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin. More commonly known in English as the Miami, the Myaamia figure prominently in the early history of the United States, especially in the 1790s, when war chief Mihšihkinaahkwa (or Little Turtle) co-led an alliance of Miami and Shawnee warriors that defeated successive American armies in the Ohio valley before meeting defeat at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794. In the battle's wake, through treaty and subterfuge, Americans dispossessed the Myaamia of their lands, removing them first to Kansas in the mid-nineteenth century before final resettlement in Oklahoma not long after. Not only did the Myaamia lose their homelands, their language and culture suffered as well, lapsing into silence as the community fractured and native speakers passed away.  But as George Ironstrack tells us on today's episode, not all is lost, and through the power of education and a lot of hard work, what was once silenced is now heard again in Myaamia communities from the banks of the Wabash River in Indiana to northeastern Oklahoma.  Ironstrack is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Assistant Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio. The Center is a major educational and research institution dedicated to revitalizing Myaamia language and culture, and a leader in using digital technology to explore the indigenous past. Ironstrack spoke to Jim Ambuske about the history of the Myaamia people, and the work that he and his colleagues are doing at the Myaamia Center to awaken a sleeping language.  Be sure to check out the Myaamia Center's many digital resources, including the Miami-Illinois Digital Archive. About Our Guest:  George Ironstrack is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and the Assistant Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University. He has participated in Myaamia language renewal projects as both a student and a teacher since the mid-1990s. Examples of his work can be found on the Myaamia Community Blog: aacimotaatiiyankwi.org.  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/support

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
The Power Of Giving Back

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:10


Jon talks with Matthew Lester, President, Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit, and Dennis Bernard, President, United Jewish Fund. They talk about leadership, mentorship, and the power of giving back. They also discuss how Matthew and Dennis balance their community responsibility with family responsibility and running their own businesses. Matthew B. Lester Founder & Chief Executive Officer, Princeton Enterprises, L.L.C. In 1994, Matthew B. Lester founded Princeton Enterprises, L.L.C., a privately held real estate acquisition, development, and property management company based in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. To date, Princeton's portfolio consists of over 150 properties with an aggregate value in excess of $1 billion and operates nearly 25,000 apartment units, office, industrial, storage, and other commercial facilities located in fifteen states and Canada. Over the years, Mr. Lester has been personally involved in numerous community service programs by devoting his time and financial assistance to countless organizations that support the health, education, and economic well-being of those experiencing hardships. Mr. Lester is the current President of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit and Co-Chair of the Jewish Federation's Annual Campaign. He is a Board Member for the American Joint Distribution Committee (JDC); a member of the Collections Committee for the Detroit Institute of Arts; and a member of the Greater Detroit Campaign Leadership Council for the University of Michigan. Mr. Lester is a former President of the Jewish Senior Life of Metropolitan Detroit and has formerly served as a Board Member for Kadima; BBYO; the Detroit Maccabi Committee; the Jewish Fund; Forgotten Harvest; and the Jewish News Foundation. In addition to holding those positions, Mr. Lester has also served as a Board Member and Chairman for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra; a Chairman of the Financial Oversight Committee for the Jewish Community Center of Detroit; a past Advisor to the Executive Director for YAD EZRA; and a past member of the Sherman Campaign and Blumenstein Leadership Groups. Over the past 20 years, Mr. Lester has led numerous mission trips to Israel, Ethiopia, Hungary, Poland, and Cuba. Mr. Lester graduated from the University of Michigan in 1987 with a bachelor's degree in history and from the University of Southern California in 1990 with a law degree. After graduation, Mr. Lester joined the law firm of Jaffe, Raitt, Heuer & Weiss, P.C., and developed prominent litigation and real estate practice. While engaged in the practice of law, Mr. Lester initiated his real estate investment career and made his first successful acquisition. He has lectured on real estate finance at the University of Michigan; has appeared as a real estate valuation witness, and has served as a court-appointed receiver for numerous lenders. Mr. Lester is the former President of the Apartment Association of Michigan. Mr. Lester was a past recipient of the Frank A. Wetsman Young Leadership Award; the Jewish Senior Life Award of Excellence; and a former Honoree of the Year for YAD EZRA. He has been nationally recognized in Multifamily Executive; Apartment Finance Today; National Real Estate Investor; NPR – All Things Considered; and Crain's Business Detroit; as well as receiving recognition for the American Board of Trial Advocates Award and the Midwest Commercial Real Estate Hall of Fame. Mr. Lester has been a guest speaker or panel member for Apartment Finance Today; Multifamily Executive; Detroit Commercial Real Estate Summit; Marcus & Millichap Southeast Multifamily Forum; and many other speaking events. In his personal time, Mr. Lester enjoys a variety of activities with his wife and children; particularly spending time at the family farm located in Northern Michigan. Dennis S. Bernard Founder and President of Bernard Financial Group and Bernard Financial Servicing Group Dennis Bernard is the founder and President of Bernard Financial Group (“BFG”) and Bernard Financial Servicing Group (“BFSG”). Founded in 1991, BFG has grown into the largest commercial mortgage banking firm in Michigan financing on average over $1 billion each year of Michigan Commercial Real Estate. BFG became a member of the Strategic Alliance Mortgage (SAM) network in 2003 (www.samalliance.com). SAM is a national network of the largest independently owned commercial mortgage banking firm and the third-largest lending platform in the country. Bernard is a past national president. Over the last 33 years, Mr. Bernard has specialized in both debt and equity placement with commercial lenders and institutional joint venture participants. Bernard Financial Group has also been involved in commercial mortgage servicing on construction and permanent loan portfolios. Mr. Bernard has been involved with over 1,000 commercial real estate financial transactions totaling over $24,000,000,000. Mr. Bernard has been engaged as both a consultant and a correspondent by over twenty-five national lenders. Bernard Financial Group's client list reads like Michigan's Who's Who of owners and developers. These transactions have included multi and single-tenant office, industrial, hi-tech, retail, multi-family, manufactured housing communities, self-storage, hotel, and senior housing. Bernard Financial Group has closed over $22,000,000,000 in financing since its inception. These included forward commitments and immediate fundings on multi-family, retail, industrial, and high-tech properties. The lenders were Life Companies, pension funds, structured lenders, securitized lenders, and quasi-government agencies. Bernard Financial Servicing Group currently provides full cashiering servicing for over $4,400,000,000 for Life Companies and CMBS Lenders. Bernard Financial Servicing Group is now actively subbed Special Servicing for many national firms. Mr. Bernard's educational background includes a Bachelor's Degree in Finance from Miami University along with an MBA specializing in Finance and Strategic Planning from Case Western Reserve University. Mr. Bernard has been a lecturer on real estate finance at the University of Michigan's Graduate School of Business. Mr. Bernard has also appeared as an expert witness on real estate interest rates and financings in Michigan, New York, and Texas. Mr. Bernard has been an editorial contributor to The Wall Street Journal, Commercial, Inc., Crain's Detroit Business, Michigan Real Estate Journal, Midwest Real Estate News, National Real Estate Investors, Heartland Properties, Real Estate Forum, among others. Mr. Bernard has received numerous awards for his community and business involvement. Annually named to Metropolitan Detroit Top 100 Business Leaders. Most recently, he was elected to the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) CRE Board of Governors. Additionally, he has been recognized by Crain's Detroit Business as a “40 under 40”, by Midwest Real Estate News as a “40 over 40” Most Influential Real Estate Professional and Midwest Hall of Fame, and by Commercial Inc. as an Elite Eight winner. He has been bestowed the honor of the 2006 Governors Service Award for Volunteering and Community Leadership. He has also received Crain's Detroit Business, University of Michigan, and ULI's “Real Estate Excellence” award. Mr. Bernard was recently honored by being awarded the International Association of Jewish Vocational Services Greenberg Leadership Award. He has also received the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit's Young Leadership Award, the Jewish Community Council Activist of the Year Award, the American Jewish Committee “Outstanding Humanitarian Award”, and was deemed “Home Town Hero” for Oakland County for his activities and involvements on behalf of local charities. Mr. Bernard currently sits on nine different charitable organizations Board of Trustees. Mr. Bernard has been the Vice-Chair of Michigan's Venture Michigan Fund and currently serves as gubernatorial appointments to two other State of Michigan Boards or Task Forces. Mr. Bernard enjoys his mentoring in the Detroit Public Schools. Most importantly, Mr. Bernard goes home for dinner every night and spends the weekends with his family.   Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/  Website: https://jondwoskin.com/  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/  Email: jon@jondwoskin.com  Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Matt Lester and Dennis Bernard: Websites: www.jewishdetroit.org  www.jewishfederation.org 

Major Insight
When Photography and Fashion Meet Business Analytics and Marketing

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 19:36


Annie David ‘22 is always searching for ways to combine creativity and analytics. As a senior studying marketing and business, Annie is also passionate about a career in fashion and photography. She is also the Creative Director at Up Magazine, Miami University's sophisticated student-run fashion & lifestyle publication, and the former VP of marketing for Advancing Women in Entrepreneurship. On this episode, she also talks about overcoming the uncertainly of being a freshman and how joining student organizations helped bring her diverse interests together.   Featured Majors: Marketing, Business Analytics, Emerging Technology in Business + Design

Thought About Food Podcast
Tony Chackal on Supper Clubs

Thought About Food Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 63:23


This episode we spoke with Tony Chackal about "supper clubs" -- how you can start one, and the political, social, and cultural implications of the practice of providing food as a host or receiving food as a guest. Show Notes: Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show. Tony Chackal is a philosopher and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at Miami University. Tony kindly agreed to create a playlist to listen to with your supper club. Take a listen, and if you start a supper club, let us know! The book I couldn't come up with the name of was obviously Bowling Alone The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a possible inspiration for a "pre-breakfast club" that you could also consider starting. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

Reframe from Miami University
BONUS: New Media Technology, Global Geopolitics, and the Future of Sport

Reframe from Miami University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 22:07


On this special bonus episode, we continue the conversation with Adam Beissel, Miami University assistant professor sport leadership and management. This time we look ahead to the future of sport. We discuss how various technological, economic, and social factors will continue to shape the industry, as well as what new media and even global geopolitics will mean for the kinds sports that may dominate the U.S. in the years ahead.

This Podcast Will Kill You
Ep 81 Chagas disease: The Reverse Triple Discovery

This Podcast Will Kill You

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 109:25


A nighttime “kiss” from a bug that casts a curse on its recipient in the form of a lifelong, and possibly fatal, illness. No, this isn't some half-remembered fairy tale. It's the true story of Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by many species of triatomines (aka kissing bugs). In this episode, we take you through the utterly complicated biology of Chagas disease in its acute and chronic forms, the surprising evolutionary and historical background of this parasite and the scientist for whom it's named, and finally the grim reality that is the global status of Chagas disease today.  The dizzying ecological complexity and pathophysiological mystery of this disease makes it a challenge to study, and the lack of funding only compounds the issue; Chagas disease bears the dubious distinction of the most neglected of all the neglected tropical diseases. In spite of this, many people are dedicated to easing the global burden of Chagas disease, and we were delighted to interview two of these Chagas champions for this episode. Daisy Hernandez, Associate Professor at Miami University, joins us to discuss the inspiration for her recent book The Kissing Bug: A True Story of a Family, an Insect, and a Nation's Neglect of a Deadly Disease, and Dr. Sarah Hamer, Associate Professor at Texas A&M University, delves into the ecological aspects of this disease and shares the incredible community science program that raises awareness about T. cruzi and the bugs that transmit it. To learn more, check out the links below: Daisy Hernandez: website, Twitter (@daisyhernandez), Instagram (@iamdazeher), Facebook  Dr. Sarah Hamer: lab website, lab Twitter (@hamer_lab), Community Science Program See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Black to Nature
Free the Land, Free the People--with Roxanne Ornelas

Black to Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 45:56


I talk to indigenous rights scholar and geographer Roxanne Ornelas of Miami University about indigenous land rights, the environment, and the National Parks.

Life and Football
Drew Engels - Erskine College OL Coach / Run Game Coordinator / Rec. Coord.

Life and Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 16:37


In this episode of the Life and Football Podcast our special guest was Drew Engels. Drew Engels is the offensive line coach, run-game coordinator, and recruiting coordinator for the Flying Fleet of Erskine College. Engels was the offensive line coach and run game coordinator for the Fire at Southeastern University. He spent three seasons as the offensive line coach, assistant head coach, and recruiting coordinator at Warner University. There, he tutored two-time AFCA All-American tackle Dajshon Oliver. Under the tutelage of Engels, the Royals' offensive line went from giving up nearly three sacks per game to 1.3. During the 2014 season, Engels was a graduate assistant for Chuck Martin at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, working with the Redhawks' offensive line. He also spent two seasons working at Western Michigan University under coaches Bill Cubit and P.J. Fleck. Engels has also coached at Hope College, where he graduated from, as well as Grand Valley State University, helping the Lakers reach the NCAA Division II Championship, and Grandville High School. The Life and Football Podcast is available on the following platforms Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Anchor, Spotify, Breaker, Overcast Pocketcasts, Radio Public, Stitcher, Player FM, & YouTube!

Enrollment Insights Podcast
#35 - Jaime Hunt and Building Thriving Creative Design Teams

Enrollment Insights Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 32:15


In this episode, you will hear from Jaime Hunt, VP and CMO at Miami University. Jaime has been Vice President and Chief Communications and Marketing Officer at Miami University since September 2020. Prior to that, she was Vice Chancellor for Strategic Communications and Chief Communications and Marketing Officer at Winston-Salem State University (2015-2020). She began her career in 1997 as a print journalist in St. Paul, Minnesota, covering K-12 education and city government. Her first role in higher education was at Northwestern Health Sciences University (2004-2007) where she served as a Public Relations Coordinator. She has also served at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (2007-2010) and Radford University (2010-2015). She has been actively involved in the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education since 2006, was a board member for the College News Association of the Carolinas (2017-2019), and founded the College Communicators of the North Carolina Piedmont. She also served as Vice Chair of the Women's Fund of Winston-Salem (2020). 0:52 - You can't approach staff with "one-size-fits-all" project handoffs 2:20 - Getting to know staff when you aren't in the same place 3:33 - Working with different styles within a team or project 6:33 - Input from diverse points of view to improve creativity and brainstorming 8:26 - How to ask for feedback to ensure you get valuable feedback 10:49 - Creating space for creativity as a team with design challenges 14:49 - Setting up effective marketing and communication teams 15:54 - Using brand guidelines as guardrails rather than walls 17:16 - How to approach writing and maintaining brand guidelines 19:06 - Supporting staff creativity within rigid guidelines and cyclical work 21:52 - How the pandemic has helped and hindered creativity 23:41- How to communicate your needs and vision to the creative team for successful project outcomes 29:08 - Tips for getting to a CMO or Marketing leadership role 31:09 - How to continue the conversation Show notes are available on the Enrollment Insights Blog at niche.bz/podcast. In the Enrollment Insights Podcast, you'll hear about novel solutions to problems, ways to make processes better for students, and the questions that spark internal reflection and end up changing entire processes.

Grating the Nutmeg
125. Precious Memories Captured in Hair

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 20:47


In this episode, join Mary Donohue, Asst. Publisher of Connecticut Explored, for a discussion with Dr. Helen Sheumaker about Victorian jewelry and wreaths made from human hair. Dr. Sheumaker is the author of Love Entwined: The Curious History of Human Hair Work.  She teaches history and American Studies at Miami University of Ohio. Find out more about this now unfashionable way to remember your loved ones!   Read Dr. Sheumaker's feature story in the Fall 2021 issue of Connecticut Explored-order your copy at ctexplored.org   And see more about her book here: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Entwined-Curious-History-Hairwork/dp/0812240146/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Love+Entwined&qid=1630356702&sr=8-2 This episode was produced by Mary Donohue, Assistant Publisher of Connecticut Explored, and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan. Donohue has documented Connecticut's built environment and popular culture for over 30 years. Contact her at marydonohue@comcast.net  And our thanks to the Lane Public Library in Oxford, Ohio for providing Dr. Sheumaker with a recording space. Want to know more about Connecticut's landmarks, museums, art, and history? Subscribe to Connecticut Explored-in your mailbox or inbox. And for a daily dose of history, visit Today in Connecticut History produced by the Connecticut State Historian at TodayinCThistory.com

Major Insight
Balancing Biomedical Engineering, Virtual Reality, and Video Games

Major Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 15:37


Imagine smart prosthetics that anticipate and respond to the user. Unlocking the secrets of human balance inside virtual worlds. Or combining computer programing with genetic engineering. It may sound like science fiction. But it's all part of the college experience for Gabe Lenneman ‘22. As a senior studying Biomedical Engineering and Bioinformatics, Gabe also competes on the waterski team and plays on the varsity eSports team. On this episode, he also talks about finding the courage to try new things, advice he would give his freshman self, and more. Featured Majors: Bioengineering, Bioinformatics Featured Organizations and Internships: Waterski team, Varsity Esports team

Truss Levelz w/ Cam Jordan & Mark Ingram

Baltimore Ravens stud, All-Decade defensive end and Walter Payton Man of the Year, Calais Campbell, joins the guys on this week's episode of Truss Levelz. The future Hall of Famer and one of the true D-line beasts of the league talks it all, from his time at The U to wreaking havoc throughout the NFL. Hell, just tune in for his incredible voice. Calais is as real as it comes!   Career goals and going for 100 career sacks this season [5:00]  Growing up in Denver and dominating at basketball [6:25] Going to the University of Miami and playing tight end [11:20] Getting drafted by the Arizona Cardinals and playing in the Super Bowl [25:45] Going from Arizona to Jacksonville [37:40] Almost winning Defensive Player of the Year [43:35]  Winning the 2019 Walter Payton Man of the Year award [45:44]   About Our Hosts: NFL superstars, Cam Jordan and Mark Ingram are former Saints teammates and real-life friends whose personalities, minds, and hearts are as big as their talent on the field. Brimming with an infectious energy, these two juggernauts have joined forces to bring you Truss Levelz. A podcast where the best and brightest in the NFL share stories that go beyond the X's and O's while spreading good vibes far-and-wide. On its surface, football is a game of combat enacted by athletes at the peak of their performance. It's the definition of rough & tumble and not for the faint of heart. But there's so much more to these gridiron warriors than what we see on the field. Prepare yourself for the ultimate inside look into the world of football. There's levels to this game… Truss. Other places to find Truss Levelz:  Subscribe on Youtube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXxForFmBnEvxKtoU3tyndZZZtaa4pth9 Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trusslevelz If you liked this episode, please don't forget to subscribe, tune in, and share this podcast. You may also leave us a review anywhere you listen and share your feedback!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in Food
Susan V. Spellman, "Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business" (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:05


In this episode for the Economic and Business History channel, I interviewed Dr. Susan V. Spellman, Associate Professor of History at Miami University. She is the author of Cornering the Market Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business (Oxford University Press, 2016). In popular stereotypes, local grocers were avuncular men who spent their days in pickle-barrel conversations and checkers games; they were backward small-town merchants resistant to modernizing impulses. Cornering the Market challenges these conventions to demonstrate that nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century grocers were important but unsung innovators of business models and retail technologies that fostered the rise of contemporary retailing. Small grocery owners revolutionized business practices from the bottom by becoming the first retailers to own and operate cash registers, develop new distribution paths, and engage in transforming the grocery trade from local enterprises to a nationwide industry. Drawing on storekeepers' diaries, business ledgers and documents, and the letters of merchants, wholesalers, traveling men, and consumers, Susan V. Spellman details the remarkable achievements of American small businessmen and their major contributions to the making of "modern" enterprise in the United States. The development of mass production, distribution, and marketing, the growth of regional and national markets, and the introduction of new organizational and business methods fundamentally changed the structures of American capitalism. Within the walls of their stores, proprietors confronted these changes by crafting solutions centered on notions of efficiency, scale, and price control. Without abandoning local ties, they turned social concepts of the community into commercial profitability. It was a powerful combination that businesses from chain stores to Walmart continue to exploit today. Paula De La Cruz-Fernandez is a consultant, historian, and digital editor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

New Books Network
Susan V. Spellman, "Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business" (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:05


In this episode for the Economic and Business History channel, I interviewed Dr. Susan V. Spellman, Associate Professor of History at Miami University. She is the author of Cornering the Market Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business (Oxford University Press, 2016). In popular stereotypes, local grocers were avuncular men who spent their days in pickle-barrel conversations and checkers games; they were backward small-town merchants resistant to modernizing impulses. Cornering the Market challenges these conventions to demonstrate that nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century grocers were important but unsung innovators of business models and retail technologies that fostered the rise of contemporary retailing. Small grocery owners revolutionized business practices from the bottom by becoming the first retailers to own and operate cash registers, develop new distribution paths, and engage in transforming the grocery trade from local enterprises to a nationwide industry. Drawing on storekeepers' diaries, business ledgers and documents, and the letters of merchants, wholesalers, traveling men, and consumers, Susan V. Spellman details the remarkable achievements of American small businessmen and their major contributions to the making of "modern" enterprise in the United States. The development of mass production, distribution, and marketing, the growth of regional and national markets, and the introduction of new organizational and business methods fundamentally changed the structures of American capitalism. Within the walls of their stores, proprietors confronted these changes by crafting solutions centered on notions of efficiency, scale, and price control. Without abandoning local ties, they turned social concepts of the community into commercial profitability. It was a powerful combination that businesses from chain stores to Walmart continue to exploit today. Paula De La Cruz-Fernandez is a consultant, historian, and digital editor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Susan V. Spellman, "Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business" (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:05


In this episode for the Economic and Business History channel, I interviewed Dr. Susan V. Spellman, Associate Professor of History at Miami University. She is the author of Cornering the Market Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business (Oxford University Press, 2016). In popular stereotypes, local grocers were avuncular men who spent their days in pickle-barrel conversations and checkers games; they were backward small-town merchants resistant to modernizing impulses. Cornering the Market challenges these conventions to demonstrate that nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century grocers were important but unsung innovators of business models and retail technologies that fostered the rise of contemporary retailing. Small grocery owners revolutionized business practices from the bottom by becoming the first retailers to own and operate cash registers, develop new distribution paths, and engage in transforming the grocery trade from local enterprises to a nationwide industry. Drawing on storekeepers' diaries, business ledgers and documents, and the letters of merchants, wholesalers, traveling men, and consumers, Susan V. Spellman details the remarkable achievements of American small businessmen and their major contributions to the making of "modern" enterprise in the United States. The development of mass production, distribution, and marketing, the growth of regional and national markets, and the introduction of new organizational and business methods fundamentally changed the structures of American capitalism. Within the walls of their stores, proprietors confronted these changes by crafting solutions centered on notions of efficiency, scale, and price control. Without abandoning local ties, they turned social concepts of the community into commercial profitability. It was a powerful combination that businesses from chain stores to Walmart continue to exploit today. Paula De La Cruz-Fernandez is a consultant, historian, and digital editor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Susan V. Spellman, "Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business" (Oxford UP, 2016)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:05


In this episode for the Economic and Business History channel, I interviewed Dr. Susan V. Spellman, Associate Professor of History at Miami University. She is the author of Cornering the Market Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business (Oxford University Press, 2016). In popular stereotypes, local grocers were avuncular men who spent their days in pickle-barrel conversations and checkers games; they were backward small-town merchants resistant to modernizing impulses. Cornering the Market challenges these conventions to demonstrate that nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century grocers were important but unsung innovators of business models and retail technologies that fostered the rise of contemporary retailing. Small grocery owners revolutionized business practices from the bottom by becoming the first retailers to own and operate cash registers, develop new distribution paths, and engage in transforming the grocery trade from local enterprises to a nationwide industry. Drawing on storekeepers' diaries, business ledgers and documents, and the letters of merchants, wholesalers, traveling men, and consumers, Susan V. Spellman details the remarkable achievements of American small businessmen and their major contributions to the making of "modern" enterprise in the United States. The development of mass production, distribution, and marketing, the growth of regional and national markets, and the introduction of new organizational and business methods fundamentally changed the structures of American capitalism. Within the walls of their stores, proprietors confronted these changes by crafting solutions centered on notions of efficiency, scale, and price control. Without abandoning local ties, they turned social concepts of the community into commercial profitability. It was a powerful combination that businesses from chain stores to Walmart continue to exploit today. Paula De La Cruz-Fernandez is a consultant, historian, and digital editor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Cincinnati Edition
Last Military Flight Leaves Kabul Airport

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 31:43


Miami University experts discuss the Taliban's resurgence.

Hidden Brain
You 2.0: Regrets, I Have a Few...

Hidden Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 28:47


We all have regrets. By some estimates, regret is one of the most common emotions we experience in our daily lives. In the final episode of our You 2.0 series, we bring you a favorite interview with Amy Summerville, the former head of the Regret Lab at Miami University in Ohio. After years of studying this emotion, she says she's learned something that may seem counterintuitive: regret doesn't always have to be a negative force in our lives.  If you like our work, please consider supporting it! See how you can help at support.hiddenbrain.org. And to learn more about human behavior and ideas that can improve your life, subscribe to our newsletter at news.hiddenbrain.org.

Grow Microbiology
Lecture in a box: Understand vaccine basics & the details of the vaccines used for COVID-19 by Microbiology author Kelly Cowan

Grow Microbiology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 38:56


COVID-19 has challenged everyone to understand how vaccines work and how we can ensure their safety.  This talk from microbiology author Marjorie Kelly Cowan is an update of her early summer talk and provides vaccine basics and then the particulars of the vaccines used for COVID-19. Be sure that your students have access to an authoritative source of information amongst all the noise in the cybersphere concerning vaccines, with this 38-minute video pulling on concepts and figures from her microbiology textbooks.If you would like to view this lecture visually, click here: https://www.mheducation.com/highered/highered/discipline-detail/microbiology/vaccines-and-covid-19.htmlAbout the AuthorKelly Cowan has taught microbiology to pre-nursing and allied health students for over 20 years. She received her PhD from the University of Louisville and held postdoctoral positions at the University of Maryland and the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her campus, Miami University Middletown, is an open admissions regional campus of Miami University in Ohio. She has also authored over 25 basic research papers with her undergraduate and graduate students. For the past several years, she has turned her focus to studying pedagogical techniques that narrow the gap between under resourced students and well-resourced students. She is past chair of the American Society for Microbiology's Undergraduate Education committee and past chair of ASM's education division, Division W.

Food Fight!
College = Drink Beer, Eat Garbage, Rinse, Repeat

Food Fight!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 80:56


Kirk went to college at the University of New Hampshire in the late '80s/early ‘90s. Lindsey went to college at Miami University in the early to mid 2000s. But despite their different locations and slight (SLIGHT) age difference, they both have one thing in common; they both ate like trash monsters for all four years of higher learning. So that's what this episode is all about! The two dig into all of the glorious sadness that is college food: ramen, cup o' noodles, microwave nachos, late-night pizza, soup and crackers, Velveeta Mac & Cheese, frozen stir fry in a bag, even…rice cakes? And, apropos of nothing, Lindsey reveals that she didn't know burps could smell until she went to college. Honestly, it's amazing these two even graduated. Email us at foodfightthepodcast@gmail.com Follow instagram.com/yummy Follow Lindsey: instagram.com/lindseygentile Hosts: Kirk Pynchon & Lindsey Gentile Producer: Kirk Pynchon Producer/Engineer: Andrew Price Theme song by: Kirk “Dad Beats” Pynchon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We Should Talk About That
We Should Talk About Botox. A WeSTAT Skincare Consultation with Medical Esthetician, Jennifer Daniels.

We Should Talk About That

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 54:46


The Two Jess(es) start off Season 3 with a bang, and get really vulnerable about.....their faces. JessB gets really honest about what she sees going on under her eyes, and while way back in Season 1, she waxed poetic about aging and her right to eye bags, she has decided, she's done.In their quest for hearing all sides of the skincare story, and in an effort to appease their curiosity and get some answers to the burning question for almost every woman over 40: WHAT IS HAPPENING TO MY F%&*ING FACE! And what can I do about it?JessK brings in THE EXPERT to answer ALL the questions, and these answers are brought to us by non other than her sister, Jennifer Daniels. Jennifer is a medical esthetician, and owner of The Med Spa (https://themedsparaleigh.com/) which is one of the top med spas in the greater Raliegh area. Jennifer generously offers her advice, and professional wisdom, as she patiently answers all of Jess and Jess' questions about prevention and correction, neurotoxins, fillers, creams, just to name a few. JessK shares her thoughts and experience around her own use with injectables, and the thought process behind it. The constant conundrum of aging gracefully with authenticity, or with the assistance of modern science, the largest organ of our body and how we care for it is always cause for interesting, and sometimes heated, conversations!Meet Jennifer!“Beautiful skin is attainable for everyone and finding the right balance of products and treatments for clients is what I do best.  A skincare routine just has to work for you.  I am a product enthusiast, and I'm always researching how ingredients react with other components to achieve the optimal skincare regimen.”After her daughter started kindergarten, Jennifer decided she needed a change from her decade-plus career in sales and marketing. She wanted to follow her lifelong passion for skincare and layer on to her B.S. in Business Administration from Miami University. She went back to school, graduated top of her class in Esthetics at Miller Motte College and went on to acquire Laser Certification at the Laser Institute in Albany, NY.  Jennifer has been affiliated with Raleigh Plastic Surgery Center since 2008 and began The MedSpa in early 2013.Jennifer is wholeheartedly committed to the improvement of clients' skin and addressing their skin's appearance  and concerns. Her favorite part of her job is conversing with patients to get insight into their wants, needs and expectations about aging, sorting through the myriad of products on the market and their skincare goals.  “Integrated skincare performed with integrity” it's a mantra Jennifer embodies and what has landed The Medspa as one of the top rated medical spas in the Triangle.Favorite beauty service: Eyelash tinting! The best way to make your eyes pop (of course after you use Latisse or Revitalash to grow long lush lashes!)Favorite skincare product: Hydrating B5 gel by Skinceuticals hands down! Comprised of Hyaluronic acid, EVERYONE can use it. Everyone needs it! Hydrates to create supple, flawless skin—I have used HA for a decade!Support the show (http://www.paypal.com)

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison
[Repost] #192: Why We Can't Fight Weight Stigma While Also Advocating for Weight Loss with Jeffrey Hunger, Social Psychologist and Weight-Stigma Researcher

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 90:04


Social psychologist and weight-stigma researcher Jeffrey Hunger joins us to discuss why we can't fight weight stigma while also advocating for weight loss, how “wellness” has been co-opted by diet culture (aka The Wellness Diet), why we need to do more than just tell people “diets don't work,” the role of critical thinking in taking down diet culture, and so much more! Plus, Christy answers a listener question about how to handle cravings for sugar and “processed” foods after a restrictive Wellness Diet. (This episode originally aired on April 8, 2019.) Jeffrey Hunger, PhD, is currently a postdoctoral scholar in Health Psychology at UCLA and will be joining the Miami University as an assistant professor in Psychology this fall. He received his Bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Minnesota, Master's degree in psychological research from CSU Fullerton, and PhD in Psychological and Brain Sciences from UC Santa Barbara. As a social and health psychologist, Dr. Hunger is interested in using insights from psychology to understand and ultimately improve the health of stigmatized groups, including heavier individuals, and racial and sexual minorities. Dr. Hunger's research is published in top outlets across psychology, public health, and medicine, and has been featured in The New York Times, Huffington Post, NPR, and more. To learn more about him and his work, please visit JeffreyHunger.com. Subscribe to our newsletter, Food Psych Weekly, to keep getting new weekly Q&As and other new content while the podcast is on hiatus! If you're ready to break free from diet culture once and for all, come check out Christy's Intuitive Eating Fundamentals online course. You'll get all your questions answered in an exclusive monthly podcast, plus ongoing support in our private community forum and dozens of hours of other great content. Christy's first book, Anti-Diet, is available wherever you get your books. Order online at christyharrison.com/book, or at local bookstores across North America, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand. Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, for help getting started on the anti-diet path. For full show notes and a transcript of this episode, go to christyharrison.com/foodpsych. Ask your own question about intuitive eating, Health at Every Size, or eating disorder recovery at christyharrison.com/questions.

The Sport Psych Show
#155 Dr Marina Harris & Shameema Yousuf - Simone Biles: Redefining Mental Toughness

The Sport Psych Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 58:19


I'm delighted to speak with Dr Marina Harris and Shameema Yousuf in this episode. Marina recently graduated with her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Nevada. She also has a Master's degree in Kinesiology and Health with an emphasis in sport psychology from Miami University. She also spends part of her time in the University of North Carolina Athletics Department, working with athletes to improve their mental wellness and sport performance. Shameema is a HCPC registered sport psychologist, registered clinical mental health counsellor and is a member of APA, AASP, and BASES. Shameema has a private practice working with youth athletes all the way up to elite athletes. We discuss a fantastic paper Marina recently wrote entitled “Simone Biles and Team USA Redefine Mental Toughness - The true definition of mental grit and what we can learn from it” which Shameema provided her expert opinion on.  

Stats + Stories
Communicating Statistics Effectively | Stats and Stories at JSM 2019 (Repost)

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 20:43


In honor of this year's Joint Statistical Meetings, this week's episode is a repost of a conversation John Bailer and Brain Tarran, of Significance Magazine, had at JSM 2019 about communicating statistical information at a large-scale professional event. John Bailer is “the stats guy” and co-creator of Stats+Stories. He is also a University Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Statistics at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He is currently President-elect of the International Statistical Institute and previously served on the previously on the ASA Board of Directors. His scholarly interests include the design and analysis of environmental toxicology experiments and occupational health studies, quantitative risk estimation, gerontological data analysis, promoting quantitative literacy, and enhancing connections between statistics and journalism.

Business Daily
Doping in eSports: the billion-dollar pill

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 17:28


Doping is a growing problem in the multi-billion dollar industry of competitive online gaming – but remains an open secret. As prize money runs in to the millions, are more young people turning to drugs to stay focused to win? With major league eSport athletes admitting to mass doping, we speak with the founder of the world's first eSport university programme - Dr Glenn Platt at Miami University, Ohio - who tells us the casual attitude to doping for performance enhancement. Varsity eSport players Jared Shapiro and Jennifer Frank tell us that doping using Adderall and Ritalin are engrained within eSports, making it to difficult ban, when so many gamers need them for medical purposes. Doping in eSport regulator Ian Smith from the eSports Integrity Commission says that the major tournament organisers and games publishers should foot the bill for testing – which is severely underfunded. But while the major names – DOTA 2, Overwatch and League of Legends – continue to grow in users during lockdown, Craig Fletcher, an eSports tournament organiser, says the business has less money to spend on regulation, after coronavirus stops people gathering for tournaments. (Image: Pixelated pills. Credit: non157 / Getty Images)

In The Trenches with Dave Lapham
Chuck Martin In The Trenches with Dave Lapham

In The Trenches with Dave Lapham

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 42:36


In our newest episode of In The Trenches with Dave Lapham, presented by First Star Logistics, we welcome Miami University head football coach Chuck Martin. It's easy to see why Coach Chuck Martin has been a winner during his coaching career, having won conference and even NCAA Division II championships. While Chuck Martin may not have seen a career as a coach, many who coached him along the way saw the makings of one. Coach Martin returns to his youth in Park Forest, Illinois, his prep career at Rich East High School, and his college career at Millikin University. Along the way, Coach Martin talks about his coaching career that started at Mankato State and his time with Brian Kelly at Grand Valley State and Notre Dame before taking the helm at Miami University. I feel you're going to see why Chuck Martin has been a very successful football coach.

Making Sense
Interview: What is that Thing's Value Today?

Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 58:00


Professor Sam Williamson, economic historian, explains how the value of commodities, projects and income/wealth should be properly measured across time (AND IT IS NOT WITH A CPI INDEX!). Otherwise, like a recent NY Times article, your worth may be off by a factor of 20!!!!--------EP. 90 REFERENCES--------Measuring Worth: https://bit.ly/36TfZZDMeasuring Worth Twitter: https://bit.ly/3BuZotfMeasuring Worth Blog: https://bit.ly/3rqyz4RNY Times Tulsa Article: https://nyti.ms/3eKKDIRNational Geographic Tulsa Article: https://on.natgeo.com/3izkL41---------SEE IT-----------Alhambra YouTube: https://bit.ly/2Xp3royEmil YouTube: https://bit.ly/310yisL---------HEAR IT----------Vurbl: https://bit.ly/3rq4dPn Apple: https://apple.co/3czMcWNDeezer: https://bit.ly/3ndoVPEiHeart: https://ihr.fm/31jq7cITuneIn: http://tun.in/pjT2ZCastro: https://bit.ly/30DMYzaGoogle: https://bit.ly/3e2Z48MSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3arP8mYPandora: https://pdora.co/2GQL3QgBreaker: https://bit.ly/2CpHAFOCastbox: https://bit.ly/3fJR5xQPodbean: https://bit.ly/2QpaDghStitcher: https://bit.ly/2C1M1GBPlayerFM: https://bit.ly/3piLtjVPodchaser: https://bit.ly/3oFCrwNPocketCast: https://pca.st/encarkdtSoundCloud: https://bit.ly/3l0yFfKListenNotes: https://bit.ly/38xY7pbAmazonMusic: https://amzn.to/2UpEk2PPodcastAddict: https://bit.ly/2V39Xjr----EPISODE #90 TOPICS----0:00:00 The NYTimes says the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot cost $27M. And Professor Williamson? $534m.0:06:24 Introducing Professor Samuel H. Williamson0:09:21 At what point does using "CPI" to value something in the past stop making sense?0:11:25 George Washington's nephew asked to borrow $1,000 in 1800 - how much is that worth now?0:16:03 Why does the mainstream press continue to use woefully inadequate estimates of worth?0:16:38 How does one select the correct measure of present worth for a historical value?0:20:45 What does Professor Williamson think about the current "transitory" inflation debate?0:29:41 Is the CPI a good, best effort measure of inflation in the United States?0:31:53 Are alternative measures of inflation better than the CPI?0:36:06 Mainstream economic data implies a preciseness that is illusory.0:38:56 The headlines in the media are merely the surface of deeper, complex concepts.0:40:26 A real price value of the Empire State Building doesn't tell us what it is worth today.0:44:26 MeasuringWorth has data for the US, UK, Spain, Australia, gold, silver, stocks, etc.0:47:48 Is their a pension crisis? ---------WHO-----------Samuel H. Williamson, cofounder / president of MeasuringWorth, cofounder of The Cliometric Society, creator of EH.net and Professor of Economics, Emeritus, from Miami University with Jeff Snider, Head of Global Investment Research for Alhambra Investments, and Emil Kalinowski. Podcast intro/outro is "Mama's Woogie Mojo" by Wendy Marcini at Epidemic Sound. Art by David Parkins.

Coach and Coordinator Podcast
Defending RPO From 1 High - Chuck Martin, Head Coach, Miami University (OH)

Coach and Coordinator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 16:40


In this segment of his clinic talk at the Illinois HS Football Coaches Association Clinic, Chuck Martin, Head Coach, Miami (OH)explains how they utilize a 1-high structure to Defend the RPO. They take the approach that they will make an offense 1 dimensional while taking away conflict from their own defenders. For them it's about keeping their best linebackers in the box and not allowing the offense to dictate and make them apex players who have to get on the edge and tackle in space. Coach points out that they know what their kids are good at and they ask them to do those things. Their 1 high system is simple and gives them the advantage in getting aligned quickly. Coach shares more on the benefits of their system and examples of their success. The entire talk with game film is available on CoachTube: https://bit.ly/3kKQCkY Find all of the courses from the IHSFCA here: https://bit.ly/3kLBPGr Lou Tepper on the Coach and Coordinator Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/user-804678956/3-3-stack-and-linebacker-play-former-fbs-coach-lou-tepper

Finding Genius Podcast
Discussing the Timing of Life and Evolutionary Changes with Nicholas P. Money

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 27:54


Nicholas (Nik) P. Money is a Professor and Director of the Western Program at Miami University. He has spent most of his professional career studying fungi and other microorganisms and has published several books on the topics. His new book, Nature Fast and Nature Slow, was released in the summer of 2021 and focuses on biology from a unique perspective, the timing of life.  Click on play to learn: How miniscule units of time can be used to study fast mechanisms over slivers of time.  Why Professor Money chose to focus his new book on the passing of time. What the prospects may be for human life extension. The subtitle of Nik Money's new book is, “How Life Works, From Fractions of a Second to Billions of Years.” He captures the reader's attention with thought provoking statements about how quickly time seems to pass, shares the concept of milliseconds, and discusses nature slow which stretches out over billions of years.  The book explores the timetable of the universe in ten chapters with each chapter focusing on a particular slice of time beginning with nature fast. In the first chapter, Money discusses the evolution of nematocysts and expands on the evolution of the branches of the tree of life including sea slugs, anemones, comb jellies, and flatworms.  Each chapter in the book opens a new world of information on evolutionary changes over time. The author discusses specific topics such as bowhead whales, bats, and bristlecones. He is already planting the seeds of a new book that focuses on nature big and small. To learn more visit: https://themycologist.com Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

ADHD reWired
381 | Resilience and Loss with Christian Morrow

ADHD reWired

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 59:28


"When you look at entrepreneurs, some of the most successful people in this world come from broken homes and troubled childhoods and poverty, and it's because they've been able to navigate adversity and they're so good at it." Listen as your host Eric Tivers and his guest Christian Morrow discuss growing up with ADHD, facing disease and addiction and depression in parents, and how Christian has and continues to work through the events of his life on this episode of . Diagnosed with ADHD as a child, Christian has learned to navigate both a personal and professional life, as well as cope with tragedy in his personal life. More recently, he was also diagnosed with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and his father passed away at age 64. He couldn't enjoy his early 20s like most other young adults and found himself having to get organized and grow up really quickly just as he was about to finish college. His plans for grad school and his life were even put on hold for a while. From dealing with a parent with an addiction to the loss of a parent to suicide while he was in college, Christian has developed a new perspective about life, resiliency, and self-discovery. Now, he currently works in higher education where he recruits for Miami University and deals directly with respective college students, counselors, and faculty every semester. He's also just graduated from grad school and has a home and a 4-year-old girl with his fiancée. Listen as Christian shares his experiences as a child with ADHD and the effect of his dad's leukemia and addiction and his mother's depression in his life from elementary school through college. He also reveals the difficulty he faced in trying to complete his education during some traumatic events involving his parents, discusses handling the aftermath of his mother's death, and talks about how he continues to process what has happened in his life. You'll learn: [02:47] Welcome to the show, Christian! [04:50] How did Adderall and Strattera affect Christian? [06:54] A leukemia diagnosis for his dad in 1995 triggered the start of Christian's hectic life. [09:02] Christian's dad traded in his family for his addiction. [10:24] Christian discusses the beginning point of his mother's depression. [12:24] After a period of rehabilitation, Christian's dad moved back in with his son and ex-wife. [14:40] Why has Christian always preferred writing in cursive over print? [16:07] Miami U delivered a letter to Christian that kicked things into high gear. [24:31] For a few years, Christian was living two lives as a college student and a caretaker. [25:47] Christian discusses his OCD as a trauma response. [27:01] What was it about teaching middle schoolers that turned Christian off? [28:47] On the morning of April 10, 2015, Christian got some bad news from his dad. [31:17] Christian became the executor of his mom's estate at age 22. [33:05] What kind of strategies helped Christian get organized? [38:23] ADHD is never just on an island by itself. It's part of the greater picture of life. [39:55] Christian's already done so much at age 29, and he's often told he has an old soul. [42:01] How does Christian continue to process the events of his life? [44:32] Christian has felt obligated to take care of others, but how does he take care of himself? [46:05] If you've recently found out you have ADHD or are struggling with it, Christian offers this advice. [48:38] Christian has this thing about not starting anything unless he knows he'll win or be successful beforehand. [50:27] How did his own upbringing shape Christian as a dad now? [53:16] To wrap up the show, Christian shares what he thinks listeners should take away from this conversation. [55:10] If you are a regular listener, consider becoming a patron by clicking on our Patreon tab at  .