Podcasts about Slavery

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Treatment of people as property

  • 6,231PODCASTS
  • 11,940EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 17, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Slavery

Show all podcasts related to slavery

Latest podcast episodes about Slavery

Sense of Soul Podcast
Systemic Racism and Critical Race Theory

Sense of Soul Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 83:38


Today on Sense of Soul Podcast,  we have with us the host of Systemic: a podcast about race, Dan Kimbrough he is an Award-winning documentary and visual media producer. An experienced and passionate educator that has taught courses ranging from basic video production to mobile journalism. Successfully overhauled and designed various media production and broadcast facilities.  Dan's podcast “Systemic, a podcast about race”, explores the aspects of race and racism in America. His goal is to educate and explain the intertwining of race as a systemic part of American culture. Dan shares topics of Slavery, Critical Race Theory to his own personal life experiences. In this episode Dan breaks that shit down so that we all have a better understanding of Critical Race Theory and Systemic Racism. We share Dan's hope to enlighten and drive Amercans to help work towards an anti-racist future. https://parkmultimedia.com Find Dan's wonderful podcast Systemic and learn more about him at his website. www.dankimbrough.com Follow Dan's Journey at his Twitter and Linkden below  @dankimbrough  Linkden Don't forget to rate, follow and leave us a comment! You can listen to the EXTENDED VERSION of this episode AD FREE on Patreon and NOW on Sense of Soul Patreon listen to Shanna's mini-series about her ancestral journey, “Untangled Roots” and Mande's mini series about her two NDE's has begun.  https://www.patreon.com/senseofsoul NEW!! SENSE OF SOUL'S NETWORK OF LIGHTWORKERS! Announcing our Amazing Affliate, Kelle Sparta aka The Spirit Doctor and her amazing programs, you can sign up here through Sense of Soul. https://www.mysenseofsoul.com/sense-of-soul-affiliates-page Visit us at www.mysenseofsoul.com

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
The 1619 Project Violates Several Major Points in US History: Seth Liebsohn with Wilfred Reilly

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 19:24


Seth Liebsohn speaks with Wilfred Reilly about the lies in the 1619 project. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Footnoting History
Winnie-the-Pooh

Footnoting History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 20:23


(Christine) Winnie-the-Pooh has lived in the the hearts of people of all ages since the 1920s. Here, Christine traces the life of the famous bear (and his friends) from his origins in the family of author A.A. Milne and his acquisition by the Disney Company, all the way to his current place of residence. For more information, please visit FootnotingHistory.com

KQED’s Forum
Reparations Task Force Sheds Light on History of Slavery in California

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 55:29


Conversations about the history of slavery are often confined to the North and the South, with the West viewed as a free “promised land.” But California passed laws, like the Fugitive Slave Act of 1852, that reinforced the institution of slavery, and otherwise allowed coerced, unpaid labor in the state. And the laws impacted more than just Black people, too. Historian Stacey L. Smith writes in her book “Freedom's Frontier” that “ diverse forms of American Indian servitude, sexual trafficking in bound women, and contract labor involving Latin Americans, Asians, and Pacific Islanders all kept the slavery question alive in California during the 1850s.” This history has been brought to the fore in recent weeks as the state's Reparations Task Force continues to hear testimony about the impacts of slavery on African Americans. We take a closer look at this part of California's past and why it matters.

Embrace The Void
EV - 225 Reconsidering Reparations with Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò

Embrace The Void

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 70:38


My guest this week is Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, assistant professor at Georgetown university pan african community action. We discuss his new book Reconsidering Reparations and the scale of change needed to bring about global justice.Reconsidering Reparations: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/reconsidering-reparations-9780197508893?cc=us&lang=en&Convocation: Cedric RobinsonMusic by GW RodriguezSibling Pod Philosophers in Space: https://0gphilosophy.libsyn.com/Support us at Patreon.com/EmbraceTheVoidIf you enjoy the show, please Like and Review us on your pod app, especially iTunes. It really helps!Recent Appearances: I was on Beyond Atheism talking about moral realism for non-believers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8dZHGosvPMNext week: Sowell's History of Slavery with Charles Boyd

Westside Christian Fellowship
Addiction: Being Set Free of Voluntary Slavery

Westside Christian Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 61:05


Watch our services live at http://wcfav.org/ Free Downloads of Pastor Shane's E-books at https://westsidechristianfellowship.org/teachings/ Donate to Westside Christian Fellowship here: https://westsidechristianfellowship.org/give/ Free speech is being severely compromised. This new FREE SPEECH platform is amazing - many solid voices are moving over. You can follow Pastor Shane here on Parler https://parler.com/profile/ShaneIdleman/posts. As of now, we're still on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. Westside Christian Fellowship is a non-denominational Christian church that meets every every Sunday at 9:00 am & 11:00 am in Leona Valley, California (9306 Leona Avenue). For more info, or to read our statement of faith, visit westsidechristianfellowship.org/about-wcf/statement-of-faith/

The Mallory Bros Podcast
Episode 83 | ”That Aint

The Mallory Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 123:25


On this episode of the Mallory Bros. Podcast, they bros start with a message about consistency in the New Year. They then send an RIP message out to a few very important celebrities that unfortunately lost their lives over the past week and a half. They talk Gunna's album as it compares to Weeknd's rollout which leads to an interesting discussion about the term “P” and it's meaning. They have a discussion about the Taco Bell Wing Craze that leads to a fast food argument. They speak to their excitement about HBO's “Euphoria” making its return. They then speak to their experience as African descendants of Slavery and their experience with those in the culture who have the benefit of a “Home Country”. This conversation is inspired by the conversation the guys have about Maya Angelou's new Quarter and a different take on the Harriett Tubman 20 dollar bill. A very edgy, insightful, and honest discussion.  Lastly, the fella's recap the NFL's final regular season games and make bold picks for the Playoffs. 

Battle Fatigue
The Mess of 1835

Battle Fatigue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 44:21


Happy new 365 y'all! (Hacked by AJ, don't mind her…) *ahem* It's a new year for Battle Fatigue and we hope you had the holidays you deserved. So we know AJ loves rabbit holes and Dalin loves trying to dig her out, but this trip in a history wonderland is as ridiculous as they come. Kick back as AJ leads you through the ridiculous story of how one man's misguided ambition led to a fake slave insurrection and the secret squirrel henchmen discovered to be [no spoilers!]. It sounds wild, but like many parts of history, it's true. And if that's not enough - and more importantly - the duo will show just how closely related we are to it all today. It's the ties that bind in this one!

The Brion McClanahan Show
Ep. 564: A War Over the "History of Slavery"?

The Brion McClanahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:22


GQ Magazine thinks America is at war over "the history of slavery", at least that is what author and "historian" Clint Smith argues. You see, Smith believes that America has long lied about the history of slavery, meaning that most Americans have never been taught the "truth" about slavery. By the "truth," Smith means the abolitionist positions on the institution before the War. This would be laughable if it wasn't so stupid. No one has ever read "Uncle Tom's Cabin", or seen the picture of "Whipped Peter", or heard that John Brown was a hero. Nope. They only get the proslavery arguments and nothing else. But Smith unknowingly admits what this war is really about: power. It's always been so. https://mcclanahanacademy.com https://brionmcclanahan.com/support http://learntruehistory.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/support

The Deep End with Tim Hatch
Deep Dive Bible Study S5E13 | Romans 6: Our Slavery And The Human Will

The Deep End with Tim Hatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 56:42


Deep Dive Bible Study S5E13 | Romans 6: Our Slavery And The Human Will by Tim Hatch

The_C.O.W.S.
The C.O.W.S. w/ Dr. Kevin Waite: Reparations for Black Californians?

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Dr. Kevin Waite. A political historian of the 19th-century United States with a focus on slavery, imperialism, and the American West, Dr. Waite is an Assistant Professor of Modern American History at the Durham University in England. He's current working on project to share the history of Biddy Mason, a black female slave who helped build Los Angeles. Dr. Waite is also a member of Mayor Eric Garcetti's Steering Committee for the creation of memorial to recognize the non-white victims of the 1871 Los Angeles Chinese Massacre. Dr. Waite's work, including his historical work, West of Slavery, may be a part of the research being used by a California state task force to determine if Reparations are owed to black people. We'll see if Dr. Waite thinks will happen, and if this may be widespread - black people being compensated and repaired for centuries of White Terrorism. #Reparations INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

The Muck Podcast
Episode 106: Stay Out of the Ocean | Wyatt Outlaw & the Kirk Holden War and George Q. Cannon

The Muck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 71:11


Tina and Hillary cover Commissioner Wyatt Outlaw & the Kirk-Holden War and Utah Territorial candidate George Q. Cannon. Tina's Story Wyatt Outlaw was the first African American to be appointed Town Commissioner and constable of Graham, North Carolina in 1869. BUT when whites objected to being policed by a black man, the KKK lynch Wyatt leading to the Kirk-Holden War. Hillary's Story George Q. Cannon moved up the ranks to become a senior apostle in the Mormon Church and also served as non-voting delegate for Utah Territory in the United States Congress for 10 years beginning in 1872. BUT when political opponents learn of his plural marriages, his seat is jeopardized. Sources Tina's Story Black Then THE KIRK-HOLDEN WAR OF 1870 (https://blackthen.com/the-kirk-holden-war-of-1870/) The Murder of Wyatt Outlaw (https://blackthen.com/the-murder-of-wyatt-outlaw/)--by Matt Swift Caswell County Historical Association Kirk-Holden War (1870) (http://sites.rootsweb.com/~ncccha/memoranda/kirkholdenwar.html) City of Graham Remembrance of Constable Wyatt Outlaw (https://www.cityofgraham.com/remembrance-of-constable-wyatt-outlaw/) Civil War Era North Carolina Governor William W. Holden's Impeachment (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/items/show/962) John Walter Stephens (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/exhibits/show/republicans-kkk/john-walter-stephens) The Ku Klux Klan and the Kirk-Holden War (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/exhibits/show/republicans-kkk/kirk-holden) Elon News Network Alamance NAACP spearheads effort to rename park after Black councilman slain in 1870 (https://www.elonnewsnetwork.com/article/2021/02/rename-graham-park-after-wyatt-outlaw)--by Mackenzie Wilkes Medium The Confederate monument standing where the Klan killed Wyatt Outlaw (https://medium.com/@orangeintogrape/the-confederate-monument-standing-where-the-klan-killed-wyatt-outlaw-2884dd8d33f6)--by Mike Scott NC Pedia Governor Holden Speaks Out Against the Ku Klux Klan (https://www.ncpedia.org/anchor/governor-holden-speaks-out) The Kirk-Holden War (https://www.ncpedia.org/anchor/kirk-holden-war) Union League (https://www.ncpedia.org/union-league) North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultureal Resources Lynching of Wyatt Outlaw and the Kirk-Holden War (https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2015/02/26/lynching-of-wyatt-outlaw-and-the-kirk-holden-war) North Carolina History Holden Impeachment (https://northcarolinahistory.org/encyclopedia/holden-impeachment/) The Times News The life and tragic death of Wyatt Outlaw (https://www.thetimesnews.com/story/news/2015/08/16/the-life-tragic-death-wyatt/33672318007/) Trial of William W. Holden (https://ia802606.us.archive.org/12/items/trialofwilliamwh02hold/trialofwilliamwh02hold_bw.pdf) A Red Record Wyatt Outlaw (https://lynching.web.unc.edu/the-people/wyatt-outlaw/) Wikipedia Kirk-Holden War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirk%E2%80%93Holden_war) William Woods Holden (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Woods_Holden) Wyatt Outlaw (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyatt_Outlaw) Yes Weekly Wyatt Outlaw and the white men who put a monument where they lynched him (https://www.yesweekly.com/education/wyatt-outlaw-and-the-white-men-who-put-a-monument-where-they-lynched-him/article_7ef182a0-dc2b-11ea-a508-ab7d42bfc93b.html)--by Ian McDowell Photos Wyatt Outlaw (https://blackthen.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/wyatt...jpg)--taken from Black Then William Woods Holden (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/NCG-WilliamHolden.jpg)--via Public Domain George W. Kirk (https://www.ncpedia.org/sites/default/files/images_bio/Kirk_George_W_LoC.jpg)--from Library of Congress via Public Domain Hillary's Story BYU Religious Studies Center George Q. Cannon in Hawai‘i, 1850–54: Relationship Challenges of a Young Missionary (https://rsc.byu.edu/pioneers-pacific/george-q-cannon-hawaii-1850-54-relationship-challenges-young-missionary)--by Davis Bitton Church Historians Press The Journal of George Q. Cannon (https://www.churchhistorianspress.org/george-q-cannon/about?lang=eng) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints George Q. Cannon: A Mighty Instrument (https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/exhibit/george-q-cannon-a-mighty-instrument?lang=eng) History, Art & Archives Cannon, George Quayle (https://history.house.gov/People/Detail/10597) Utah Department of Heritage & Arts A PATRIARCH & THREE SCIONS: GEORGE Q. CANNON AND HIS OLDEST SONS JOHN, FRANK & ABRAHAM (https://heritage.utah.gov/a-patriarch-three-scions-george-q-cannon-and-his-oldest-sons-john-frank-abraham/) Wikipedia George Q. Cannon (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Q._Cannon) Photos George Q. Cannon (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/George_Q._Cannon_-_Brady-Handy.jpg/1024px-George_Q._Cannon_-_Brady-Handy.jpg)--by Mathew Benjamin Brady via Public Domain Cannon and his three oldest sons (https://heritage.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/GQC-JQC-FJC-and-AHC-1691x2048.jpg)--via Utah Department of Heritage & Arts Portrait of Polygamists in prison (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Polygamists_in_prison.jpg/1920px-Polygamists_in_prison.jpg)--from Charles Roscoe Savage via Public Domain

Yaron Brook Show
YBS: Sam Seder BS Watch -- Slavery & Capitalism

Yaron Brook Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 99:21


Like what you hear? Like, share, and subscribe to stay updated on new videos and help promote the Yaron Brook Show: https://bit.ly/3ztPxTxBecome a sponsor to get exclusive access and help create more videos like this: https://bit.ly/2TCEqHcOr make a one-time donation: https://bit.ly/2RZOyJJContinue the discussion by following Yaron on Twitter (https://bit.ly/3iMGl6z) and Facebook (https://bit.ly/3vvWDDC )Want to learn more about Ayn Rand and Objectivism? Visit the Ayn Rand Institute: https://bit.ly/35qoEC3 #SlaveTrade #Mercantilism #Economics #Freedom #Law #Objectivism #Ethics #Politics

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Seth Gruber: What do Slavery, the Holocaust, and Abortion Have In Common?

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 53:49


We catch up with one of the most bold, articulate straight-shooting pro-life advocates today, Seth Gruber, and talk about recent news stories as well as his blog, Ten Questions for Pro-Choicers. Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast
267: The Intersection of Business and Human Rights with John Cotton Richmond

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 29:34


John Cotton Richmond Ambassador Richmond is an attorney and diplomat focused on ethical business, human rights, democracy, and rule of law. He served in the country's highest position dedicated to combating human trafficking as a U.S. Ambassador where he led U.S. foreign policy in the global fight for freedom. As a Partner at Dentons, Ambassador…

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast
266: Rescuing Boys Labor Trafficked in the Fishing Industry with Chris Field

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 33:10


Dr. Sandie Morgan is joined by Chris Field from Mercy Project in Ghana, an organization that works with the community through education and empowerment to combat labor trafficking and build stronger communities. Chris Field Chris Field is the Founder and Executive Director of Mercy Project. He traveled to Ghana for the first time in August…

The Hartmann Report
WILL AMERICA BE TORN APART AGAIN BY WEALTHY WHITE MEN?

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 57:40


White people in the South have repeatedly been suckered into taking the side of oligarchs, once to support the cotton industry and now to prop up fossil fuels and tax breaks for the ultra rich. Most recently they've been following a libertine billionaire from New York who manipulated their fears with birtherism and racism while mocking them behind their backs. Also U.S. Representative from Wisconsin, Mark Pocan joins Thom for a national progressive town hall meeting with callers.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast
Bonus – Move to End Human Trafficking

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 5:17


In this bonus episode, Dr. Sandie Morgan interviews Jill Rolls, a Priceless Committee member and community advocate. Together they discuss how Jill discovered GCWJ and an all-new January event. Jill Rolls Jill is a seasoned voice actor, having lent her voice and a variety of accents to over 40 audiobooks. She is a Meisner trained…

By Any Means Necessary
Exposing Brutality and Slavery In The Mass Incarceration System

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:45


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Jenipher Jones, Co-Chair of the National Lawyers Guild Mass Incarceration Committee and lead counsel for the JLS International Law Project to discuss a submission by Jailhouse Lawyers Speak to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues on the expansion and abuses of the mass incarceration system, slavery in the US prison system and the intentional nature of mass incarceration, the role the UN might play in the dismantling of the mass incarceration system, and the role of a movement for liberation in delegitimizing the incarceration system.

Core Christianity
Does the Bible Condone Slavery?

Core Christianity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 25:01


Episode 875 | Adriel Sanchez and Bill Maier answer caller questions. Show Notes CoreChristianity.com Questions in this Episode 1. Can I still take communion if I smoke cigarettes? 2. I have a question about Exodus 21:20-22. What do you think about what the Bible says about slaves being someone's property? 3. Does 1 Corinthians 15 teach that our bodies will be spiritual or natural at the resurrection? 4. Should Christians refer to Jesus as ‘Yeshua'? 5. What does James 5:13-16 mean and should we practice this with those who are sick? 6. Please explain the unforgivable sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. What exactly is it and why is it the only unforgivable sin? Today's Offer All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment Request our latest special offers here or call 1-833-THE-CORE (833-843-2673) to request them by phone. Want to partner with us in our work here at Core Christianity? Consider becoming a member of the Inner Core. Resources Core Question – Does the Bible Condone Slavery?

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective
Mini-Series "Indigenous Slavery... an Obscured History" Part One

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:01


To start of the new year, we are introducing our first mini-series entitled "Indigenous Slavery...a History Obscured." This series is written, produced, and voiced by Michael Kickingbear Johnson, an enrolled member of The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe. This is Part one in the series. This Episode Covers:1.) A explanation of the participation of Cristobal Columbus in the selling and trading of Africans & Indigenous People.2.) The role of the Doctrine of Discovery and the Catholic Church had in Indigenous slaveryRunning time: 26 minutes.Resources worth checking out:1.) "Pagans in the promise land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery" by Steven Newcomb. https://www.amazon.com/Pagans-Promised-Land-Christian-Discovery/dp/15559164222.) Documentary: "The Doctrine of Discovery, Unmasking The Domination Code"https://doctrineofdiscovery.org/the-doctrine-of-discovery-unmasking-the-domination-code/

KPFA - Letters and Politics
John C. Calhoun: Defender of Racial Slavery & White Democracy

KPFA - Letters and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 59:58


New Books in African American Studies
Trevor Burnard, "Jamaica in the Age of Revolution" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 70:03


Between the start of the Seven Years' War in 1756 and the onset of the French Revolution in 1789, Jamaica was the richest and most important colony in British America. White Jamaican slaveowners presided over a highly productive economic system, a precursor to the modern factory in its management of labor, its harvesting of resources, and its scale of capital investment and output. Planters, supported by a dynamic merchant class in Kingston, created a plantation system in which short-term profit maximization was the main aim. Their slave system worked because the planters who ran it were extremely powerful. In Jamaica in the Age of Revolution (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020), prize-winning historian Trevor Burnard analyzes the men and women who gained so much from the labor of enslaved people in Jamaica to expose the ways in which power was wielded in a period when the powerful were unconstrained by custom, law, or, for the most part, public approbation or disapproval. Burnard finds that the unremitting war by the powerful against the poor and powerless, evident in the day-to-day struggles slaves had with masters, is a crucial context for grasping what enslaved people had to endure. Examining such events as Tacky's Rebellion of 1760 (the largest slave revolt in the Caribbean before the Haitian Revolution), the Somerset decision of 1772, and the murder case of the Zong in 1783 in an Atlantic context, Burnard reveals Jamiaca to be a brutally effective and exploitative society that was highly adaptable to new economic and political circumstances, even when placed under great stress, as during the American Revolution. Jamaica in the Age of Revolution demonstrates the importance of Jamaican planters and merchants to British imperial thinking at a time when slavery was unchallenged. Trevor Burnard is the Wilberforce Professor of Slavery and Emancipation and Director of the Wilberforce Institute at the University of Hull. Professor Burnard is a scholar of early American, imperial, world and Atlantic history, with a special interest in plantation societies in the New World and their connections to eighteenth-century modernity. He is coauthor, with John Garrigus, of The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica, also available from the University of Pennsylvania Press. Jerrad P. Pacatte is a Ph.D. candidate and School of Arts and Sciences Excellence Fellow in the Department of History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. A social historian of gender, slavery, and emancipation in early America and the Atlantic World, Jerrad is currently completing his dissertation, entitled “The Work of Freedom: African American Women and the Ordeal of Emancipation in New England, 1740-1840” which examines the everyday lives, labors, and emancipation experiences of African-descended women in late-colonial and early republic New England. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

The African History Network Show
Max Julien, Betty White die; Jonkonnu, Black Slaves mocked their White owners

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 93:00


Max Julien ‘The Mack' dies at 88; He was more than 'Goldie'; The Blaxploitation Era of films also fought against drugs, police brutality and more; Betty White dies at 99; ‘Live with it': Betty White defied racist demands in 1954; Jonkonnu: The holiday of Jamaican Origins when Black Slaves could mock their White Slave masters. - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 1-3-22 Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow or PayPal @ TheAHNShow@gmail.com or http://www.PayPal.me/TheAHNShow or visit http://www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com and click on the yellow “Donate” button.  

Valley Beit Midrash
Parshat Bo: On Reparations for Slavery and Injustice

Valley Beit Midrash

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 9:11


As part of the weekly Parsha Podcast on Divine Ethics and Human Justice with Rabbi Dr. Shmuly Yanklowitz -- DONATE: www.bit.ly/1NmpbsP​​​​​​​ For podcasts of VBM lectures, GO HERE: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/learning-library/ www.facebook.com/valleybeitmi...​ Become a member today, starting at just $18 per month! Click the link to see our membership options: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/become-a-member/

Element Christian Church of Santa Maria
Songs of Ascent Week 17: Hallelujah (Praise the Lord)

Element Christian Church of Santa Maria

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 34:00


Psalm 135 would have been sung after the ascent to Jerusalem. It's a psalm that encourages true worship in which praise is the inevitable expression of a relationship with the living God and creator of the universe. God's people would be reminded of the abundant reasons they have for praising and blessing “the name of the Lord,” and that our God is worthy of all praise. WATCH FULL SERVICE ON YOUTUBE

History of Africa
Season 3 Episode 12 - Osei Kwame, The Muslim Asantehene

History of Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 31:26


With his place on the golden stool in a tenuous position, the young asantehene Osei Kwame secures his power through a series of purges of the Ashanti government. But, despite firmly entrenching his allies in power, Kwame's downfall will come not because of his governmental policy, but his personal religious views.Support the show (https://patreon.com/historyofafrica)

Music Entrepreneur Club Podcast
Episode 132: Is The Music Business Slavery?

Music Entrepreneur Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 64:41


Is sampling stealing? Many producers claim sampling is the same as stealing drum and sample kits. Pain shares why he thinks sample clearance is unfair. Erinn and Dame debate whether or not the music business is slavery and the group discusses Summer Walker's record deal and why it may be either unfair or standard.

Today in the History of Freedom
Episode 1: Importation of Slavery Act

Today in the History of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 2:23


The one thing we should always declare a trade war on.

The African History Network Show
African History, Kemet, Understanding Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade (Class Preview)

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 66:00


‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade (Class Preview) with Michael Imhotep. 1-1-22 NEXT Class Sunday, 1-2-22, 12pm EST, (LIVE Online Course) ‘Ancient Kemet (Egypt), The Moors & The Maafa: Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade What They Didn't Teach You In School' with Michael Imhotep host of The African History Network Show.  10 Week Online Course.  REGISTER NOW!. Discounted Reg. $60 (54% OFF); ALL SESSIONS WILL BE RECORDED SO YOU CAN WATCH AT ANY TIME!  WATCH CONTENT ON DEMAND!   REGISTER HERE: https://theahn.learnworlds.com/course/ancient-kemet-moors-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oct-2021   Course Bundle Pack, Get Both Online Courses for Only $70, Regularly $260!!! 2nd Class ‘From The Civil War To Civil Rights Movement & Black Power (1865 -1968) Saturdays 12pm EST https://theahn.learnworlds.com/bundles?bundle_id=ancient-kemet-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-civil-war-to-black-power-bundle-pack    

Bob Enyart Live
The Painful Truth about the Emancipation Proclamation

Bob Enyart Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


* On the 150th Anniversary of the Proclamation, the Surprising Truth: With tomorrow (January 1st, 2022) being the 159th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Bob Enyart and guest Jamie Schofield analyze the meaning and actual intent of that sad document. For this was no abolitionist policy (as a contemporaneous report in the Rocky Mountain News makes clear), but an example of moral compromise that ended in failure. The Proclamation was actually comprised of two announcements, not just one.  The first half – the preliminary proclamation – set the policy and gave a deadline of 100 days.  It was addressed not to the common citizens of the nation or to the Union military, but rather to the states in rebellion at that time.  What was Lincoln's declared policy on slavery at that time?  He made that very clear in a letter to Horace Greeley on Aug. 22, 1862, just days before the issuance of the preliminary proclamation: If there be those who would not save the Union, unless they could at the same time save slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. . . . I have here stated my purpose according to my view of official duty; and I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men everywhere could be free. Lincoln's goal was not the abolition of slavery but rather the preservation of the Union, and if that meant keeping slaves in bondage everywhere, he would support and practice exactly that.  And this non-abolitionist stance is reflected in the text of the Emancipation Proclamation.The Preliminary Proclamation, September, 1862 In short, the stated intent and purpose of this policy was to offer the Confederate states the opportunity to keep their slaves if they would choose to stop rebelling within a 100-day deadline.  Essentially, it said that if your state ceases its rebellion against the union, you may keep your slaves. I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, do hereby proclaim and declare that hereafter, as heretofore, the war will be prosecuted for the object of practically restoring the constitutional relation between the United States... That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; Any state still in rebellion against the Union on Jan. 1 would be subject to the Proclamation, which would declare any current slaves in those areas to be free.  The stated goal was not to free any slaves, but rather to preserve the Union.  Was it a success?  Before hearing the answer, Bob predicted that such a policy would bear no fruit, and he was right.  In fact, not a single state took Lincoln up on his offer.  By its own standard, the Proclamation was an abject failure!  In fact, all the proclamation did in that regard was to infuriate the Confederate states more than ever, deepening their resolve to reject the Union. Perhaps even worse, the preliminary proclamation also explicitly ordered slaves to be returned to their slave owners in specific circumstances, thus actually ordering the enforcement of keeping such men in bondage: Sec.10. And be it further enacted, That no slave escaping into any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia, from any other State, shall be delivered up, or in any way impeded or hindered of his liberty, except for crime, or some offence against the laws, unless the person claiming said fugitive shall first make oath that the person to whom the labor or service of such fugitive is alleged to be due is his lawful owner, and has not borne arms against the United States in the present rebellion, nor in any way given aid and comfort thereto; In other words, if a slave escaped to an area controlled by the Union, all a Southern slave owner had to do was show up, give an oath (no evidence required) that he was the lawful owner of that slave, and swear that he had never taken up arms against the Union, and then “here's your slave back.” The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 This document was the culmination of the policy already given 100 days earlier.  Not a single Confederate state had taken Lincoln's offer to cease rebellion and keep their slaves.  Therefore, this document declared (largely symbolically) the slaves in those non-Union-controlled areas to be free.  But, at the same time, and as one should expect in such a compromised and non-abolitionist policy, it also explicitly listed all of the areas in the U.S. where slaves would be kept in bondage.  Thus, this policy actually authorized the continuing wicked enslavement of innocent men, women and children, for example in many counties in Louisiana, especially around New Orleans, as well as in the newly-forming West Virginia. Many abolitionists of the day decried the Emancipation Proclamation, rightly pointing out its moral compromise.  Lincoln's own secretary of state, William Seward, commented that "We show our sympathy with slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free."  Unlike Lincoln, Seward knew the atrocities of slavery firsthand, having been raised by a slave-owning family.  "I early came to the conclusion that something was wrong... and [that] determined me to be an abolitionist." On the other hand, in their coverage of the Proclamation, the now-defunct Rocky Mountain News here in Colorado celebrated on their front page the fact that this policy was not abolitionist, and mocked abolitionists who disagreed with it, praising Lincoln for going against the “radical” abolitionists.  The newspaper wrote: “The last mail... brought scores of Eastern and Western papers with similar recommendations.  The voice of the press is almost unanimous in its approval.  That is a pretty correct index of popular opinion, and we may therefore set down that almost the entire loyal States endorse the action of the President.  It must be expected that the ultra Abolitionists will kick against it, as too conservative [not going far enough] for their radical views.  Let them squirm!  ‘Honest Abe' has shown that he will be no tool of theirs.” How were slaves freed and slavery abolished, then? It's important to note that the Emancipation Proclamation didn't outlaw slavery anywhere.  It declared current slaves in those areas to be free, in areas where the Union had no control.  It essentially “freed” them in word only, and was largely a symbolic gesture.  As the Union military moved through the Confederate states in rebellion, they did free slaves they encountered.  In truth, they could have done this with or without the Proclamation.  The Proclamation was simply used as an excuse to do it, but they would have been right to do it, regardless.  Lincoln gave orders to the Union Army to free those slaves, apart from the Proclamation, which wasn't addressed to the Union Army, but to the Confederate States themselves.  He could have ordered the Union Army to do this without such a proclamation.  And even if Lincoln hadn't issued that order, it would have still been right for Union forces moving through the South to free those slaves, anyway.  If you are a military unit and have taken over an area from the enemy, and you find men who have been kidnapped and brutalized by the people there, the right thing to do would be to free those victims.  The Proclamation didn't free anyone, although it did serve as a political excuse to do so. What of the abolition of slavery, then?  That was accomplished later, in some areas at the state level, and in the rest of the nation through federal action.  Unlike in the Emancipation Proclamation, in all of these cases it was a principled, no-compromise, abolitionist policy that required the complete abolition of slavery in each state.  For example, West Virginia (which had ironically seceded from Virginia while the latter was seceding from the Union) wasn't allowed to join the Union as a new state unless their constitution abolished slavery without exception.  In Maryland, Arkansas and Louisiana in 1864, they abolished slavery at the state level as their citizens ratified new state constitutions.  In Missouri in January of 1865, that governor abolished slavery via executive order.  In all other Southern states, slavery was ultimately abolished through the ratification of the 13th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, in December of 1865. In all of these cases, it was a no-compromise policy that we would describe today as “pro-personhood.”  Slavery was ultimately abolished despite the pro-slavery policy of the Emancipation Proclamation, not because of it. Today's Resource: Have you seen the Government Department at our KGOV Store? We are featuring Bruce Shortt's vitally-important book, The Harsh Truth about Public Schools. And also, check out the classic God's Criminal Justice System seminar, God and the Death Penalty, Live from Las Vegas, and Bob on Drugs DVDs, and our powerhouse Focus on the Strategy resources!

Real Science Radio
The Painful Truth about the Emancipation Proclamation

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


* On the 150th Anniversary of the Proclamation, the Surprising Truth: With tomorrow (January 1st, 2022) being the 159th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Bob Enyart and guest Jamie Schofield analyze the meaning and actual intent of that sad document. For this was no abolitionist policy (as a contemporaneous report in the Rocky Mountain News makes clear), but an example of moral compromise that ended in failure. The Proclamation was actually comprised of two announcements, not just one.  The first half – the preliminary proclamation – set the policy and gave a deadline of 100 days.  It was addressed not to the common citizens of the nation or to the Union military, but rather to the states in rebellion at that time.  What was Lincoln's declared policy on slavery at that time?  He made that very clear in a letter to Horace Greeley on Aug. 22, 1862, just days before the issuance of the preliminary proclamation: If there be those who would not save the Union, unless they could at the same time save slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. . . . I have here stated my purpose according to my view of official duty; and I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men everywhere could be free. Lincoln's goal was not the abolition of slavery but rather the preservation of the Union, and if that meant keeping slaves in bondage everywhere, he would support and practice exactly that.  And this non-abolitionist stance is reflected in the text of the Emancipation Proclamation.The Preliminary Proclamation, September, 1862 In short, the stated intent and purpose of this policy was to offer the Confederate states the opportunity to keep their slaves if they would choose to stop rebelling within a 100-day deadline.  Essentially, it said that if your state ceases its rebellion against the union, you may keep your slaves. I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, do hereby proclaim and declare that hereafter, as heretofore, the war will be prosecuted for the object of practically restoring the constitutional relation between the United States... That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; Any state still in rebellion against the Union on Jan. 1 would be subject to the Proclamation, which would declare any current slaves in those areas to be free.  The stated goal was not to free any slaves, but rather to preserve the Union.  Was it a success?  Before hearing the answer, Bob predicted that such a policy would bear no fruit, and he was right.  In fact, not a single state took Lincoln up on his offer.  By its own standard, the Proclamation was an abject failure!  In fact, all the proclamation did in that regard was to infuriate the Confederate states more than ever, deepening their resolve to reject the Union. Perhaps even worse, the preliminary proclamation also explicitly ordered slaves to be returned to their slave owners in specific circumstances, thus actually ordering the enforcement of keeping such men in bondage: Sec.10. And be it further enacted, That no slave escaping into any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia, from any other State, shall be delivered up, or in any way impeded or hindered of his liberty, except for crime, or some offence against the laws, unless the person claiming said fugitive shall first make oath that the person to whom the labor or service of such fugitive is alleged to be due is his lawful owner, and has not borne arms against the United States in the present rebellion, nor in any way given aid and comfort thereto; In other words, if a slave escaped to an area controlled by the Union, all a Southern slave owner had to do was show up, give an oath (no evidence required) that he was the lawful owner of that slave, and swear that he had never taken up arms against the Union, and then “here's your slave back.” The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 This document was the culmination of the policy already given 100 days earlier.  Not a single Confederate state had taken Lincoln's offer to cease rebellion and keep their slaves.  Therefore, this document declared (largely symbolically) the slaves in those non-Union-controlled areas to be free.  But, at the same time, and as one should expect in such a compromised and non-abolitionist policy, it also explicitly listed all of the areas in the U.S. where slaves would be kept in bondage.  Thus, this policy actually authorized the continuing wicked enslavement of innocent men, women and children, for example in many counties in Louisiana, especially around New Orleans, as well as in the newly-forming West Virginia. Many abolitionists of the day decried the Emancipation Proclamation, rightly pointing out its moral compromise.  Lincoln's own secretary of state, William Seward, commented that "We show our sympathy with slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free."  Unlike Lincoln, Seward knew the atrocities of slavery firsthand, having been raised by a slave-owning family.  "I early came to the conclusion that something was wrong... and [that] determined me to be an abolitionist." On the other hand, in their coverage of the Proclamation, the now-defunct Rocky Mountain News here in Colorado celebrated on their front page the fact that this policy was not abolitionist, and mocked abolitionists who disagreed with it, praising Lincoln for going against the “radical” abolitionists.  The newspaper wrote: “The last mail... brought scores of Eastern and Western papers with similar recommendations.  The voice of the press is almost unanimous in its approval.  That is a pretty correct index of popular opinion, and we may therefore set down that almost the entire loyal States endorse the action of the President.  It must be expected that the ultra Abolitionists will kick against it, as too conservative [not going far enough] for their radical views.  Let them squirm!  ‘Honest Abe' has shown that he will be no tool of theirs.” How were slaves freed and slavery abolished, then? It's important to note that the Emancipation Proclamation didn't outlaw slavery anywhere.  It declared current slaves in those areas to be free, in areas where the Union had no control.  It essentially “freed” them in word only, and was largely a symbolic gesture.  As the Union military moved through the Confederate states in rebellion, they did free slaves they encountered.  In truth, they could have done this with or without the Proclamation.  The Proclamation was simply used as an excuse to do it, but they would have been right to do it, regardless.  Lincoln gave orders to the Union Army to free those slaves, apart from the Proclamation, which wasn't addressed to the Union Army, but to the Confederate States themselves.  He could have ordered the Union Army to do this without such a proclamation.  And even if Lincoln hadn't issued that order, it would have still been right for Union forces moving through the South to free those slaves, anyway.  If you are a military unit and have taken over an area from the enemy, and you find men who have been kidnapped and brutalized by the people there, the right thing to do would be to free those victims.  The Proclamation didn't free anyone, although it did serve as a political excuse to do so. What of the abolition of slavery, then?  That was accomplished later, in some areas at the state level, and in the rest of the nation through federal action.  Unlike in the Emancipation Proclamation, in all of these cases it was a principled, no-compromise, abolitionist policy that required the complete abolition of slavery in each state.  For example, West Virginia (which had ironically seceded from Virginia while the latter was seceding from the Union) wasn't allowed to join the Union as a new state unless their constitution abolished slavery without exception.  In Maryland, Arkansas and Louisiana in 1864, they abolished slavery at the state level as their citizens ratified new state constitutions.  In Missouri in January of 1865, that governor abolished slavery via executive order.  In all other Southern states, slavery was ultimately abolished through the ratification of the 13th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, in December of 1865. In all of these cases, it was a no-compromise policy that we would describe today as “pro-personhood.”  Slavery was ultimately abolished despite the pro-slavery policy of the Emancipation Proclamation, not because of it. Today's Resource: Have you seen the Government Department at our KGOV Store? We are featuring Bruce Shortt's vitally-important book, The Harsh Truth about Public Schools. And also, check out the classic God's Criminal Justice System seminar, God and the Death Penalty, Live from Las Vegas, and Bob on Drugs DVDs, and our powerhouse Focus on the Strategy resources!

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: NY school banned jingle bells because of possible connection to slavery

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 34:53


Big Lead: Top story:   All the snow ,Trending: Boosters age expansion ,CDC Director says they changed isolation based on what people could handle , CDC and PCR tests - they finally admit they don't work well  , Fauci says no hugging and kissing on NYE //  GUEST:  Todd Myers on Climate Change and snow //  NY school banned jingle bells because of possible connection to slavery See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Uprising
Ep 3: Coming To Terms With the 1619 Project

Uprising

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:29


Analayzing Matt Karp's taking in Harpers magazine about the historical relevance of the 1619 project

The Ezra Klein Show
Best of: Clint Smith III on confronting the legacy of slavery

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 61:42


Vox's Jamil Smith talks with author Clint Smith III about his book How the Word Is Passed, which documents the writer's personal journey visiting sites that embody the legacy of American slavery. They discuss the power of this re-confrontation, how to bridge the gaps in education and awareness of America's past, and the experience of Black writers in a nation that is "a web of contradictions." Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Clint Smith III (@ClintSmithIII), Staff writer, The Atlantic References:  How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America by Clint Smith (Little, Brown; 2021) "Why Confederate Lies Live On" by Clint Smith (The Atlantic; May 10) "The lost neighborhood under New York's Central Park" by Ranjani Chakraborty (Vox; Jan. 20, 2020) "The Statue of Liberty was created to celebrate freed slaves, not immigrants, its new museum recounts" by Gillian Brockell (Washington Post; May 23, 2019) "No, the Civil War didn't erase slavery's harm" by W. Caleb McDaniel (Houston Chronicle; July 12, 2019) Nikole Hannah-Jones Issues Statement on Decision to Decline Tenure Offer at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and to Accept Knight Chair Appointment at Howard University (NAACP Legal Defense Fund; July 6) Crash Course: Black American History, hosted by Clint Smith Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Vox Audio Fellow: Victoria Dominguez Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Making Contact
Fallen Heroes, 2021

Making Contact

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 29:29


In our annual Fallen Heroes episode, we share words of inspiration from, and about some lesser-known grassroots activists who passed away in 2021.

Making Contact
Fallen Heroes, 2021

Making Contact

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 29:29


In our annual Fallen Heroes episode, we share words of inspiration from, and about some lesser-known grassroots activists who passed away in 2021.

Fresh Take with Josh Dukelow
The Professors: Greatest Americans Countdown (Part 2)

Fresh Take with Josh Dukelow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:25


Lawrence University Professor of History Jerry Podair and Professor of Government Arnie Shober join Josh for a special year-end countdown of the ten greatest Americans of all time. They share their views on what makes each person great, as well as some of the complicating elements of their legacies, and explain how each one helps to define what America is in the 21st century.In this second installment, they discuss Harriet Beecher Stowe (seven), Chief Justice John Marshall (six), and George Washington (five). Stay tuned all week for the full countdown!

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
Best Of 2021: The Legacies of Slavery Hidden in Plain Sight & America's Long Journey to Recognizing Juneteenth w/ Clint Smith, Annette Gordon-Reed & Jason Myles

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 138:41


In today's jam-packed Best of 2021: Sam and Emma host author Clint Smith, staff writer at the Atlantic, to discuss his new book, How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America on how the legacy of slavery has been passed down and obscured through generations of storytelling, and the manner in which this manifests in modern society. They walk through the sites that Smith visits in his book – from Monticello, looking at how the stories of Thomas Jefferson perfectly encapsulate the cognitive dissonance of how Americans view ourselves, to Angola Prison as a symbol of modern enslavement literally build upon a plantation – and how the heirloom of ideology is passed down through every element of our society, through education, through infrastructure, and certainly through community policing measures. Smith explores his experiences at a Sons of Confederate Veterans celebration, and the importance of elevating empirical historical facts in making space for activists and organizers to express contemporary racism as carrying the remnants and residues of these systems through all elements of American society. Then Sam sits down with with Harvard history professor Annette Gordon-Reed on her new book, On Juneteenth, which explores the Texas roots and national consciousness of the holiday celebrating the end of slavery in the South. Beginning in the 1500s, Gordon-Reed walks us through the arrival of slavery in Texas with Spanish settlers, and its development as an Enslaver's Republic as it broke away from Mexico and U.S. slaveholders ventured into the state to capitalize on the protection of the industry. Then, they discuss Gordon Granger's arrival in Texas on June 19, 1865, to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation, and the active and direct removal of status from former slave owners and deliverance of autonomy to Black freed folk, before they move into the violence of reconstruction in Texas and the South. Professor Gordon-Reed then walks through the importance of Juneteenth since the arrival of Granger, with the purchasing of what would become Emancipation Park in Houston as a grounds for celebration directly following it, why this day, in particular, took off as a celebration of manumission, and how Juneteenth has come into more widespread popularity. Lastly, Sam and Emma are joined by Jason Myles, co-host of the This Is Revolution podcast, as they dissect his Medium article, “I Was a Teenage Anarchist," on the growth of the punk movement around the concepts of authenticity and deconstruction, how that hindered its growth and ability to alter the mainstream, instead, setting it up to be absorbed by the machine, and what that can teach us about the state of the online left today. Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Great company, great product and fans of the show! Use code Leftisbest and get 20% off at http://www.sunsetlakecbd.com. And now Sunset Lake CBD has donated $2500 to the Nurses strike fund, and we encourage MR listeners to help if they can. Here's a link to where folks can donate: https://forms.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

This Day in Esoteric Political History
'21 Favorite: NYC Slavery Revolt (1712)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 18:28


Heading into 2022, we're re-airing a couple favorite episodes from the year, and bringing you a couple special episodes. We'll be back live in the new year with a brand new slate. Thanks for all your support this year, if you'd like to become a member of Radiotopia you can do so on our website thisdaypod.com /// It's April 6th. This day in 1712, a group of enslaved people start a fire in New York City aimed at sparking a larger rebellion. Jody, Niki, and Kellie discuss the slave rebellion of 1712, the landscape of slavery in New York City at that time, and the brutal crackdown to the revolt. Find a transcript of this episode at: https://tinyurl.com/esoterichistory This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 362: The Woman Clothed with the Sun (2021)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 29:02


Fr. Mike continues to interpret the symbols within Revelation. He compares story of Our Lady of Guadalupe to the woman in Revelation. Fr. Mike provides context to the letter to the Hebrews, a letter that makes the case for Jesus, explaining who he is and the beauty of what he did for us. Today's readings are Revelation 12-14, Hebrews 1-4, and Proverbs 31:16-18. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

Timesuck with Dan Cummins
276 - Robert MF'n Smalls and Year End Recap

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 150:28


Robert Smalls! He was born a slave in Beaufort, South Carolina  in 1839. Then he'd pull off a daring sea-faring escape to the Union during the Civil War, then become the first black captain for the Union, then becoming a member of the US House of Representatives. He would die in the house he was born in - his former slave master's - a house he bought after the Civil War. His story is one of perseverance and grit - of refusing to quit no mater how the odds are stacked against you. After his story, I share my current state of mind as I reflect back on the kind of year 2021 was, and then look forward to 2022. Thanks for the ride, meatsacks! Hail Nimrod! Thanks one last time for allowing the 2021 Bad Magic Giving Tree to be such a success! We raised $49,000 through a combination of Patreon, fan, and personal donation. And now 198 children are going to receive the presents they would have otherwise never received. Nimrod is very fucking pleased. :)Watch the Suck on YouTube:  https://youtu.be/wHlI9_qiQgEMerch - https://badmagicmerch.com/  Discord! https://discord.gg/tqzH89vWant to join the Cult of the Curious private Facebook Group? Go directly to Facebook and search for "Cult of the Curious" in order to locate whatever happens to be our most current page :)For all merch related questions/problems: store@badmagicproductions.com (copy and paste)Please rate and subscribe on iTunes and elsewhere and follow the suck on social media!! @timesuckpodcast on IG and http://www.facebook.com/timesuckpodcastWanna become a Space Lizard? We're over 10,000 strong! Click here: https://www.patreon.com/timesuckpodcastSign up through Patreon and for $5 a month you get to listen to the Secret Suck, which will drop Thursdays at Noon, PST. You'll also get 20% off of all regular Timesuck merch PLUS access to exclusive Space Lizard merch. You get to vote on two Monday topics each month via the app. And you get the download link for my new comedy album, Feel the Heat. Check the Patreon posts to find out how to download the new album and take advantage of other benefits

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast
265: Sustainable Housing, Aftercare, and Existing Resources with AVODAH Collective

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:57


Dr. Sandie Morgan is joined by three speakers from the AVODAH Collective, an organization that is partnering with churches to create space for women survivors of sex trafficking, young people, and families to find restoration through trauma-informed aftercare. They all discuss ingredients of the “secret sauce” to sustainable housing and aftercare. Speakers Deb O'Hara-Rusckowski, RN,…

Paulogia
No Lives Matter to Evolutionists (feat. Cynthia McDonald) - Evolution Exposed Exposed

Paulogia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:36


Our examination of the "Evolution Exposed" all-star creationist six-hour epic seminar with Ray Comfort and 10 other well-known prominent anti-evolution speakers. This time, Mark Spence of Living Waters tells us about how evolutionists don't value life.Cynthia McDonald brings her expertise in biology and culture to assure us that Mark doesn't know what he's talking about.Cynthia McDonaldhttps://linktr.ee/camglamminghttps://www.youtube.com/c/TheNonProphetsACAJoin this channel to get access to perks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIS4cWaXgWpznjwovFYQBJQ/joinSupport Paulogia athttp://www.patreon.com/paulogiahttp://www.paypal.me/paulogiahttps://www.amazon.ca/hz/wishlist/ls/YTALNY19IBC8?ref_=wl_sharehttps://teespring.com/stores/paulogiaPaulogia Audio-Only-Version Podcasthttps://paulogia.buzzsprout.comFollow Paulogia athttp://www.twitter.com/paulogia0http://www.facebook.com/paulogia0https://discord.gg/BXbv7DSCynthia's References:“White too Long” Robert P Jones“Racism among white Christians is higher than among the nonreligious. That's no coincidence.” https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/racism-among-white-christians-higher-among-nonreligious-s-no-coincidence-ncna1235045 “Oldest Institution of Southern Baptist Convention Reveals Past Ties to Slavery” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/12/us/southern-baptist-slavery.html “Basil Manly” http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1182 “Christianity in the United States” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_in_the_United_States#:~:text=In%20a%202020%20survey%20by,%2C%20and%2085%25%20in%201990. “Intrinsic Value, Ecology, and Conservation” https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/intrinsic-value-ecology-and-conservation-25815400/ “PRRI (Public Religion Research Institute)” https://www.prri.org/ White Supremacist Ideas Have Historical Roots In U.S. Christianity https://www.npr.org/2020/07/01/883115867/white-supremacist-ideas-have-historical-roots-in-u-s-christianity “Home  Science  Biology‘Primordial soup' theory doesn't hold up, study says. Instead, life might have first emerged elsewhere” https://www.zmescience.com/science/biology/origin-of-life-theory/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/paulogia)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 361: Judgment and Repentance (2021)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:11


Fr. Mike summarizes and contextualizes the book of Philemon, addressing the tension of slavery addressed in the Bible. He provides an explanation on the continued destruction depicted in Revelation as the visions of the apostle John, holding it up to the light of the Gospel. Today's readings are Revelation 8-11, Philemon, and Proverbs 31:16-18. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1390 Tell Stories, Not Myths: Our Second Founding (Reconstruction) (Repost)

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 73:06


Original Air Date 1/5/2021 Today we take a look at the often-overlooked decade of Reconstruction in the wake of the Civil War. After hundreds of years of slavery, Reconstruction was a brief moment of relative democracy and equality before the white power structure reasserted itself and instated the policies that would be known as "Jim Crow Laws" which would last another 80 years. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com Transcript MEMBERSHIP, Gift Memberships and Donations! (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) MERCHANDISE! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: The Second Revolution Part 1 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. Ch. 2: The Power of Frederick Douglass and the 2nd American Revolution w/ David Blight - The Majority Report w/ Sam Seder - Air Date 9-29-20 Sam hosts Pulitzer Prize-winning Yale Historian David Blight to discuss his recent biography of Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, and how the Reconstruction era lives on in our contemporary politics. Ch. 3: The Second Revolution Part 2 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. Ch. 4: Slavery, Race, and the Confederate Army - Professor Buzzkill History Podcast - Air Date 8-14-18 Professor Colin Woodward joins us to discuss the importance of slavery in the minds of Confederate soldiers, as well as its effects on military policy and decision making. He tells us about the Rebels' persistent belief in the need to defend slavery Ch. 5: The Second Revolution Part 3 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 6: The Second Revolution Part 4 - Scene on Radio - Air Date 2-19-20 VOICEMAILS Ch. 7: Experiment with Refer-o-Matic - Nick From California New Ch. 8: Power and defining the marginalized - Pat from Chicago FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 9: Final comments on the epic Refer-o-Matic program and why we should be messaging to rural America MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: "Statue of 'Robert Smalls, U.S. Congressman' -- The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) Washington (DC) October 2016" by Ron Cogswell, Flickr | License | Changes: Cropped   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com SUPPORT THE SHOW Listen Anywhere! Check out the BotL iOS/Android App in the App Stores! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

The Hartmann Report
THE REAL HISTORY OF SANTA AND WHY THE GOP EXPLOITS RELIGION TO MANIPULATE THEIR VOTERS

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 56:45


Thom Hartmann explains the history behind our commervialized experience of Christmas and Santa Claus. Also the ways that conquerors and Republicans have used religion especially Christianity to exploit the public and as a means to their ends. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
318 Ste. Geneviéve National Historical Park

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 59:29


About 620 miles north of New Orleans and 62 miles south of St. Louis, sits the town of Ste. Geneviéve, Missouri. Established in 1750 by the French, Ste. Geneviéve reveals much about what it was like to establish a colony in the heartland of North America and what it was like for colonists to live so far removed from seats of imperial power. Claire Casey, a National Park Service interpretative ranger at the Ste. Geneviéve National Historical Park, joins us to explore the early American history of Ste. Geneviéve. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/318 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Get $50 to invest with Schwab Starter Kit Complementary Episodes Episode 102: William Nester, George Rogers Clark and the Fight for the Illinois Country Episode 108: Ann Little, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright Episode 120: Marcia Zug, Mail Order Brides in Early America Episode 139: Andrés Reséndez, The Other Slavery Episode 308: Jessica Marie Johnson, Slavery and Freedom in French Louisiana Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

The Chris Plante Show
12-20 Hour 3 - Covid And Slavery

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 37:56


In Hour 3, Chris talks about how Maryland Gov Larry Hogan has Covid, as do Elizabeth Warren and Corey Booker.  More talk is had about the Wuhan Lab Leak theory and more.  Also Chris reads a piece from George Will about the 1619 project. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 5:00am-9:00am Monday-Friday. To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 346: Fruits of the Spirit

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 21:00


Fr. Mike reminds us of the context of Galatians and reiterates Paul's admonition not to revert to our previous ways of life now that we have been freed from the yoke of slavery. He also discusses the works of the flesh which separate us from Christ and the fruits of the spirit which result from a life lived in God, reminding us that we will reap what we sow in due season. Today's readings are Acts 25, Galatians 4-6, and Proverbs 29:15-17. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.