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    Best podcasts about Library

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    Latest podcast episodes about Library

    KZYX News
    Long Valley Library getting closer to opening

    KZYX News

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 6:27


    June 30, 2022 — After seven years of fundraising and scouting for a location, the Friends of the Long Valley Public Library are close to opening a branch of the county library in downtown Laytonville. The Friends have raised about $40,000 since 2015, and just last week, the library got the green light for a USDA Rural Development Grant of $64,200 as a 75% match to buy furniture, books, and other materials for opening day. Shawn Haven, one of the core members of the Friends group, met KZYX on Wednesday morning at the future location of the new branch, in the Foster's shopping center just off of Highway 101. “We got started in 2015,” she recalled. “John Pinches offered us the old Bookmobile, and we went from there.” The county has an established Bookmobile program, which brings books to Laytonville every other Tuesday. “That Bookmobile that they gave us was not fit for county employee habitation, so we sold that and used the money, moving toward this project,” she said. “Of course, paying rent on this space through covid was a little pricey, but we're getting there. A little more to go, and we'll be ready.” Deborah Fader Samson, the Library and Museum Director, said in an email that she is planning for a New Year's Grand Opening. Haven is pleased with the central location, which is within sight of the elementary and middle schools. It's a block or so from the high school and the Book Room, a bookstore at the site of the old high school that serves as an ongoing fundraiser for the library. The walls at the Book Room are lined with school lockers, murals by a visiting Mayan scholar, a piano that's out of tune, and donated bookshelves stuffed with volumes. There is also a seed library, which will remain even after the public library opens. The Book Rom has taken on a life of its own over the years. “We started with a big pile of boxes of books right there,” Haven recalled. Originally, the local school superintendent gave the Friends permission to use the old school site as storage for their books between sales. “And we thought, well, this is such a mess, we can't function in here,” she said. “So we put up some shelves. And then we thought, well, we can put up some more shelves. And then we said, well, can we open it? Why schlepp all these books? We're all old ladies, right? So she said, sure, go ahead. We just kept expanding our space, expanding our hours, so there you have it.” The Book Room has become more than a bookstore raising money for the library. It's a hub of community activity, with a large central room where groups gather to play bridge, spin, have healthy snacks, or curl up with one of the approximately 3,500 books that continue to pour in. Volumes are currently organized by subject and age range, with one shelf dedicated to books about insects for young people, another featuring biographies, and one section devoted entirely to books by lawyers. “We have a little bit of everything,” Haven observed. “Or, as they say, something to offend everyone. The true job of a library.” Haven promised the Book Room won't be phased out by the library. “The library here, to start off, will be open three days a week,” she said. “Probably Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday. And then the Book Room is open Monday, Tuesday, and Friday. So there will be full literary and seed library coverage every day except Sunday…so we've got your back.” The library site has had multiple incarnations: it's been a restaurant, a beauty parlor, and, most recently, a tattoo shop. It's about 1000 square feet and has the capacity for around a thousand books, plus computers, magazines, and newspapers. And there's a variety of artwork, starting with a hand-carved chinquapin counter carved by local woodworker Robin Thompson along the expansive, north-facing windows, “for laptop work and staring out the window,” Haven noted. There will be two public computer stations, with free broadband provided by a California State Library grant with speeds up to 1 Gbps, “so it's fast and reliable, unless someone cuts a cable, of course.” The Friends of the Library also have a 4x6 mural of local nature scenes that artist Danza Davis painted with kids at Juvenile Hall, as part of a Get Art in the Schools Program grant through the Arts Council. That piece will be one of the first things patrons see when they walk into the library. But another work of art, in the future break room, is being diligently covered over with a meticulous decoupage of printed material. “This post, it had pinups on it,” Haven said, gesturing at a column still featuring a few remnants of vintage girly pictures, leftover from the tattoo shop. “It's really sad to cover them up,” she said. “But the method is starch with a little varathane over it, so if anyone ever wants to restore it, they can. I hate to destroy someone else's art.” The Friends found the site about three years ago, but the learning curve was steep, especially during covid. “When we started this, we didn't even know we had to have a permit,” Haven recalled; “because we weren't doing anything major. The place had been a business before. It was obviously okay…we thought. So we had to get an architect…it sounds so easy. But it took like three years.” They had to repair an unsafe irregularity in the floor, install new lighting and lots of new electrical outlets, and lay down a new sidewalk that's ADA accessible from the parking lot. The furniture is supposed to arrive in November, right around the time the ballots go out, with a measure asking voters if they'd like to double Measure A, to a quarter cent sales tax, and keep it going in perpetuity. Voters will also be asked to decide on a quarter cent sales tax for fire services. “The two taxes are not in a fight, I don't think,” Haven said. “So we'll be out and about, and out and about.” Voters have been primed by the signature-gathering process, “and we'll be sure they stay primed, and get more primed, and bring their friends.”

    Lost in the Stacks: the Research Library Rock'n'Roll Radio Show
    Episode 522: The Library of Parliament (Happy Canada Day!)

    Lost in the Stacks: the Research Library Rock'n'Roll Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 59:10


    Guest: Jamila Hastick, Electronic Services Librarian, Library of Parliament It's Canada Day! Guest Jamila Hastick talks about what it's like to work as a librarian in the Canadian Library of Parliament/Bibliothèque du Parlement.

    The KGEZ Good Morning Show
    ImagineIF Library Communications Specialist Lune Axelson 6-28-2022

    The KGEZ Good Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 14:46


    ImagineIF Library Communications Specialist Lune Axelson joined the KGEZ Good Morning Show with John Hendricks and Robin Mitchell on Tuesday June 28, 2022 to talk about library events for July!

    1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota
    Natalie Draper and Emily Lloyd discuss events/activities at Northfield Public Library

    1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


    Natalie Draper and Emily Lloyd of the Northfield Public Library talk about summer activities and events at the library.

    Library Rap: The Hip Hop Interviews with Tim Einenkel
    AllHipHop.com Presents: Library Rap: Rahzel Interview

    Library Rap: The Hip Hop Interviews with Tim Einenkel

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 26:36


    Check out Tim's interview with the legendary Rahzel. For the full interview go to AllHipHop.com

    Yanghaiying
    Tourist Fresno library

    Yanghaiying

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 16:45


    Tourist Fresno library --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/haiying-yang/support

    In Research Of
    S03E19 - Noah's Flood

    In Research Of

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 132:05


    We're joined by Sharon Hill to look into the vital 1970s question: Was Noah's Ark Real? (And does it disprove Darwin's theory of evolution through natural selection?)  spoilers: No and No.  The episode opens with "footage" (re-creations, repurposed footage) of the famous 1889 Flood. The footage in the movie appears to be from a short film called The World that Perished (1977) but we couldn't find a version of that to share.  The 1976 film In Search of Noah's Ark is available (in poor quality) on YouTube.  Nimoy reminds of us the other Ark with this library fashion-alert moment. The episode re-creates the famous "undressing in excitement" story of George Smith discovering the Utnapishtim version of the flood myth.  (Later in the episode we get a better shot of Nimoy in the Library.) We discussed the "Ararat Anomaly" briefly. The many searches for Noah's Ark. Physicist Rainer Berger (1930 - 2003) puts a lot of fake evidence to rest with his radiocarbon dating skills. Creationist Henry Morris "an expert in the flow of water??" Jeb discusses Abzu briefly. The "Creation Research Society" is behind a lot of the content in this episode. The episode calls him "Dr. Clifford Burdick" but he doesn't appear to have actually been a PhD.   Burdick reminded some of us of Reverend Kane from Poltergeist 2. There is some mention of the Younger Dryas - a favorite of Hancockian enthusiasts.   Many cultures around the world have flood myths. Many cultures around the world have floods. There may be some connection?   Discussion of the site called Doggerland. Warm Mineral Springs in Florida. The Black Sea Deluge hypothesis.   Burdick did look a little lost in the desert at one point...

    KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed
    Washoe County Library System relaunches in-person Drag Queen Story Time

    KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 2:55


    The Washoe County Library System hosted its first in-person Drag Queen Story Time since 2019 to some protest.

    The Faerie Conclave
    76 - How to Play Mono Black in Commander with Jarom

    The Faerie Conclave

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 70:26


    On Episode 76 of The Faerie Conclave, Alec invites extra special guest and mono black expert Jarom back to talk about our favorite color! We talk all about mono black's strengths, weaknesses, strategies, and everything in between when it comes to commander.  Join us while we gush about how cool and synergistic black is in EDH and some of the spicy decks you can build!Alec's Marrow-Gnawer deck list can be found here.Jarom's Shirei, Shizo's Caretaker deck list can be found here.Community Spotlight: MTGGoldfish! Check out the MTGGoldfish site here.Check out the MTGGoldfish YouTube channel here.Follow The Faerie Conclave's content and social medias here.The Faerie Conclave logo and imagery was created by Kirtly Maxfield who can be contacted for design services at thelichencollective.com.The Faerie Conclave theme music was created by Livi Cheney who can be found as soffboilite on SoundCloud.

    LPLCast
    LPLCast Episode 83

    LPLCast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 33:54


    Week of 7/4/22 at the Library - Parks Wellness Challenge - "Matchmaking Can Be Murder" | Hosts Dylan Posa and Barb Leitschuh go over upcoming events, discuss the Parks Wellness Challenge, and lastly, return to 'Barb the Bookie' to recommend an "Matchmaking Can Be Murder" by Amanda Flower.

    Library Leadership Podcast
    Coaching in the Workplace with Vera Keown

    Library Leadership Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 19:08


    If you could find a way to support others in your organization, increase engagement, and improve performance and commitment all while deepening levels of understanding would you do it? On this show Vera Keown, Organizational Development Librarian at the University of Manitoba, talks about Coaching in the Workplace and what we can do to successfully implement skills that make these kinds of benefits possible.

    Reading Glasses
    Ep 262 - Best Books of the Year So Far!

    Reading Glasses

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:54


    Brea and Mallory discuss their favorite books of 2022 that were released from January to June, and solve a tricky reader problem about large print books. Email us at readingglassespodcast at gmail dot com!Reading Glasses MerchRecommendations StoreSponsors -Ever tried Microdosing? Visit Microdose.com and use GLASSES for 30% off + Free Shipping. Magic Spoonwww.magicspoon.com/GLASSESCODE: GLASSESLinks -Reading Glasses Facebook GroupReading Glasses Goodreads GroupAmazon Wish ListNewsletterLibro.fm Readathon: August 21stBooks Mentioned - Anatomy: A Love Story by Dana SchwartzFruiting Bodies by Kathryn HarlanThe Imposter by Suzanne Woods FisherThe Cartographers by Peng ShepardWhen Women Were Dragons by Kelly BarnhillI Kissed Shara Wheeler by Casey McQuistonSea of Tranquility by Emily St. John MandelBook Lovers by Emily HenryLight Years from Home by Mike ChenDead Silence by S.A. BarnesOlga Dies Dreaming by Xochitl GonzalezThe Kaiju Preservation Society by John ScalziLegends & Lattes by Travis BaldreeA Caribbean Heiress in Paris by Adriana HerreraWhere the Drowned Girls Go by Seanan McGuireThe Book of the Most Precious Substance by Sara GranTo Paradise by Hanya YanagiharaUnlikely Animals by Annie HarnettWhen We Were Birds by Ayanna Lloyd BanwoSundial by Catriona WardOur Lady of Mysterious Ailments by T.L. HuchuWhat Moves the Dead by T. KingfisherBliss Montage by Ling MaThe Daughter of Doctor Moreau by Silvia Moreno-GarciaLavender House by LC RosenOur Wives Under the Sea by Julia Armfield

    Trent Loos Podcast
    Rural Route Radio June 30, 2022 Amanda Radke hits a Home Run with "Kevin" the bottle calf at the Public Library

    Trent Loos Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 48:03


    Seeking every avenue possible to share the story of food production as a means of national security and it appears the Corn Palace is a great place to do that in Mitchell, SD.

    The Teach Joyfully Podcast
    102. Tips for How to Organize Your Classroom Library

    The Teach Joyfully Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 20:13


    Classroom library woes? Figuring out how to organize your classroom library is harder than we imagine it will be. There are so many decisions to be made and each one changes how our class library functions.  Don't get bogged down in decision fatigue. In this episode, I have all my tips to break down the decision-making process to help you make a plan for your classroom library that will actually work. Listen in to find out more! Don't forget to check out all the resources, and grab the Classroom Library Organization Cheat Sheet. It's all in the show notes! TEACH JOYFULLY FB COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/theteachinglab INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/lisa_j_burns

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast
    Queer Poem-a-Day: Gay Epithalamium by Benjamin Garcia

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 5:13


    Benjamin Garcia's first collection, THROWN IN THE THROAT, won the National Poetry Series and the Eugene Paul Nassar Poetry Prize, in addition to being a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. He works as a sexual health and harm reduction educator in New York's Finger Lakes region, where he received the Jill Gonzalez Health Educator Award recognizing contributions to HIV treatment and prevention. A CantoMundo and Lambda Literary fellow, he serves as core faculty at Alma College's low-residency MFA program. His poems and essays have recently appeared or are forthcoming in: AGNI, American Poetry Review, Kenyon Review, and New England Review. His video poem “Ode to the Peacok” is available for viewing at the Broad Museum's website as part of El Poder de la Poesia: Latinx Voices in Response to HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2018 by Benjamin Francis. This poem first appeared in Nimrod International.  Text of today's poem and more details about our program can be found at: deerfieldlibrary.org/queerpoemaday/ Find books from participating poets in our library's catalog.  Queer Poem-a-Day is directed by poet and teacher Lisa Hiton and Dylan Zavagno, Adult Services Coordinator at the Deerfield Public Library. Music for this second year of our series is the first movement, Schéhérazade, from Masques, Op. 34, by Karol Szymanowski, performed by pianist Daniel Baer. Queer Poem-a-Day is supported by generous donations from the Friends of the Deerfield Public Library and the Deerfield Fine Arts Commission. Queer Poem-a-Day is a program from the Adult Services Department at the Library and may include adult language. 

    New Books Network
    Radha Raghunathan, "Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam)" (Adyar Library, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:43


    Mahakavi Subramania Bharati was a multi-faceted genius, an innovative poet who initiated a new era in Tamil literature. He was the first writer to have introduced to the Tamil literary world a new genre called ‘novella' by his composition of Ñānaratam (‘The Wisdom-chariot') written in elegant Tamil prose. In Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam), Dr Radha Raghunathan gives the biographical background of Bharati, his association with Dr. Annie Besant of the Theosophical Society and his contributions for ‘New India' and ‘Commonweal,' and a translation of Bharati's ‘novella' Ñānaratam. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in Literary Studies
    Radha Raghunathan, "Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam)" (Adyar Library, 2022)

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:43


    Mahakavi Subramania Bharati was a multi-faceted genius, an innovative poet who initiated a new era in Tamil literature. He was the first writer to have introduced to the Tamil literary world a new genre called ‘novella' by his composition of Ñānaratam (‘The Wisdom-chariot') written in elegant Tamil prose. In Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam), Dr Radha Raghunathan gives the biographical background of Bharati, his association with Dr. Annie Besant of the Theosophical Society and his contributions for ‘New India' and ‘Commonweal,' and a translation of Bharati's ‘novella' Ñānaratam. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    New Books in South Asian Studies
    Radha Raghunathan, "Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam)" (Adyar Library, 2022)

    New Books in South Asian Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 27:43


    Mahakavi Subramania Bharati was a multi-faceted genius, an innovative poet who initiated a new era in Tamil literature. He was the first writer to have introduced to the Tamil literary world a new genre called ‘novella' by his composition of Ñānaratam (‘The Wisdom-chariot') written in elegant Tamil prose. In Soaring with Bharati in the Wisdom-Chariot (Ñānaratam), Dr Radha Raghunathan gives the biographical background of Bharati, his association with Dr. Annie Besant of the Theosophical Society and his contributions for ‘New India' and ‘Commonweal,' and a translation of Bharati's ‘novella' Ñānaratam. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

    Nooit meer slapen
    Francesco Veenstra (Rijksbouwmeester)

    Nooit meer slapen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 57:42


    Op 1 september 2021 volgde hij Floris Alkemade op als nieuwe Rijksbouwmeester. In die rol adviseert hij over architectuur en de stedelijke omgeving van het rijksvastgoed. Ook spreekt hij zich in de media uit over zijn visie op toekomstbestendige bouw: hoe wapent Nederland zich tegen problemen als woningtekorten, klimaatverandering en bevolkingsgroei? Veenstra studeerde af aan de Rotterdamse Academie van Bouwkunst. Hij ontwierp meerdere gebouwen met een openbare functie, waaronder de Library of Birmingham en Stadskantoor en stationshal Delft. Pieter van der Wielen gaat met Francesco Veenstra in gesprek.

    Nordic Talks
    Library evolution

    Nordic Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 24:47


    What do you think of when you hear the word library? Maybe you think of a building full of books - a place to explore other worlds and perspectives. But in the 21st century libraries have become much more than that. They mirror society and reflect the developments occurring in the surrounding world. In some libraries, you can now even borrow a so-called human book – a real human being sitting in front of you sharing their personal story. Sounds exciting, right? In this episode, we explore the unifying power of libraries and discover why some people consider them to be the beating heart of modern communities. This episode comes from an online Nordic Talks event organized by the Toronto International Festival of Authors in partnership with the Harbourfront Centre. The talk is part of Toronto's Harbourfront Centre "Nordic Bridges 2022" cultural exchange initiative.

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast
    Queer Poem-a-Day: GPOY as Rainbowfrong.gif by Aerik Francis

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 3:12


    Aerik Francis is a Queer Black & Latinx poet based in Denver, Colorado, USA. Aerik is the author of the recently published chapbook BODYELECTRONIC (Trouble Department 2022). Selected by Dorothy Chan as the winner of the 2022 chapbook contest, Aerik's second chapbook MISEDUCATION is forthcoming from New Delta Review in 2023. Aerik is the recipient of poetry fellowships from Canto Mundo and The Watering Hole, as well as a poetry reader for Underblong poetry journal and an event coordinator for Slam Nuba. Aerik's work can be found on their website phaentompoet.com.  Copyright © 2021 by Aerik Francis. This poem first appeared in HAD.  Text of today's poem and more details about our program can be found at: deerfieldlibrary.org/queerpoemaday/ Find books from participating poets in our library's catalog.  Queer Poem-a-Day is directed by poet and teacher Lisa Hiton and Dylan Zavagno, Adult Services Coordinator at the Deerfield Public Library. Music for this second year of our series is the first movement, Schéhérazade, from Masques, Op. 34, by Karol Szymanowski, performed by pianist Daniel Baer. Queer Poem-a-Day is supported by generous donations from the Friends of the Deerfield Public Library and the Deerfield Fine Arts Commission. Queer Poem-a-Day is a program from the Adult Services Department at the Library and may include adult language. 

    Country Squire Radio
    From The Library: The Miracle of Mindfulness

    Country Squire Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 47:28


    The Library or Study has long been the haven of the contemplative pipe smoker. In our ‘From The Library' series, we take a look into the musings, writings, poetry, and more that pique our interest and consider the mind of the author and how we can, or perhaps can't, relate from our own experience. This week: “The Miracle of Mindfulness” by Thich Nhat Hanh Pipe Question: (From MarkVV) Captain Jorvik and Jon David, Ahoy, fellas! I have a query for both of you! So often Beau is left high and dry on this so I wanted to ask something of him to be inclusive! Jon David. Do different types of tobacco leaf, for instance, bright leaf and red Virginias, age differently or faster than others? Or is it purely a question of sugar content in the leaf? Or both? Or something else? And Beau. If you really were Captain Jorvik of the Seven Seas, what tobacco would you envision your pirate-self smoking? It can be period appropriate or modern, like Country Squire Treasure Island. As always, I hope you both are well, as well as your dear families. Hope to cross paths soon. Your friend, Mark VV Listener Feedback: (From Chables) Beau! Jon David! Hope yall are well! Hope to get to see yall at some point soon what with covid dying down and such. I wanted to say how tickled i was to hear my name in the St Ives drawing. Not gonna lie, i was having a rough end to a rough year, but that really made my day that day and put a smile on my face like yall do so often.

    Midnight Train Podcast
    The Antikythera Mechanism (Nerd Overload)

    Midnight Train Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 114:36


    Sign up for bonus episodes at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com    Well since last week's episode left Logan up at night with nightmares and I still can't get the stains out of my shorts; we have decided to make this week's episode a little more on the lighter side. So we are diving deep into the wonderful world of politics! You got it, today we are going to discuss The Biden Administrations wonderful and brilliant plans and maybe even get an interview with Brandon himself! HA like that would ever happen. Fuck those guys. We are actually talking about the Antikythera Mechanism, and the mysteries surrounding it.   The Antikythera mechanism is a hand-powered orrery( a mechanical model of our solar system) from Ancient Greece that has been dubbed the world's first analog computer since it was used to forecast celestial locations and eclipses decades in advance. The ancient Olympic Games' four-year cycle, which was akin to an Olympiad, could also be followed using this method.   In 1901, wreckage from a shipwreck off the shore of the Greek island of Antikythera included this artifact. Archaeologist Valerios Stais recognized it as bearing a gear on May 17, 1902. The gadget, which was found as a single lump and then fragmented into three primary components that are now divided into 82 individual shards following conservation efforts, was contained in the remnants of a wooden box that measured 34 cm 18 cm 9 cm (13.4 in 7.1 in 3.5 in). While several of these shards have inscriptions, four of them have gears. The biggest gear has 223 teeth and is around 13 centimeters (5.1 in) in diameter.   Using contemporary computer x-ray tomography and high resolution surface scanning, a team at Cardiff University led by Mike Edmunds and Tony Freeth was able to image inside fragments of the crust-encased mechanism in 2008 and decipher the faintest writing that had once been inscribed on the machine's outer casing. This shows that it contained 37 bronze meshing gears that allowed it to mimic the Moon's erratic orbit, where the Moon's velocity is higher in its perigee than in its apogee, follow the motions of the Moon and Sun across the zodiac, and anticipate eclipses. Astronomer Hipparchus of Rhodes researched this motion in the second century BC, and it is possible that he was consulted when building the device. It is believed that a piece of the system, which also determined the locations of the five classical planets, is missing.   The device has been variously dated to between 150 and 100 BC, or to 205 BC, and it is thought to have been devised and built by Greek scientists. In any event, it had to have been built prior to the shipwreck, which has been dated to around 70–60 BC by many lines of evidence. Researchers suggested in 2022 that the machine's initial calibration date, rather than the actual date of manufacture, would have been December 23, 178 BC. Some academics disagree, arguing that the calibration date should be 204 BC. Up to the astronomical clocks of Richard of Wallingford and Giovanni de' Dondi in the fourteenth century, comparable complicated machines had not been seen.   The National Archaeological Museum in Athens currently has all of the Antikythera mechanism's fragments as well as a variety of reproductions and artistic reconstructions that show how it would have appeared and operated.   During the first voyage with the Hellenic Royal Navy, in 1900–1901, Captain Dimitrios Kontos and a crew of sponge divers from Symi island found the Antikythera shipwreck. Off Point Glyphadia on the Greek island of Antikythera, at a depth of 45 meters (148 feet), a Roman cargo ship wreck was discovered. The crew found various huge items, including the mechanism, ceramics, special glassware, jewelry, bronze and marble statues, and more. In 1901, most likely that July, the mechanism was pulled from the rubble. The mechanism's origin remains unknown, however it has been speculated that it was transported from Rhodes to Rome along with other seized goods to assist a triumphant procession that Julius Caesar was staging.   The National Museum of Archaeology in Athens received all the salvaged debris pieces for storage and examination. The museum personnel spent two years assembling more visible artifacts, like the sculptures, but the mechanism, which looked like a mass of tarnished brass and wood, remained unseen. The mechanism underwent deformational modifications as a result of not treating it after removal from saltwater.   Archaeologist Valerios Stais discovered a gear wheel lodged in one of the rocks on May 17, 1902. Although most experts judged the object to be prochronistic and too complicated to have been created during the same era as the other components that had been unearthed, he originally thought it was an astronomical clock. Before British science historian and Yale University professor Derek J. de Solla Price developed an interest in the object in 1951, investigations into the object were abandoned. The 82 pieces were photographed using X-ray and gamma-ray technology in 1971 by Price and Greek nuclear researcher Charalampos Karakalos. In 1974, Price issued a 70-page report summarizing their findings.   In 2012 and 2015, two more searches at the Antikythera wreck site turned up artifacts and another ship that may or may not be related to the treasure ship on which the mechanism was discovered. A bronze disc decorated with a bull's head was also discovered. Some speculated that the disc, which has four "ears" with holes in them, may have served as a "cog wheel" in the Antikythera mechanism. There doesn't seem to be any proof that it was a component of the mechanism; it's more probable that the disc was a bronze ornament on some furniture.   The earliest analog computer is typically referred to as the Antikythera mechanism. The production of the device must have had undiscovered ancestors throughout the Hellenistic era based on its quality and intricacy. It is believed to have been erected either in the late second century BC or the early first century BC, and its construction was based on mathematical and astronomical ideas created by Greek scientists during the second century BC.   Since they recognized the calendar on the Metonic Spiral as originating from Corinth or one of its colonies in northwest Greece or Sicily, further investigation by the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project in 2008 showed that the idea for the mechanism may have originated in the colonies of Corinth. The Antikythera Mechanism Research Initiative contended in 2008 that Syracuse could suggest a relationship with the school of Archimedes because it was a Corinthian colony and the home of Archimedes. In 2017, it was shown that the Metonic Spiral's calendar is of the Corinthian type and cannot be a Syracuse calendar. Another idea postulates that the device's origin may have come from the ancient Greek city of Pergamon, site of the Library of Pergamum, and claims that coins discovered by Jacques Cousteau at the wreck site in the 1970s correspond to the time of the device's creation. It was second in significance to the Library of Alexandria during the Hellenistic era due to its extensive collection of art and scientific scrolls.   A theory that the gadget was built in an academy established by Stoic philosopher Posidonius on that Greek island is supported by the discovery of Rhodian-style vases aboard the ship that carried the object. Hipparchus, an astronomer active from around 140 BC to 120 BC, lived at Rhodes, which was a bustling commercial port and a center for astronomy and mechanical engineering. Hipparchus' hypothesis of the motion of the Moon is used by the mechanism, raising the likelihood that he may have developed it or at the very least worked on it. The island of Rhodes is situated between the latitudes of 35.85 and 36.50 degrees north; it has lately been proposed that the astronomical events on the Parapegma of the Antikythera mechanism operate best for latitudes in the range of 33.3-37.0 degrees north.   According to a research published in 2014 by Carman and Evans, the Saros Dial's start-up date corresponds to the astronomical lunar month that started soon after the new moon on April 28, 205 BC. This suggests a revised dating of about 200 BC. Carman and Evans claim that the Babylonian arithmetic style of prediction suits the device's predictive models considerably better than the conventional Greek trigonometric approach does. According to a 2017 study by Paul Iversen, the device's prototype originated in Rhodes, but this particular model was modified for a customer from Epirus in northwest Greece. Iversen contends that the device was likely built no earlier than a generation before the shipwreck, a date that is also supported by Jones.   In an effort to learn more about the mechanism, further dives were made in 2014 and 2015. A five-year investigative program that started in 2014 and finished in October 2019 was followed by a second five-year session that began in May 2020.   The original mechanism probably came in one encrusted piece from the Mediterranean. It broke into three main parts shortly after that. In the meanwhile, more little fragments have come loose from handling and cleaning, and the Cousteau expedition discovered other fragments on the ocean floor. Fragment F was found in this fashion in 2005, suggesting that other fragments may still remain in storage, undetected since their first retrieval. The majority of the mechanism and inscriptions are found on seven of the 82 known fragments, which are also mechanically noteworthy. Additionally, 16 smaller components include inscriptions that are illegible and fragmentary.    The twelve zodiacal signs are divided into equal 30-degree sectors on a fixed ring dial that represents the ecliptic on the mechanism's front face. Even though the borders of the constellations were arbitrary, this was consistent with the Babylonian practice of allocating an equal portion of the ecliptic to each zodiac sign. The Sothic Egyptian calendar, which has twelve months of 30 days plus five intercalary days, is marked off with a rotating ring that is located outside that dial. The Greek alphabetized versions of the Egyptian names for the months are used to identify them. To align the Egyptian calendar ring with the current zodiac points, the first procedure is to spin it. Due to the Egyptian calendar's disregard for leap days, a whole zodiac sign would cycle through every 120 years.   Now we cannot show you pictures because well you couldn't see them. So we will try to describe them as best we can and we can also post them online.    The mechanism was turned by a now-lost little hand crank that was connected to the biggest gear, the four-spoked gear shown on the front of fragment A, gear b1, via a crown gear. As a result, the date indicator on the front dial was shifted to the appropriate day of the Egyptian calendar. Since the year cannot be changed, it is necessary to know the year that is currently in use. Alternatively, since most calendar cycles are not synchronized with the year, the cycles indicated by the various calendar cycle indicators on the back can be found in the Babylonian ephemeris tables for the day of the year that is currently in use. If the mechanism were in good operating order, the crank would easily be able to strike a certain day on the dial because it moves the date marker around 78 days each full rotation. The mechanism's interlocking gears would all revolve as the hand crank was turned, allowing for the simultaneous determination of the Sun's and Moon's positions, the moon's phase, the timing of an eclipse, the calendar cycle, and maybe the positions of planets.   The position of the spiral dial pointers on the two huge dials on the rear had to be observed by the operator as well. As the dials included four and five complete rotations of the pointers, the pointer had a "follower" that followed the spiral incisions in the metal. Before continuing, a pointer's follower had to be manually shifted to the opposite end of the spiral after reaching the terminal month place at either end of the spiral.   Two circular concentric scales may be seen on the front dial. The Greek zodiac signs are denoted on the inner scale, which is divided into degrees. A series of similar holes underneath the movable ring that rests flush with the surface and runs in a channel that makes up the outer scale are marked off with what appear to be days.   This outer ring has been thought to symbolize the 365-day Egyptian calendar ever since the mechanism was discovered, but new study contradicts this assumption and suggests it is really divided into 354 intervals. The Sothic and Callippic cycles had previously pointed to a 365 14-day solar year, as evidenced in Ptolemy III's proposed calendar reform of 238 BC. If one accepts the 365-day presupposition, it is acknowledged that the mechanism predates the Julian calendar reform. The dials aren't thought to represent his intended leap day, but by rotating the scale back one day every four years, the outer calendar dial may be adjusted against the inner dial to account for the effect of the extra quarter-day in the solar year.   The ring is most likely seen as a manifestation of a 354-day lunar calendar if one accepts the 354-day evidence. It is perhaps the first instance of the Egyptian civil-based lunar calendar postulated by Richard Anthony Parker in 1950, given the age of the mechanism's putative manufacture and the existence of Egyptian month names. The lunar calendar was intended to act as a daily indicator of succeeding lunations and to aid in the understanding of the Metonic(The moon phases return at the same time of year every almost precisely 19 years during the Metonic cycle. Although the recurrence is imperfect, careful examination shows that the Metonic cycle, which is defined as 235 synodic months, is only 2 hours, 4 minutes, and 58 seconds longer than 19 tropical years. In the fifth century BC, Meton of Athens determined that the cycle was exactly 6,940 days long. The creation of a lunisolar calendar is made easier by using these full integers.) and Saros(The saros, which may be used to forecast solar and lunar eclipses, is a period of exactly 223 synodic months, or around 6585.3211 days, or 18 years, 10, 11, or 12 days (depending on how many leap years there are). In what is known as an eclipse cycle, the Sun, Earth, and Moon return to about the same relative geometry, a nearly straight line, one saros time after an eclipse, and a nearly similar eclipse will take place. A sar is a saros's lower half.) dials as well as the Lunar phase pointer. Unknown gearing is assumed to move a pointer across this scale in synchrony with the rest of the mechanism's Metonic gearing. A one-in-76-year Callippic cycle correction and practical lunisolar intercalation were made possible by the movement and registration of the ring with respect to the underlying holes.   The dial also shows the Sun's location on the ecliptic in relation to the current year's date. The ecliptic serves as a useful reference for determining the locations of the Moon, the five planets known to the Greeks, and other celestial bodies whose orbits are similarly near to it.   The locations of bodies on the ecliptic were marked by at least two points. The position of the Moon was displayed by a lunar pointer, while the location of the mean Sun and the current date were also provided. The Moon position was the oldest known application of epicyclic gearing(Two gears positioned so that one gear's center spins around the other's center make up an epicyclic gear train, sometimes referred to as a planetary gearset.), and it mimicked the acceleration and deceleration of the Moon's elliptical orbit rather than being a simple mean Moon indicator that would signal movement uniformly across a circular orbit.   The system followed the Metonic calendar, anticipated solar eclipses, and computed the time of various panhellenic athletic competitions, including the Ancient Olympic Games, according to recent research published in the journal Nature in July 2008. The names of the months on the instrument closely resemble those found on calendars from Epirus in northwest Greece and with Corfu, which was formerly known as Corcyra.   Five dials are located on the rear of the mechanism: the Metonic, Saros, and two smaller ones, the so-called Olympiad Dial (recently renamed the Games dial since it did not track Olympiad years; the four-year cycle it closely matches is the Halieiad), the Callippic(a certain approximate common multiple of the synodic month and the tropical year that was put out by Callippus around 330 BC. It is a 76-year span that is an improvement over the Metonic cycle's 19 years.), and the Exeligmos(a time frame of 54 years, 33 days over which further eclipses with the same characteristics and position may be predicted.)   Both the front and rear doors of the wooden casing that houses the mechanism have inscriptions on them. The "instruction manual" looks to be behind the rear door. "76 years, 19 years" is inscribed on one of its parts, denoting the Callippic and Metonic cycles. "223" for the Saros cycle is also written. Another piece of it has the phrase "on the spiral subdivisions 235," which alludes to the Metonic dial.   The mechanism is exceptional due to the degree of miniaturization and the intricacy of its components, which is equivalent to that of astronomical clocks from the fourteenth century. Although mechanism specialist Michael Wright has argued that the Greeks of this era were capable of designing a system with many more gears, it includes at least 30 gears. Whether the device contained signs for each of the five planets known to the ancient Greeks is a subject of significant controversy. With the exception of one 63-toothed gear that is otherwise unaccounted for, no gearing for such a planetary display is still in existence.   It is quite likely that the mechanism featured additional gearing that was either removed before being placed onboard the ship or lost in or after the shipwreck due to the enormous gap between the mean Sun gear and the front of the box as well as the size and mechanical characteristics on the mean Sun gear. Numerous attempts to mimic what the Greeks of the time would have done have been made as a result of the absence of evidence and the nature of the front section of the mechanism, and of course various solutions have been proposed as a result of the lack of evidence.   Michael Wright was the first to create a model that included a simulation of a future planetarium system in addition to the existing mechanism. He said that corrections for the deeper, more fundamental solar anomaly would have been undertaken in addition to the lunar anomaly (known as the "first anomaly"). Along with the well-known "mean sun" (present time) and lunar pointers, he also provided pointers for this "real sun," Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.   A solution that differs significantly from Wright's was published by Evans, Carman, and Thorndike. Their suggestion focused on the uneven spacing of the letters on the front clock face, which seemed to them to imply an off-center sun indication arrangement. By eliminating the requirement to imitate the solar anomaly, this would simplify the mechanism. Additionally, they proposed that simple dials for each individual planet would display data such as significant planetary cycle events, initial and final appearances in the night sky, and apparent direction changes rather than accurate planetary indication, which is rendered impossible by the offset inscriptions. Compared to Wright's concept, this system would result in a far more straightforward gear system with significantly lower forces and complexity.   After much investigation and labor, Freeth and Jones released their idea in 2012. They developed a concise and workable answer to the planetary indicator puzzle. They also suggest that the date pointer, which displays the mean position of the Sun and the date on the month dial, be separated to display the solar anomaly (i.e., the sun's apparent location in the zodiac dial). If the two dials are properly synced, Wright's front panel display may be shown on the other dials as well. However, unlike Wright's model, this one is simply a 3-D computer simulation and has not been physically constructed.   Similar devices A first-century BC philosophical debate by Cicero, De re publica (54-51 BC), discusses two devices that some contemporary authors believe to be some sort of planetarium or orrery, forecasting the motions of the Sun, Moon, and the five planets known at the time. After Archimedes' demise at the siege of Syracuse in 212 BC, the Roman commander Marcus Claudius Marcellus took both of them to Rome. One of these devices was the sole thing Marcellus preserved during the siege because of his admiration for Archimedes (the second was placed in the Temple of Virtue). The instrument was kept as a family heirloom, and according to Philus, who was present during a conversation Cicero imagined had taken place in Scipio Aemilianus's villa in the year 129 BC, Gaius Sulpicius Gallus, who served as consul with Marcellus's nephew in 166 BC and is credited by Pliny the Elder with being the first Roman to have written a book explaining solar and lunar eclipses, gave both a "learned explanation" and working demonstrations of the device.   According to Pappus of Alexandria (290–c. 350 AD), Archimedes had penned a now-lost treatise titled On Sphere-Making that described how to build these contraptions. Many of his innovations are described in the ancient documents that have survived, some of which even have crude illustrations. His odometer is one such instrument; the Romans later used a similar device to set their mile marks (described by Vitruvius, Heron of Alexandria and in the time of Emperor Commodus). Although the pictures in the literature looked to be practical, attempts to build them as shown had been unsuccessful. The system worked properly when the square-toothed gears in the illustration were swapped out for the angled gears found in the Antikythera mechanism.   This technique existed as early as the third century BC, if Cicero's story is accurate. Later Roman authors including Lactantius (Divinarum Institutionum Libri VII), Claudian (In sphaeram Archimedes), and Proclus (Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements of Geometry) in the fourth and fifth century also make reference to Archimedes' invention.   Cicero also said that another such device was built "recently" by his friend Posidonius, "... each one of the revolutions of which brings about the same movement in the Sun and Moon and five wandering stars [planets] as is brought about each day and night in the heavens"   Given that the third device was almost certainly in Posidonius's possession by that time and that both the Archimedes-made and Cicero-mentioned machines were found in Rome at least 30 years after the shipwreck's estimated date, it is unlikely that any one of these machines was the Antikythera mechanism discovered in the wreck. The researchers who rebuilt the Antikythera mechanism concur that it was too complex to have been a singular invention.   This proof that the Antikythera mechanism was not unique strengthens the argument that there was a tradition of complex mechanical technology in ancient Greece that was later, at least in part, transmitted to the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. During the Middle Ages, complex mechanical devices that were still simpler than the Antikythera mechanism were built in these cultures.A fifth- or sixth-century Byzantine Empire geared calendar fragment that was mounted to a sundial and maybe used to help tell time has been discovered. The Caliph of Baghdad commissioned Bani Ms's Kitab al-Hiyal, also known as the Book of Ingenious Devices, in the early ninth century AD. Over a hundred mechanical devices were detailed in this document, some of which may have been found in monastic manuscripts from antiquity. Around 1000, the scholar al-Biruni described a geared calendar that was comparable to the Byzantine mechanism, and a 13th-century astrolabe also had a clockwork system that is similar to it. It's probable that this medieval technology was brought to Europe and had a part in the region's development of mechanical clocks.   Su Song, a Chinese polymath, built a mechanical clock tower in the 11th century that, among other things, measured the positions of several stars and planets that were shown on an armillary sphere that spun mechanically.   Conspiracy Corner The Antikythera Mechanism was thought to have been created between 150 and 100 BCE at first, but recent research dates its development to approximately 205 BCE. It's interesting that this technology seems to have just vanished because comparable items didn't start turning up until the 14th century. But why did the ancient Greeks permit such a significant development to be forgotten over time? Posidonius carried on the work of the Greek astronomer Hipparchus by instructing students at an astronomy academy. Posidonius invented a contraption that "in each rotation reproduces the identical motions of the Sun, the Moon and the five planets that take place in the skies every day and night," according to Cicero, one of Posidonius' students. Which remarkably resembles the Antikythera Mechanism. However, when the Mechanism was created in the second century BCE, Posidonius was not yet alive. Hipparchus was, though. Posidonius could have built an instrument based on Hipparchus' Antikythera Mechanism, which he made many years before. What about Posidonius' instrument, though? A time traveler from the future may have developed the Mechanism, or it may genuinely be a futuristic gadget that was taken back to ancient Greece and put there on purpose if it dates to the second century BCE and equivalent technology didn't start emerging until decades later. Some people think the entire thing is a hoax despite overwhelming scientific proof to the contrary. After all, it is challenging to reconcile the Antikythera mechanism's antiquity with its growth in technology. The Turk, a fictional chess-playing robot constructed in the 18th century, has been likened to the mechanism by some. But scientists easily acknowledge that The Turk is a fraud. Why would they fabricate evidence of the mechanism's reliability? What would they be attempting to conceal? Even though it is quite old, the Antikythera mechanism represented an enormous advance in technology. So how did the Greeks of antiquity come up with the concept, much alone construct it? They didn't, according to The Ancient Aliens: “Beings with advanced knowledge of astronomical bodies, mathematics and precision engineering tools created the device or gave the knowledge for its creation to someone during the first century BC. But the knowledge was not recorded or wasn't passed down to anyone else.” Therefore, aliens either provided humanity the ability to make this gadget or the knowledge to do so, but they didn't do anything to assure that we built on it or learnt from it. It seems like the aliens weren't planning ahead very well. This theory, like the extraterrestrial one, is based simply on the observation that the Antikythera mechanism seems to be too technologically sophisticated for its period. The mythical Atlantis was a highly developed metropolis that vanished into the ocean. Many people think the city genuinely exists, despite the fact that Plato only described it in a sequence of allegories. And some of those individuals believe the Antikythera mechanism proves Atlantis existed since it was too sophisticated for any known culture at the time; they believe Atlantis, not Greece, is where the mechanism originated. According to the notion of intelligent design, a higher power purposefully created many things on Earth because they are too sophisticated to have arisen by simple evolution. Because the Antikythera mechanism is so much more sophisticated than any other artifact from that age, some people think it is proof of intelligent design. If this is the case, you have to question what divine, omnipotent creature would spend time creating such a minute object for such a trivial goal. Greece's coast is home to the island of Rhodes. Greek artifacts were placed into the ship transporting the Mechanism, which was sailing for Rome. One explanation for this might be that the Antikythera mechanism was taken together with the spoils from the island of Rhodes. How come Rhodes was pillaged? following a victorious war against the Greeks, as part of Julius Caesar's triumphal procession. Could the loss of one of history's most significant and cutting-edge technical advancements be accidentally attributed to Julius Caesar? The Antikythera mechanism may have predicted the color of eclipses, which is thought to be impossible by scientists, according to new translations of texts on the device. Therefore, were the forecasts the mechanism provided only educated guesses, or did the ancient Greeks have knowledge that we do not? According to legend, an extraterrestrial species called the Annunaki (possible episode?) invaded and inhabited Earth (they were revered as gods in ancient Mesopotamia), leaving behind evidence of their presence. The Antikythera mechanism could be one of these hints. The Mechanism uses what appears to be distinct technology that was, as far as we are aware, extremely different from anything else that was built about 200 BCE. It estimates when lunar eclipses would occur, which advanced space invaders would undoubtedly know something about. An intriguing view on the process is held by Mike Edmunds from Cardiff University. The uniqueness and technological innovation of the item are frequently highlighted in reports about it. However, Edmunds speculates that the mechanism may have been in transit to a client when the ship carrying it went down. If one device was being delivered, might there possibly be others — if not on this ship, then potentially on others from Rhodes? — he asks in his essay. There may have been more of these amazing machines that have been lost to the passage of time or are still out there waiting to be found. MOVIES - films from the future - https://filmsfromthefuture.com/movies/

    Markandeya Puranam - Sri Vaddiparthi Padmakar
    Markandeya Puranam (ముసలి తనము_ మరణము అనేది అలాంటి వారి దరిచేరవు)

    Markandeya Puranam - Sri Vaddiparthi Padmakar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 13:30


    Produced and Edited by Nikhil Dintakurthi For Sponsorships and Promotions reach out to us at nikhil.d@teluguone.com About TeluguOne Podcasts: TeluguOne is a Telugu language & entertainment portal with a plethora of features like News, Cinema/Movies, Celeb photos, Videos, Full length movies, Web Radio, Kids Zone, e-Library, Bhakti/Devotional, and many more. We have a reach to over 172 countries across the globe and been adjudged as the largest Telugu language portal in the world. Our Other Shows: TeluguOne Cricket: https://linktr.ee/teluguonecricket Daily News Bulletin: https://linktr.ee/dailynewsbulletin Alapati Chamakkulu: https://linktr.ee/alapati Garikapati Gyananidhi: https://linktr.ee/garikapatipodcast Telugu Kathalu: https://linktr.ee/telugukathalu Koumudi: http://bit.ly/Koumudi Kathavahini: https://linktr.ee/kathavahini Inspirational Stories: https://linktr.ee/inspirationalstories

    The Dinner Table: A Southern Cannibal Podcast
    5 TRUE Creepy Library Horror Stories | Episode 135

    The Dinner Table: A Southern Cannibal Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 22:18


    Libraries are supposed to be for reading and learning... but the creeps never stop...  Send your TRUE Scary Stories HERE! ► https://southerncannibal.com/ Follow me on Twitch! :) ► https://www.twitch.tv/southerncannibal LISTEN TO THE DINNER TABLE PODCAST! ► https://open.spotify.com/show/3zfschBzphkHhhpV870gFW?si=j53deGSXRxyyo9rsxqbFgw Faqs about me ► https://youtube.fandom.com/wiki/Southern_Cannibal Stalk Me! ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/Southern_Canni ► Instagram: https://instagram.com/Southern_Canni/ ► Snapchat: southerncanny ► Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/southern-cannibal-merch ► Scary Story Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL18YGadwJHERUzNMxTSoIYRIoUWfcGO2I ► DISCLAIMER: All Stories and Music featured in today's video were granted FULL permission for use on the Southern Cannibal YouTube Channel!  ► Thumbnail Artist: Myself Huge Thanks to these brave folks who sent in their stories! #1. - Aaliyah #2. - StudiousBookWorm  #3. - theolrazzledazzle #4. - Shadow #5. - Full Metal  Huge Thanks to these talented folks for their creepy music! ► Myuuji: https://www.youtube.com/c/myuuji ♪ ► CO.AG Music: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA  ♪ ► Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com ♪ ► Piano Horror:  https://www.youtube.com/PianoHorror ♪ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ #TrueScaryStories

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast
    Queer Poem-a-Day: Polyamory by Madeleine Cravens

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:44


    Madeleine Cravens is a 2022-2024 Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. She received her M.F.A from Columbia University, where she was a recipient of the Max Ritvo Poetry Fellowship. She was the first-place winner of Narrative Magazine's 2021 Poetry Contest and 2020 30 Below Contest, a semifinalist for the 92 Street Y's 2021 Discovery Prize, and a finalist for the 2022 James Hearst Poetry Prize. Copyright © 2022 by Madeleine Cravens. This poem is originally published on Queer Poem-a-Day.  Text of today's poem and more details about our program can be found at: deerfieldlibrary.org/queerpoemaday/ Find books from participating poets in our library's catalog.  Queer Poem-a-Day is directed by poet and teacher Lisa Hiton and Dylan Zavagno, Adult Services Coordinator at the Deerfield Public Library. Music for this second year of our series is the first movement, Schéhérazade, from Masques, Op. 34, by Karol Szymanowski, performed by pianist Daniel Baer. Queer Poem-a-Day is supported by generous donations from the Friends of the Deerfield Public Library and the Deerfield Fine Arts Commission. Queer Poem-a-Day is a program from the Adult Services Department at the Library and may include adult language. 

    Charlottesville Community Engagement
    June 28, 2022: Library name change would require approval from elected officials in all five JMRL jurisdictions; Council briefed on Central Water Line in advance of RWSA vote

    Charlottesville Community Engagement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:39


    Today is the antepenultimate day of Fiscal Year 2022, and we’re counting down the hours to when the metaphorical ball will drop in Richmond marking the beginning of FY2023. Are you prepared? Feel free to review previous installments of Charlottesville Community Engagement to revisit the hundreds of stories written in the tinfopast 12 fiscal months. Or head on over to Information Charlottesville to see I’ve been able to cover at least. The “I” here is Sean Tubbs and thanks for reading. On today’s program: Charlottesville City Council gets details on a water infrastructure project in advance of a vote today by the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority Many people had an opinion about whether the name of the regional library system but it’s up to elected officials to decide on a change How much trash was processed in Virginia last year? The Department of Environmental Quality has a new report.And about two hundred people attended an open house on the forthcoming update of the city’s zoning codeToday’s first shout-out goes to WTJUIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Algorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. Tune in and support freeform community radio on WTJU Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Around 200 people turn up at Pavilion to get details on the city’s zoning processWhen the Cville Plans Together Initiative began in early 2020, there were plans to engage people at a series of meetings while the work of crafting an affordable housing plan and the Comprehensive Plan update was conducted. However, the pandemic forced all of that public engagement work to go online. Council adopted the Affordable Housing Plan in March 2021 and the Comprehensive Plan last November. Both call for additional residential density across the city and an update of the zoning code is the next step. This time around, people can meet in large numbers, and an open house was held yesterday at the Ting Pavilion where attendees could get a look at the new Diagnostics and Approach Report for the zoning rewrite. People could go through the entire process to date and ask questions of consultants, city staff and each other. I dropped by briefly and spoke with James Freas, the city’s Director of Neighborhood Development Services since last September.  (read the Zoning Diagnostic and Approach report)“We’ve just released the report about two weeks ago and what we’re really looking for is where can we answer clarifying questions, where can we answer questions about what we’ve already shared and what’s in there, and what else should we be considering?” Freas said. Freas said even half an hour into the event, he could see how community engagement will be different for this phase of the Cville Plans Together initiative. “If you look around, people are having conversations,” Freas said. “You can’t do this on a Zoom environment. So it’s really exciting to be back in person talking to people face to face, introducing ourselves, having a conversation, and even if we don’t agree, because we’ve met and talked face to face, we’re able to walk away in a move civil environment.” Freas said the city will collect comments through August, and he will be visiting various neighborhood associations to explain the idea. Then the diagnostics report will be finalized in September for the Planning Commission and Council to review, followed by the actual rewrite. DEQ releases solid waste reportMore than 22.7 million tons of solid waste were sent to processing facilities in Virginia last year, with nearly 5.4 million coming from out of state. That’s according to the annual solid waste report for 2021, released yesterday by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. “The total amount of solid waste received increased by one percent or 225,524.95 tons compared to 2020,” reads the report.However, the amount that came from another jurisdiction dropped by 5.28 percent. About 44 percent of out-of-state came from Maryland, 18.7 percent came from New York State, and 14 percent came from Washington D.C. Around 11.8 percent of the waste was incinerated and 73 percent went into landfills. Another 8.24 percent was recycled. All but one of Virginia’s 204 permitted solid waste facilities submitted reports. Locally, the landfill operated by Louisa County buried 23.1 tons of solid waste and has 10.2 years left of capacity. Two transfer stations included in the reporting are the Ivy Materials Utilization Center in Albemarle County as well as the Nelson County transfer station. Speakers express multiple views on renaming of library system The Board of Trustees of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library met yesterday at the Northside Library on Rio Road for the usual things such as a five year plan and a budget. But the main item throughout the meeting was whether the system’s name should be changed. “I don’t expect that we will have a vote on the issue of the library’s name change today,” said Thomas Unsworth, the chair of the JMRL Board. “In fact the Board would be able to call a public hearing if need be to collect further feedback from commentary on that issue.”The public comment period came at the beginning of the meeting before comments on the topic from JMRL Director David Plunkett. The topic came up at the last trustee meeting in May when Myra Anderson asked for the change because Thomas Jefferson and James Madison owned people as enslaved workers. We’ll hear from Anderson again in a minute.  The first speaker identified himself as Nickolaus Cabrera and said he was a rising senior at the University of Virginia as well as president of the school’s chapter of Young Americans for Freedom. “We lose our future when we burn our past,” Cabrerra said. “What you all are considering today is a direct burning of our past. Why is this discussion happening? On what basis?” Cabrerra said the name change would do nothing more than promote a “woke agenda” and this would be an example of censorship. The next several speakers sided with this view. Others did not, including Gloria Beard of Charlottesville. “It’s time for a change for all people and I hope you all consider what we’re trying to bring across to you,”  Beard said. “It’s time to change so all people feel like this community is for everybody.” Others felt Jefferson and Madison’s legacy was too important not to honor. “Without Jefferson we would not have the freedoms we have so that is just so important for people to research, come to libraries that are full of books,” said Ann McLean of Richmond. “Yes, he loved books.” McLean said the Declaration of Independence was more important than the works of Shakespeare, the Magna Carta, and the writings of Cicero.“Without the principles set forth in the Declaration of Independence, we would have no rights and no liberties and be completely at the mercy of the government,” McLean continued. “Which we do not want to be!”Myra Anderson described herself as the president of the Reclaimed Roots Descendants Alliance and a descendant of enslaved laborers.“Six of my ancestors were sold on the auction block in 1829 at the second estate sale of Thomas Jefferson,” Anderson said. “At the time the Declaration of Independence was written and it was declared that all men are created equal, my sixth great grandfather and grandmother were enslaved at the time at Monticello.” Anderson said libraries should be inclusive spaces and the name should change to reflect the updated values of the system. She said to her, the name Jefferson does not just conjure up greatness. “It represents the trauma, the oppression, the pain, and the part of Jefferson that most white people want to gloss over when they talk about his greatness, but unfortunately that’s the part that put Black people on a trajectory of struggle,” Anderson said. Anderson said the precedent for such a change was set locally when the health district dropped his name last year. Director’s reportAfter the public comment period was over, Plunkett gave his report on how the name is currently codified and how it might be changed. He said state law for regional library boards deal with how trustees are appointed and the rules for spending money.  There’s no mention of who gets to name them. Plunkett said the current name has informally been in place since 1972 when the regional system was created to pool resources across a wider area. “The big reason though that Charlottesville, Albemarle, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson joined forces to create JMRL was because of state aid funding which was amplified in the 70’s,” Plunkett said. “Basically the state incentivized localities to get together and share their resources in order to provide library services.” The original agreement from 1972 did not yet include Greene County, and Plunkett said it was originally called the Thomas Jefferson Regional Library. “The library board heard a comment from a library board member who made a plea to them to change the name from the Thomas Jefferson Regional Library to the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library,” Plunkett said. Plunkett said that board member wanted to recognize the “special friendship” between Madison and Jefferson. He noted Madison did not live in the service area now operated by JMRL. Greene County joined in 1974 and the name was officially changed in an amended agreement. Plunkett said he’s sought legal advice about who gets to change the name. “The legal counsel that the library board has received is that the authority for changing the library name rests with member jurisdictions, with Charlottesville, Albemarle, Louisa, Greene, and Nelson,” Plunkett said. Plunkett said the agreement is overdue for its mandatory five-year review and a five-member committee with one appointed by each jurisdiction should begin that work and consider a new name as part of that process. “If there were changes made to the regional agreement at that point, they would need to take them back to their Boards of Supervisors or City Councils to vote on before that could come back as an amended regional agreement,” Plunkett said. Plunkett said the Blue Ridge Health District did not have to ask for permission to make a change and it was made administratively. He added Albemarle County Public Schools have a policy in place regarding school names (learn more). The University of Virginia has a Namings & Memorials committee. Board discussionDuring the Board discussion, Trustee Lisa Woolfork of Charlottesville noted the library was not named to honor the two former presidents, but their friendship. “It wasn’t about ‘Oh, look what they did for the Bill of Rights and the Declaration and et cetera,” Woolfork said. “It was, ‘these guys are friends!”’Woolfork noted that Charlottesville’s Unitarian church recently dropped Jefferson’s name from its official name. “I really do believe that we are in a moment where our democracy is being challenged in a variety of ways and I feel as though we have the opportunity to make some true progress to reflect some of the growth that Charlottesville has made,” Woolfork said. One of Albemarle’s trustees, Michael Powers, said at issue is that different people view as the primary legacy of Jefferson. “I think it’s clear to me that many people primarily associated Jefferson and Madison with their practice of slavery, but it’s also clear that whatever the origin of the name was at the time, over the last 50 years many people have come also to primarily associate these figures with powerful and fundamental American values, principles and ideals,” Powers said. Powers said the JMRL Board has to take both considerations into account and he spent some time defending how others have sought to defend Jefferson’s legacy. He cited the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution as the main legal tool used in the Civil Rights movement. “So we hear in the 14th amendment, equal protection for life, liberty, they are very familiar echoes of Jefferson’s ‘All men are created equal’ and ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” Powers continued. JMRL Chair Thomas Unsworth said while the JMRL can’t directly change the name, they can make recommendations or suggestions to local officials as part of the agreement review. Woolfork was clear that she feels the name must change and she resisted framing the issue as one of two equal sides. “It seems to me that that true energy of what a library does and brings and provides should be robust enough and substantial enough that we can serve our services areas and provide the things we continue to provide and not being called Jefferson Madison will not impede our ability to do that,” Woolfork said. The trustee from Louisa County pointed out that two of the five localities have already voted on resolutions opposing a name change. Neither resolution in either Greene or Louisa specified any further action. (Louisa Supervisors unanimously oppose name change, June 9, 2022)The trustee from Nelson County said she was concerned about the resolutions.“They put that out before even hearing what the other people in the area,” said Aleta Childs. The Board had a long discussion of the matter and in the end opted to pick up the conversation at its next meeting in July. By then, Tony Townsend of Albemarle will be the chair. “My agenda here is to make sure that the area’s most inclusive, diverse, and free resource doesn’t get sidetracked or handicapped by this discussion,” Townsend said. “I think it’s a good discussion. I think it needs to happen. I think we can probably come up with a plan that will allow everyone to have at least input.” Townsend said the process is just beginning. Woolfork said she wanted to know if Louisa and Greene would leave the regional system as a result. “Are they that committed to their adulation of Jefferson and Madison that they will just say ‘we don’t want to have a library with you anymore, thanks, and nice knowing you,’” Woolfork asked. The JMRL Board of Trustees next meets on July 25 at 3 p.m. Second shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  RWSA to vote today on Central Water Line projectToday the Board of Directors for the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority will meet to select an alignment for a five mile pipeline that the organization says is necessary to help secure drinking water infrastructure. Last week, Charlottesville City Council got a briefing on the project. (view the presentation)“So we call it the Central Water Line project because it was recommended to be located in the central portion of the city to provide the greatest water benefit to our regional water supply system,” said Bill Mawyer, the executive director of the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority. Mawyer said planning dates back to a drought in 2002 that led to a long discussion about how to expand the community water supply plan. That involved expansion of the Ragged Mountain Reservoir by building a new earthen dam, as well as an upgrade of the Observatory Water Treatment plan. This Central Water Line is to transfer water to a location in Pantops. “We realized later, it was not part of the original Community Water Supply plan, that we needed to have a large pipe coming away from the Observatory Treatment Plant so that we can distribute that water to all parts of the city and the county, the urban water area as we call it,” Mawyer said.The current cost share is a 52 to 48 percent split with the Albemarle County Service Authority picking up the larger share. Various versions of this pipeline have been considered in the past to increase capacity, and a report released last year called the Urban Finished Water Master Plan recommended this central pipe through the city. “If we expand the water treatment plant and we replace the raw waterline to get it to the treatment plant, it has no benefit if we can't put that water out into the system,” Mawyer said. Mawyer said the work would be done in segments of several hundred feet at a time with most of the work underneath city streets. “We expect the schedule to be from 2024 through 2028,” Mawyer said. Mawyer said the RWSA has presented to six neighborhood associations along the route and mailed out information to every parcel on the way. He said that led to another visitation of the five alignments and other alternatives that had been examined. One of the alignments would have used the Route 250 bypass but that would have taken eight years. “Work on the bypass was going to be quite a challenge [and] that likely would have to be completed at night due to the impacts on traffic,” Mawyer said. Other alignments included Preston Avenue, West Main, and along Harris Street and Fifth Street Extended. Mawyer said the latter got further attention during the neighborhood meeting phase. “Now, when we had our neighborhood meetings, they said, well what about going down Harris Street all the way to Fifth Street and come up Fifth Street ,” Mawyer said. “So we took a careful look at that and found that there were two disadvantages. One,  it was going to be about $8 million more expensive because it’s a much longer route.”Mawyer also said Fifth Street carries heavy traffic including emergency vehicles. Another potential alternative was to go underneath Shamrock Road which would have been shorter and cheaper, but other problems were identified.  “But Shamrock is such a narrow street, with no shoulder on one side, with on street parking, very congested, [and] you have the railroad track and the vertical curve,” Mawyer said. The Cherry Avenue alignment was deemed to have the least amount of traffic and to take the least amount of time to complete. “We think this southern Cherry Avenue [alignment] when all things are considered provides the greatest benefit and opportunity for us,” Mawyer said. “We recognize that there will be impacts along the way.” The RWSA’s chief engineer said she ran models on all of the various ways to connect the water line.“The connectivity that we get from the… Central Water Line that ties in all of these mains and provides this main corridor that goes east-west through the city in a relatively straight line really did provide the greatest hydraulic benefits to the system under the most number of conditions,” said Jennifer Whitaker. Councilor Michael Payne acknowledged he is not an engineer but he said he had concerns about the preferred alternative along Cherry Avenue in part because he felt RWSA’s assessment of impact to neighborhoods had been subjective. “Is that really the best route in terms of objective criteria and how much that decision has been made via subjective criteria,” Payne said. Payne said the Northern route would be cheaper with a price tag of $28 million. That alternative would also require moving ahead with an $11 million upgrade of the Emmet Street water main that was not otherwise required until the 2030’s. “It raises my eyebrow that a project that at least on my understanding while adding some redundancy to the whole system is primarily benefiting the Pantops area is being routed through the southern part of the city, particularly public housing and low income communities,” Payne said. Councilor Brian Pinkston has been on the RWSA Board of Directors since January. He supported the Cherry route and said it would have benefits for the southern portion of the city. “One of the extra benefits of doing it this way is that you get larger transmission lines on the southern side of the city,” Pinkston said. “That’s not something that’s been brought up tonight but its an important reason why I think this is the most reasonable route.” Pinkston also noted that much of the opposition is based on an idea somehow this would all be done for the benefit of people in Albemarle’s growth area. “I don’t know why it’s a problem that we would to help people in the county, particularly when they’re paying 52 percent of it,” Pinkston said. Council did not take a vote on how to direct Pinkston and the city’s two other RWSA members. Charlottesville Community Engagement is free to receive, but supported by paid subscriptions. If you subscribe, Ting will match your initial contribution! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

    Knights of the Rolled Table | a D&D podcast

    The party defends Glorn from some uninvited shadowy guests!  Featuring Zach Stones as Igneous, Jen Crespo as Diedre, Jeff Frank as Theo, Carlos Guzman as Yenni, Matt Messerman as Melbin, and Chris Daily as the DM, and Special  more KotRT on the web. All the links!  * * * * * * * * * If you enjoy the show, PLEASE take a second to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, Google podcasts, Podbean, Stitcher, or whatever platform you listen on. We'd sure appreciate it and it helps more people find the show!  * * * * * * * * * Have feedback, fan-art or D&D questions? Please send them to  knightsoftherolledtable@gmail.com Theme music by Weston Gardner @arcaneanthems Check out ARCANE ANTHEMS: Weston's Patreon to get original music for your RPG campaign   Original Character Art by Chris Daily @dungeonheads  You can see all the art on our discord or instagram.  Check out DUNGEONHEADS: a Library of characters to choose from.  Character art for your RPG campaign or stream.   Zach on Twitter @mftZach  Jen on Twitter @Jstops185 Matt on Twitter @MattMesserman Jeff on Twitter @FrankJeff Chris on Twitter @Dungeonheads Carlos on Twitter @Rufio_420 Now, go out and make life an Adventure!

    New Books in Christian Studies
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books in Christian Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

    New Books Network
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in Literary Studies
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    New Books in Archaeology
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books in Archaeology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/archaeology

    New Books in History
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    New Books in European Studies
    John Gillis, "The Fadden More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure" (Wordwell Books, 2022)

    New Books in European Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 50:56


    In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly created methods, tools, and ideas from different disciplines used to reveal its secrets. Gillis shines a light on this incredibly significant manuscript – named one of the National Museum of Ireland's top ten treasures - that represents the first insular manuscript to be discovered in the past 200 years and the first from a wetland environment. The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure was published by Wordwell and National Museum of Ireland in 2022. John Gillis is Chief Manuscript Conservator in the Library Preservation and Conservation Department in Trinity College Dublin. In 1988 he established and worked as Head of Conservation in the Delmas Conservation Bindery at Archbishop Marsh's Library, Dublin. John has been teaching book conservation techniques and theory in Italy for over 20 years. His major achievement to date has been the conservation of the Fadden More Psalter at the National Museum of Ireland Conservation Department over a four-and-a-half year period, for which he won the Heritage Council of Ireland Conservation Award in 2010. Dr. Danica Ramsey-Brimberg is a multidisciplinary researcher, who recently graduated with her PhD in History from the University of Liverpool and is an editorial assistant for the Church Archaeology journal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

    Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
    CEO of Halifax Public Libraries talks anti-2SLGBTQ+ harassment at library events

    Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 12:50


    Åsa Kachan is the CEO and chief librarian of Halifax Public Libraries. Guest host Carolyn Ray talks with her about the kind of harassment folks face at events, how they support people, and more about their decision to keep a book on their shelves that advocates say contains transphobic misinformation and hate speech.

    Idaho Matters
    Boise Public Library gets new mental health coordinator

    Idaho Matters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 12:01


    When questions at the library turn personal, the new mental health coordinator can help.

    KOVC Podcast
    06/27/22 - Voice of the Valley; Sara Nordlund; Library

    KOVC Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:32


    The White Witch Podcast
    Bone Magick

    The White Witch Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 76:30


    Hi WitchesJoin me today to interview the wonderful Sarelle from HexNwerk talking all about how she works with bones in her craft and within her work.Find Sarelle's works on Etsy - HexNwerk - Etsy UKFine Sarelle on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hex_n_werk/Sarelle sells her work on both platforms. She ships worldwide too!Our book review is A Lantern in the Dark by Danielle BlackwoodI reference the following website in relation to your birth chart - Free Astrology Birth Chart Report (cafeastrology.com)I need to credit the following amazing websites for the research I carried out for this episode - Learn Religions.com, Tarot Pugs, Caroline Conjure, Witch with me, Shirley Two Feathers.com, Other Worldy Oracle, Flying the Hedge, The magic kitchen.com, Moody moonCheck out this site for the different ways to create a bone throwing set - How To Make And Use A Powerful Bone Throwing Divination Set - Avery HartThe Hedge Witch's Garden is the first offering from our independent small press The Hedge Witch's Library that focuses on the element of fire and magick and rituals celebrating Beltane and Litha.Our beautiful sixty page A5 book contains a rich cornucopia of ways you might wish to celebrate these two sabbaths, all about working with the element of fire, sun magick, the fae, the magick of the hawthorn tree, magickal teas you can make, deities, solstice magick, fire scrying, hedge riding, herb magick, foraging and recipes to make with seasonal produce. We will be releasing further booklets for other sabbaths.The Hedge Witchs Garden - Etsy UKFind my Patreon here - For just £6 a month you receive grimoire pages for The White Witch Podcast - a Patreon podcast episode, a workshop or event, meditation, story retelling, access to our witchy community over on Discord and access to The Literary Witches Coven where we read a book together and discuss at the beginning of the next month. Our theme for June is the Sea Witch.The White Witch Coven is creating Podcast episodes, Online Workshops, Grimoire Sheets | PatreonFind me here for my other podcast The Hedge Witch's Almanac - ‎The Hedge Witch's Almanac on Apple PodcastsFind me on Instagram --

    Elliot In The Morning
    EITM: Book Ink 6/27/22

    Elliot In The Morning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 17:47


    Library fundraising via tattoo.

    Papercut: The Nyack Library Podcast
    Papercut: The Nyack Library Podcast Episode 2.6 Teaser: All You Need Is Pride

    Papercut: The Nyack Library Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 0:22


    We're back!  Join us for a discussion of The Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda Petrus.    

    Miscarriage Hope Desk Podcast
    Elaine Wang - IVF Coaching and the Mind-Body Connection After | #094

    Miscarriage Hope Desk Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 36:15


    In episode #094, Elaine shares her expertise as an IVF coach as well as her personal story of loss while going through the in vitro fertilization process. For the past seven years, Elaine served alongside Dr. David Diaz at West Coast Fertility Centers heading the wellness program. As a former IVF patient with a background in public education, dance, yoga, tai chi, and qigong, a wonderful collaboration was created to best serve the needs of their patients. Similar to a doula, Elaine's IVF wellness coaching includes partnering with patients in the operating room during their procedures, preparing them physically and mentally prior to procedures, and creating customized wellness plans. During her time there, Elaine also created a self-care online course guiding women through the IVF and egg freezing process (fertilityfitkit.com) Elaine shares how her experience of pregnancy loss impacted her coaching, the importance of the mind-body connection, and how she personally processed her miscarriage. Topics Discussed: in vitro fertilization (IVF), egg freezing, mind-body connection, miscarriage, chemical pregnancy, recurrent pregnancy loss, mental health after miscarriage, processing grief and pregnancy loss CONNECT WITH ELAINE- ivfcarecoach.com fertilityfitkit.com MISCARRIAGE HOPE DESK RESOURCES- Miscarriage Hope Desk aims to help women struggling miscarriage, pregnancy loss and recurrent miscarriages (RPL), by providing the following resources- - Library of Articles, found here- https://miscarriagehopedesk.com/library/understanding-why/ - Instagram Community- https://instagram.com/miscarriagehopedesk - Facebook Community- https://www.facebook.com/groups/1617075958466247/ - Free Miscarriage Lab Checklist- https://miscarriagehopedesk.com/labs - Free Weekly Newsletter- http://miscarriagehopedesk.com/newsletter FREE MEAL PLANS Do you need help getting healthy, tasty meals on the table? Check out our sponsor Prep Dish, PrepDish.com/mhd to get 2 weeks FREE! SHOW NOTES- https://miscarriagehopedesk.com/podcast/ Get a FREE Miscarriage Lab Testing Checklist- MiscarriageHopeDesk.com/labs  

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast
    Queer Poem-a-Day: Arm'd and Fearless by Julian Gewirtz

    The Deerfield Public Library Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 2:50


    Julian Gewirtz is the author of YOUR FACE MY FLAG (Copper Canyon Press, forthcoming October 2022 (https://www.coppercanyonpress.org/books/your-face-my-flag-by-julian-gewirtz). His poems have appeared in the Best American Poetry, Boston Review, Lambda Literary, The Nation, The New Republic, PEN America, Ploughshares, The Yale Review, and elsewhere. He is also the author of two books on the history of modern China, Never Turn Back: China and the Forbidden History of the 1980s and Unlikely Partners (“a gripping read” –The Economist). He co-edited an issue of Logic Magazine on China and technology and has written essays and reviews for publications including the New York Times, The Guardian, Harper's, Foreign Affairs, Prac Crit, and Parnassus: Poetry in Review. Copyright © Julian Gewirtz, 2014. A version of this poem was originally published in Conjunctions. Text of today's poem and more details about our program can be found at: deerfieldlibrary.org/queerpoemaday/ Find books from participating poets in our library's catalog.  Queer Poem-a-Day is directed by poet and teacher Lisa Hiton and Dylan Zavagno, Adult Services Coordinator at the Deerfield Public Library. Music for this second year of our series is the first movement, Schéhérazade, from Masques, Op. 34, by Karol Szymanowski, performed by pianist Daniel Baer. Queer Poem-a-Day is supported by generous donations from the Friends of the Deerfield Public Library and the Deerfield Fine Arts Commission. Queer Poem-a-Day is a program from the Adult Services Department at the Library and may include adult language.

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