Podcasts about Mayflower

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Famous ship of the 17th century

  • 657PODCASTS
  • 1,384EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
Mayflower

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Best podcasts about Mayflower

Latest podcast episodes about Mayflower

Break It Down Show
Cork Graham - 5 Acres and a Moose

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 67:38


Cork Graham - 5 Acres and a Moose - In 1983, long before Cork Graham became a team leader on Discovery Channel's hit series TREASURE QUEST, he burst onto the international scene, not as an author, but as a photojournalist. As a fresh out-of-high school, 18-year-old combat photographer, he cut his teeth on the Kampuchea/Vietnam War and Hmong resistance in Laos. Get more on Cork at Check out his other website: Cork Graham is a direct descendant of Mayflower passengers Edward Fuller and his son Samuel, and David Graham and his son Andrew, Colonial Army veterans of the Battle of Kings Mountain, international bestselling author Cork Graham is considered one of the best adventure memoirists and historians of his generation. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku He isn't a spoon He is a fork, as in sharp That is our Cork   ​Similar episodes: Xander Bullock  John Green  Pete A Turner  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

The African History Network Show
National Day of Mourning 400 years after Pilgrims have the 1st Thanksgiving 1621

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 122:00


Thanksgiving: National Day of Mourning 400 years after Pilgrims have the 1st Thanksgiving in 1621; This tribe helped the Pilgrims survive for their first Thanksgiving. They still regret it 400 years later.; Pres. Lincoln had 38 Sioux Warriors Executed on Dec. 26th, 1862.  Here's what really happened.; Nov. 28, 1898: First National Convention of the Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty, and Pension Association;  Guilty! Guilty! Guilty! All 3 White men in the murder of Ahmaud Arbery - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 11-28-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow or PayPal @ TheAHNShow@gmail.com or http://www.PayPal.me/TheAHNShow or visit http://www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com and click on the yellow “Donate” button.

Houston's First Baptist Church Messages (Audio)
God's Faithfulness to The Exodus Generation and the Mayflower Generation

Houston's First Baptist Church Messages (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


God's faithfulness is to all generations, and we can learn lessons through the lives of those that went before us. When we face trials and tribulations in our lives, let's choose obedience; let's be courageous; and let's be thankful. When we keep our eyes on the Lord, living surrendered, we can trust that He is working out all things for our good.

Houston's First Baptist Church Messages (Video)
God's Faithfulness to The Exodus Generation and the Mayflower Generation

Houston's First Baptist Church Messages (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


God's faithfulness is to all generations, and we can learn lessons through the lives of those that went before us. When we face trials and tribulations in our lives, let's choose obedience; let's be courageous; and let's be thankful. When we keep our eyes on the Lord, living surrendered, we can trust that He is working out all things for our good.

The Christian Worldview radio program
Thanksgiving Special: The Pilgrims' Beliefs and the Founding of America

The Christian Worldview radio program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 53:59


GUEST: DR. JERRY NEWCOMBE, producer, The Pilgrims documentary A small group of biblical Christians known as the the Pilgrims are widely considered to be “the founders of America”. Numbering only about 400-500 souls, they had fled religious persecution in England to settle in Holland. But after ten years there, they decided on another move across the Atlantic Ocean to an unknown land that would become the United States. About 50 Pilgrims were on the first vessel called The Mayflower, arriving in modern-day Cape Cod in Massachusetts in November 1620. One year later in November 1621, after a brutal winter in which many of them died, they celebrated a bountiful harvest with local Indians who had helped them in what has become known as the first Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims and their biblical beliefs which led directly to the principles of the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution 150 years have been mostly forgotten by the majority of our population. “Separation of church and state” is a sacrament of mainstream society today…but it wasn't to the Pilgrims. They said they came to America “for the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith.” Dr. Jerry Newcombe, producer of the documentary film, The Pilgrims, joins us this Thanksgiving weekend on The Christian Worldview to discuss the Pilgrims' story and and what they believed and lived by. For in them we have an example for how we can live in our pilgrimage in a contrary world.

SeaBros Fishing Podcast
034: Capt. Bryan and Taylor Sears - "The Pilgrim Table"

SeaBros Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 102:35


Thank you for tuning into the SeaBros Fishing Podcast!We're back...again! On this episode we sit down and recap our 2021 charter fishing season aboard the Mass Bay Guides' boats (our family's charter fishing business). It was a great season for us. Incredible customers, good fishing, epic battles with big fish and many awesome memories.  We tell several fish stories in this one, give our perspective on the 2021 fishing season and we begin to discuss our outlook for 2022... all while trying to get comfortable at a table that we are pretty sure came across the Atlantic on the Mayflower.Thank you all for the support and Happy Thanksgiving!Stay Tight,The Sears BrothersSponsors, Information, and Links from this podcast episode:SponsorsMass Bay Guides (10% Off Bookings Until 12/25/21)Costa SunglassesLT Marine Products (Use promo code: seabros for 10% Off)Black Oak LED (Use promo code: Giantbluefin for 20% Off)Deep Apparel (Use promo code: Seabros35 for 35% Off)SeaBros Swag (Tuna Mark Patch Hats)Use promo code: tuna2020% all apparel until 12/25/21Social MediaSeaBrosFishing: @seabrosfishingMBG Fishing Charters: @massbayguidesBryan: @mbgbryanTaylor: @mbgtaylorSeaBros Fishing WebsiteMass Bay Guides WebsiteSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/seabrosfishing)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/seabrosfishing)

Top of Mind with Julie Rose
Cinema Therapy, Kid of the Year, REDI Program

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 104:09


If you need therapy and love watching movies, YouTube channel Cinema Therapy is for you. TIME picked a kid of the year for the first time. A program that helps low-income kids cope emotionally and socially keeps benefitting them years later. Also on today's show: a replay of our Thanksgiving special canvasses the history of Thanksgiving on the celebration of its 400th anniversary, the British celebration of the landing of the Mayflower at Plymouth Rock, and preparing and tasting different foods are a great way to introduce kids to making healthy, varied choices.

Verdict with Ted Cruz
Ep. 96 - Thanksgiving Love Triangle

Verdict with Ted Cruz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 26:20


The woke (read: miserable) Left has decided that Thanksgiving is a day to reflect on how terrible America is. Nonsense! Thanksgiving is a day for, well, thanksgiving. Senator Ted Cruz and Michael Knowles are joined by Liz Wheeler for this special holiday episode. Together, the Audiocasting A-Team shares some quirky Turkey Day traditions, takes your silly and serious Thanksgiving-themed questions, and even tells the story of a little known Mayflower love triangle, putting Michael's Yale literature degree to the test. And what would an episode all about traditions be without poking a little fun at the Woke Women's March? Happy Thanksgiving! -- Diversify your savings and get up to $1,500 of free silver today with American Hartford Gold: text CACTUS to 6-5-5-3-2. -- Join over 2-million AMAC Members as we fight to uphold the values of the greatest nation on earth—faith, family, and freedom: https://amac.us/cactus. -- Skip the trip to the post office and use https://Stamps.com this holiday season. Claim your four-week trial today with the promo code: VERDICT. -- Get more politics, more mailbag, more cactus, and more Verdict with the new all-access subscription, Verdict+: http://verdictwithtedcruz.com/plus. -- You asked, we answered. Verdict merch is HERE! Snag your exclusive Verdict swag: http://shop.verdictwithtedcruz.com.

Meet Your Heroes
Episode 91: The Mayflower, The Encore!

Meet Your Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 33:52


Ready to ruin Thanksgiving 2021? We can help with that, with this Encore edition of our Mayflower episode. Give it a listen while you prepare your famous Green bean casserole and then bring it up over dessert. Guaranteed to make the holiday memorable!

Books From the Basement
Season Two: Bonus Episode #1

Books From the Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 113:50


Happy Thanksgiving! It's time for the first bonus episode of Season 2. In this jam-packed episode, Lisa and Amy answer questions raised during their special Halloween Bonus Episode. Find out the facts behind the Halloween candy panic and the specifics on the Bloody Mary game. Then you'll learn all about the Tylenol and Excedrin tampering cases of the 1980's. After that, Lisa and Amy cover some historical Thanksgiving topics such as the Mayflower, the pilgrims of Plymouth and the first Thanksgiving. Plus, they discuss their own Thanksgiving traditions. As always, there's no starter and no ender--just content and conversation. Sit back, relax and join us as we tackle these subjects and more.  Please rate, review and subscribe on Apple Podcasts. It's free to subscribe, and you can still listen on your favorite platform.  Just click on the link below, select listen on Apple iTunes, then choose ratings and reviews. It's just that easy and it really helps us out a lot! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/books-from-the-basement/id1544343334If you want to help us keep our podcast ad-free, please go to www.buymeacoffee.com/booksbasement where you can make a donation by buying us a "book" instead of a coffee!             Visit our FB Page: www.facebook/booksfromthebasement Join our FB Group: www.facebook.com/groups/booksfromthebasementpcFollow us on Twitter: @books_basementThank you to Sara Pack for helping us with our grammar and punctuation questions! Sara is an editor and can be found on Upwork or at sarapackediting.com

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
400 Years of Thanksgiving

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 24:57


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29 1 Thessalonians 5:18 tells us to Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. And today on MoneyWise, we will do exactly that! Rob West celebrates God's faithfulness and provision as we mark 400 years of Thanksgiving in America. In the year 1621, 400 years ago this month, the Puritans of Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts celebrated the first Thanksgiving.The Puritans had intended to get to the New World early in summer, but the crossing of the Atlantic was much rougher and took longer than expected. They didn't arrive in the New World until November 1620. Planting was impossible and a harsh winter delayed the building of the first houses until late January. All of that resulted in what became known as The Starving Time for the Plymouth colony. One hundred and two Puritans had crossed over on the Mayflower. Nearly half of their number died that first winter due to disease and starvation. But spring finally came, and those who survived had established good relations with the Native Americans, who helped them plant crops that eventually became a fair harvest in the fall.That brings us to the first thanksgiving when the Puritans were moved to celebrate and praise God for their survival. Many have forgotten the reason the Puritans had dared to venture into the harsh New World in the first place: religious freedom.Persecuted for their faith in England, they fled to Holland first. But English authorities even pursued them there, leading many to undertake the perilous voyage to America. William Bradford would later write of their earliest days in America, Thus out of small beginnings greater things have been produced by His hand that made all things of nothing, and gives being to all things that are; and, as one small candle may light a thousand, so the light here kindled hath shone unto many. And Four hundred years later, we Christians in America still give thanks to God for His provision. We hope your day is as blessed as the first Thanksgiving. LISTENER QUESTIONS On today's program, Rob West answered the following listener questions: ●Is it worthwhile to pay an extra $50-100 per month toward your mortgage? ●If you're selling your house but have no immediate plans to purchase another house, what should you do with the proceeds from the home sale? And are those proceeds taxable? ●Is it beneficial to continue working until your full retirement age? ●What should you do with funds in a 403B when changing jobs? ●Can you roll funds from a Roth IRA into another Roth IRA? RESOURCES MENTIONED DURING THIS PROGRAM: Sound Mind Investing Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it's your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking theDonate tab on our websiteor in our app.

Daily Rosary
Nov 25, 2021, Thanksgiving Day, Holy Rosary (Luminous Mysteries) | In Memoriam of Maria Blanca

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 30:35


Friends of the Rosary: We rejoice by celebrating Thanksgiving today. As Christians following the True Faith, we always must be grateful to the Lord Jesus, because we live for Him. The lack of gratefulness is an offense, as we don't recognize His glory and what He did in the Cross for each one of us. And a historic note. The first Thanksgiving in the U.S. was actually a Catholic celebration. Over five decades before the Mayflower, a group of Spanish colonists celebrated Mass and had a feast with native Timucuans in what would become the oldest settlement in the U.S. — St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, a group of colonists settled at Santa Fe, along with Franciscan missionaries, said Mass and a great feast with the natives followed. Moreover, hundreds of towns established by the Spaniards in the New World celebrated Thanksgiving masses. The U.S. was Catholic prior to the arrival of the Puritans. The first Thanksgiving was Catholic. Let's properly write history while giving thanks to God for His boundless gifts. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York • November 25, 2021, Today's Holy Rosary, YouTube.com/TheRosaryNetwork • In Memoriam of Maria Blanca: Testimonials • Free Online Video Course: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Rosary of Mary

Costume Drama Rewind
Season 2, Episode 4: "The Mouse on the Mayflower" (1968)

Costume Drama Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 10:55


Happy Thanksgiving from Costume Drama Rewind, where we're marking the holiday by reviewing the animated classic “The Mouse on the Mayflower.” Did the Pilgrims really get rescued from all their troubles by a mouse in a tiny hat? Probably not, but that's also not the weirdest or least accurate thing going on with this little movie. 

Consider This from NPR
The Indigenous Stories Glossed Over In The Typical 'First Thanksgiving' Story

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:58


The commonly-told version of the first Thanksgiving story leaves out a lot: The indigenous Wampanoag people who lived in a complex society long before the Mayflower arrived at Plymouth Rock; Squanto escaping bondage in Spain before becoming an emissary to the Pilgrims; and the long legacy of violent displacement that followed.Paula Peters, a writer and a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, still lives near where the Pilgrims made landfall on her ancestral homeland. She talks about how the 1621 feast fits into history.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Top of Mind with Julie Rose
The 400th Thanksgiving, Mayflower 400, Cooking with Kids

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 104:10


Since COVID-19 suppressed the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Thanksgiving, Americans celebrate the anniversary this year. Across the pond, Brits celebrate the 400th anniversary of the landing of the Mayflower at Plymouth Rock. A nonprofit helps kids enjoy and make the foods on their dinner plates. Also, on today's show: the US's dietary guidelines come under fire; nearly all apps today seem to be playing games with users; British citizens turned up over 47,000 artifacts in their backyards.

News 4 Debrief
The (Real) Story of Thanksgiving

News 4 Debrief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:04


Thanksgiving is one of those holidays with what seems like a pretty clear origin story: the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts, where pilgrims celebrated the first harvest in their new home with members of the Wampanoag tribe who already lived there. But Dr. Joe Stahlman, a professor at the University of Buffalo and a member of the Seneca Nation of Indians, says it didn't actually go down that way. In this holiday edition of The Debrief, he talks with Michael Gargiulo about what really happened that first Thanksgiving, and why Americans should still celebrate the holiday.

The Smerconish Podcast
Busting Thanksgiving Myths with Kenneth C. Davis

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:12


Kenneth C. Davis, author of the Don't Know Much About series of books and dontknowmuch.com, joins Michael to talk Thanksgiving myths, swapping out turkey for seafood, and the real story of what happened on Plymouth Rock.

The Roundtable
TaraShea Nesbit imagines an ominous Plymouth in "Beheld"

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:08


Ten years after the Mayflower pilgrims arrived on rocky, unfamiliar soil, Plymouth is not the land its residents had imagined. Seemingly established on a dream of religious freedom, in reality the town is led by fervent puritans who prohibit the residents from living, trading, and worshipping as they choose. By the time an unfamiliar ship, bearing new colonists, appears on the horizon one summer morning, Anglican outsiders have had enough.

Verbal Processing
Thanksgiving Recommendations- Books, Games, Crafts, Activities

Verbal Processing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:33


Thanksgiving Recommendations- Books, Games, Crafts, Activities Low Prep Work , Low Cost, and Low Maintenance Books : Check Amazon, ThriftBooks.com , Your local Library, or Thrift Store * "The Three Young Pilgrims" by Cheryl Harness, * The Pilgrims' First Thanksgiving by Ann McGovern ( & all of Ann McGovern books) * The Landing of the Pilgrims by James Daugherty * Corn is Maize by Aliki * Squanto by Clyde Robert * The Voyage of the Mayflower by Allison Lassieur *Squanto and the Miracle of Thanksgiving by Eric Metaxas * Bonus: Geography Books "My World" by Ira Wolfman, and "Maps and Globes" by Harriet Barton Games : *Bingo *Scavenger Hunt- Inside, Outside, Thanksgiving Theme, Nature Theme, *Madlibs *Bean Bag Toss *Checkers *Chess * Hot Potato *Musical Chairs *Charades *"Would You Rather" - commercial version or DIY Crafts : * Pretty leaves + metalic sharpies + washi tape ( see thenestingplace.com for more) * hand turkies * Thanksgiving Coloring Pages * Turkey and or Pilgrim Puppets with small paper bags Activities : * riddles *jokes (maybe check out some kid friendly joke books ahead of time ) * Take a walk * volunteer * look through old photo albums * watch home movies * tell stories, pass on your heritage, culture, and values --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jenny828/message

Bax & O'Brien Podcast
FITZY MAYFLOWER MARATHON 2021

Bax & O'Brien Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:29


FITZY MAYFLOWER MARATHON 2021 by Bax & O'Brien Podcast

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown
When and where was the first Thanksgiving Feast?

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 2:10


Let's talk Turkey! No, not the Butterball sitting in the Oval Office. I'm talking about the real thing, the big bird, 46 million of which we Americans will devour on this Thanksgiving Day. It was the Aztecs who first domesticated the gallopavo, but leave it to the Spanish explorers to "foul-up" the bird's origins. They declared it to be related to the peacock – Wrong! They also thought the peacock originated in Turkey – Wrong! And, they thought Turkey was located in Africa – well, you can see the Spanish were pretty confused. Actually, the origin of Thanksgiving is confused. The popular assumption is that it was first celebrated by the Mayflower immigrants and the Wampanoag natives at Plymouth, Massachusetts, 1621. They feasted on venison, furkees (Wampanoag for gobblers) eels, mussels, corn, and beer. But wait, say Virginians, the first precursor to our annual November Food-a-Palooza was not in Massachusetts – the Thanksgiving feast originated down here in Jamestown colony, back in 1608. Whoa, there, hold your horses, pilgrims. Folks in El Paso, Texas, say it all began way out there in 1598, when Spanish settlers sat down with people of the Piro and Manso tribes, gave thanks, then feasted on roasted duck, geese and fish. "Ha!" says a Florida group, asserting the very, very first Thanksgiving happened in 1565 when the Spanish settlers of St. Augustine and friends from the Timucuan tribe chowed-down on "cocido" – a stew of salt pork, garbanzo beans and garlic - washing it all down with red wine. Wherever it began, and whatever the purists claim is "official," Thanksgiving today is as multicultural as America. So let's enjoy! Kick-back, give thanks we're in a country with such ethnic richness, and dive into your turkey rellenos, moo-shu turkey, turkey falafel, barbecued turkey...

Raccoon T*****s podcast
Ep. 66 - Look at Ye. Postin Crowd Work.

Raccoon T*****s podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 33:51


VIDEO LINK: https://youtu.be/auE1WHH8kEg On today's Thanksgiving episode, we had the opportunity to interview a real life Pilgrim from the Mayflower! We talk politics and Kyle Rittenhouse and Travis Scott and Tweets yet again! Enjoy!

Houston Matters
A chef’s advice for preparing your Thanksgiving feast (Nov. 23, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:11


On Tuesday's Houston Matters: Two men who worked as security guards at Travis Scott's Astroworld music festival have filed a lawsuit against concert organizers saying security companies at the event failed to properly train and supervise employees during the event that left ten people dead and 25 hospitalized. Wee hear some of what they have to say. Also this hour: Millions of Americans are expected to take to the roads this week to head to Thanksgiving gatherings, and they won't all be paying close attention, or observing the traffic laws…or sober, sadly. In that spirit, we offer this opportunity to be reminded of some of the rules of the road. Then, are you're stressed out about the big meal you have to prepare this week because there's ten, maybe twenty people coming over? That's nothing. Ever year, the folks at Bosscat Kitchen & Libations host a Thanksgiving feast for more than 300 guests. So, maybe they can help you out? Executive Chef Peter Petro joins us to talk about his signature Thanksgiving dishes and to answer your last-minute meal prep questions. And the book Mayflower Chronicles by a Houston author – who's a direct descendant of one of the Mayflower pilgrims – illustrates what we often get wrong about the history of Thanksgiving.

Reason for Truth
Putting THANKS Into Thanksgiving! - 11:21:21, 7.43 PM

Reason for Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 21:32


Putting the THANKS back into the U.S. THANKSGIVING holiday is not as easy as it once was. In today's episode Host Steven Garofalo along with Tony Casella address two things. First, is the history and struggles of how the Thanksgiving holiday came to be in the first place. That alone should give us thanks. But then Steven and Tony takes us to God's Word which tells us to give thanks in all things-for just as God provided for the pilgrims after a massive struggle with a horrible winter and the loss of half their population from sickness...God blessed them abundantly the following fall season. Even in times of struggle and difficulty, we can and should give thanks to God!Please consider giving us a FIVE STAR REVIEW in ITUNES which will help us spread the Word of God. Oh yeah..and MAKE SURE TO SMASH that SUBSCRIBE BUTTON! But then tell all your friends about us...even grandma Maria Lucia DiMarie! She will thank you for doing so!=================We JUST uploaded an episode called "FEAR NOT, GOD IS IN CONTROL!" which is a MUST SEE in light of today's episode,. You DO NOT WANT TO MISS THAT-This is the linkhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/reason-for-truth/id714350749?i=1000542306056

That Shakespeare Life
Ep 188: Plymouth Colony with David and Aaron Bradford

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:08


It is Thanksgiving this week here in the US where we take time to intentionally be grateful for what we've been given and count our blessings, but it is also the one time of year where the whole nation remembers an event that began during the life of William Shakespeare: the journey of the Pilgrims on the Mayflower. Not many people realize the story of William Shakespeare overlaps with that of the Pilgrims, due mostly to the fact that the Pilgrims wouldn't actually set sail from Plymouth until 1620, which is 4 years after the death of William Shakespeare. However, The Puritans were a major part of Shakespeare's life in England prior to that fateful day in 1620, including Puritans who lived within walking distance of the known residences Shakespeare took up in London. The story of the Mayflower, Pilgrims, and so-called “Strangers” that travelled with them including Miles Standish, William Brewster, and William Bradford, informs our understanding of Shakespeare's culture and the strong religious tensions that were building up in early 17th century England..    As many countries were flocking to the New World and trying to establish colonies there, England, too was placing a mark on the new land with settlements like Jamestown being established under Captain John Smith in 1607. At the same time, the Pilgrims were seeking to go to this New World, but for a decidedly different reason. As a group of religious separatists, as they were known then, they were seeking the right to freedom of religion. The group capitalized on the popular wave of exploration under James I to secure a land patent that allowed them to travel to England and set up a new colony where they could worship, and live, in freedom. Accompanied by the Merchant Adventurers and sanctioned by the Plymouth Colony, the Pilgrims set sail on September 6, 1620.    Here today to tell us about the history behind the Pilgrim's journey from England to Plymouth and the realities of that First Thanksgiving are our guests and historians behind the 1620 Experience, David and Aaron Bradford.

Valley 101
Before the Pilgrims, there was Fray Marcos de Niza

Valley 101

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:06


Most of us are familiar with the story of Thanksgiving. In 1620, a ship called The Mayflower traveled from Plymouth, England to the New World in search of religious separation and a fresh start. In 1621, they enjoyed a bountiful meal after the harvest with the Wampanoag tribe, expressing their gratitude for helping them learn to survive in their new home. Many of us might believe that this was the first interaction between European settlers and Indigenous peoples who lived in what is now America. But long before the Pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock, there was an explorer who walked the Arizona land and interacted with its people. In this week's episode of Valley 101, a podcast from The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com, we share with you the story of the Franciscan friar, Marcos de Niza, and his relationship with the Indigenous peoples of the Southwest. 

Spiritual Dope
Milagros Phillips A New Perspective on Race Healing

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 61:51


Spirituality encompasses the light and the dark… with the darkness meaning your shadows… without exploration, you may never uncover your truth. ⁠ ⁠ Join me this weekend with Milagros Phillips as we have an open conversation regarding spirituality, race, and more.⁠ ⁠ Racism is one of the most divisive issues in America today. From Charlottesville, VA to Ferguson, MO, tensions about race relations are high. ⁠ ⁠ There are many people who feel that racism is too sensitive a topic to discuss, but if we don't have the conversation around racism, how do people know what is acceptable and what isn't? ⁠ ⁠ This is an issue that will not disappear on its own or through silence.⁠ Connect with Milagros here: https://www.milagrosphillips.com/ and here: https://www.instagram.com/theracehealer/ The below is a machine transcript from otter.ai and has not been edited: Unknown Speaker 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one up to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you could have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general appear so limited in this process? Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the questions you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you, this world, the people in it? And most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't have all the answers, but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another head of spiritual dub with your host, Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:41 Hey, there's spiritual dope. I'm on here today with Milagros Phillips and she is affectionately known as the race healer. logros has been facilitating programs for over 35 years on race literacy, racial conditioning and healing from racism that inform transform and lead to inspired action. Programs are presented at educational institutions, fortune 100, companies, corporations and public courses seminars, a keynote speaker TEDx presenter, three times author or four times four time author, and certified coach for logros fourth book cracking the healers code, a prescription for healing racism and finding wholeness has been, it's been released recently, and we'll lagosians work comes from lived experience and is backed by historical and scientific research. It comes from walking through the shadow to find her light and in the process helping others find theirs. What she brings to this work is great compassion, a deep understanding of race and an awareness of people's individual and collective power. Waters. I'm gonna I'm gonna direct everybody else. So to your website to get the rest of your bio there. I think that should get us get us fired up there. Milagro Phillips 1:53 How are you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you. Thank you so much for inviting me to be here to have this conversation with you. Brandon Handley 2:00 Absolutely, definitely looking forward to it. So I usually like to start these off with the whole idea that you know, you and I are kind of vessels for Source Energy, right? Call it what you want. And the idea is that somebody tuning into this podcast today that's going to hear a message that made specifically for them, it's going to be delivered through you. And it can only be delivered through you at this time in this place. What is that message today? That we're one human family, and we have a history that has never been healed? has barely been told, that gets in the way of us being that one human family that one global village. I really like that concept. It's funny. My children had a course called I think they went to a school called like the global village. This last year they did at home. Courtney didn't go into school traditionally, right. So they did at home studies. And that was the the coursework that they did. And you know, it's a global village, right. I mean, how else? How else could we look at it? And I guess that that's a little bit about what we'll be talking about today. Right? I mean, I'd love to just kind of, you know, talk to you about some of the work that you you're doing. Let's talk about how you became to be known as the race healer, which we'll just start right there. Milagro Phillips 3:29 Sure. Yeah, I was having a conversation with a friend about my work. And he said to me, Oh, you're here to be hunted if you're here to be one of the human race healers. And so we joked about how you know, the acronym was HRH, and which of course, he was like, of course, you know, Her Royal Highness, that would be you. Right. So so we got rid of the human piece. We just left it as race healer. And he kept calling me that and I really resisted that, you know, that title for a very long time. And then I finally I actually went to, to New York to have some work done on my website. And one of the women that was working on the website said, Well seems to meet your race healer. And I was like, okay, message from spirit. You're hearing it more than once you probably pay attention. And so to that became my nickname the race healer. Brandon Handley 4:42 Yeah, I mean, what what was your resistance to it? Like, who Milagro Phillips 4:46 am I to have a title like that? You know, I mean, I There have been things in my life that I've resisted like, when it comes to this work. For instance, I got my calling when I was 13 years old, the day that Dr. King died And, and I talked about that in the book, I locked myself in the bathroom to cry and my father kept knocking on the door and going okay in there. And I, you know, I keep saying, Yeah, I'm fine, but it really wasn't. And at some point while I was in there, just sobbing my eyes out, actually heard a voice, I said, Your to continue the work. And I had no idea what that meant. Except that I knew there was no way in the world I was ever gonna do race work like that was just not I'm not doing it, you know? And eventually, you know, obviously, I said yes to the column. But what's really interesting is that in that saying, yes, which, by the way, took decades for me to actually say yes to my calling. What I realized was that I sort of look back on my life, I realized I came in wired to do that work. You know, the people who were my parents, the place where I was born, the things that, like, who has a history like this. So I'll give you an example. My mother's best friend, this is when I was a little girl in the Caribbean, and mother's best friend lived around the block from us, and their backyard abutted our backyard. And at night, my mother was she was going to go visit her friend, and she would take me with her, we would walk through the backyard, because obviously that was the shortcut, right. And I remember being terrified of my favorite tree, which was huge with this huge avocado tree in the backyard. It was a beautiful tree. And I love this tree. And during the day, this tree was like my best friend sit under it to read. I was like, I learned to cook under that tree and just absolutely love this tree. So at night, though, I was terrified of that tree. I always felt like if I opened my eyes in the dark, I would see people hanging from that tree. Now I'm just a little girl, okay, like, between the ages of we lived in a house till I was eight. So I must have been between five and six years old. And it was rumored that they had hung slaves on that tree. And so I you know, like, who has a history like that you don't me like it just sort of, you know, politics and people in the south where it's like, yeah, it wasn't just a rumor. You know, we actually saw people being wrong from these trees. But, you know, in things that my father would say, and my mother would say, I mean, you know, I look back and I realized, wow, I spent a lifetime preparing to do this work. Brandon Handley 7:44 And I think that that makes sense. Especially when you said you know, you you heard the calling. And at a young age, right. Which sounds to me like it was because it was delivered by spirit. I don't know what kind of your your spiritual upbringing was at that point. But I mean, you we all kind of resist that, that first calling? Well, not everybody you hear that call me like, not me. Not now. This isn't this isn't for me, I'm gonna go do these 90,000 Other things that I feel like I should be doing other than this. Because to your point, you said, Who am I? Right, who am I and to play such a large role. But I think it's Joseph Campbell kind of talks about in the hero's journey in the call, right? That call doesn't go away that call like it will still kind of follows you around like a lost puppy is like, Are you sure? Milagro Phillips 8:39 Until you say yes. Brandon Handley 8:40 Right. I mean, I think I mean, I really agree to that. I think that that's right. And and and to your point, like, you're building up to that you are the perfect person for that calling. And when you feel that calling you kind of open up and apparently right for books. Can you do all the work? Right, right. Right. So I mean, I I'm not too familiar with, and I'm curious as we're having this kind of racism talk. What was the Caribbean like, I mean, versus the state. So you're there to your eight and then you come to the States I imagine. What was that? Yeah, no actually came Milagro Phillips 9:19 when I was the dance. And, I mean, obviously it was, it was a huge difference, right? The first thing that happened was, I came the beginning of November. And I remember my sister picked me up at the airport with a big fur coat. And, and I was wearing my, my cabana hat and my you know, it was dressed for the Caribbean right? It's got what else would I have been dressed with these short bobby socks and the whole thing and and I put on the scope. We walk outside and we get into a taxi. And all of a sudden this white stuff starts to fall on the taxi is nighttime And I said to my sister, that she goes nearly no, in other words, you better get used to it. So that in and of itself was quite a shock, you know, and of course, the cold air because you're not used to that, you know, it's sort of Olson's is this big shock, like, you stepped into a refrigerator kind of thing, you know, so. So there's that. And then, of course, I didn't speak the language at the time, so I had to learn to speak English. And, and just, you know, in also going from living in a house that was, you know, it was one floor, and living on a fifth floor, fourth floor, in an apartment building, it was just, you know, and instead of a backyard, there was a park across the street. So we were lucky, because we had a park across the street, of our apartment in New York, but, but it was just, it was just completely different, completely different. I was talking with someone recently, and I said, you know, we don't stop to think that people are migrating today, for the same reason that they have always migrated for the same reason that the people in the Mayflower migrated from Europe to come to the continental USA, and to go to other parts of the world. And that's because of, you know, people normally migrate because of food insecurity, housing insecurity, they migrate because of natural disasters, famines, and in you know, things like that. And wars, obviously, you know, and skirmishes and things like that. And so, you know, we forget that. And I think it's important for people to remember to be more compassionate, and to realize that the people who are who are at the border, are coming here for the same reasons that the Europeans came here when they came in the 1600s, and the 1700s 1800s, early 1900s, and so on. And how a lot of them were not considered white, you know, the Irish were not considered white, when they first came to this country, neither were the Italians, you know, and people had to lose their accent to assimilate, they have to stop speaking their own language to assimilate. So there were things that you had to do in order to be able to fit in, the difference is, if you're a black or brown person, you never do fit in, because the structure is not set up, for you to fit in. And so, you know, becoming aware of the ways in which immigrating and leaving your land behind affects you, at the psychological, emotional, spiritual level, you know, people also left their country, because they didn't have spiritual freedom. You know, and that's a huge thing for people to be able to practice their religion and their spirituality in the way that they want to do it. And so, you know, just being aware of all of that is extremely important. And then understanding the historical context as to why people had to leave Europe when they did, you know, in the place was rife with diseases, there was no sanitation. And so there was a lot of sickness, and you had only three months to grow your food. So a lot of people were starving and malnutrition, you can't even think straight when you're malnutrition, you know, not to mention the fact that the Crime and Punishment, the way that it was set up was something you know, it was set up to, it was basically based on violence, to traumatize, to destabilize to control. And so when the Europeans traveled the world and began to colonize the rest of the world, they brought with them what they had, which was their own unresolved trauma, the violence that they had experienced, receiving perpetrated upon the people that they were coming across. And then they were the diseases and things like that, that they brought. But they did the same thing to others that have been done to them. They made sure that people couldn't practice their religion or their, their spirituality, they had to let go of their languages, you know, the few native tribes that did survive. And the Africans that survived the Middle Passage, were were they had to give up their language. They had to give up their spiritual practices. They had to, you know, they, they had to fit in in the way that they were being made to fit in to this system. And when you stop to think about the fact that, you know, people who grow in cold climates who only have about three months to grow their food, who look out into their world, nine months out of the year, and there isn't even a leaf on the tree, their consciousness is the consciousness of lack, where people who are in places where it's always green, it's always lush, if the papaya is not growing the mangoes growing or, you know, something is always growing. So you can always feed your family, you have, you know, anyone can build shelter, because shelter is four sticks, and some plantain leaves to keep you from the sun, you know, to shelter you from the heat of the sun, that, you know, you don't really need to cover your body because it's hot, as opposed to you know, cold weather we have to layer up and you know, and so, so the the, the ways in which people did culture had to do with where they lived in the world, where their tribes developed in the world. And the and you know, those ways those cultures work well in their own environment. You know, like, for people in cold climates, it's good for them to preserve food and to be good preservers, because they only have three months to grow their food and whatever they harvest has to last until they can grow and harvest again, right. Whereas if you try to preserve food in hot climates, the food's gonna go bad. So it's, you know that those cultures and things work well in their own environment. The problem is, when you take one culture, and you impose it on other people, and in places where it doesn't belong, and then you get people to stop telling their stories, so they no longer have access to their history, you make them stop speaking their language, so they can't connect to the previous generation, who doesn't speak the same language and campus on the wisdom and the information and so on and so forth. I mean, you start to see what a mess, right? Brandon Handley 16:41 Yeah, no honor. percent. I mean, I see that, that last part, I see that even in a generational divide, where we're separated from even our young and our parents, right, that the whole tribal elder thing kind of goes out there, especially, at least in the Western civilization, and an America where it's like, alright, well, you're. So now that you're not usable, basically, is what we're saying, can you just go finish out your years in this corner, but all that wisdom is going there too. And there's conversations that aren't being had, and there's a lot of wisdom that that's not being had there. And to your point, in regards of the language, there's only a certain way to convey that story. And that's with the authentic language, right? Because a lot of that stuff does not translate into you know, English, right, it loses its it loses its flavor, or as it were. So, I mean, lots of reasons to migrate, understand, like, you know, the racism, definitely, you know, I think that, you know, as a nation, we all forget that. A, we were all immigrants at one point, be, you know, we were not all accepted all the time, regardless of where we think we are right now. But when the question is, what brought your family to the states? And, you know, I know, we talked a little bit about kind of the culture shock and of itself, but one of the things that since we're covering the racism aspect of it, how, you know, what was it I'm not familiar with, how it wasn't a Caribbean for you, right? And then the culture and the acceptance or non acceptance and what it was like for you to fit in, in the States. Milagro Phillips 18:26 Yeah, so um, so it was definitely different. And I remember when I first started to go to school, and I was learning English. Um, I remember that I lived in in one of those neighborhoods that was changing was a mostly Jewish neighborhood. There were some African American families, some Cuban families, and a few Puerto Rican fan was very few Dominicans. This is it 64. And the end of 1964, beginning of 1965, was actually when I started school. And what was interesting was that the reason first of all that I came to this country was because the, my father realized that the US was about to go to war with the Dominican Republic. And he wanted to get the whole family out of there. And we had, you know, his sisters lived in the US and we had cousins here and so on. So he tried to get the entire family out before the end of 64. And sure enough, the United States attacked the Dominican Republic in 1965. And so So you see this this onslaught of Dominican families of a lot of people who were our neighbors in the in the Dr. Ended up being our neighbors in New York, you know, because they tuber escaping what had happened in the country at that time. So again, you know, little things that we don't talk about, because a lot of people don't know that the US went to war with the Dominican Republic, and it was like, you know, this tiny country To mean, and this big US Army and Navy and all of you know, and so, um, so that was the beginning of that. And then, um, then I had to, you know, I was in school, I had to learn the language. And it was really interesting for me, because I remember that the black children didn't play with me because I didn't speak English. The white children in play with me because I was black and Hispanic children and play with me because they didn't want anyone to know that people who look like me came from where they came from. Because what happens is, you know, and, and I explained this to several people. When you, when you go around the US, and, and you look at the Latin X community, people look a certain way, it's mostly lighter skin, or brown skin, people, lighter, brown skinned people who get to get out of those countries. And I was explaining to someone that you have to remember that, that for those of us coming into the US, you have to get a visa, you have to get your visa through the Council of general, the Council of general, usually white males, who bring with them the same racism that they experienced all their lives, which has to do with segregation, and everything else. And so the only people they let out of those countries are people who don't look like me. And we were at that time, we were kind of a novelty, because my, my parents folk, it, both my parents, my entire family was bilingual, except for me, I had at that time, five brothers and one sister, I was the only one who didn't speak any English, but everybody was bilingual. My grandmother never spoke Spanish. And my mother was an American citizen, because she was born in the Virgin Islands. And in 1936, when the Virgin Islands were bought by the US and became the US Virgin Islands, they were they were British Virgin Virgin Islands. When they bought them, they all the people who were on that island who had been born there up until that time, up until 1936, who become American citizens, that my mother could only give citizenship to any of her children who was born in 1936, which I wasn't even thought of back at that time, you know? And so, you know, so there are all these restrictions that are put on those immigrations, and we don't always consider that. And so the people, for the most part, who get to get out of those countries, and for whom it was certainly back in the 50s, and 60s and 70s, easier to get out of those countries are the more European you look, the better your chances of getting a visa to get out. Brandon Handley 22:56 Sure, I mean, that makes sense, given how we roll, right? Like I mean, that's just just kind of, you know, that's definitely a good history of it. Where would you say it is at this point in time? Just like kind of racism in general. You know, what can we do? What do you feel like we are now and some of the work that you're doing? What's the trajectory? Milagro Phillips 23:20 Yeah. So as of the murder of George Floyd, by Derek Shogun. People have awakened. However, however, it's been over a year now. And people are starting to fall asleep, again, is what I've noticed. And unless something happens, and it's on television, and even, you know, I've seen some pretty horrific stuff, be on the news in between the COVID stuff, right? People are not really paying attention like they were before. And I think that when it comes to the subject, people are prone to exhaustion. And the truth is that if we're going to change, we can't afford to stay exhausted, it's okay to be exhausted. And then, you know, take a nap if you need to, but don't fall fast asleep again. Because there's so much work to be done. And there's so much that we don't know that we need to really awaken to and in start changing. I think people don't realize that racism is institutional, systemic, internalized, and interpersonal. And we keep trying to solve it at the interpersonal perspective. Well, you said this, and I should say that and I actually have people say to me, if somebody says so and so what should I respond? And it's like, Are you kidding me? Really, if you can't respond from your heart, there's a problem, right? Like, maybe you should do some really work around it so that you can respond from your heart. And so so there's this whole thing. The reality is that Brandon Handley 24:57 look, you might just want to jump in there real quick, right? Like I mean, I think that There's the the idea. And this would be, you know, again, what do we call it like crusty old white guys, right? Like, you know, coming from come from like that side of the fence. It's like, it's like, alright, well, I want to be sensitive, but I don't even know I was supposed to be sensitive to at this point in time, like, you know? Yeah. Right, cuz I'm just playing devil's advocate. I don't know who that person was like, What am I supposed to say? Like, I just want to have a conversation, and I don't want to come out looking like a jerk. Yeah. And I think that, what do Milagro Phillips 25:30 we do with that is, so here's the thing. Healing takes courage. It just does. It's not for the faint hearted. It just is, doesn't matter what it is, right? Whether whether you're healing from a broken arm, or a broken spirit, it takes courage to be with whatever is in that moment. And then to ask ourselves, why is this still hurting? Why is this hurting so much, you know, that that a lot of it is about becoming self reflective, rather than having a quick response. So that you can be right or so that you can fit in or you can say the right thing or be politically correct. We can't afford to do that anymore. People need to be authentic. And then they also need to say, I don't know what I don't know. You know, and not expect to be taught either, you can say that. I don't know what I don't know. Without an expectation that someone has to teach you. You can begin to ask questions and search for things so that you can start to get your own answers. Because a white person's never going to know what it's like to be a black or brown person or black or brown versus not going to know what it's like to be white. But we have we have a common thread. And we we know now through epigenetics, that we're all related. There's only one human family and one global village. Right. And the fact that we have been misinformed, that is not anyone's fault. But it is our collective responsibility to begin to ask questions, and to sit in uncomfortable conversations. Because if we think that a conversation is uncomfortable, and we want to escape it, can you imagine what it's like to be a black and brown person be stopped by the police? Where there is no conversation? How comfortable? Yeah, look, Brandon Handley 27:28 I mean, look, look, I'm uncomfortable getting stopped by the police. I'm a white guy, right. So I can only imagine. Right? And and you know, and so no idea, like, like we talked about for what are some of the uncomfortable questions that you feel like we should be asking. Milagro Phillips 27:44 So what is the history? What is the real history? Because clearly, we've not been taught the real history. Yeah. And really starting to do our own research, looking into what traumatized our families, what brought our families here, because it was some kind of trauma. You can, you can pretty much bet. I mean, people didn't jump on the Mayflower because it was the Carnival Cruise, you know what I mean? That they were gonna fall off the face of the earth by getting those fish you know, they were willing to do it, they're willing to risk their lives because it was so horrific where they were. So what trauma brought your family here? And how does that still show up in your family? Because we know now through epigenetics, that trauma gets passed down from one generation to another, we also know that it's impossible for someone to to traumatize another person without themselves being compromised. So in other words, both the victim and the perpetrator get to pass on that trauma to their children, their grandchildren, their great grandchildren honor, not up to at least seven generations. And so what we need to do is we need to become race literate. We need to become literate about our history and to see, first of all to understand that there's no such thing as black history. It's American history, okay. The fact that it's been segregated, like everything else has been segregated doesn't change the fact that it's still American history, and what people call Black history is really white history in you see what I mean? Like there's this Brandon Handley 29:21 No, I got it, I get it. Like, I mean, so we've got this this again, this is a point of contention for me where like, there's there's a continuous continuous, like kind of forced segregation, right, where do we get to the point where we can integrate to your point as a human race? Yeah, right. Um, and and I mean, I definitely you know, for what it's worth, you know, my you know, my grandfather came over from Norway right had to you know, American Iron is Americanize his name and all the stuff that we're talking about too, but you know, of course, you know, being white and tall and blue eyed. You know, it probably didn't have the same challenges. But you know, nonetheless, there were challenges came over for a reason. So I think that that that that the trauma or that conversation that you're talking about can be had on both ends. And especially as we come at it, you know, you and I are having a mature conversation, right? Or a conversation at least just says, Hey, you know? Yeah, that's a lot of messed up things happen, right? So a lot of these things were outside of you and I are control, what can we do to facilitate, you know, something cohesive and compassionate going forward? Right, what does that what does that picture look like? Versus you when we're talking this evening, I've even seen the Latino community losing their mind over being called like, Latinx. Right below, we can't, like we can't even say Latinx. Right. And it's another thing that's kind of being forced that like, I saw something today, about what you're saying, like Black History Month, there's this Latin Heritage Month, like, why is it have to be like this constant like segregation, you know, people, I think, should be proud of, of, or at least know their story. Right? Here's my story. This is, you know, not even like, you know, and to your point, like, you're coming from the Caribbean, right? And you've got all these other people like, No, you can't have people knowing about, you know, you like you're talking about the Latino crowd saying we can't, you know, be associated with you. And so there's, there's different stories, and I think that they all deserve to be told and heard. But how do we how do we celebrate the differences versus? Versus being afraid of them? Milagro Phillips 31:42 Yeah, I think that I think there's, there's room for an awareness of both. I think that if we are too much into the celebration, without acknowledging the pain, then the shadow eats us up. And if we're too much into the shadow without seeing the hope, then the shadow eats us up. Either way the shadow was right. And so it's unbalanced. It's it's being aware of the fact that we need healing, because what do we do when something hurts, we go to the doctor, right? They ask for a lineage, right? They need your history, right? So understanding the historical context of that pain is is incredibly important, being being courageous enough to walk through the shadow of that, and be able to and willing to admit to the violence of that shadow, being willing to, to really take in, and when I say take care, I mean, listen to another's pain, without judging them or thinking, Well, what's wrong? What did you do wrong, or that kind of thing. And really having a greater sense of compassion for all of us, ourselves and others. And one of the I do a two day intensive. And in that program, one of the the stages of healing and I talk about it in the book, is forgiveness. And that's a huge one to ask for people who are continuously being re traumatized, and experiencing violence toward them. And yet, it's part of the healing process. And, you know, getting to that place where you can actually not, not just give it word, right, but really internalize that forgiveness, and that compassion and the realization that traumatize people traumatize others, that we've all been traumatized in one form or another, that if we don't become aware of that we will continue to traumatize each other without even being aware that we're doing it. Except that we know that there's a discomfort in these conversations, or there is something you know, let me like those. Brandon Handley 34:05 Tommy it is it's I mean, I know that I was talking to one of our network diversity specialist sounds like and I told her, I said, you know, I don't, I'm probably gonna say the wrong thing. And I'm not doing it on purpose, like I just want to have I just want to be able to talk. Right, and without being a landmine. And again, I appreciate this, you know, to appreciate the sensitivity, right, the sensitivity and awareness needs to be there. But I don't have you know, we, it'd be great to kind of work around that fear of having an open conversation. I don't think that you should be afraid. Like, I'm not really afraid, right of having an open conversation and, and being honest about it, right. To your point, like when you said earlier, if we can have an honest, authentic conversation, there really shouldn't be fear involved with it if we're talking from the heart, right. So I think Milagro Phillips 34:55 some of the fear is we we sort of have hang our lives on specific things, right? And there's the threat that someone's going to tell us something that dislodge. Is that, right? So, so if, if we believe that certain people or certain way, and that's what we've learned and that kind of thing. And then somebody comes along and says, Oh, actually, it isn't like that, you know, that rails, your cage, and it causes cognitive dissonance and people are very uncomfortable with that. And very often, what happens when you want to have a conversation about race in a mixed environment is that you trigger people stress response is fight flight or paralysis, they either want to defend themselves or come up with some way of either they get angry with you, or they want to flee the conversation, or else they freeze, and don't know what to say and don't know what to do. And so just being aware, and having compassion around the fact that that actually does happen to people. And it also knowing that we first of all, we don't all have the whole story, and probably never will. We need to be open to hearing people's stories and listening to people, and being open to hearing what they have to say, regardless of the color of their skin, where they come from, or whatever, without scaring them into silence. And we do that a lot. When it comes to the issue of race, you put some research to say something right away, somebody will jump on them. And you can't say that or you know, or whatever. And so it makes it difficult to have authentic conversations when we're not free to say what's in our hearts, and to express it our way. And one of the things that I talk about in the book are the languages of the caste system, because we live under a caste system and explain all that. It's not like the Indian caste system, this particular world. I'm sorry, Brandon Handley 37:00 lagosians. Just a new book, The new new book, you're talking about? No. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, here's Caracas. Milagro Phillips 37:07 Yeah, um, that in that caste system, because we all live under the same umbrella. But we've internalized that differently. And as a result of that, what happens is that people speak different languages. And we're all speaking English, but we're speaking it from a completely different perspective. And what often happens is, let's say, a politician makes a comment. A white male politician makes a comment to be specific, right? And a person of color will say, Well, that was really racist what that person just said. And watch fight flight or paralysis, right? So the politician immediately defend themselves. And if they can't defend themselves, they'll get somebody else to defend them. It's usually another white male politician who speaks his language, right? And that person will say, of course, he's not a racist. Here's what he said wasn't racist, blah, blah, blah, right. And, and of course, to them, it doesn't sound racist, because they speak the same language, the language of supremacy. And at that level, they can hear each other and they say, what they say about and in front of people of color, and they understand each other people of color, hear it from their filters, that says, Okay, this could be a dangerous situation for me, I need to be conscious of the fact that this person just made a racist comment. I'm not sure that I'm safe with that person. So they'll say what you just said was racist, but to the person, it doesn't sound racist, it wasn't great, blah, blah, blah, you know, and so everybody speaking from behind their filters of the caste system, which means that you can't hear people properly. And I want to I'm so sorry, apologize. I have to plug my computer in, which I did not do earlier. So I don't want to lose you. I am so sorry about this. Brandon Handley 39:07 Sorry, why you're doing that? I mean, I think that what made disarm somebody or in that conversation, like, what's some of the language we can use? is racism, even the right word? Or do you just feel uncomfortable? Right, what you're saying to me is just making me feel uncomfortable triggers, you know, makes me feel unsafe, right, is by saying something like that. Do you feel like that might open the dialogue a little bit differently? And, you know, I get what you're saying too, like, I'm a big I'm a huge believer in filters like we've we've all we've all got our own set of filters and, you know, kind of our heritage wherever we were brought up from we're coming with our own, you know, package of, you know, filter packets or right we all come with it and Depending on where we're at, and you know, so we got, you know, a couple of white politicians, and they say some stuff and you know, somebody audience, they're like, Yeah, I've heard some stuff like this before. And that's not the right thing to say. And I'm definitely uncomfortable in that, you know, but call it out is racist. It's kind of like what's getting shouted out? Or are they really saying, that makes me feel uncomfortable? Milagro Phillips 40:19 Well, you know, so here's the thing. Racism, when when you really understand it, when you're able to unpack it, what you realize is that it's not a character judgment, it's conditioning. So what you're really saying is, you're revealing your racial conditioning, maybe a longer way of saying it, but it's basically the same thing. Okay. And, and, but what that does, is it then brings to mind that where that person may be functioning from, is that, you know, 600 years of racial conditioning, which doesn't go away. You know, what if people have been integrating since the 1960s, versus verses hundreds of years of this stuff, right, and I'm talking institutionalized, so they were turning to law systemics, they were systems to support those laws internalized because you internalize the environment, you live it, and then you act it out with the other people in your life. Right. And so, when, when we are looking, and that's why I wrote the book, it's like, you know, having a consciousness that, yes, people will say these things, and they need them. And they don't even think there's anything wrong with saying those things. If they're on one side of the spectrum, from the other side of the spectrum. It sounds really ugly, right? And so those people will call you on it. If no one calls you on it, you will continue to do it. Because you're doing better. Or you may just be functioning out of maliciousness. But some people really don't know any better. Right? So Brandon Handley 42:07 Well, I mean, I'll tell you, I'll tell you this real quick, if you don't mind me jumping in, like, you know, so I'm up here in the Northeast Philadelphia area, born in San Francisco, you know, hippie parents growing up, and all that jazz, went down from the Philadelphia area to North Carolina, right outside of Raleigh Durham. And, you know, went hung out with some of my neighbors, we're all hanging out, we're drinking, we're having a good time eating chicken wings and hanging out. And my neighbor starts telling, like these really racist jokes, and I had to pause. It's like, dumbfounded. First of all, I was like, I can't believe like, this does not serve as like, guys. I don't know about you. But like, where I come from, we really don't talk like this. Right. Like, and it was just, to me, I was blown away by the fact that it's still so prevalent. Right? And of course, of course, right? Because as we're talking here, like, I'm not, I'm on the other side of it, right? Like, you know, again, I don't feel to see the impacts. And, you know, it's impossible for me to but it's not possible for me, of course, to have these conversations right with somebody else's experienced it and come at it from a place of compassion. But I just thought I'd throw that in there. Because again, like, wherever you're at, right now, let's say you're from the Northeast from California, or someplace where it's not as institutionalized as you're talking about, right, as it has been. And, you know, they're still holding on to it. It's kind of it's kind of mind boggling. Yeah. So I mean, I'm just I mean, I've experienced, at least again, from, from the old white guy perspective, like, you know, still still experiencing it. And it's, it makes me uncomfortable. So I again, I can only imagine being in a position where one of my co workers as matter of fact, he had bought some property, and he and his mixed race couple, and in North Carolina still had people were still giving them issues. And this is very recently, right. Within the past couple years, they bought some property, and there were some people that wouldn't stop hunting on that property. And they would tell them, they'd be like, Hey, we're our family did we're gonna keep doing it. You can't tell us that. Like, they tried to hold on to it for as long as they could. But like it's in the end, it made them feel uncomfortable, where they just sold the property. And that, to me was a tragedy, right? Like, where are we today that, that this is still a thing. And we want to call ourselves a progressive society. Milagro Phillips 44:30 That's why it's important for people to become race literate. Because when people understand and even if they continue to behave the same way, they're doing it from a conscious place. And when you're when you've got information and you're conscious, you have responsibility. You can choose to ignore that responsibility, but that doesn't mean that responsibility of your awareness goes away. So helping people to become race literate is extremely empowering. and race, literary literacy is the knowledge and awareness of the history of race and awareness that we are, we're all raised in a racial caste system. By the time children are three years old, they can tell you what caste system they belong to. Who are the good people in the back in the caste system? Who are the bad people? Three years old? They've already been racialized, you know? And so, what are we going to do today to change tomorrow, you know, we cannot if we continue to behave, and to do the same way, and to act out of ignorance, and not change our behavior, we're gonna continue to see the same thing for yet another generation, another generation and another generation, like, we have a responsibility to become as aware, and as knowledgeable as we can. And you know, the spiritual path is a path of awareness. We, it's about becoming conscious. It's about feeling things in our bodies, and experiencing them in our emotions, and being open to what that means to us. How does that make us feel? You know, because if it made us feel well, we'd have conversations with everybody in anybody about race, the fact that people are so uncomfortable with the conversation, it tells you, that's where the juice is, that's where the healing needs to happen. That's where the consciousness needs to shift. And ultimately, everybody wants to solve racism, like I said, from the intrapersonal perspective, coming from their heads. But if we don't become aware that it needs to take that 12 inch drop into our hearts, and then another 12 inch into our guts, so we know it, and we are aware of it. And we we realize that part of it is learning to walk in somebody else's shoes long enough to understand why they're hurting. That's when we start to shift. Brandon Handley 46:59 No, I love that. Oh, that. What would you suggest for somebody that's beginning to, you know, to to gain some race literacy? Like what are some of the first steps into into that? What do you recommend? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 47:13 so again, asking questions, doing research, looking into one's personal history, you know, why did your parents come here? What, you know, why are you here now? Right? Understanding that, looking at some of the, the history of Europe, really, and what was going on there that made people want to leave? in droves? Right? What, what are our connections to one another, in terms of being this one human family living on one global village? And what does that mean? And how do we care for one another compassionately? How do we do what we really, I really believe human beings came here, to be connected, to love each other, to learn from one another, to become more conscious together. And a lot of this stuff is keeping us from doing that work, which is the deeper work that we need to do. And so, for me, becoming race literates is the first thing stop being afraid of our history. It's ugly, it's nasty, it is what it is. But if we don't look at it, we keep repeating it. And we are worthy of having the power to create something new, instead of recreating the past and thinking we're creating something new, right. And so having an awareness of our history, allowing our hearts to open to all people, realizing that everyone, everyone on the planet deserves to thrive, and have the opportunity to do that. And so for me, this, this is about becoming conscious, and in really living from the depth of our hearts, not in the love and like kind of, you know, ignoring life kind of way, but really, by being conscious, and bringing that love and that light into all that is happening on our planet today. So that we can create something new to that to leave behind for the next generation. Brandon Handley 49:23 I think that's fantastic. And that that part where you're talking about the love and light, you know, and skipping the shadow, right? Really, it's what I just saw somebody call it spiritual bypassing recently, right? You know, kind of like just like, I'm like, I'm gonna go ahead and if if I just kind of hold this space, but we need to address the shadow, like you're talking about in your biography. I'm assuming that you touched on that and in your book. And again, the most recent book is called Milagro Phillips 49:50 cracking the healers code, prescription for healing racism, and finding wholeness. Brandon Handley 49:57 Great and you can find, you know, yours Barnes and Nobles. Yeah, that kind of thing. Right looking looking for that. Yeah. So awesome. I love it. And, you know, look, we, we've got a lot of work to do. Milagro Phillips 50:09 We can do it. It's one human family. Brandon Handley 50:12 Right. Hey, would you say that we're getting better? Milagro Phillips 50:14 I think we are because part of getting better is becoming conscious. Because when we just we can make different choices. You know. Brandon Handley 50:24 So I think and I actually want to jump all the way back to an area that you talked about, about the exhaustion part. Right. And I think that, I wouldn't say that, you know, again, coming from the white guy view, but you know, COVID Plus, like this heightened, you know, view on on the racism? I think the whole package, everybody's just exhausted in general, but not to fall asleep at the wheel, how can we, you know, how can we do it in a way that energizes us, right, how do you see a way that we can do that? Or is that just a finding a balance that? Yeah, Milagro Phillips 51:05 no, I, I really believe that. We can do this in a way that energizes us. I see, since the death of George Floyd. Every week, I was doing seminars up until this march on race literacy, and just, you know, getting the community to come in and have these experiences, like come in, I mean, unzoom, and have these experiences on a weekly basis. I'm now doing it on a monthly basis. The first, first Monday of the month, I do this lunch and learn so people can, you know, bring their lunch at work to their computer and join this conversation and learn some things I will often share something about, about some historical piece, and then we have discussions about how that history fits into today. How are we repeating that history today, what it looks like and feels like, also exercises, we always end with a meditation to really bring people back into balance before they go back to work. And in, you know, I have a series of programs that I do, I have a two day seminar that I do that I've been doing since 2020, since 2001, so it's 20 years old this year. And it's so powerful, and people always say that they just never see race the same way again, it helps them to heal all kinds of things with their, their own family. Because we use I take people through a universal process of healing that allows them to be able to do that, which is you know, a lot of the stuff that's, that's in the book. So, um, you know, so people can join these conversations to stay awake and stay aware. I know that there are times that people don't want to attend these things, especially white nails, because they feel like they're going to be the bad boy in the room kind of thing. You know, the one that everybody's looking at is, you know, I don't do that in my seminars, because what I'm aware of, is the fact that we've all been misinformed, and those who are misinformed, they're bound to miss create, and it doesn't matter your gender, it doesn't matter your sexual orientation, it doesn't matter the color of your skin, we have all when it comes to race and racism, all of us have been misinformed. And we can't blame people for that. But we can hold them compassionately responsible for their own ability and choices to change. Brandon Handley 53:29 That was fantastic. Those zoom calls the Lunch and Learns is that open to everybody has something, Milagro Phillips 53:36 you can go on my website and get information on that on that program. And it's open to the entire community. And I will continue to do that as long as I can. Brandon Handley 53:49 That's fantastic. That's great that that's available. Thank you for that. So logros at this point of the conversation I kind of look at like anybody tuning into this I mean, obviously you great conversation on the racism and we touched on the spirituality I look at this as a spiritual speed dating, right? Somebody is looking to like get the next fish will connect on this conversation. So I'm going to ask you a question. Basler espiritual black Bachelorette, a number one who to do to do? Move, I think you've already established that kind of like we are all one would you agree that you know kind of we are all one in one shape. Milagro Phillips 54:30 I mean, you know, we're all cousins, some of us 35th cousins and mother's 50th cousins, but we're all related. And we know that through the study of epigenetics, so that's already been established. It's no longer one of these. Oh, you're my spiritual sibling. And yes, absolutely. But you're also my physical sibling. Yeah. And so being aware of that is really important. Brandon Handley 54:56 Now Perfect, perfect. Whoo doo doo doo doo. To, what would you say is our greatest distraction Milagro Phillips 55:09 when it comes to this topic, everything in anything, you know, anything we could throw in the fire, so that we are now focused on the fire and we take our eyes off the ball, right? When it comes to race, because people don't really want to deal with it. It is uncomfortable for most people. And yet, as I said before, can you imagine if it's uncomfortable in a conversation versus being uncomfortable, because, you know, you're you're being beaten to death in the streets or shot or your family member at you've lost them because of this, right? So there are levels of discomfort, right. And some people are more uncomfortable than others, because they are living the violence. And so for those of us who are not, it's important that we show up, even with our discomfort, because we're always going to feel uncomfortable until we start showing up and learning what this is really about. Brandon Handley 56:07 That's fine. No, it's true. Right? There's always a willingness to to not be, you know, uncomfortable as quickly as possible. Right. And, and I can't think of too many topics that are more uncomfortable than Yeah, that's right. Even Even amongst friends. And, you know, just trying to again, you know, because I think sometimes you just feel like the bad guy, like you said earlier, like, you know, I don't know that I go into a room feel like the bad guy, or, you know, the one that's been called out, but it definitely, again, you know, just just wanting to do the right thing, even though I don't know what the wrong thing is. Yeah. Milagro Phillips 56:44 You know, and that's, that's a huge piece. It's like it is the not knowing what the wrong thing is, or, or what is really wrong here. Like, I'm just uncomfortable with this. And in those, there's those who can escape it, right? Because it's sort of like, oh, you know, I don't have to deal with that, right. And there are those who can't. And yet, there's something, you know, um, it's Bradshaw, that wrote in his book, family secrets about how there are secrets and families that people keep and their secrets and families where it's sort of like, people just don't talk about certain things, right. And, and yet everybody acts, reacts and interact out of the family secret, whether they know the secret or not, right. And that's what happens to us as a human family when it comes to this history. Like, we all know, something's off, right? We don't know quite what it is. So I'll give you an example of that. For the most part, people call Haiti, the poorest country in the world, or at least one of the poorest countries in the world. But no one ever talks about the fact that Haiti has been paying reparations to Frances 1825, when they set themselves free in 1804. And from slavery, and the French kept trying to go back in there to re enslaved them. And finally, they use the Doctrine of Discovery to get back in there, and to have them pay reparations all these years. Now, if you are so poor, you can't afford to do anything, let alone pay reparations, right. And so, you know, just the realization that there's so many natural resources on that island that, you know, people are still finding natural resources on those islands. And, you know, when we only tell one piece of the story, what happens is that people get hung up on that one piece. And yet, there's something in our hearts that kind of knows that something's off, you know, people are constantly being told those and $19 a month to support a child in Haiti, when in reality, if friends gave back even one part of all that they siphoned out of there, that island would not be poor, okay, they just would not be poor. And that is not the only place it's all of these places that have been colonized to the so called poor countries, which most of them have happened to have dictators, which I think is quite a coincidence. Right. And those of us who are spiritual know that there are synchronicities, right. And so, you know, so just having an awareness like we need an expanded awareness of this stuff, and not just go with Okay, the going story is, Haiti is a poor country. So you know, Hades, not a poor country. Haiti is a country that has been stolen from Okay, that is very different, because you don't steal where there's poverty, because I know the seal, right? Brandon Handley 59:42 No, no, you're right, right. You don't exploit Milagro Phillips 59:44 people, because they're poor. You exploit them because they have natural resources as a human being. All right. So we need to get really clear about what it is that we're talking about. When we're talking about this stuff, which is why I wrote that book. It's like, people need to get clear Let's let's have an honest, authentic conversation that goes beyond the rhetoric. Oh, it's it's this right like, okay, so why is it that way? You know, it's nuts. Right? Right. You'll, Brandon Handley 1:00:13 we'll be on the first layer go beyond that first layer, right? This, this is what I heard. This is what I was told. You know, why would somebody tell you that? Yeah, I'm kind of getting beyond that, for sure. For sure. It makes sense. I never knew, right? I never knew that I'm, you know, still paying France back. Right. And I think that that's crazy, right? Even Even, even the whole idea of you know, the British selling the Virgin Islands to the state. So to me, it's just boggle your mind. So snowballs my so Ragosa thank you so much for the conversation. I enjoyed it. I think that you know, you're obviously doing some great work. Excited for you to release your fourth book. Understand that you're working on the fifth. And where can we send people to find out more about Sure. Yeah, Milagro Phillips 1:01:01 so you can visit my website Milagros phillips.com. So it's just my name.com. And there's a lot of information on there. And as soon as this podcast is open for posting it on the website, so Brandon Handley 1:01:13 fantastic. Thanks again for being Milagro Phillips 1:01:17 so much. I Unknown Speaker 1:01:20 really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dove podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove. CO You can also join the discussion on Facebook spiritual though, and Instagram at spiritual underscore Joe. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email Brandon at spiritual Co Co. And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition.

Simplify
We Are Pilgrims

Simplify

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 11:38


Long before the Mayflower set sail for America's east coast, the writer of Hebrews points us to a gallery of pilgrims. Listen to this week's episode to hear their story.    Purchase my brand new book Ten Words: a Practical Look at the Ten Commandments at https://pentecostalpublishing.com/products/ten-words Listen to Ten Words: a Practical Look at the Ten Commandments on Audible at Ten Words on Audible Purchase the devotional Simplify—which launched the podcast— at https://pentecostalpublishing.com/search?q=simplify   Join me on another podcast called God's Word for Life to help us better learn and live out God's Word for Life. Listen on Podbean Listen on Google Podcasts   Join me on another another podcast called The Preacher and the Policeman, where Lt. Andy Burns and I mix in current events with the gospel and do our best to add a heaping helping of humor.  Listen on Podbean Listen on Google Podcasts   Music provided by: Positive Happy by PeriTune https://soundcloud.com/sei_peridot Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/TutcA4JPa7Q

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler
What Everyone Should Know About Thanksgiving — History, Origin & Secret Truths with Melanie Kirkpatrick

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 63:06


If you've ever wondered whether there's more to thanksgiving than turkeys, shopping and football, then do we have the Thanksgiving Show for you!   Today I'll be talking with Melanie Kirkpatrick, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, former deputy editor of the Wall Street Journal's editorial page, and the award-winning author of Escape from North Korea, and her latest Thanksgiving.   That is just what I want to talk with her about today, what's the true holiday at the heart of the American Experience.   That plus we'll talk about Franksgiving, Unthanksgiving, Mary had a little lamb, why pumpkin pie's a myth, why no one landed at Plymouth rock, and why in the world a writer in Hong Kong, might think thanksgiving is Independence Day,   Thanksgiving Self-Improvement & Self-Help Topics Include: What's the worst turkey sound ever? Why a book on Thanksgiving? What happened in Newcomer's High in Queens? What happened in 1621 to the Mayflower expedition? Why Plymouth Rock was a myth What happened during the first winter? What were the gratitude practices of people from the Mayflower? What was the first thanksgiving like? What was the miracle of Squanto's life experiences? What was the original significance of Thanksgiving What's the history of thanksgiving and Native Americans What happened at Alcatraz? Who else claimed to have the first thanksgiving dinner? What did George Washing do for Thanksgiving? Why Lincoln had two Thanksgivings in one year? Where did Mary Had a Little Lamb come from? Who was the Godmother of Thanksgiving? Who was Sarah Josepha Hale? How did football and thanksgiving come together? What's Franksgiving and what happened in 1939? What's the connection between Thanksgiving and generosity? What's the history of giving and Washington and Thanksgiving? What does over-eating have to do with thanksgiving? What pie wasn't at the first thanksgiving dinner? When did Turkey's get connected with Thanksgiving What does succotash have to do with thanksgiving? What's the practice of five kernels of corn? Illustrated by Artist Kathryn Messenger on the book :o)   To find out more visit: https://www.melaniekirkpatrick.com/ https://amzn.to/3qULECz - Order Michael Sandler's new book, "AWE, the Automatic Writing Experience" www.automaticwriting.com  ……. Follow Michael and Jessica's exciting journey and get even more great tools, tips, and behind-the-scenes access. Go to https://www.patreon.com/inspirenation   For free meditations, weekly tips, stories, and similar shows visit: https://inspirenationshow.com/   We've got NEW Merch! - https://teespring.com/stores/inspire-nation-store   Follow Inspire Nation, and the lives of Michael and Jessica, on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/InspireNationLive/   Find us on TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@inspirenationshow 

Front Row
Ralph Fiennes on Four Quartets, Songlines exhibition, art postcard from Plymouth

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:14


‘A spiritual enquiry into what it is to be human' is how Ralph Fiennes describes T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets. On the eve of the opening in the West End he tells presenter Elle Osili-Wood about his stage presentation and his relationship with the poems. An exhibition that was a smash hit in Australia has come to Plymouth. “Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters” explores the ancient stories of Indigenous Australians through more than 300 works of art. Senior curator Margo Neale explains the meaning of the Seven Sisters Dreaming stories, that are central to the exhibition. Plus BBC Devon presenter Sarah Gosling takes us to the south coast and to Plymouth, where this Friday hip hop takes over the city thanks to Roots Up festival, as part of the Mayflower 400 anniversary celebrations. We also hear about grassroots theatre, comedy, and the thriving music scene which is pulling creatives to the south west from across the country. PRESENTER: Elle Osili-Wood PRODUCER: Julian May PHOTO: Ralph Fiennes on stage in Four Quartets PHOTO CREDIT: Matt Humphrey

Coffee with the Chicken Ladies
Episode #51 Dunghill Fowl / Chickens on the Mayflower / Vintage Chicken Gravy Boats

Coffee with the Chicken Ladies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:02


In this episode we celebrate (American) Thanksgiving! We investigate whether there were chickens on the Mayflower, spotlight one of the most common types of chickens in 17th century New England, share Chrisie's unique and delicious stuffing recipe, and chat about vintage chicken decorated gravy boats. Our sponsor, Grubbly Farms, is offering our listeners 20% off your purchase for first time buyers! That's a fantastic value! This offer does not apply to subscriptions and cannot be used with any other discounts. Click here for our affiliate link and use our code COFFEE20 to get your discount.Chicken Luv Box -  use CWTCL for $5 off your order!https://www.chickenluv.com/Dunghill Fowl at Old Sturbridge Villagehttps://www.osv.org/explore-the-village/heritage-breed-animals/Strong Animals Chicken Essentialshttps://www.getstronganimals.com/Ben Franklin's World Podcast, Episode #213  Rebecca Fraser and the Pilgrims of Plimothhttps://benfranklinsworld.com/episode-213-rebecca-fraser-the-pilgrims-of-plimoth/Chrisie's Thanksgiving Stuffinghttps://coffeewiththechickenladies.com/farm-fresh-egg-recipes/chrisies-thanksgiving-stuffing/CWTCL Websitehttps://coffeewiththechickenladies.com/CWTCL Etsy Shophttps://www.etsy.com/shop/CoffeeWChickenLadiesCWTCL Amazon Recommendationshttps://www.amazon.com/shop/coffeewiththechickenladiesCWTCL Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/coffeewiththechickenladies/?hl=enSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/coffeewiththechickenladies)

KIND OF A BIG DEAL
Mini Deal - The One Where We Have A Big Deal Thanksgiving - Episode 71 With Terry Miller and Doug Parks

KIND OF A BIG DEAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 27:31


Kind of A Big Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2021 occurs on Thursday, November 25. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn't until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November. In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the "New World." After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the men had an orgy on the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth. Did you know? Lobster, Seal and Swans were on the Pilgrim's Menu. Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year's harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well. During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country's war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies. In 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians, earning her the nickname the “Mother of Thanksgiving.” --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kindofabigdeal/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kindofabigdeal/support

Fay It Forward - The Fay Kranz-Greene Podcast
Who was the captain of the mayflower??

Fay It Forward - The Fay Kranz-Greene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 5:36


Who was the captain of the mayflower??

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-11-11: Jeffrey J. Jillson, Deer check stations, and Russell Stewart

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 3:48


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Jeffrey J. Jillson was a professional ice hockey player who played in the NHL for the San Jose Sharks, Boston Bruins and the Buffalo Sabres. Now, for our feature story: With Rhode Island's deer hunting season underway, state wildlife officials are reminding hunters that deer taken during the first two days of the muzzleloader season this past Saturday and Sunday must be physically checked at one of five state-operated sites. The same rule applies for the first two days of shotgun deer season on December 4th and 5th. It also applies to deer taken with archery equipment. Check stations allow state biologists with the help of volunteers to collect samples and take data that provides insight into the overall health of Rhode Island's deer population. The check stations are located in Exeter, Richmond, Glocester, West Kingston and Tiverton. Deer taken on Patience Island, Prudence Island, and Block Island are exempt, but must still be reported using the online system. For more information on all things Westerly and Rhode Island, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from Randall Realtors Compass in Westerly. They're looking for real estate agents. You'll need to obtain a real estate license before you start. Pay can be $100,000 or more per year. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=ca280a731c2da875&advn=7652287743140876 Today we're remembering the life of Russell Stewart, beloved husband to June. Russ was born in New London, CT and  lived in Stonington and North Stonington for most of his life. Russ attended the UCONN where he earned a bachelors degree. He then earned masters degrees from both Trinity College and Eastern Connecticut State University. Before retiring from teaching, he earned a law degree from UCONN Law School. He received a Fulbright Scholarship to study in India, and numerous fellowships to universities and colleges around the country. He worked as a social studies teacher for the town of Groton for some 20 years, where he is often fondly remembered for playing piano for his students. Russ also served as President of the New London Central Labor Council in 1967 while representing the Groton Teacher's Union. Russ was an avid traveler, often with various members of his family, always with his wife. He visited over 60 countries and every state in the union consistently making new friends wherever he went. While there, he would pursue other interests such as rock and mineral hounding or genealogy. Russ traced his line back to multiple Mayflower passengers and to Charlemagne. Russ played the piano and performed many weekends in local bands. At home he enjoyed listening to all kinds of music and sharing his huge musical selection with anyone wanting to listen. He was an avid fan of the UCONN huskies, particularly the women's basketball team whom he watched in person attending their home games and following them to several Final Fours. Russell Stewart was an amazing man who touched the lives of countless people. He will be dearly missed by his wife of 65 years, his sons, his daughter, his half sister, many family members, and all his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Russ's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Harold's Old Time Radio
Paul Harvey - Mayflower (fun folks and no beer)

Harold's Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 3:40


Paul Harvey - Mayflower (fun folks and no beer)

The New Witches
78. Ancestor Veneration for Beginners

The New Witches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 83:01


The veil is thinner than ever this time of year. So if you're curious about incorporating your ancestors into your practice and want to connect with them more, this episode will give you a beginner's manual on how to do that. We cover the difference between ancestor veneration and ancestor worship, the ethics to consider when working with your ancestors, and different traditions of ancestor veneration from around the world. Listen to hear how Maria and Laura are honoring and connecting with their ancestors in their own practices.Support the show (https://patreon.com/thenewwitches)

Murderous Roots with Denise & Zelda
Episode 26: Minneapolis Svengali

Murderous Roots with Denise & Zelda

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 114:50


Listen to our latest episode as we discuss the murder Harry T. Hayward arranged, his later confession to his cousin, and what happened to his family after his death. Then continue listening as we explore a tree that goes back to the Mayflower, New Netherland, a murdered family member, and how a member of his family was tied to the Springfield Race Riot of 1908.

Mayflower Church
When You Just Can’t Keep Quiet - Video

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 67:57


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
When You Just Can’t Keep Quiet - PDF

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
When You Just Can’t Keep Quiet - Audio

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 67:57


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill
164: What's up with natural immunity? and four other topics

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:40


P&C drink and review a homebrewed Alt beer, then do five topics in five minutes each. 1. Why is natural immunity being ignored by the vaccine proponents? Our goal should be immunity against Covid. Why does it matter if it's from the vaccine or from natural immunity? 2. Why do assassins and mass murderers have three names? 3. What is forest bathing? 4. Indians at the time of Columbus vs. Indians at the time of the Mayflower. 5. Who's the pervert?

Mayflower Church
Join us for Sunday Morning Worship at 10:30! - PDF

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
World Wide Communion and a World Wide Church - Audio

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 3:21


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
World Wide Communion and a World Wide Church - Video

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 3:21


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
World Wide Communion and a World Wide Church - PDF

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
Youth Sunday

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 37:08


Mayflower's Youth Group is taking over the service for our annual Youth Sunday! They focus on stories of friendship and what they have learned in their first fall series. The youth will also help lead World Communion Sunday for the congregation.

Mayflower Church
Birth Marks - Audio

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 74:51


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Mayflower Church
Birth Marks - PDF

Mayflower Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021


We are pleased to provide you with sermons from Mayflower Congregational Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mayflower is a growing inclusive church - Faith is a journey, God is good, Jesus saves, and the Spirit leads us to faith, hope and love.

Brooke and Jubal
Shock Collar Question of the Day (09/16/21)

Brooke and Jubal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 8:30


Brooke is wearing the Shock Collar this morning! Today's question: On THIS DAY in 1620, English Colonists boarded the Mayflower & set sail for America...where they would eventually create the settlement of Plymouth, Massachusetts. Some died & many were sea-sick the entire voyage. And morning show fun fact: Jose DOES plan to reenact it for everyone, in the upcoming months. We are just waiting on the old boat rental guy to get back to us. But today's Shock Collar Question is all about the Mayflower & their journey. I'm going to ask you FOUR questions. You'll have 30 seconds a piece to discuss before I need an answer. 1. True or False. Brooke is REALLY a descendant of a passenger aboard the Mayflower? 2. How many months was the Mayflower's voyage across the Atlantic? 3. Originally, the Mayflower set sail with a 2nd ship, that had to turn back due to leaks. What was the OTHER SHIP called: The Endeavor? The Mary Thomas? Or Speedwell? 4. Meals aboard the Mayflower were nothing to celebrate. Cooks ran out of fresh food just DAYS into the journey, and passengers had to eat several unsavory things to survive. Which food did the passengers NOT eat aboard... Moldy cheese, chicken feet, hard biscuits, cow tongue.

Hard Factor
9/16: Top South Carolina Lawyer Admits to Hiring Hitman to Shoot Him in Head

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 65:22


Prominent South Carolinian Alex Murdaugh, whose wife and son were shot and killed three months ago arranged for a former client (Curtis Edward Smith) to kill him so that his surviving son could collect a life insurance payout of about $10 million, according to court documents. Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:04:02) - Holidays: Mexican Independence Day (00:06:16) - Today in History: 1620 The Voyage of the Mayflower (00:07:19) - #3.4 - Gavin Newsome Won the California recall (00:09:42) - #3.3 - Secretary of Defense Mark Esper Involved in Milley Debacle (00:12:04) - #3.2 - UEFA Champions League (00:17:22) - #3.1 - Twitter locked out Nicki Minaj (00:18:16) - #2 - A New Study Confirms - Lots of People want to Fuck Robots. (00:23:47) - #1 - FBI Lied to Cover Up Mistakes in Larry Nassar USA Gynmaistic Sex Assault Case TikTok International Moment (00:30:07) - Scotland - Boy Eats Magnets and Ruins Insides Because of #MagnetChallenge (00:33:29) - Florida - Florida Woman Wednesday - Florida Woman Puts out Hit on Kamala Harris (00:39:00) - Update: Murdaugh Family Multiple Murder Case - Mark runs down the latest in the case of SC lawyer Alex Murdaugh and his “assasination” plot (00:51:38) - OK Woman FInds Human Feces in Grocery Freezer - Pat tells us about Shirley Wright-Johnson who reached for a bag of Totino's pizza rolls and grabbed something she never expected. These stories and more… brought to you by our fantastic sponsors. Full Boar BBQ - Proof the American dream is still alive when you have a superior product mixed with unstoppable work ethic. What started with a group of high school friends trying their hand at a local BBQ competition has turned into a company that is trusted everywhere it is known to make you the star of your backyard. Hard Factor listeners get 10% off their entire order using promo code Factor at fullboarbbqproducts.com Talkspace - Match with a licensed therapist when you go to talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code HARDFACTOR Lightstream - Lower your interest rate and save with a Credit Card Consolidation Loan from LightStream get a special interest rate discount and save even more by going to Lightstream.com/Factor Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480 or or send us a voicememo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com & leave a 5-Star review on Apple Pods to hear it on Friday's show Follow/Subscribe @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Facebook, Apple Pods and Spotify to support the Show!