Podcasts about Colonial

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  • 2,064PODCASTS
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  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Colonial

Show all podcasts related to colonial

Latest podcast episodes about Colonial

Hablemos de Terror
Ánimas malditas | Relato colonial de terror

Hablemos de Terror

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 24:08


Hola terroríficos como les va ? muchas gracias por estar al pendiente de nuestro podcast, hoy les comparto un relato colonial "Ánimas Malditas", recuerden que si quieren apoyarnos nos ayudaría mucho que se suscribieran a nuestro canal de youtube!!, así que disfruten y recuerden que pueden compartir sus experiencias a nuestro correo:tuhistoria@hablemosdeterror.comO a nuestra página de Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/hablemosdeterrorSi les gusta nuestro contenido no duden en suscribirse ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sigan nuestro Instagram !!https://www.instagram.com/terrorpodcast/Bienvenidos

Better Than I Found It
107 | Ronnie McGraw

Better Than I Found It

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 35:05


Ronnie McGraw has been a part of the golf world for the past 80+ years. He also happens to be Coach McGraw's uncle. He worked for the Hogan company for many years. He tells us about his interactions with Mr. Hogan, working with legendary players such as Tom Kite, going to Colonial as a child, and much more. Thank you so much for coming on Mr. McGraw! Subscribe to the podcast for future episodes. You can follow us on Instagram and Facebook —> @BetterThanIFoundItPodcast Associated social media accounts: Coach McGraw - @BearCoachMcGraw Mikkel - @MikkelGolf Baylor Men's Golf - @BaylorMGolf Music: DriftMaster by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/betterthanifoundit/message

New Books in World Affairs
Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books in Economic and Business History
Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies
Nicholas Ferns, "Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945–1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:12


In the voluminous literature on the history of modernisation theory and its associated concept of development since the end of World War II, much of the focus lies on the efforts undertaken by developed nations—most notably the United States and Soviet Union—to establish a model for developing countries to build not just their economies but their nations as well. Eschewing this paradigm, Dr Nicholas Ferns' excellent monograph Australia in the Age of International Development, 1945-1975: Colonial and Foreign Aid Policy in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia (published by Routledge in 2020) provides a rich and important intervention that highlights how the ideas and practices that underpinned international development were shaped not only by the Cold War superpowers but by middle powers like Australia as well. Focussing particularly on Australia's development aid efforts in Papua New Guinea and Southeast Asia through its own formulation of the ‘New Deal' for the former and the Colombo Plan for the latter, Ferns brings to light the complexity of a country caught in the middle of its own perception as being between a developed and developing nation, between British and American economic and developmental influences, and between serving as a colonial power in its own right while also supporting anti-colonial movements. Bernard Z. Keo is Lecturer in Asian History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia who specialises in decolonisation and nation-building in Southeast Asia. He can be contacted at: b.keo@latrobe.edu.au. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/australian-and-new-zealand-studies

The Great Derelict
How Big is your Space Navy?

The Great Derelict

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 55:52


Welcome back aboard the Great Derelict! This week Andy is joined by Claude Berube to pick up where they left off when discussing if Starfleet is a Military or not and asking Just how big does your Space Navy have to be? We look at Starfleet, the Imperial Navy from SW, the Colonial fleet from BSG and what can we learn from real Naval History and what can these shows teach us, to ensure that when the fate of the universe depends on it, there's more than 1 ship in the sector. You can find Claude on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cgberube  On the Preble Hall Podcast about Naval History here -https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/preble-hall/id1485514337 And on the Joint Geeks of Staff here: https://the-joint-geeks-of-staff.simplecast.com/ And our previous episode here: https://greatderelict.libsyn.com/is-starfleet-a-military And you can find more of Andy and his other casts over at Rogue Two Media - http://www.roguetwomedia.com/ - https://twitter.com/GreatDerelict - https://www.facebook.com/groups/GreatDerelict/

Blowing Bubbles
Blowing Bubbles - 03-08-2022 - 422 - Colonial Digital Bubbles - Karaitiana Taiuru

Blowing Bubbles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 55:00


422 - Colonial Digital Bubbles - Karaitiana Taiuru in Christchurch joins Samuel Mann in Sawyers Bay. With a contribution from Tahu Mackenzie. This show was broadcast on OAR 105.4FM Dunedin - oar.org.nz

Wednesday Talk Radio
Anti-colonial struggles in "Canada" with Kanahus Manuel

Wednesday Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


BetAmerica Radio Network
Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast 8/2/22--Guest Jon Hardoon

BetAmerica Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 41:55


Jason recaps some of the late Sunday racing action as well as Conagher's big win at Colonial on Monday. Then we welcome in handicapper Jon Hardoon to talk some Saratoga, Del Mar, and more! 

Pause On The Play
Maroon Communities: The History of Black Brilliance and Freedom with Dr. Crystal Menzies

Pause On The Play

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 49:23


There is so much history that we don't learn in school. Colonial and white supremacist historical narratives rarely acknowledge the history of Black resistance and rebellion, or the free Black communities created by Maroons, some of which still exist to this day. Dr. Crystal Menzies joins Erica to discuss the past and present of Maroon communities, what they have to teach us about communal care and collective responsibility, and why we need accessible, intergenerational education. In this discussion: The history of Maroon communities and how they sustain their cultures to this day How Maroon communities implement communal care and accountability Why we need to learn about the resistance and rebellion of Black people Why education needs to be intergenerational and in community Connect with Dr. Crystal Menzies: EmancipatED Instagram: @emancipate_ed Ready to dive deeper? Pause on the Play, The Community was created as a space to be able to share information, to allow people to connect with one another, to amplify what is important to them, and support one another in becoming the change that we want to create. In the community, we have conversations where you learn about something that you were unaware of, and how you can shift what's possible, what can come up in the future if you allow yourself to dream a little bit bigger, to be willing to listen a little bit more intently. If you would like to be a part of these conversations, if you would like to be in a room with other people that are values-aligned and looking to reconsider their normals, this is the place for you. Learn more at  pauseontheplay.com/community Resources: Learn more about Queen Nanny of the Maroons Watch In Search of Voodoo: Roots to Heaven

Insight with Beth Ruyak
California's Monkeypox Response | Lake Tahoe's Ecological Health | All-Age Venue Café Colonial Fights to Stay Open

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


California's response to the monkeypox outbreak. Researchers at UC Davis release their annual report, which raises concerns about the ecological health of Lake Tahoe. All-age venue Café Colonial fights to stay open. California's monkeypox response

New Zealand History
Shifting perspectives about colonial conflict: The Wairau Affray and the Battle of Boulcott's Farm

New Zealand History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:44


Liana MacDonald (Ngāti Kuia, Rangitāne o Wairau, Ngāti Koata) is a lecturer in the Faculty of Education, Victoria University of Wellington. She is interested in how racism, whiteness, and settler colonialism manifest in national institutions. In this talk, Liana focusses on two significant conflicts between mana whenua and British and settler militia during the early stages of the New Zealand Wars and how they are remembered today. Interviews reveal how the Wairau Affray (1843) is remembered differently by settler and Indigenous people from the Marlborough region. Researcher observations are the basis for thinking about how sites associated with the Battle of Boulcott's Farm (1846) reflect settler perspectives about the past. The research in this talk is part of a large-scale ethnographic study called He Taonga te Wareware? Remembering and Forgetting New Zealand's Colonial Past.  These monthly Public History Talks are a collaboration between the Alexander Turnbull Library and Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Recorded live via Zoom, 1 June 2022. Download a transcript of this talk: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/files/pdfs/transcript-liana-macdonald-pht-2022-07-26.pdf

Virginia History Podcast
Colonial Virginia's War Against Piracy - Jeremy Moss Interview

Virginia History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 44:21


In which Jeremy Moss discusses his new book - Colonial Virginia's War Against Piracy: The Governor and the Buccaneer.

Wai? Indigenous Words and Ideas
Ep. 36: Reading, Thinking, and Writing about Race with Lana and Ani

Wai? Indigenous Words and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 60:05


Returning guests: Philosopher, writer, and PhD student Anisha Sankar and soon to be Assistant Professor of Pacific Island Studies at the University of Oregon and author of Bloody Woman Lana Lopesi. Contents: This episode gives some background to the anthology project Towards a Grammar of Race in Aotearoa New Zealand to be published by Bridget Williams Books in Sept/Oct 2022. We reflect back on the beginning of a reading group that culminated into this project, drawing from Jodi Byrd's The Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism,  Frank B. Wilderson III's Afropessimism, Lisa A. Lowe's The Intimacies of Four Continents, Otherwise Worlds: Against Settler Colonialism and Anti-Blackness, and more. Reading and thinking with challenging theoretical perspectives, through different points of views and disciplines, offered productive tensions that better spoke to the messy and complex realities of our modern world. This background assisted us in finding language to navigate the local and global discourse and experience of race and power, such as debates between ethnicity vs. race in a New Zealand context. This project sought to bring together different authors, understandings, ideas, and experiences of race together. We confront a lack of societal consensus or shared language to even discuss race by putting these diverse positions together in what we call, ‘towards a grammar of race'. Grammar is both linguistic and philosophical, as the rules that give structure to language and to society. Ani and Lana also share a bit about their chapters in the book and we end with a critical reflection on ‘accessibility'. Terms: Incommensurability is a term borrowed from mathematics that refers to having no common measure, and is used in reference to Afropessimism, which uses the term to confront the inadequacies to theorise Black suffering and Blackness in other theoretical camps, positions, or traditions; Paranoid and reparative reading are references to Eve Sedgwick's book Touching Feeling – Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity and particularly the chapter ‘Paranoid reading and reparative reading, or you're so paranoid, you probably think this essay is about you.'; Colonial imaginary refers to the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of a modern euro-imperial consciousness and reality.

New Books in the American South
Peter H. Wood, "Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion" (Norton, 1996)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:30


Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a podcast channel on the New Books Network. I am your host, Adam Xavier McNeil. Today's podcast is special, not because this is the 99th episode of my New Books career, but because I get the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Peter H. Wood completing the dissertation version of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion. In this wide-ranging interview, I discuss the origin story of Peter's work, what happened at Duke University in the 80s and 90s that opened opportunities for the likes of Jennifer L. Morgan, Vincent Brown, and the late great Julius Scott to come through the Durham doors, and where he sees the field of slavery studies going? Enjoy the conversation, family.  Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books Network
Peter H. Wood, "Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion" (Norton, 1996)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:30


Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a podcast channel on the New Books Network. I am your host, Adam Xavier McNeil. Today's podcast is special, not because this is the 99th episode of my New Books career, but because I get the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Peter H. Wood completing the dissertation version of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion. In this wide-ranging interview, I discuss the origin story of Peter's work, what happened at Duke University in the 80s and 90s that opened opportunities for the likes of Jennifer L. Morgan, Vincent Brown, and the late great Julius Scott to come through the Durham doors, and where he sees the field of slavery studies going? Enjoy the conversation, family.  Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Peter H. Wood, "Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion" (Norton, 1996)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:30


Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a podcast channel on the New Books Network. I am your host, Adam Xavier McNeil. Today's podcast is special, not because this is the 99th episode of my New Books career, but because I get the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Peter H. Wood completing the dissertation version of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion. In this wide-ranging interview, I discuss the origin story of Peter's work, what happened at Duke University in the 80s and 90s that opened opportunities for the likes of Jennifer L. Morgan, Vincent Brown, and the late great Julius Scott to come through the Durham doors, and where he sees the field of slavery studies going? Enjoy the conversation, family.  Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Peter H. Wood, "Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion" (Norton, 1996)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:30


Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a podcast channel on the New Books Network. I am your host, Adam Xavier McNeil. Today's podcast is special, not because this is the 99th episode of my New Books career, but because I get the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Peter H. Wood completing the dissertation version of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion. In this wide-ranging interview, I discuss the origin story of Peter's work, what happened at Duke University in the 80s and 90s that opened opportunities for the likes of Jennifer L. Morgan, Vincent Brown, and the late great Julius Scott to come through the Durham doors, and where he sees the field of slavery studies going? Enjoy the conversation, family.  Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Hablemos de Terror
La misteriosa Mansión Ulloa | Relato colonial de terror

Hablemos de Terror

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 18:36


Hola terroríficos como les va ? muchas gracias por estar al pendiente de nuestro podcast, hoy les comparto un relato colonial "La misteriosa Mansión Ulloa", recuerden que si quieren apoyarnos nos ayudaría mucho que se suscribieran a nuestro canal de youtube!!, así que disfruten y recuerden que pueden compartir sus experiencias a nuestro correo:tuhistoria@hablemosdeterror.comO a nuestra página de Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/hablemosdeterrorSi les gusta nuestro contenido no duden en suscribirse ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sigan nuestro Instagram !!https://www.instagram.com/terrorpodcast/Bienvenidos

New Books in African American Studies
Peter H. Wood, "Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion" (Norton, 1996)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:30


Welcome to New Books in African American Studies, a podcast channel on the New Books Network. I am your host, Adam Xavier McNeil. Today's podcast is special, not because this is the 99th episode of my New Books career, but because I get the chance to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Peter H. Wood completing the dissertation version of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 Through the Stono Rebellion. In this wide-ranging interview, I discuss the origin story of Peter's work, what happened at Duke University in the 80s and 90s that opened opportunities for the likes of Jennifer L. Morgan, Vincent Brown, and the late great Julius Scott to come through the Durham doors, and where he sees the field of slavery studies going? Enjoy the conversation, family.  Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

BetAmerica Radio Network
Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast 7/28/22--Weekend Preview

BetAmerica Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 38:51


Jason looks back at some of the stakes action from Saratoga and Colonial from Wednesday. Then we do our weekend preview looking ahead to Saratoga and Del Mar weekend racing. 

Cyber and Technology with Mike
28 July 2022 Cyber and Tech News

Cyber and Technology with Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 12:48


In today's podcast we cover four crucial cyber and technology topics, including: 1. TSA issues new cyber directive to pipeline owners 2. Spanish police arrest 2 behind radioactive alert hack3. Twitter data for sale on darkweb, potentially stolen via known flaw 4. Kansas-based MSP suffering apparent ransomware incident I'd love feedback, feel free to send your comments and feedback to  | cyberandtechwithmike@gmail.com

New Books in the American South
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in French Studies
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in History
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Native American Studies
Michael K. Beauchamp, "Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815" (LSU Press, 2021)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:29


M. K. Beauchamp's Instruments of Empire: Colonial Elites and U.S. Governance in Early National Louisiana, 1803–1815 (LSU Press, 2021) examines the challenges that resulted from U.S. territorial expansion through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. With the acquisition of this vast region, the United States gained a colonial European population whose birthplace, language, and religion often differed from those of their U.S. counterparts. This population exhibited multiple ethnic tensions and possessed little experience with republican government. Consequently, administration of the territory proved a trial-and-error endeavor involving incremental cooperation between federal officials and local elites. As Beauchamp demonstrates, this process of gradual accommodation served as an essential nationalizing experience for the people of Louisiana. After the acquisition, federal officials who doubted the loyalty of the local French population and their capacity for self-governance denied the territory of Orleans--easily the region's most populated and economically robust area--a quick path to statehood. Instead, U.S. officials looked to groups including free people of color, Native Americans, and recent immigrants, all of whom found themselves ideally placed to negotiate for greater privileges from the new territorial government. Beauchamp argues that U.S. administrators, despite claims of impartiality and equality before the law, regularly acted as fickle agents of imperial power and frequently co-opted local elites with prominent positions within the parishes. Overall, the methods utilized by the United States in governing Louisiana shared much in common with European colonial practices implemented elsewhere in North America during the early nineteenth century. While historians have previously focused on Washington policy makers in investigating the relationship between the United States and the newly acquired territory, Beauchamp emphasizes the integral role played by territorial elites who wielded enormous power and enabled government to function. His work offers profound insights into the interplay of class, ethnicity, and race, as well as an understanding of colonialism, the nature of republics, democracy, and empire. By placing the territorial period of early national Louisiana in an imperial context, this study reshapes perceptions of American expansion and manifest destiny in the nineteenth century and beyond. Instruments of Empire serves as a rich resource for specialists studying Louisiana and the U.S. South, as well as scholars of slavery and free people of color, nineteenth-century American history, Atlantic World and border studies, U.S. foreign relations, and the history of colonialism and empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network
Tuesday AmWager ATR from Colonial-Part 1: Kate Dalton

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network
Tuesday AmWager ATR from Colonial-Part 3: Jill Byrne, Jason Beem, Jessica Paquette, Andy Serling.

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Bloody Violent History
Terrorist (Violence pt 3 of 3)

Bloody Violent History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 69:44


1.  Intro  2. The Terrorist in the Ancient world   3. 17th, 18th & 19th Century Terror   4. The Anti-Colonial Wave  5. Extremism and Technology 6. Spectaculars  7. State Sponsored Terrorism and the Lone Wolf   8. The Future   p.s. The ReaperWhether the Sicarii of ancient Judea or Al-Qaeda of modern times, terrorist groups and their accompanying violence have scarred human existence for millennia.  Technology and human interdependence – along with the rise of air travel, computing and the advent of high explosives – have ensured that anyone with a grudge or malign political motive, can resort to violence in order to achieve their aims.  Sometimes that very violence is an end in itself and the late twentieth century saw the rise of terrorist organisations whose aim was to create as much destruction and bloodshed as possible.  The late 1960s saw Palestinian terrorism on the rise, closely followed by the radical left wing European groups such as the Red Army faction.  Later, there came the mercenary types such as Abu Nidal and Carlos the Jackal.  Finally there came the extremist Islamic groups:  Al Qaeda and Isis.But the tactics of all these groups flowed from the post-Colonial era, when kidnapping, hostage-taking and car bombings were the norm, and often achieved results.  This then is the blood-soaked trail, and the placing of terrorist incidents in the context of wider asymmetric threats.  Terrorism can be a tool of both the deranged individual and the oppressive state.  We ignore such threats at our peril.

The Real News Podcast
From Haiti to Minneapolis, anti-colonial resistance catches white supremacy by surprise

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 57:57


Read the transcript of this podcast: https://therealnews.com/from-haiti-to-minneapolis-anti-colonial-resistance-catches-white-supremacy-by-surpriseResistance is everywhere, but everywhere a surprise, especially when the agents of struggle are the colonized, the enslaved, the wretched of the earth. Anticolonial revolts and slave rebellions have often been described by those in power as “eruptions”—volcanic shocks to a system that does not, cannot, see them coming. In his new book, Anticolonial Eruptions: Racial Hubris and the Cunning of Resistance, Geo Maher diagnoses a paradoxical weakness built right into the foundations of white supremacist power, a colonial blind spot that grows as domination seems more complete. TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez interviews Maher about his book and what understanding the dynamics of anticolonial eruptions, past and present, can tell us about the historical moment we're in and the task ahead of us.Geo Maher is an organizer, writer, radical political theorist, co-editor of the Duke University Press series Radical Américas, and Visiting Associate Professor at Vassar College. He is the author of numerous books, including We Created Chávez: A People's History of the Venezuelan Revolution; Building the Commune: Radical Democracy in Venezuela; Decolonizing Dialectics; A World Without Police; and Anticolonial Eruptions: Racial Hubris and the Cunning of Resistance.Pre-Production/Studio: Dwayne GladdenPost-Production: Adam ColeyHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Think 100%: The Coolest Show on Climate Change
S4 Ep:16 Geography is Colonial w/ Francisca Rockey

Think 100%: The Coolest Show on Climate Change

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 47:54


The study of geography implies that the space we exist in is natural. However, colonialism, capitalism and cisheteropatriarchy have spatially engineered the current world.  Examples of this include borders, limited access to green space, redlining, food apartheids and sacrifice zones. Francisca Rockey, founder of Black Geographers, speaks to Rev Yearwood about the role of geography in politics, how colonial the discipline  is, and allies taking up space. Support: https://www.blackgeographers.com/ The Coolest Show – brought to you by Hip Hop Caucus Think 100% PODCASTS – drops new episodes every Monday on environmental justice and how we solve the climate crisis. Listen and subscribe here or at TheCoolestShow.com! Follow @Think100Climate and @RevYearwood on Instagram, Twitter, and Instagram.

Mainely History
Beer in Colonial Maine with Emerson Baker

Mainely History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 56:42


Ian joins Emerson Baker on a special on the road episode featuring discussion of beer and other alcoholic drinks in colonial Maine, as well as tasting some modern "heritage" brews.

The Ron Burgundy Podcast
Anderson .Paak

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 52:20


Anderson .Paak agrees to do the podcast. WARNING: This episode was haunted by a ghost.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

For The Wild
Dr. LARRY WARD on Healing the Colonial Mind /296

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


In this episode of For The Wild podcast, we plumb into racial karma and healing systemic trauma in the American context with guest Dr. Larry Ward. Covering the neuroscience of trauma, the habit of racism, and various typologies of systemic trauma, Dr. Ward provides insight into how we might consciously choose to activate our neuroplasticity toward justice rather than collectively rewarding our neuroplasticity for violence and oppression. We are reminded in this episode that we are more than our colonial traumatic memory; we are, in fact, part of the one living reality of the natural world. According to Dr. Ward, cultivating a spiritual practice of awareness of our embeddedness with the world allows us to transcend the conditioning of the colonial mind. Harkening to the potential for anima mundi, the creation of a new world soul, we are invited to lead in the direction of the positive deconstruction of the current world order and to be vigilant in putting our minds and behaviors toward creating generative possibilities for the planet and generations to come. Dr. Larry Ward (he/him) is a senior teacher in Buddhist Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh's Plum Village tradition, author of the book America's Racial Karma, and co-author with his wife Peggy of Love's Garden, A Guide To Mindful Relationships. Dr. Ward brings twenty five years of international experience in organizational change and local community renewal to his work as director of the Lotus Institute and as an advisor/dharma teacher. He holds a PhD in Religious Studies with an emphasis on Buddhism and the neuroscience of meditation. Larry is a knowledgeable, charismatic and inspirational teacher, offering insights with personal stories and resounding clarity that express his dharma name, “True Great Sound.” Music by Daniela Lanaia, Curran Runz, Lady Moon and the Eclipse, and The New Runes Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Summer Blockbusters: Apocalypto - Dirt 199

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 74:10


Amber guides Anna through the jungle of the 2006 film Apocalypto...but hopefully a little less racistly than director Mel Gibson did! We'll talk about human sacrifice, what was (and was not) going on in Maya culture in the 15th century CE, and the movie's ending that couldn't be more on the nose if it went “boop!” Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links The Story of Civilization (via Wikipedia) With help from a friend, Mel cut to the chase (The Washington Post) Mel Gibson criticizes Iraq war at film fest (Today) Is Apocalypto Pornography? (Archaeology) Relativism, Revisionism, Aboriginalism, and Emic/Etic Truth: The Case Study of Apocalypto (The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare) The perduring Maya: new archaeology on early Colonial transitions (Antiquity, via ResearchGate) Maya Resistance to Colonial Rule in Everyday Life (The Latin American Anthropological Review) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Dirt Podcast
Summer Blockbusters: Apocalypto - Ep 199

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 74:10


Amber guides Anna through the jungle of the 2006 film Apocalypto...but hopefully a little less racistly than director Mel Gibson did! We'll talk about human sacrifice, what was (and was not) going on in Maya culture in the 15th century CE, and the movie's ending that couldn't be more on the nose if it went “boop!” Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Links The Story of Civilization (via Wikipedia) With help from a friend, Mel cut to the chase (The Washington Post) Mel Gibson criticizes Iraq war at film fest (Today) Is Apocalypto Pornography? (Archaeology) Relativism, Revisionism, Aboriginalism, and Emic/Etic Truth: The Case Study of Apocalypto (The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare) The perduring Maya: new archaeology on early Colonial transitions (Antiquity, via ResearchGate) Maya Resistance to Colonial Rule in Everyday Life (The Latin American Anthropological Review) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Hablemos de Terror
El callejón del muerto | Relato Colonial de terror

Hablemos de Terror

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 17:42


Hola terroríficos como les va ? muchas gracias por estar al pendiente de nuestro podcast, hoy les comparto un relato colonial "El callejón del muerto", recuerden que si quieren apoyarnos nos ayudaría mucho que se suscribieran a nuestro canal de youtube!!, así que disfruten y recuerden que pueden compartir sus experiencias a nuestro correo:tuhistoria@hablemosdeterror.comO a nuestra página de Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/hablemosdeterrorSi les gusta nuestro contenido no duden en suscribirse ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Sigan nuestro Instagram !!https://www.instagram.com/terrorpodcast/Bienvenidos

The John Batchelor Show
#PRC: Neo-colonial cadres on an African tour. Charles Burton, senior Fellow at the Centre for Advancing Canada's Interests Abroad at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 10:22


Photo: #PRC: Neo-colonial cadres on an African tour. Charles Burton, senior Fellow at the Centre for Advancing Canada's Interests Abroad at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://amp.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/3185515/chinese-diplomats-flock-africa-response-western-charm https://www.politico.com/news/2022/07/15/biden-china-saudi-us-00045722

Rejects & Revolutionaries: The origins of America
Restoration 11: Rumors of colonial independence

Rejects & Revolutionaries: The origins of America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 45:44


After the Willoughby brothers, the king imposed governors in Barbados who he expected to be loyal to him instead of the colony.  The first two backfired in dramatically different ways, one siding with the colonists, and the other descending into embarrasing levels of tyranny and corruption.   Website (transcripts)  

NPR's Book of the Day
'Covered in Night' compares colonial and Indigenous approaches to justice

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 10:13 Very Popular


In this episode, we're going back in time to 1722 to examine the different approaches to justice between Native Americans and Pennsylvania colonists in the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America by historian Nicole Eustace. In an interview with Here & Now's Scott Tong, Eustace discusses how reparative justice has deep roots in American history.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Summer in New England

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 164:32


Today on Boston Public Radio: Jon Gruber discusses the latest on inflation, including the potential strategies of the Federal Reserve Bank and why the middle class is being left behind. He also explains the economic impacts of government failure and whether the US is heading in that direction. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” Then, we ask listeners how they're dealing with rising inflation. Stephanie Leydon and Sarah Betancourt talk about their reporting on housing inflation and scarcity in Massachusetts from their new series “Priced Out,” and share about some of the stories they've looked into so far. Leydon is the Director of Special Projects at GBH. Betancourt is a reporter for GBH News. Then, we take listener calls responding to the housing crisis in Massachusetts.  Jared Bowen shares the latest in the Boston arts scene, including Neil Diamond's 'Beautiful Noise' at the Colonial, Michael R. Jackson's “A Strange Loop,” which just premiered on Broadway, the immersive show “Beyond King Tut” at the SoWa Power Station and ProBlak Gibbs' new mural on the Greenway “Breathe Life Together.” Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Matt Gertz talks about the link between right-wing media and today's politics, including Fox News' response to the Jan 6th hearings, its relationship to former President Donald Trump and criticism of Pete Buttigieg's recent interview. Gertz is a senior fellow for Media Matters for America, which reports on news from the conservative media landscape.   Mitra Kaboli and Ben Riskin preview their new podcast, “Welcome to Provincetown.” They share their inspiration for creating the podcast, and reflect on the stories they tell in it and their own experiences in the town. Kaboli is an audio documentarian, sound designer & artist, who hosts and co-created Welcome to Provincetown. Riskin is the principal of Room Tone, an audio advisory providing strategy consulting, business development, and management services to enterprise and independent podcasters, he co-created Welcome to Provincetown.  We end the show by asking listeners what makes summer in New England great.

For The Wild
KYLE WHYTE on the Colonial Genesis of Climate Change [ENCORE] /295

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 Very Popular


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Dr. Kyle Whyte originally aired in January of 2020. The United States has more miles of pipeline than any other country in the world. Pipeline construction is one of the many ways in which the U.S. continues terraforming the land in support of ongoing settler colonialism. On this episode of For The Wild, we are joined by Kyle Whyte to discuss this very issue in connection to the vast extractive energy network that surrounds the Great Lakes area. Kyle Whyte is Professor and Timnick Chair in the Humanities in the departments of Philosophy and Community Sustainability at Michigan State University. Music by Cary Morin & Bonnie "Prince" Billy Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description,references, and action points