Podcasts about Williamsburg

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  • 1,036PODCASTS
  • 1,916EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Williamsburg

Show all podcasts related to williamsburg

Latest podcast episodes about Williamsburg

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast
Season 2 - The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 36

The Epic Order of the Seven - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:42


Patrick Henry is stuck! As he prepares for his big trip to Williamsburg in pursuit of his law license he needs a dependable horse - so the Epic animals team up with a sticky solution to get him unstuck!  The Order of the Seven animal team helps birth one nation under God by entering the lives of a unique generation of children chosen to become the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. Each episode is hosted by Max, Liz and Nigel – and includes a selection from the audiobook, “The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key!” For your very own copy of the audiobook, written by Jenny L. Cote, read by our own “Announcer Lad” Denny Brownlee – go to Audible.com. Just click here:  http://bitly.ws/cik6 (http://bitly.ws/cik6) And if you'd like to help ensure this podcast can continue to bless future listeners – please consider supporting Playful World Ministries and this podcast through: https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee (https://actintl.givingfuel.com/brownlee) And we'd love to hear from you, too! Email: Jenny@epicorderoftheseven.com This episode features: 1:22 - After an awkward introduction - Max, Liz, & Nigel find out they'll be receiving gifts! 3:49 - The Voice, the Revolution, & the Key - Chapter 36 – “Sweet on Miz P." 31:33 - Nigel's News Nuggets - horsepower in the 18th century 33:33 - Jenny's Corner - how to recharge your creative "batteries." 37:43 - The Epic animals and Announcer Lad all receive their gifts - and find out why - courtesy of Miz P! Support this podcast

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Thanks to online shopping Black Friday is not what it used to be... A fire in Williamsburg rips through an apartment building... A local landlord gives back to his neighborhoods retailers and tenets at the same time

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 3:11


November 26 2021 All Local  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
New Variant Causes The Market To Tumble; It's Black Friday-Are The Stores Packed?; Williamsburg and Neptune See Thanksgiving Fires

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 6:37


The All Local,.12 pm Update  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mind Over Murder
BONUS: True Crime Bookshelf: Best Books (Part 1)

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 49:52


Join Mind Over Murder hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley for a bonus episode as they provide their True Crime Bookshelf: Best Book recommendations. All of the ideas you need for any true crime fan on your holiday list. This is Part 1 of 2.Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Featured Case from Othram and DNAsolves.com:Walker County Sheriff's Office and Othram Team to Identify Walker County Jane Doe https://dnasolves.com/articles/walker_county_jane_doe/?fbclid=IwAR1GtEMwZNtnRG91Yjr_NxeNkEL8Ndq2z3N4uOMTYyfAmlrDFREeech4AUgYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase4 new episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders New Colonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com New Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

Virginia History Podcast
First Families of Virginia - The Custises Part 2

Virginia History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 75:04


In which the Custis influence from the time of John Custis IV to George Washington Parke Custis is discussed.

Virginia History Podcast
First Families of Virginia - The Custises Part 1

Virginia History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:02


In which the Custis family foundations up to John Custis IV of Williamsburg are discussed.

Southern Gothic
The Peyton Randolph House Hauntings (Minisode)

Southern Gothic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:13


In this Southern Gothic: Minisode we return to Williamsburg, Virginia to explore the most haunted residence in the four-century-old colonial town-- the Peyton Randolph House. Help Southern Gothic grow by becoming a Patreon Supporter today! Website: SouthernGothicMedia.com Merch Store: https://www.southerngothicmedia.com/merch Pinterest @SouthernGothicMedia Facebook: @SouthernGothicMedia Instagram: @SouthernGothicMedia Twitter: @SoGoPodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Who The Hell Are We?
Baby John Wayne

Who The Hell Are We?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:17


Ed in Chicago, Melanie in Williamsburg, watching old movies and dishing on them! This week's movie: BABY FACE (1933) starring Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent, Theresa Harris, and baby John Wayne. Mel and Ed make book recommendations with similar themes. Send podcast comments and suggestions to Melanded@whothehellarewe.com Don't forget to subscribe to the show!

The Speakeasy
Another Christmas Miracle

The Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:01


Founder of new Brooklyn spot Thief, John McNulty joins us to talk about the trials of opening a bar during a pandemic and how he's hoping we can steal back lost time with the aid of a 12 foot inflatable grinch. Plus, the New York Times reports that there are rats in New York City, who knew? Please SUBSCRIBE and RATE the show if you can. Join us each week as we sit down with a wide range of hospitality and spirits experts from around the world to discuss everything that impacts our business. FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM:Damon Boelte @DamonBoelteSother Teague @CreativeDrunkGreg Benson @100ProofGregSpeakeasy Podcast @SpeakeasyPodcastFOLLOW US ON TWITTER: Sother Teague @CreativeDrunk SpeakeasyRadio @SpeakeasyRadio#HRN10Years #DrinkingOnTheRadioHeritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Speakeasy by becoming a member!The Speakeasy is Powered by Simplecast.

The Line
Talea Beer Co.

The Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 67:14


On today's episode, Eli is joined by Tara Hankinson and LeAnn Darland, the founders of Talea Beer Co. After several years of planning, fundraising, and overcoming the many roadblocks it takes to get a physical location up and running, they opened the Talea Brewery and Taproom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, in March of 2021. Talea is the only exclusively woman and veteran-owned and founded production brewery (and taproom) in NYC. We discuss balancing work and family, ABV, opening during the pandemic, and their future expansion plans.Photo Courtesy of Talea Beer.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Line by becoming a member!theLINE is Powered by Simplecast.

Mind Over Murder
Colonial Parkway Murders Report: One Killer or Four?

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 43:29


Join Mind Over Murder hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley as they provide a status report on the Colonial Parkway Murders. Is it one killer or four or more offenders? Where does the Colonial Parkway Murders case go from here? What do the families want? Is the search for answers the same as the search for justice?New Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCheck out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/New Story on Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasNext year's CrimeCon will be held April 29-May 1, 2022 in Las Vegas. We will be there!Details: https://www.crimecon.com/cc22Featured Case from Othram and DNAsolves.com:Walker County Sheriff's Office and Othram Team to Identify Walker County Jane Doe https://dnasolves.com/articles/walker_county_jane_doe/?fbclid=IwAR1GtEMwZNtnRG91Yjr_NxeNkEL8Ndq2z3N4uOMTYyfAmlrDFREeech4AUgYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase4 new episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlNew Colonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com New Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Nehemiah Persoff and The Actors Studio

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 21:30


TVC 558.1: Part 2 of a conversation that began last week with James Rosin, author of the novellas Butterfly and Belle Garden Beat and the publisher of The Many Faces of Nehemiah, the memoirs of his cousin Nehemiah Persoff, one of the greatest and most versatile character actors of the twentieth century. Topics this segment include Persoff's long association with the Actors Studio in New York, and the important lesson he learned early in his career about the difference between acting for the stage and acting on film. James Rosin is scheduled to appear at the Williamsburg Nostalgia Fest, Nov. 11 through Nov. 13 in Williamsburg, VA. Want to advertise/sponsor our show? TV Confidential has partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle advertising/sponsorship requests for the podcast edition of our program. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started: https://www.advertisecast.com/TVConfidentialAradiotalkshowabout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2136: Williamsburg Music

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:49


Episode: 2136 Hi-Tech in 1740: The Musical Instrument Maker of Williamsburg.  Today, we make the machines that make our music.

Who The Hell Are We?
More Wedding Content!

Who The Hell Are We?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 53:03


Podcasting from Chicago and Williamsburg, Mel and Ed are *still* popping popcorn, watching old movies and dishing on them! This week's movie: FATHER OF THE BRIDE (1950) starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett, Elizabeth Taylor, Billie Burke, and Leo G. Carroll. Mel and Ed make book recommendations with similar themes. Send podcast comments and suggestions to Melanded@whothehellarewe.com Don't forget to subscribe to the show!

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
The Many Faces of Nehemiah Persoff

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 23:48


TVC 557.2: James Rosin, publisher of The Many Faces of Nehemiah, continues his discussion with Ed about the stage, screen and television career of his cousin, actor Nehemiah Persoff. Jim is scheduled to appear at the Williamsburg Nostalgia Fest, Nov. 11 through Nov. 13 in Williamsburg, VA. Want to advertise/sponsor our show? TV Confidential has partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle advertising/sponsorship requests for the podcast edition of our program. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started: https://www.advertisecast.com/TVConfidentialAradiotalkshowabout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Every Damn Thing
67. In-N-Out Burger, Portmanteaus (w/ Matt Hock)

Every Damn Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 39:14


Phil and Jake are joined by returning guest Matt Hock (from Space Cadet & The Explosion) to rank In-N-Out Burger, and word mash-ups aka portmanteaus on the List of Every Damn Thing.Get Space Cadet's record “Lion On A Leash” on Wiretap Records, listen to them on Spotify, and follow them on Instagram (@space_cadet_band). And go to one of their upcoming shows!If you have something to add to the list, email it to list@everydamnthing.net (or get at us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).SHOW NOTES: In the episode, Phil talks about @tweakseason on TikTok. Phil doesn't have TikTok but he has a summary of @tweakseason's activities on his desk every Monday morning. Here's a youtube compilation it's in the genre of "guy walking around NYC". Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser is a book about fast food in America. We read it a long time ago but we remember it was heavy on the Carl's Jr. One of the last chapters is about how everything they just said about how bad the industry is doesn't really apply to In-N-Out - they pay their workers better, produce better quality food, etc. Shake Shack is a fast-casual hamburger chain based in NYC (which is now nationwide). According to Phil, the burger is better than In-N-Out but it costs three times as much.  We mention Taqueria Diana in Williamsburg again. Go there. Dick's is the place where the cool hang out. The swass like to play, and the rich flaunt clout. It's a burger place in Seattle. In an alternate universe it took off in popularity instead of In-N-Out. Sir Mix-A-Lot is a Seattle-based rapper and HAM radio enthusiast. Waffle House is an all-day breakfast chain based in the Southeast. When fights happen at Waffle House, they often end up on social media. Veggie Grill is a vegetarian fast food chain on the West Coast, as well as in New York and Massachusetts. It's pretty much wherever coastal elites like to be, and it's good food. Taco Time is a Mexican fast food chain in the western U.S., but not California. El Pollo Loco deserves to be ranked later. It's Phil's favorite fast-food chain. "Thighvertising" came up in Phil's search for portmanteaus. He admits Jake was right it should be called “adverthighsing”. James Joyce coined the term “Scandiknavery” in Finnegan's Wake'. It's pretty specific but we're looking forward to using it.  Phil thinks “pegacorn is” a bad one because "Winged Unicorn" just sounds better. Other portmanteaus discussed include “bodacious”, “throuple”, “guesstimate” and “chillax”. After plugging his own shows, Matt makes sure to plug our good friend Dave Hause's upcoming shows in November. ALSO DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:Jesus Christ * Animal Style * French fries * anti-vaxxers * * Popeye's chicken * Steven Seagal * QAnon * war * the Jersey Shore * Alice in Wonderland * Pompeii * goats * Jessica Rabbit * skorts * jorts * jeggings * Watchmen (TV series) * Below are the Top Ten and Bottom Top items on List of Every Damn Thing as of this episode (for the complete up-to-date list, go here).TOP TEN: Dolly Parton - person interspecies animal friends - idea sex - idea Clement Street in San Francisco - location Prince - person It's-It - food Cher - person Pee-Wee Herman - fictional character Donald Duck - fictional character Hank Williams - person BOTTOM TEN:204. Jenny McCarthy - person205. Jon Voight - person206. Hank Williams, Jr - person207. British Royal Family - institution208. Steven Seagal - person209. McRib - food210. war - idea211. cigarettes - drug212. QAnon - idea213. transphobia - ideaTheme song by Jade Puget. Graphic design by Jason Mann. This episode was produced & edited by Jake MacLachlan, with audio help from Luke Janela. Show notes by Jake MacLachlan & Phil Green.Our website is everydamnthing.net and we're also on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Email us at list@everydamnthing.net. 

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television
Nehemiah Persoff and "Less is More"

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 19:30


TVC 557.2: James Rosin, publisher of The Many Faces of Nehemiah, continues his discussion with Ed about the stage, screen and television career of his cousin, actor Nehemiah Persoff. Jim is scheduled to appear at the Williamsburg Nostalgia Fest, Nov. 11 through Nov. 13 in Williamsburg, VA. Want to advertise/sponsor our show? TV Confidential has partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle advertising/sponsorship requests for the podcast edition of our program. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started: https://www.advertisecast.com/TVConfidentialAradiotalkshowabout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Schneps Connects
Building a “Strike” of an Empire with Charley Ryan, Founder of Brooklyn Bowl

Schneps Connects

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 35:14


Charley Ryan, co-owner of Brooklyn Bowl on Wythe Avenue in Williamsburg was born on the South Side of Chicago and was raised in Battle … Read More

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 75: Tango Alpha Lima: The Pink Tax, Marines and vaccines, and military AWOL weapons problems

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 41:56


Ashley educates the guys about the “Pink Tax” on uniforms for military women, and the FATIGUES Act that proposes and end to the disparity. Jeff shares the latest chapter in the continuing saga of vaccines for members of the military: Marines facing consequences for vaccine refusals. CV still can't figure out why the military can't keep track of their weapons, and neither can Congress, who is imposing new rules to force America's armed services to keep better track of their guns and explosives. RAPID FIRE VA hiring spree to tackle an expected surge in backlogged benefits claims Special Honor Flight trips honor service of women and Black veterans American Legion Baseball Alums featured in MLB World Series DOL encouraging partners to expand services for transitioning veterans and spouses

Talking Sopranos
Episode #84 "Chasing It"

Talking Sopranos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 147:26


     This week Michael and Steve welcome Robert back to the podcast. His work on the series was absolutely incredible, but to this day has never actually seen the show. He talks about his lifelong friendship with Jamie-Lynn Sigler and their Pajama Pants podcast. He also shares his thoughts about the entertainment business and why he decided to get out.      Then Michael and Steve get into this week's episode, Tony Soprano takes another step toward the dark side, AJ and Blanca hit a rocky road and Hesh sees Tony for what he really is..Talking Sopranos #84 “Chasing It” S7- Ep4. Pick up your copy WOKE UP THIS MORNING: The Definitive Oral History of the Sopranos on November 2nd wherever books are sold…..Michael and Steve will be signing copies Tuesday November 2nd at 7pm at the Bookends Bookstore in Ridgewood, New Jersey http://www.book-ends.comMichael and Steve will also be holding a virtual event through Barnes and Nobel on Monday November 8th at 7pm.https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnes-amp-noble-17337409237 Now's your chance to enter the Talking Sopranos Superfan Contest and join Michael and Steve on the podcast. Just go to talkingsopranos.com or click the link below and tell us in 150 words or less why you are a Talking Sopranos Superfan and what you think happened at the end of the series. Entries are due by November 1st at midnight.https://www.talkingsopranos.com/fancontest Check out Comedy and Conversations with the Sopranos Live. Get your tickets today!https://www.ticketmaster.com/in-conversation-with-the-sopranos-tickets/artist/2683319 See Zopa live Saturday November 6th at Baby's Alright in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, N.Y.http://babysallright.com https://www.talkingsopranos.comhttps://bluechew.comhttps://www.betterhelp.com/talkinghttps://www.xchairtalking.comhttps://www.shopify.com/sopranos 

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear
Parashat Chayeh Sarah: Pipelines of Beracha

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


The pasuk says in this week's parasha Chaye Sarah , “ ויבוא אברהם לספוד לשרה ולבכותה– Avraham came to eulogize Sarah and cry for her." The Midrash Tanchuma says the eulogy that Avraham gave was the Eshet Chayil . One of the pasukim which he said was, “ותקם בעוד לילה ותתן טרף לביתה– she got up in the middle of the night and provided food for her family. It refers to when Avraham woke up early to go to do the Akeida . He told Sarah that they were going on a mission to do the will of Hashem and so she woke up in the middle of the night to prepare food for them for their journey. The Yesod Vishoresh Ha'Avodah writes another explanation of that pasuk ; whoever is able to pick himself בעוד לילה – while it is still dark, while he's in a dark time in his life, and re-energize himself to serve Hashem with all of his strength, in that merit, ותתן טרף לביתה – he'll have enough sustenance for him and his family. When people go through difficult financial times, they have a hard time focusing on avodat Hashem because they are too preoccupied with worry and stress. If they could rise above it and serve Hashem better than ever, that could be the zechut that they need to open the pipelines of beracha. Hashem could help a person in any situation, we should never feel like our parnasa has to come from any given place – הרבה שלוחים למקום . I read a story in the Machon Shaar HaBitachon about a man whose wife works as a kindergarten teacher, earning 9000 shekels per month. Together with his small stipend from a kollel, they manage to support their large family of nine children. Before Pesach this past year, she was told that because of all the lockdowns and missing school, they would not be paying one month of her salary. This couple strengthened their emunah and said to themselves, the same Hashem who has always taken care of our Pesach expenses in the past will once again take care of them this year. They prayed hard and increased their efforts in avodat Hashem, which was not an easy task for people who live month to month and did not know how they were going to pay for their immediate expenses. A few days later, a friend of this man told him he wanted to help him out for Pesach and asked him how much he normally spent on his matzot. The man answered, “Around 500 shekels,” and thanked his friend for his offer. That evening, his friend came by and dropped off an envelope. When he opened it later he saw there were 1600 shekels in it. Then, the next day, they got a call that his wife was deemed eligible for compensation for breaking her hand two years before at her school. At that time, they applied for work related injury compensation, but they were denied. Now, two years later, out of nowhere, they were told that their request was recently brought up again and this time they deemed it eligible for compensation. They deposited exactly 7,400 shekels into their account, which along with what the friend gave them gave them a grand total of 9000 shekels, exactly what they got every month. Hashem has many ways of helping us. There was another story written there about a talmid chacham from Yerushalayim who needed some money to cover his daughter's wedding expenses. For his hishtadlut, he called up a friend of his who lives in Williamsburg who was also a Torah scholar and told him about his situation. The friend didn't have the money to help him himself, but he told him he would keep his eyes open for potential donors. The very next day, the rabbi from Williamsburg was sitting in the beit midrash learning when two men walked in and began learning two rows in front of him. He overheard one man tell the other, “I wish I knew someone else who was marrying off a child the same time I am.” After they finished learning, this rabbi went over to them and asked about that comment. The man replied he was marrying off his youngest son in a month and wanted to cover a poor couple's wedding expenses as a merit for his own couple. The rabbi told him about his friend in Yerushalayim and it turned out both weddings were scheduled for the exact same night. Later on they calculated how much money was needed and this man sent the full amount $7500 to Yerushalayim to help that talmid chacham in need. הרבה שלוחים למקום . Hashem has many ways of helping. It's up to us to pick ourselves up when times are hard and continue serving Hashem with all our energy. B'ezrat Hashem, that will open the pipelines of beracha and bring down more parnasa .

Belle, Book & Candle
S4 E12: Ghost Tales for the Thinning Veil | A Southern Dialogue with DC O'Rourke

Belle, Book & Candle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 41:40


Haunted tales from an experienced storyteller, ghost tour guide, and paranormal investigator - what more could you want this Samhain? DC talks about his one-sided ghostly romance, experiences at the Williamsburg public jail, the haunted nursing home where he picked up more than he bargained for, and perhaps the most famous ghost he's ever met in this episode. Plus, we chat about whether spirit activity really picks up during Samhain-tide, protecting ourselves when interacting with ghosts, spirit attachments and being an empath as well as a paranormal investigator! Come in for the spine-tingling tales! OUR GUEST Denny O'Rourke, or DC as he is known professionally, is an acclaimed ghost storyteller who's been chasing after ghosts his entire life. When he isn't telling stories he is researching and investigating the paranormal. He's also the host of Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal where he tells haunting tales from across the world. https://linktr.ee/hauntinglyyoursparanormal CONTACT MELA www.podpage.com/belle-book-candle FB & IG @bellebookcandlesc YT: Belle, Book & Candle Support by becoming a patron: www.patreon.com/bellebookcandle Or, buy Mela a coffee! www.buymeacoffee.com/bellebookcandle Interested in our upcoming Greenwild Festival on November 13, 2021? Check it out here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/greenwild-festival-for-witches-mystics-tickets-152286885173 CREDITS My dad wrote the lyrics to my theme song, and we sing it together at the beginning. Thanks to my husband for his contributions. Thank you to our guest, DC O'Rourke Original Broadcast: 10.27.21 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bellebookcandle/support

Political Misfits
Vaccine Giants Deny Licenses; Ethiopia Conflict; Release of JFK Records Delayed

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 114:03


Dr. Iyabo Obasanjo, professor of public health at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA, talks to us about vaccine giants Moderna and Pfizer refusing to grant licenses for their mRNA technology to developing countries, arguing that they lack the infrastructure and technological know-how to produce vaccines. We talk about how this is just another move to monopolize vaccine production and protect profits, even after these companies are regular recipients of public funds, and how many countries do in fact have the capacity to produce vaccines. We also talk about the controversy surrounding Dr. Anthony Fauci's statements last year related to the origins of the virus, new theories about lab leaks, and whether these can actually hold water. Journalist Hermela Aregawi joins us to talk about the ongoing conflict in Ethiopia and the Tigray region, where the Tigray People's Liberation Front are taking an increasingly aggressive stance, and how Western media have failed in presenting a balanced view of the conflict, sometimes to point of sounding like TLPF spokespeople. We discuss how famine has been weaponized and loosely used by Western media in order to demonize the Ethiopian government, and how allegations that the government has blocked aid have been fueled by international aid organizations and the UN without properly verifying the evidence in these allegations. We also talk about how there has been a lack of reporting on the migrant crisis and flow into Sudan, and the completion of the Grand Renaissance Dam, which has region-wide implications. Dan Lazare, journalist and writer, joins us to talk about the Biden administration again delaying the release of government records on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, citing the COVID-19 pandemic as one of the reasons for the delay, and what new revelations, if any, could come to light once these records are released. We also talk about the U.S. obsession with placing sanctions on countries it does not like, even after it's been revealed that, beyond inflicting misery on populations, sanctions are not an effective geo-political tool, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey predicting hyperinflation coming in the US and the world.

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast
Concerns of a Cold War with China

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


Is the United States about to enter into another cold war, this time with China? Is it already happening? Tensions are growing after reports last week that the communist nation recently launched a hypersonic missile that is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, a move that military and foreign affairs experts say poses a major threat to American security. This comes as China and Russia conduct joint naval military operations around Japan as well as continued saber rattling by the Chinese over the fate of Taiwan. How is the Biden administration reacting to the threats being posed by China and how worrying is that new hypersonic missile to the U.S. and allies in the region? Reporter Brody Carter is covering the story for CBN News and joins The Rundown today to explain. Also, one of the first black churches in America was unearthed in colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, but why was it covered up in the first place? Hear how archaeologists dug up the old buildings and why there's hope it can promote the healing that America so desperately needs right now.

The Innovative Mindset
Climate activist and award-winning actor Aria McKenna on the crucial story of our time

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 65:06


Aria McKenna on storytelling and world-changing for the climate and the environment This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset It's also brought to you by Gloria Chou's PR Starter Pack. If you want to get featured in the media, this is your best first step. I've used these techniques to get featured in magazines, newspapers, and podcasts. They work! https://izoldat.krtra.com/t/so6Aw0yCuva4 Aria McKenna is an actress, writer and producer turned climate advocate. She founded Global Cooling Productions and is in development with several mission-driven projects. She trained with Al Gore as part of his Climate Reality Leadership Corps and has studied, worked, and presented with organizations such as The American Sustainable Business Council, Citizens Climate Lobby, American Renewable Energy DAY, EarthX, and the Cooperative Impact Social Innovation Conference. She is currently working with the Healthy Climate Alliance and the Planetary Restoration Action Group to advocate for an emergency three-pronged approach to restore the climate to safe levels. Connect with Aria Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/revolutionearth/ Website: https://www.ariamckenna.com/index.html Petition on Climate change  Global Cooling Productions' Patreon  Episode transcript [00:00:00] Aria McKenna: I feel like there is an incredible power in storytelling and that the media can be used to help pull people along and to engage them long enough to get them to have a deeper understanding of the situation. And to care deeply about changing it. [00:00:29] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you relax, focus, meditate, and even sleep. [00:00:49] I love it and have been using it to write, create, and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative [00:01:00] mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word, and now let's get to the show. [00:01:13] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg, I'm your host, and I'm thrilled that you're here. I'm also thrilled and honored and think this is so important. So you need to know that to welcome my guests this week. Aria McKenna is an actress writer and producer turned climate. [00:01:32] Catnip to me, as you know, she founded global cooling productions and is in development with several mission-driven projects. She trained with Al gore as part of his climate reality leadership core and a studied work and presented with organizations such as the American sustainable business council. [00:01:49] Citizens' climate lobby, American renewable energy day, earth X, and the cooperative impact social innovation conference. She's currently working with the healthy climate Alliance and the [00:02:00] planetary restoration action group to advocate for an emergency three pronged approach to restore the climate to safe levels, such important work aria. [00:02:09] I'm so glad that you're here. I'm so glad that you're doing the work that you're doing. Welcome. [00:02:14] Aria McKenna: Thank you so much. It is great to be here. I have really been enjoying doing my research on you and seeing what amazing work you're doing and the commonalities we have with the voiceover background as well. I really love your, oh, [00:02:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: thank you so much. [00:02:32] And we have another commonality. I worked for years for the globe program, which was a, it's a joint NASA NOAA NSF program. K through 12, designed to teach students all about, uh, the environment, the earth. And it was, the idea was started by Al gore in his book earth in the balance. So we sort of have Al gore in common as well. [00:02:53] Oh, [00:02:53] Aria McKenna: wow. I love that. Yeah. I know you've been doing some education. I also did some educational outreach [00:03:00] with the Cleo Institute. Ah, fabulous. [00:03:04] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It's such important work. It really is. And, and, you know, I want to just, I want to jump right in and I mean, obviously this is important work and we know that the G 20 summit is happening at the end of the week in Rome. [00:03:19] So I want to talk to you about what, what importance you think the these countries can play in bringing the climate back to safe level. [00:03:31] Aria McKenna: Yeah, no, thank you. Um, it is absolutely huge and so important that we get countries on the same page together to create a collective action plan that actually has the power to restore the current. [00:03:53] Um, as part of a healthy climate Alliance and the political, the planetary [00:04:00] restoration action group, we are working to help forward the mission of educating people about the difference between climate restoration and reducing climate change to less than two degrees, which right now is what the United nations has agreed to. [00:04:21] So we know that there has been some work in, in this direction. It's wonderful to get countries on board, agreeing to a goal, to deal with the climate. First of all, you know, let's just say that first. Um, but right now their goal is to reach net zero by 2050. And we know that carbon dioxide and methane do not just automatically disappear from the atmosphere on their own. [00:04:55] So we are continuing to put greenhouse gases [00:05:00] in the atmosphere. And so it's going to keep on warming and we know that warming is leading to extreme weather. Uh, what happened with hurricane Ida caused $95 billion. Just that one. So we need investments in turning this around. So what we're advocating for is a three-pronged approach to restoring the climate to safe levels. [00:05:31] Those are levels that are pre-industrial levels that humans have lived safely within for, for some time. So if we actually brought carbon dioxide down to 300 parts per million, then that is actually known to be safe. Uh, right now we've got, uh, three 50 has been a goal where we know that if you go [00:06:00] beyond three 50, it's not safe. [00:06:03] So we actually have the power, not only to reduce our carbon footprint and to reduce the amount of methane we put in the atmosphere, but we actually have the power to draw those greenhouse gases down. And as we draw them down, we help reduce warming. So those are two major steps that need to happen to move us toward climate restoration. [00:06:30] And then the planetary restoration action group has introduced the third step, which is the emergency mitigation that we need to do in response to how quickly the Arctic is melting. So right now we're looking at massive sea level rise, which is a serious environmental injustice situation, especially when it comes to small [00:07:00] nations of Florida is, is, you know, half of Florida is going to be gone. [00:07:05] So we need to deal with sea level rise as well. So if we just have goals to reduce warming, we are not doing anything to reverse sea level rise or to. Or to deal with the, uh, massive injustice that is thrust upon small countries around the world. So we are advocating for a three pronged approach that deals with the emergency situation of an escalating crisis that has completely disrupted our weather systems and led to flooding, uh, droughts, fires, uh, all around the world. [00:07:51] So, um, you know, we really need to change that goal, create a positive vision for the future and to really pull, [00:08:00] pull ourselves up by the bootstraps and create a plan to turn the situation around so that we can have a safe planet for our children. [00:08:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. Um, I'm taking all this in. Cause it's it. And here's the thing I've worked in earth science when I worked at NASA for years. [00:08:24] And so I understand all of this and I, and I get it and yet it's still, it's still overwhelming. And so the thing that I come up against, whenever I'm talking to anybody about climate change and the climate crisis is how do we get people to think long-term about this? Because we can look at today's weather and go, oh, it rained today, but it didn't rain yesterday and it's not going to rain tomorrow. [00:08:50] Those changes are easy. But when we're looking at the climate, we're looking at long-term trends and patterns and how do, how do we come up with, and, [00:09:00] and what are your thoughts on this? How do we come up with innovative ways? To get people to understand the causality there that the climate changing is what's causing some of these extreme weather events and, and wildfires and all of these other catastrophes that you mentioned just a minute ago, how do we get that causality to connect in people's minds? [00:09:27] Aria McKenna: I think that's an excellent question. And I have so many different things that pop into my mind in response to that. Uh, one of them is the importance of keeping these things in people's mind, because exactly what you say. We have these disasters and when it's on the news, people go, oh my God. Wow. Oh, I can't believe that. [00:09:53] And of course, if you're personally affected by it, that that's, that's, uh, affecting you on a whole nother level. Right. [00:10:00] But once it goes away, You go on to other things, you start thinking about other things you think about, you know, what am I going to eat? How am I going to take care of my kids? What am I going to do about these immediate things that are right in front of me? [00:10:16] So we need that kind of long-term engagement that helps to educate people and emotionally charged them to take the kinds of actions that will actually make a difference in the world. Right? So for me, personally, my personal approach to this is that I feel like there is an incredible power in storytelling and that the media can be used to help pull people along and to engage them. [00:10:58] Long enough to [00:11:00] get them to have a deeper understanding of the situation and to care deeply about changing it. So, you know, I've got some projects that I'm working on. I'm not going to go into full detail, but I do want to say that I think that when we tell stories, people, people care about people and they care about their children. [00:11:29] And, and so many people care about the planet that we live on. Right. And that's across political divides. Unfortunately, the issue of climate has absolutely been politicized. There has been a lot of misinformation propagated by the fossil fuel industry and, and other industries that, that gain to profit. [00:11:55] Right? So we're fighting a lot when it comes [00:12:00] to focusing on climate, some people are gonna hop a board, they're gonna get the connections and they're going to take action in response to those connections. But there are other people who might not get the connection ever, honestly, It might take them a lot longer. [00:12:23] And the good news is that I think there are multiple ways in because the same things that are affecting the climate are also affecting our drinking water. They're affecting the air that we breathe. They're creating childhood cancer. They are, uh, affecting people's breathing asthma emphysema. There are so many direct causalities and environmental injustices tied to [00:13:00] the fossil fuel industry. [00:13:02] That I do think that when we educate people about these issues as well, we end up getting double benefits. So I think that the, one of the things that's difficult with us when it comes to the news cycle is you talk about how many people are affected when it's a statistic. And when it's an overwhelming statistic, we shy away from it. [00:13:26] It feels overwhelming. There's nothing we can do about it. But if you tell a story about one person and how they're affected, and people care about that person and they can make connections to their own lives and how they're being affected that I think has more power when it comes to. Energizing people and inspiring people to make personal changes. [00:13:55] Does that make sense? [00:13:57] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It does. It does. Absolutely. It's [00:14:00] just the thing that, the thing that I'm concerned about as I think about what you're saying, and as I take it in is, again, that notion of, if somebody is going through surviving through a hurricane, are they going, oh, well this is due to climate change or are they going, oh, let me get to higher ground or lower ground or whatever it is I need to do to protect myself and my family. [00:14:24] Right. And then later that connection that you're talking about has to be restated or reinforced because they might not know. And so what do we do? Oh, hold on one sec. [00:14:44] I had to cough there for a second. Didn't want to cough. What do we do? To, I don't want to say befriend, but to align with these industries that traditionally either don't [00:15:00] care or don't see that, that the work that they're doing is causing. These grave and big changes on a planetary scale, right? The fossil fuel industry, isn't going anywhere for the foreseeable future. [00:15:15] Is there a way in your mind to get them to change their practices? I mean, I know farmers who are stopping doing dairy production, cow, you know, keeping cows and cows are some of the biggest methane producers. And there've been new farmers in the news recently that have said, you know what, I'm going completely vegan. [00:15:37] I'm just going to go to plant farming, things like that are happening. Do you think it is possible for the fossil fuel industry to pivot? And if so, what would it take for them to start looking at new ways, more sustainable ways of treating our home planet? Kind of. [00:15:56] Aria McKenna: Well, I think that's where the [00:16:00] international community comes in for one thing right now. [00:16:04] So many governments are subsidizing the fossil fuel industry to the tune of billions and billions of dollars. Right? [00:16:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: So, [00:16:14] Aria McKenna: and they're not giving the same kinds of funds to clean energy in general, you know, at least in this country, it's not par or it hasn't been in the past. So those are things that we need to change. [00:16:29] And fortunately, the cost for electric, uh, you know, uh, solar energy, wind, energy, electrification, all of these things, the costs have gone down so much that right now, there is so much financial incentive to actually change their ways. So it's actually, I'm trying to remember where I had read this. Oh shoot. [00:16:58] There was, um, [00:17:00] a recent, there was, there was a meeting and it had to do with the fossil fuel industry and they actually ended up coming to the conclusion. There were some, oh, I don't know if I tell the story properly. I'm sorry. Um, but, but the bottom line, I'll just say that they had come to the conclusion. [00:17:21] They realized that it was no longer in their financial benefit to continue business as usual. And there were some stakeholders who actually drew a line and said, no, we have to change. [00:17:35] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that I, that gives me some hope. It really does, you know, and you know, it's interesting what you were saying about, I have so many questions. [00:17:43] Uh, well, you were saying about storytelling is so true that if that, if we talk about, uh, climate change on a, on a global scale, or even on a city scale, when I work with kids and we'll talk about, uh, Cape town and then breaching getting very close to date day zero, where they [00:18:00] have no more water supplies and they, they keep pushing it back because the rain comes just enough. [00:18:07] The kids themselves, I was working. Remember I was working with a bunch of sixth graders. They got it. And then they went, can we ship water to. And it was a really interesting question, because then we talked about what it would take, the, the resources it would take to ship water from at this point, this was Washington DC to Cape town, South Africa. [00:18:28] And could we ship enough and all of that. And, and so talking about these stories, got the kids really interested in what they could do. They're tomorrow's decision makers. And I know that you, as you said, love stories and you started as an actor and you've transformed your mission. It sounds like to tell stories about the planet about climate. [00:18:52] And I'm just wondering, how did that happen? What made you go from I'm a performer [00:19:00] on stage or screen to I'm an advocate and an activist on behalf of the planet and the. [00:19:07] Aria McKenna: Yeah. No, thank you. Um, I'm I'm glad you asked that. Um, I'll just say to, to start off, I'll say that I grew up in Florida and Florida is absolutely beautiful. [00:19:24] I'm I'm I'm partial. Okay. We've got these incredible beautiful crystal clear Springs. We've got these incredible lakes. It's, it's a water place. Obviously we're a peninsula. I grew up in the water, swimming in the Gulf of Mexico. Uh, so these things are really important to me. I've always loved nature. Uh, it it's been a solace to me, so I actually was, you know, play, uh, down in key west. [00:19:54] I was playing Betty in summers in, in, uh, Betty summer vacation [00:20:00] and I was Snoopy diving. Um, and a, a diving, Snoopy diving. It's amazing. You don't have to get a scuba diving certificate. All you, you can be in your bathing suit and you put a snorkel on and the snorkel goes all the way up and it connects to a boat that's filled with oxygen. [00:20:25] So you just breathe the air and the boat just, it's like a little raft and it floats above you. So you can go way down. And I was exploring, uh, the world's third largest coral reef there. It was so beautiful. It was one of the most incredible experiences of my life to be down there and to feel like a fish. [00:20:47] It was, it was incredible. And I was down for about a half an hour. And when I came up, I just was like, oh my God, I'm so affected by this. This was so beautiful. [00:21:00] So incredible. And the guy. Told me that the water, her warming, he's the first person who told me about global warming. And he said that those coral reefs were dying because of the warming oceans. [00:21:20] And it just devastated me. I couldn't believe that something like this was going to be wiped out and I'd always wanted to have a daughter. It was just one of those things that was in me. And I remember that was one of my first thoughts was someday when I do have a daughter, is she going to be able to experience this? [00:21:46] This is something I would love to share with my kids, but this, this could be gone by that. So that just affected me a lot. And, but I, I went on, I did the [00:22:00] play, I moved to New York city. I started my career and moved there right before September 11th, which was a pretty intense time. Um, but the entire time I was up in New York and I remember there was the Gulf oil spill that happened, and that was absolutely devastating. [00:22:22] And meanwhile, being up in Brooklyn, I found I was having a lot of difficulty breathing, uh, because of all the traffic and, uh, you know, just the, the air pollution. And there was an oil spill up in the Queens area and I was living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and every time I went over to the water, I struggled to breathe just because of that. [00:22:47] So I had health repercussions and. I also simultaneously was seeing the Gulf of Mexico be absolutely devastated and destroyed. And that was my childhood [00:23:00] playground, you know, so just seeing so much, you know, my health being robbed by the fossil fuel industry, uh, the devastation and the goal, knowing, you know, seeing sea turtles that I knew were, were being devastated by, uh, the, the horrible oil spill. [00:23:20] So just the passion kept building in me. And, you know, after I moved to New York, I also had my daughter, my daughter Phoenix was, was born, um, after I moved to New York. So of course, as a mom, your sense of responsibility for the world that they're living in. Just becomes so much greater. So it, you know, it was a struggle back and forth for some time. [00:23:51] And I just, it just, I was getting work in TV and [00:24:00] I just started feeling like, what is the impact of the work that I'm doing? This is not having the impact that I want to have. I felt like I was being cast in things that just perpetuated fear in people and that didn't really have lasting redeeming value. [00:24:20] And then what was most important to me was to have a safe planet for my daughter into the future. And I felt like I just needed to stop standing on the sideline and I needed to get involved and I needed to figure out what it was that I could do. And so in that process, that's when I had this epiphany and I was like, you know, what, what if I created a TV series that. [00:24:48] Uh, dug into these issues that focus on the issues that matter to me and give me that opportunity to create work that I could [00:25:00] really be proud of. And so, but I didn't know nearly as much as I know now then. And so that started a process of, okay, I've got a research, I've got to learn a lot in order to be able to create the series. [00:25:16] And the series that I was working on is, is very much focused on what could that beautiful future world look like if we could turn this around. And so I had to do research into what would it take in order to. Transform this horrible trajectory that we're on right now and turn it into a much more positive trajectory. [00:25:47] So that's when I started, uh, trained with Al gore, I did the climate reality leadership Corps and that just led to all kinds of other things. And I think one of the things that has been, [00:26:00] uh, really inspiring and taught me a lot is working with the American renewable energy day. It's like a week long summit. [00:26:09] Uh, I went there, I had been invited to be on a panel, um, and. There are so many people they're doing incredible work. People who really need to be supported as well. And that's really where I learned what it would actually take technologically scientifically all the fat. Um, and then of course, we've got the cultural and the society, uh, aspects as well in order to support the types of leadership decisions that we need. [00:26:43] Um, and the industrial decisions that we need. Um, you know, sorry. So I've learned a lot in the process, so that's, that's basically where that started. [00:26:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Wow. I, you know, those kinds of things, [00:27:00] those kinds of epiphany's obviously it changed, it changed the trajectory of your life and it's changed how, how you're working in the world, which I, which I think is incredible and amazing. [00:27:13] And I love and. I keep coming back to this. How do we do it? You know, you're a storyteller. What, what role do you see? Art storytelling, music playing in change, opening minds, changing minds. I'm not sure exactly what the right way of asking the question is, but I mean, music makes me cry on a regular basis. [00:27:39] It can also inspire me. How can, how can music do it? How can storytelling do it? How can art do it? How can we use them to inspire people, to look at the earth and the climate in a different way than they otherwise might? [00:27:59] Aria McKenna: I think the [00:28:00] important part of it is that they help us to reconnect with our humanity and that ultimately caring about the planet, caring about the next generations, caring about other people on the planet. [00:28:16] You know, we need to be connected to our humanity, to our hearts in order to care enough, to do some lifting, you know, to understand that, you know, honestly, our, our personal choices are connected to this, but also what's really important is who we vote for. Um, You know, we, we need leadership. That's going to take us in the right direction and we need an educated populace in, in that. [00:28:53] So, you know, my, my part of it, when it comes to storytelling, um, I'll just talk about, without going into too [00:29:00] many details, I'll say that I have a character in, um, one of the main stories that I'm really looking for, that I, that I started working on back then, that I'm in development process with, uh, that character, first of all, is a conservative. [00:29:19] So that is, you know, a party that, uh, unfortunately there are some people within the conservative party who have been spreading a lot of climate denial. And so she starts the story off this as being really uncertain. She doesn't know what to believe and, and what to think, but she's an intelligent, compassionate, human being. [00:29:44] And so as that character gets educated, that also educates the public. Um, and I'm, I'm hoping that we've created a character that a lot of people are going to be able to identify with as [00:30:00] well and care about. Um, I think when people can see themselves in somebody else, then that helps open their heart up to another way of thinking and having some compassion, uh, getting over their prejudgments. [00:30:22] And so. I feel like that's really important to me in the storytelling as well is to create characters that both sides can identify with and not to paint people of the conservative party, for instance, in a bad light to, to understand that we're all human beings and that we all have our strengths. We all have our weaknesses and we all have room to grow. [00:30:59] You know, [00:31:00] we have opportunities for redemption. And so, so, so that's, that's one way in that I really personally identify with, and that I'm really looking forward to getting out there and being able to move to fruition where I can have some, some deeper, more public conversations about the details of the story that I've, that I've been building. [00:31:26] But I do think that also on a personal level, the more individuals start having those conversations about their own experiences, the way they're effected by the climate prices, the way they are affected by pollution, et cetera, and the things that they are personally doing in order to turn this around, hopefully that also will help give people that impetus and help bring people together at a time where people are unfortunately incredibly divided. [00:31:58] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, absolutely. [00:32:00] They, they, they, there is this incredible division. Among, uh, people who believe one way, people who believe in other way, but, but the sort of looking at it, it's funny coming back to Al gore and inconvenient truth, looking at the objective truth, we can look at the numbers and save things have been happening. [00:32:18] They've been happening, especially in the last 50 years. Looking at the global mean temperature change since 1870 to today is that it's the numbers tell a very stark story. And yet if you say to me that, uh, the UN or the G 20, whoever it is said, oh, we're going to be okay with a two degree, uh, rise in temperatures where we're looking at it for that. [00:32:48] Then how, because I, if I'm, if I'm somebody who doesn't know two degrees doesn't seem a lot, but it is right. It changed so much changes even with that two degrees. [00:33:00] So how do we get that? Notion across that, that any change going up is going to make a lot of difference, not only to us, but to the plants and, and the animals and all of the ecosystems on the planet. [00:33:21] Aria McKenna: That is an excellent question. I really appreciate that. I think that, well, for one thing, you know, let's be clear, it's not two degrees Fahrenheit. It's two degrees Celsius, which is a bigger number, but also unfortunately there have been. So many natural disasters that we've been seeing lately. And fortunately, they are finally starting to talk about it on the news. [00:33:55] It has taken so long to get them to this point where they're [00:34:00] actually speaking about it in solid terms for so long, we've had, you know, 98% consensus on manmade, global warming, and yet they've been presenting it as if it's a 50 50 concept. And we're really not sure let's talk someone who thinks this and someone who thinks that and give them equal weight in the discussion. [00:34:22] And, and of course they don't have equal weight. So we know that. Um, so fortunately some of the mainstream news narrative is finally starting to change. I really wish they had done this a long time ago. Sure. But I am hoping that that does make an impact. I think that the awareness and the concern about these issues definitely is on the rise. [00:34:49] And as more people are affected by it, and mainstream news media is starting to have more conversations about this. Hopefully that's definitely going to help people [00:35:00] understand, okay, we're starting to experience this right now. You know, I have a crop. This crop is dying because it's not getting enough water. [00:35:08] Or I have a crop it's completely devastated because we experienced this flooding. I mean, the flooding up in New York city that happened recently, I could not believe how quickly that came back came, came down. Hmm. I mean, it was insane to watch a video of someone who started filming outside their window, just as it kind of started. [00:35:38] And within a matter of minutes, they had cars just starting to float away on the street right next to them and bang into houses next to them. So I think that unfortunately it is taking a real life, wake up call in order to get people to pay attention. [00:36:00] So they're going to need to start connecting the dots with who they vote for the policies that they support and start taking some more responsibility in how people show up to the voting polls in order to make a difference for their children's future for one thing. [00:36:16] But, you know, let's be clear. It's not just our children's future. Our future, it's our present. It's our, now it's everything. It's our food systems. It's our health. It's, [00:36:29] Izolda Trakhtenberg: uh, [00:36:31] Aria McKenna: you know, when you have people, you have, you know, I read some time ago about a bacteria that because of the warming started affecting these cows and they just keeled over. [00:36:48] I mean, just, I will check it, remember the exact number. It was like hundreds or thousands of cows that just died because of the heat. So these types of things are happening. [00:37:00] And we just need to shine more of a light on it. My friend, Betsy Rosenberg, uh, actually has something that she's working on called green TV. [00:37:12] Uh, just wanna throw that out there too, because she's been trying for years and years to get the mainstream news media to pay more attention and start covering climate on more of a regular basis. And now she's having the opportunity to have those conversations to start shining a light on the things that are happening and on the. [00:37:32] Solutions that we have at our fingertips and the people and the companies who are working to forward those solutions. So you may just need to put a lot more support behind those solutions, stop funding and fueling and supporting all of the things that are contributing to the problem. Start voting for politicians who are actually gonna make a difference. [00:37:53] And then people who are into agriculture. This is one of the things that I love so much [00:38:00] is that regenerative farming and getting rid of industrial agriculture has. Enormous potential for being able to draw down carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. And then it has the by-product of making the soil healthier, making them more resilient to droughts and floods, uh, helping to regulate our weather systems. [00:38:32] I mean, it's, it's like a miracle, but the other thing that it does is when you're not using the industrial fertilizers, then you don't have this, this runoff with. So what happens is with industrialized agriculture, they're using. These chemicals that actually contribute to global warming just through the creation of produce even is [00:39:00] contributing to global warming because of industrial agriculture. [00:39:03] But if you have regenerative farming techniques, then when we are growing our produce, not only are we reducing our carbon footprint, but when it rains, we don't have as much runoff. And the runoff that occurs is not putting fertilizers into our waterways. Those, the fertilizers that go into our waterways, then go down into the oceans. [00:39:25] The Gulf of Mexico right now has fish kills thousands of miles long. Because of industrial fertilizers that have made its way from agricultural systems into the waterways and created massive algae blooms that have absorbed all the oxygen and killed our wildlife, killed our fish. So that affects fishing industry. [00:39:50] Which affects the economy, which affects people's food supplies. So it's a big circle. And the more we understand that circle [00:40:00] and we understand what the solutions are, the more people will get on board and say, yes, of course, I'm going to switch my farm to being a regenerative farm system. That's more compassionate, more humane creating food that has more vitamins, more nutrients in it. [00:40:19] And that basically makes me happier because it's, it's a system that's more respectful of nature and its systems, and that can take care of itself better. It's it's wonderful. Really, the more we learn. [00:40:39] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. Before we started, before we started recording this episode, I said that to you didn't I was like, yeah, I'm going to be saying yes. Yes, yes, yes, yes, absolutely. To pretty much everything you say. It's interesting though, the soil is a carbon sink and we get that. I understand the soil as a carbon sink and certainly global climate [00:41:00] change with the permafrost melting. [00:41:02] There's a lot more methane and CO2 being released back up into the atmosphere. So there, there, there, I, your point is well taken that it's a cycle we can look at. Uh, animals versus plants breathing, right? Plants breathe in CO2, breathe out oxygen. We breathe in oxygen and breathe out CO2. So there's a lot of, there are a lot of these systems, these cycles that go on and I make no secret of the fact that I'm vegan. [00:41:25] So thinking about the notion of the fish in the ocean, I want to leave the fish in the ocean there. And I understand that there are that there are industries that, that, um, that slaughter animals and, and have animals as part of the food and eating process. And yet when we're talking about some of these processes, like regenerative, agriculture, and planting for the soil that you have, rather than the soil that you want so that you don't need fertilizer, we're talking about [00:42:00] a real shift. [00:42:01] Right. We, in order, in order to shift our awareness and our focus to looking at the biome, looking at the bias, fear, the whole planet and seeing what needs to happen, what we need to do to make these changes. It takes, it takes a, it takes a massive shift in the minds of everybody, people who farm and people who eat. [00:42:24] And if we're not farmers, we're all eaters. So how do we do that? Right? What can, what can an average person do? And you said vote and that's great. But today, right now, if I am Jane Q public, and I want to start doing something, what's your thought, what, what can I do right now today to make a difference? [00:42:47] Aria McKenna: That's an excellent question. Um, I mean, for me personally, I think the biggest difference you can make is that if you can, uh, switch to solar panels, if you can. [00:43:00] Get off your gas, guzzler and switch to an electric vehicle. Uh, those are the types of things that of course make a really big impact. Uh, you get to dramatically cut your carbon footprint, and I've certainly heard people out there say, oh, but you know, there's problems with, with battery storage. [00:43:23] And there is, there are, it's not perfect. There, there are costs to mining. There are issues, but on the whole, you are still making a dramatic impact, not only on your carbon footprint, but you're also reducing dependence on something that is constantly polluting. So to create that initial device, there can be some costs to that, but then once you've got it made, it's just constantly generating electricity without continuing.[00:44:00] [00:44:00] To add to the problem while that electricity is being generated. So it's a, it's a huge shift in the right direction. Um, I do, I'm going to be perfectly transparent here. I was vegan for seven years and I created, I developed, created, I developed some. Issues. And so I had to stop being vegan. So for me personally, I think they're just, people have different bodies and need different things. [00:44:28] And I hated it so much when I was told I had to start eating meat again, and I, and I fought against it, but I did start feeling better after I made that switch. So that's for me. And so, because of that, I'm so supportive of regenerative agriculture as well, because not only is it much more compassionate to the animals, but it also drastically reduces the carbon [00:45:00] footprint of those animals. [00:45:02] When you do eat. If, if you are a mediator, so you can reduce your consumption and you can also be really conscious of where that food comes from, whether it's produce or whether it is animal and, uh, how that food is treated. It's not, uh, easy necessarily to find all those sources, but grass fed for instance, is definitely better than something that isn't grass fed. [00:45:32] Uh, you know, so that those are the personal choices that I, that I've had to make. Um, so yeah, uh, and also of course, recycling makes a difference. It's not being utilized at the scale that it really should be utilized at. But you definitely just want to have that consciousness, you know, the whole reduce, reuse, recycle, uh, that does make a [00:46:00] difference. [00:46:00] And I'm not sure what else to say there right now. [00:46:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It is interesting. Isn't it? When, when, when someone says, Hey, what do you think puts you on the spot? It can be a little bit challenging, but at the same time, if we were to make some of these things habits, it would change today, but it would also change in the longterm. [00:46:21] And one of the things that I advocate for is very simple. When you wash your hands, get your hands wet. Turn off the faucet. Don't keep the water running, you know, simple things like that. Every, I think it's every minute the water runs down the sink. It's eight, it's eight gallons of water. That's crazy to me. [00:46:39] I know it's crazy. We can, we can do the same when we're brushing our teeth. We can water our plants, uh, in the evening or in the early morning before the water will evaporate because of the sunshine. There's a lot of, there's a lot of stuff that you can do today right now. Yeah. That won't make that won't make a, [00:47:00] a huge dent in your time, but will make a huge dent in saving water, for example. [00:47:07] Aria McKenna: Yeah, definitely. Definitely. It's it's that thing or the more, you know, the more you're able to do, and there are so many different areas that are affected by this. So in general, like one of the areas I think is really important is just being a conscious consumer, learning about the companies that. Bye from. [00:47:27] There are some companies that are, you know, have zero waste facilities that are powered a hundred percent by clean electricity when they are operating. Uh, you know, so things like that make a, make a huge difference. Just reading, reading, reading, uh, and buying glass containers instead of plastic, whenever possible, those types of [00:48:00] choices make it make a big difference. [00:48:02] Not wasting papers. You know, things [00:48:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: like that. Absolutely. There, I mean, there are things, you know, maybe what I'll do is put together a list of certain things and put them in the, in the show notes. So that if you're interested in knowing more about the things you can do right now today to start making a difference, you'll have them in the show notes. [00:48:22] If you're listening to this, I do want to ask you something aria that I, that you mentioned something that I was like, oh, this is so cool because I don't tend to have a very I'm, I'm an optimist, but I don't tend to have a very positive vision for the future, unless things change drastically. And you said that a positive visit vision of the future is something that you want to promote that it's possible. [00:48:43] And so I was wondering how. Can that happen? How can a positive vision, because I don't know if you know who Wendy Hapgood is. She is the co-founder and director of the wild tomorrow fund. And she was on the podcast a few weeks ago, and she was talking about the same thing that, that we want to be [00:49:00] looking at a positive vision for the future, as a way of, of bringing more people into awareness about, about where we are with wildlife and the planet and, and the environment and climate. [00:49:13] What do you think that a positive vision for the future can do to mobilize people and, and to, to sort of bring all of us out of a certain sense of apathy and hopelessness? Excellent [00:49:27] Aria McKenna: question. [00:49:28] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Um, [00:49:31] Aria McKenna: um, well, I mean, I, you, you said it for, at first, I mean, whenever you're feeling hopelessness, that obviously does create a sense of apathy, which disempowered. [00:49:44] Right. And unfortunately the environmental movement for some time in order to make people aware of what a serious situation we're in, the environmental movement has painted some pretty dire pictures of the [00:50:00] direction we're heading, because unfortunately that has been the direction that we're heading. So they've been perfectly honest and they've been trying to mobilize people through fear. [00:50:09] And I think that's very understandable, but unfortunately it hasn't been yet. And I think it's done more to turn people away from the movement because people don't want to be bombed out. We're we're living in a very overwhelming world right now. There are a lot of things to be concerned about and to be afraid of. [00:50:32] I hate to say that, but, but it's true. So when you add one more thing to it, and it's something that seems a little far down the road, it's, it's not going to be as important to you, or you're going to turn away from it because you're trying to protect your health. You know, you're trying to protect your mental health. [00:50:50] So I it's, it's a shame, but I think that has been the direction we have gone. And that's been the reason why we haven't been as successful as we [00:51:00] absolutely need to be. So. It does take some concerted effort to change that dynamic. And so there were two things I'm involved with that I think are helping to move things in the right direction. [00:51:14] And one is the work with the healthy climate Alliance and with the planetary restoration action group, because they are focused on changing the goal of the United nations from let's reduce the devastating warming that we're experienced to something that might be survivable. If we're lucky to let's actually restore the planet, let's restore the climate. [00:51:38] Let's create something that we can be proud of to hand down to our next generation. We have to focus on what we want when we're creating those goals. And fortunately they have enough scientists. They have enough technology to have enough understanding to create a strategy. To actually deal with that. [00:51:59] [00:52:00] And to be honest with what kind of strategy it is that we need in order to turn this thing around. So, you know, so that's, that's one thing, um, I just wanted to say really quickly, uh, Peter for Koski has been such an inspiration to me. He's the one who brought me into the healthy climate Alliance. And he founded the foundation for climate restoration and he's one of the most optimistic, hopeful guys that I know who happens to be in the environmental movement. [00:52:31] And so that's been incredibly helpful to me because I think that being an environmentalist can be incredibly difficult. Sometimes there have definitely been times I've felt that kind of apathy and futility and frustration and fear about the direction we're heading. Yeah. So, um, so, so that's one thing I just wanted to say that I think that the work that they're [00:53:00] doing is incredibly important to it adequately understands the danger of the situation that we're in while also creating a vision for the future by changing our goals. [00:53:12] To let's reduce it from less, let's reduce damage to let's prevent let's restore let's regenerate. Let's get our ecosystems back. Let's focus on the natural systems, the technological systems, everything it is that we can do to help turn this situation around and respect the earth and protect our environment. [00:53:36] So I think that's incredibly important. And then the other thing is that through storytelling, that's what I'm focused on with, with revolution earth, with my TV series is to, uh, have an equal recognition of the dangerous situation we are currently in while also creating a beautiful, hopeful vision [00:54:00] for the future that we can all work [00:54:01] Izolda Trakhtenberg: toward. [00:54:06] I feel like going and seen. Wow. Yes, yes, absolutely. I that's just lovely and I can't wait. I can't wait to, uh, to, to watch revolution earth when it comes out. That's going to be amazing. Uh, thank you, aria. I'm so, so grateful that you took the time to. Beyond the show and to talk about what, obviously to me is a very crucial and critically important subject climate change and, and saving the planet. [00:54:37] Let's face it let's, you know, and, and actually, you know, it's interesting to me is that it's not saving the planet. The planet will be fine for another four and a half to 5 billion years. It's not the planet we're saving. The planet has gone through lots of changes. It's the plants and the animals that live on the planet, including us, that we are working to save. [00:54:55] And that's something that we need to keep in mind. Whenever we say, save the earth. Now the [00:55:00] earth will be fine. I'm selfish. I want the planet for, for me, for my cats, for the elephants, for the tigers, for the dolphins, for the birds, for the plants, for all of us. And, and I want it to be healthy for that. [00:55:14] Cause the planet, the earth will be fine for billions more years. So it's interesting to me that we think about it in those terms and it's important and I'm so glad that you're doing. To tell these stories, aria it's. So it's crucial. And, and I think it's going to be critical to our survival. So I'm, I'm grateful to you. [00:55:34] And I, I, I wanted to, if you wouldn't mind, uh, people learn differently and I know all of the information about where people can find you is going to be in the show notes, but I'd love it. If you would just list where people can find Arya, McKenna, and the incredible work that she's done. [00:55:49] Aria McKenna: Uh, thank you so much is older. [00:55:52] Uh, first of all, really great to be on the show. I'm so happy to meet you so impressed with the work that you are doing. [00:56:00] And, um, so yeah, I would say, please go to global cooling productions.com. You can learn more about the production company that I am launching in order to, uh, produce these projects that I'm working on. [00:56:18] And I would really appreciate it. If you went and supported my. Patrion page as well, which is going to be in the show notes and, uh, yeah. And, and reach out to me on Facebook, uh, you know, just all those links that will be below. Please do I appreciate the follows, uh, any contributions that that can be made would be greatly appreciated to help continue the work and, uh, yeah, just thank you so much for having me on the show and we will be putting together and open. [00:56:59] [00:57:00] As well, we don't have the site up point yet. Uh, but by the time this episode airs, there probably should be an open letter online, uh, to support, uh, that would go to members of the and also, uh, various world leaders at cop 26. So we really would love to get some, some public support for changing the international goals from less reduced, dangerous warming. [00:57:32] To less actually restore the climate and utilize the technology and the organizations that are already out there that are already existing, that are doing amazing work to restore the soil, restore the oceans, uh, through ocean permaculture, to reduce ocean acidification and help draw down downward carbon dioxide there. [00:57:53] Um, you know, there's so much that can be done that is being done by amazing people and [00:58:00] going there and supporting means so much to, to all of us and to our children. [00:58:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And that is that. Yes, absolutely. And there's, this is something that you and I talked about before. I feel a little bit like I'm about to shill for you, but I'm going to do it anyway. [00:58:18] You and I talked about this before we started recording the episode and that is that people who do the work that you're doing on behalf of the climate, or about, uh, on behalf of wildlife or on behalf of the plants or whatever it is trying to restore, trying to save, trying to nourish and nurture. A lot of people think, oh yeah, I'm doing it for the love of the game. [00:58:41] And other people will say, yes, you're doing it for the love of the game. Good for you. But honestly, let's, let's be very real. You still have to pay your rent, even if you're doing it for the love of the game, you still got to buy Catlett or at least I do. So, uh, I feel a little bit like this is a telethon, but it isn't so seriously if [00:59:00] it, you know, when you, if you're listening to this and you're kind of going, oh, should I have that latte? [00:59:06] That that latte could go to, uh, to some, to some activists, somewhere who was doing the work that will help all of us. That's something to think about. And, uh, I'm gonna, I'm going to shut my mouth on that now, but it's something that I really I've been thinking a lot more about recently that notion of, for the love of the game does not mean you are independently wealthy. [00:59:27] So anyway, [00:59:29] Aria McKenna: thank you. I absolutely. Yes, this is [00:59:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: true. Absolutely. I mean, it, it just is we're, you know, those of us, uh, who shine the light, like me and, and other people I know who are in the podcasting space, for example, you know, we ha I have an opportunity to talk to people like you who are doing this incredible work, but I always feel like. [00:59:47] Yay. And you know, you aria and I, and in so many of us, uh, so many other activists in one way or another, still have to buy cat food. Uh, so anyway, uh, but I, I have just [01:00:00] one more question cause, cause you and I could keep talking and talking and talking to you and you'll have to come back after the launch of the whole global cooling productions or maybe when, when revolution earth comes out. [01:00:10] I'd love to have you back to talk about it some more. I have. Oh good. Yay. I have one more question that I ask everybody who comes on the show and it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some profound answers. And the question is this. If you had an airplane, a, an, uh, an environmentally friendly airplane, uh, that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say. [01:00:36] Oh, [01:00:37] Aria McKenna: bye. That is a fantastic question. How to answer that? Oh my goodness. Um, geez and environmentally friendly airplane. First of all, that would be fantastic. I'm looking forward to that. Um, you know, it's, [01:01:00] it's interesting. This is going to sound, I feel like this is going to really sound [01:01:05] Izolda Trakhtenberg: hokey. I love hope. [01:01:08] Aria McKenna: I just, I feel like what connects all of this, the work that we're doing is, is just fueled by, by love, you know, love for self love for others. [01:01:24] Love for the planet, the, you know, the animals, the ecosystems. If there was a way to just kind of spread that and, and connect people more deeply to, uh, uh, a constant sense of love and appreciation. I don't know if there are three words, you know, words that I could put up there that would just make that magically happen. [01:01:51] Um, but you know, love yourself and, and, and love others, you know, and the more [01:02:00] we can connect with that, I think the more compassionate we are and the more we can hear each other, uh, the more, hopefully we'll be able to come together and start working together again to make the world a better place. I don't know if there are words that magically make that happen, but I do feel like that's what connects all of this. [01:02:23] And hopefully something that everyone can agree on. [01:02:27] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Totally. I, I agree with you and the words that came to me when you were talking were two words and it was just, they were just spread love, spread love, man. Oh yeah. I love that though. That's what I, when, when you were talking, I'm like, oh, I think she's talking about spreading love. [01:02:43] I think that's great. Thank you. Yeah, my pleasure. My pleasure. Normally I don't, I don't come up with these answers, but there are times when they pop me on the head when Edna, the librarian who lives in my head, pops me on the head goes, this is what you were thinking. Okay, great. Thanks Edna. [01:02:59] Aria McKenna: So anyway, [01:03:00] thank you. [01:03:00] All right. So [01:03:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: REO, once again, thank you so much. I appreciate you being on the show. [01:03:08] Aria McKenna: Oh, thanks. Thank you so much for having such a pleasure to speak with you and also to explore all your wonderful resources that you have. Yeah. Thank you. I [01:03:21] Izolda Trakhtenberg: appreciate that. I, yes, I have many resources go to the website is all the t.com. [01:03:26] You will find them all. This is the innovative mindset podcast. If you've enjoyed the episode and I am sure you have, first of all, remember to turn off your water while you're washing your hands. That's very important. Get involved and. Much more involved and really pay attention to the work that aria is doing. [01:03:46] She's doing some incredible work. She, and those like her are doing some incredible work. So please get involved with that. If you're enjoying the show, tell a friend, subscribe to it, have them subscribe. Let's all. Talk about how we can be innovative [01:04:00] to move into this new and uncertain future stronger and better together until next time. [01:04:06] This is Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast, reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [01:04:19] thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on patrion.com/innovative mindset. [01:04:37] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg in his copyright 2021 as always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative mindset.[01:05:00]

Talking Sopranos
Episode #83 "Remember When"

Talking Sopranos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 179:07


    Michael and Steve welcome the one and only Vincent Pastore back to the podcast. Vinny has a blast sharing his favorite memories from the show, and how he thought he got whacked for smoking weed at a concert. He also shares a really funny story about how he screwed up introducing Bruce Springsteen at a concert, and of course whether he thinks Tony is alive or dead.     Then Michael and Steve take on the third episode of the final season. Tony is questioning Paulie's loyalty, Phil is making big moves and the series is starting to build to that final ending.  Check out Talking Sopranos #83 “Remember When” S7-Ep3. Make sure to subscribe to the Talking Sopranos podcast wherever you get your podcasts and go to the Talking Sopranos website to buy official merchandise.      Now's your chance to enter the Talking Sopranos Superfan Contest and join Michael and Steve on the podcast. Just go to talkingsopranos.com or click the link below and tell us in 150 words or less why you are a Talking Sopranos Superfan and what you think happened at the end of the series. Entries are due by November 1st at midnight.https://www.talkingsopranos.com/fancontest      WOKE UP THIS MORNING: The Definitive Oral History of the Sopranos is available on November 2nd wherever books are sold. Get yours before they sell out. Also Michael and Steve are signing copies on November 2nd at the Bookends Bookstore in Ridgewood, New Jersey http://www.book-ends.comBarnes and Noble will be holding a virtual event on Monday November 8th at 7pm.https://www.eventbrite.com/o/barnes-amp-noble-17337409237 Check out Comedy and Conversations with the Sopranos Live. Get your tickets today!https://www.ticketmaster.com/in-conversation-with-the-sopranos-tickets/artist/2683319 See Zopa live Saturday November 6th at Baby's Alright in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, N.Y.http://babysallright.com Get official Sopranos merchandise and more at http://www.proplayerstars.comNeed a ride call Broadway Elite and tell them Michael and Steve sent you. https://broadway-elite.com or call 973-515-8123https://www.talkingsopranos.comhttps://www.betterhelp.com/talkinghttps://simplisafe.com/talkinghttps://www.indochino.com 

Big Orange Couch: The 90s Nickelodeon Podcast
Book Club: The Tale of the Shimmering Shell

Big Orange Couch: The 90s Nickelodeon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 82:27


On the spooky 212th episode of Big Orange Couch: The 90s Nickelodeon Podcast, Andrew, Joey, Adam, Bob, and Vince discuss the Are You Afraid of the Dark novel, "The Tale of the Shimmering Shell," for our third annual book club! Also, a reading of the Midnight Society segments, ratings and we name the book. Plus, colonial Williamsburg, candy corn and cake, an argument about a seed, and so much more! 

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 23, 2021: Mixed-use building planned for Broadway Blueprint area, and other Albemarle development updates

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 13:52


In today’s first subscriber supported Public Service Announcement, one person wants you to know about another community litter cleanup event in Albemarle, this time on October 30 in the southern part of the county. The latest Love Albemarle event will take place between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. at sites in Esmont, Keene, Scottsville, and North Garden. Around fifty people showed up for a similar event in Esmont this past spring, and organizers want to double that amount. Organizer Ed Brooks is seeking to get children involved, so if you’re a parent or guardian and want to spend the morning cleaning up road-side litter, register today! On this edition of the program:A host of development updates in Albemarle County, including a mixed-use development in the Broadway BlueprintThe Virginia Chapter of the American Planning Association releases its annual awardsEmmet Street at Ivy Road to be closed for nearly two weeks for stormwater projectChris Greene Lake reopens to dogs after a month’s closureA suspicious item is found at Charlottesville’s federal courtFire crews and police officers responded last night to reports of a suspicious item at the Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in downtown Charlottesville, but the item was determined by the Virginia State Police to be of no threat. The area was closed from 6:45 p.m. to around 8:30 p.m. according to a release from the city’s communications office.The incident comes just three days before a trial gets underway in the federal cases against multiple organizers involved in the August 12 Unite the Right rally. The lawsuit was filed four years ago and seeks damages based on an 1871 civil rights law as well as a prevention of future rallies. Defendants include Jason Kessler, Richard Spencer, and Christopher Cantwell, among others. The trial begins Monday morning. (read more in the University of Michigan’s Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse)The water at Chris Greene Lake Park has been reopened to dogs and people. Albemarle issued an advisory in late September after tests reported elevated levels of harmful algae. There have been two consecutive tests which have indicated water quality has returned to normal levels. A release announcing the reopening went out Friday afternoon. Emmet Street will be fully closed between Ivy Road and Rothery Road for nearly two weeks between November 1 and November 12. Traffic will be detoured along Massie Road and Copeley Road. According to a release, the roadway will be shut to allow for installation of a large stormwater utility structure across Emmet Street. Pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, and transit-riders are warned of potential delays. “Please expect traffic backups along the detour route and if possible, utilize Rt 250 or other city streets to bypass the area,” reads the release. “Pedestrians will be detoured through the UVA site along the parking garage service road.” The school superintendent in Nelson County has announced she will step down next June 30. The Lynchburg News Advance reports that Martha Eagle has plans to retire after a 32-year career in the Nelson school system. Nelson County has 1,520 students and more than 300 employees. (read the article)The Virginia Chapter of the American Planning Association has released its awards for 2021 at a hybrid conference in Roanoke. Senator Lynwood Lewis (D-6) received the Cardinal Award for his role as a legislator, singling out key pieces of legislation that were signed into law in the from the past year.SB1350: Requires the Commonwealth Transportation Board to incorporate resiliency into project selection processSB1374: Establishes a carbon sequestration task force which must report before 2022 General Assembly  SB1389: Requires landowners whose properties are prone to flooding to report that risk to potential buyersSB1404: Adjustments to the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund to clarify intent to reduce nitrogen and phosphorous reduction Fairfax County won the Commonwealth Plan of the year for its Zoning Ordinance Modernization Project, which cut the length of those regulations in half.“The new streamlined ordinance is half the size of the previous Ordinance from 1978, which was accomplished through elimination of repetition and use of easy-to-understand language, graphics, and figures,” reads the award’s write-up.The city of Norfolk won three awards for three projects. OpenNorfolk is an initiative that helped businesses connect with customers during the pandemic. Norfolk also created a Missing Middle Pattern Book to explain how additional density could be achieved in single-family neighborhoods. The Norfolk Thrive plan presents a vision for how to extend urban development in the coastal city from the Harbor Park ballpark to Norfolk State University. The latter won the APA’s Resilient Virginia Community of the Year. Other awards include:Williamsburg Planning Director Carolyn Murphy won the Outstanding Service AwardThe Edge District between York County, James City County, and the City of Williamsburg won the Holzheimer Economic Development Award Frederick County won the Commonwealth Connectors Award and planner John Bishop won the Outstanding Service Award for the Crossover Boulevard project, which is a new four-lane roadway in WinchesterIn today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!Time now for a round up of various developments in Albemarle County. Developer Alan Cadgene has filed plans with Albemarle County for a mixed-use development to be built on a 1.36 acre property just to the northwest of the redeveloped Woolen Mills factory. The proposal is for a 2,500 square foot manufacturing buildings with 13 dwelling units. The project is being submitted by-right. “[That] means that if the proposed plans meet the minimum requirements of the county’s zoning, site plan, or subdivision ordinances, they must be approved,” reads the public notification for the project.The county’s Comprehensive Plan designates the land as Neighborhood Density Residential which calls for between three and six units per acre. According to the project application, the residential density on the site be 9.55 units per acre. An existing structure on the property would remain. This is within the scope of the county’s Broadway Blueprint planning area. That’s being run by the county’s Economic Development Office. Elsewhere in the county, plans have been filed for 250 units along Rio Road near Four Seasons. Andy Reitelbach is a senior planner with the county. “So the application is called the Heritage on Rio,” Retelbach said.The property is within the jurisdiction of the Places29-Hydraulic Community Advisory Committee, which had a community meeting on a rezoning application for the project on October 18. “Sometimes the current zoning and the future land use designation do not always line up so that is one reason why a property owner may choose to request a rezoning of their property,” Reitelbach said. In this case, the request is to go from R-6 zoning to a customized zone known as a Planned Residential Development. That would allow up to 35 units per acre as well as some commercial uses. The buildings have not been designed, according to attorney Valerie Long with the firm Williams Mullen. The Architectural Review Board will also weigh in on the project as Rio Road is an entrance corridor. “The project is proposing that 15 percent of the rezoned units will be affordable to those making up to 80 percent of the area median income,” Long said. By-right there could be 50 units on the property, so that translates to 15 percent of 200, or 30 units. The Places29-North Community Advisory Committee met on October 14 and one topic was an update on the Brookhill development south of Forest Lakes and north of Polo Grounds Road. Cameron Langille is another planner in Albemarle. (watch the meeting)“Brookhill was rezoned by the Board of Supervisors in 2016,” Langille said. “Brookhill totals 277.5 acres so it is a pretty large project. It’s going to be developed in multiple phases and the rezoning referred to each of those phases as blocks.”Brookhill is a mixed-use development that must have at least 552 residential units and a maximum of 1,550 units. These include apartments, townhomes, and single-family homes. Langille said the developer could have constructed many more under the Comprehensive Plan but opted to go at a lower density. Final approval so far has been granted for 535 total dwelling unitsBlock 1 is the center of the development. “There’s going to be also a public park and a plaza gathering area, and that is going to be the primary focal point for non-residential uses in this project,” Langille said. Some blocks have been approved and constructed, while others are working their way through the review process. Block 8A consists of a 179-bed assisted living facility which is nearing opening. Block 1A and Block 8B consist of multifamily units that look like townhomes but contain more units. A site plan had been submitted for a hockey rink in the town center. “That plan got to the final site plan stage which is basically the last thing they have to do application wise before they get final approval,” Langille said. “We were reviewing that back in 2018 and from what the developer has told me it’s not going to be build in that block any longer. They are still working with the folks who are looking to do that ice rink and they are potentially going to relocate it a little further north on the north side of the town center area.”Allison Wrabel of the Daily Progress reported in February 2020 that the park had been delayed. A group called Friends of the Charlottesville Ice Park had been fundraising for the project. The website for the group has expired. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Conrad Life Report
Episode 72

Conrad Life Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 21:07


Welcome to Episode 72! Topics: fall vibes in the neighborhood, Queens County Farm Museum, iPhone backlog, L'Industrie Pizza in Williamsburg, Congress Bar, Pound Ridge, Virtual Dead Night, Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert, Can't Slow Down by Michaelangelo Matos, In These Silent Days by Brandi Carlile, Carnegie Hall 1970 by Neil Young, Let It Be (Super Deluxe) by The Beatles, 1971 on AppleTV+, Bad Sport on Netflix.

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

The Gra writes in his perush on Mishleh that the definition of the word chesed is to do for others something we are not obligated to do for them. Each time we do that, we fulfill the positive commandment of והלכת בדרכיו – emulating the ways of Hashem. Just like Hashem does things for us that He is not obligated to do, we are to act the same way towards others. The Navi tells us, Hashem does not want us to just do chesed, He wants us to love doing chesed , as it says אהבת חסד. When we do chesed , we should feel like we are connecting to Hashem through it, because when we have the right intentions, it makes the mitzvah so much greater. Sometimes, Hashem lets us know how much delight He takes in our acts of gemilut chasadim by orchestrating events in such a way that it is obvious that they are taking place in response to our act of chesed . A woman related that her friend's father was sick and she wanted to make a big gathering of inspiration and have a berachot party there with a group of friends, asking each one of them to make a kabala in the zechut that he has a refuah shelemah . Time was of the essence and she was trying to make it for that night, Sunday, but she couldn't find somebody with a house large enough to fit everyone. After a lot of effort and phone calls, she finally found a house in Borough Park and a fantastic speaker came and gave everyone chizuk there. Towards the end of the speech, the hostess walked into the house and introduced herself to everyone. She said she got a call that day at 3:00 in the afternoon asking if her home could be used for this gathering. She was in the Catskills for Shabbat and didn't really leave her house in condition to host a class. The people next to her at the time were saying, “You don't have to say yes,” but she said to herself, it would be my greatest zechut to hold such a gathering in my home and she gave them the okay. That evening, on her way back home, lo alenu , she was involved in a massive, three car accident. Her car was totally crushed but, baruch Hashem, she and all of her children walked out alive and well. Hatzala was called and treated a couple of people for minor injuries. She said she wanted to get home and say Nishmat at the gathering that was taking place there to thank Hashem publicly for protecting her and her family. While standing on the side of the road, a Chassidishe man came over and asked them if they needed help or a ride. When the man introduced himself, she almost fainted. Last year, she had organized a challah bake in her house for a woman from Williamsburg who was sick with Covid. That woman eventually passed away and she ended up starting an organization in this woman's memory. Now, the person there who was offering to help her and her family get back was none other than the husband of that lady. She shared this story of hashgacha at the gathering and told everyone there, “The chesed that a person does, Hashem uses to help that person himself.” That is true, but our attitude in doing chesed to emulate Hashem and whatever side benefits come as a result is an additional benefit. A girl who recently got married related a story of how she met her chatan . A few months ago, she went out with a boy who was very special, but not for her. She told her best friend about him and said, “I think he would be perfect for you.” Six weeks later, that friend got engaged to this boy. The couple felt such hakarat hatov to the girl for setting them up, they wanted to reciprocate. This boy called his chavruta thinking that she would be great for him. And six weeks later, she was engaged to him. It is true that when we help others we are also helping ourselves, but our main motivation should be that we are doing the ratzon Hashem and emulating Him in all of our acts of gemilut chasadim .

The Glossy Beauty Podcast
Malin+Goetz's founders say success is a balance between expediency and exclusivity

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:02


While emerging from a decade dominated by sans-serif typeface and millennial pink, it may be hard to remember a time when an ode to simplicity could make a brand stand out. But when Malin+Goetz, a natural apothecary beauty brand, was founded in 2004, its “less is more” approach at a time when the market was about “more and more” initiated the brand's journey.  “We came at it from a minimalist, different direction, not only in our packaging and design, but also in our formulations and the protocols,” said Matthew Malin, Malin+Goetz co-founder, on the latest Glossy Beauty Podcast. “Nobody was doing unisex [in beauty] at that time." Eighteen years later, in a Covid-19 riddled world, Malin+Goetz has once again proven that it's not afraid to take the road less traveled. In this case, that's meant opening a retail location in Williamsburg, after the beauty industry saw a wave of door closures.  “If a store doesn't have something special, which includes beautiful design, wonderful brands and products, and great service, it's going to be challenging in the post-Covid world,” said Andrew Goetz, Malin+Goetz co-founder (and Malin's partner) on the podcast.  And while the new normal, and how brands respond, may be uncharted territory, Malin+Goetz expects to take a multifaceted approach in its appeal to the consumer. The brand's brick-and-mortar stores, luxury hospitality partners and e-commerce play via its own site and Amazon “are all important aspects of how to be a successful brand,” said Goetz. “Being able to support that customer through those different channels is critical.”

Strange & Unusual
Ep 88: It's What Carrie Fisher Would Have Wanted - Local Topics

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 75:54


In this episode Roya and Casey cover some local topics. Casey talks about the unsolved murders that happened around the Colonial Parkway around Williamsburg, Virginia and the speculation is wild. Roya talks about a haunted bed and breakfast in Guthrie, Oklahoma, The Stone Lion Inn. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod at: @strange_unusual_podcast Follow Casey: @calamitycasey / Twitch.tv/calamitycasey Follow Roya:@royarampage / Twitch.tv/royarampage Twitter: @_strangeunsual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

Southern Gothic
Ghosts of Williamsburg's Public Gaol

Southern Gothic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:17


When construction began on the Williamsburg Gaol it was never intended to house those who were deemed as significantly dangerous, like murderers or pirates.  Instead it was meant for largely non violent offenders, such as debtors, thieves, the mentally ill and enslaved people who were caught after fleeing their captors... but good intentions pale in comparison to reality, leaving many to believe that today the Williamsburg Public Gaol is one of the most haunted places in one of America's oldest communities. Book a tour at the Winchester Mystery House over at WinchesterMysteryHouse.com! Help Southern Gothic grow by becoming a Patreon Supporter today! Website: SouthernGothicMedia.com Merch Store: https://www.southerngothicmedia.com/merch Pinterest @SouthernGothicMedia Facebook: @SouthernGothicMedia Instagram: @SouthernGothicMedia Twitter: @SoGoPodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mind Over Murder
Colonial Parkway Murders: Ginny Minarik Remembers Becky Dowski

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:43


Our 100th episode! Join Mind Over Murder co-hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley with Ginny Minarik, sister-in-law to Colonial Parkway Murders victim Becky Dowski. She remembers Becky, explains how her former husband Bob and Ginny learned the facts of Becky's murder, and gives us the background on Becky's jealous former boyfriend who remains a person of interest in the case.New Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer"https://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Othram featured case! We are getting close-- can you help with a financial contribution to help solved this case? Any amount will help. Just click on the DNAsolves.com link below. Thanks.The Will County Coroner's Office and Othram Team to identify a Young Woman Found in 1981 https://dnasolves.com/articles/will_county_jane_doe_1981/Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/New Story on Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasNYT: Two Montana Sweethearts Were Fatally Shot in 1956. The Case Was Just Solved.The Cascade County Sheriff's Office said it appeared to be the oldest homicide case in the United States to be solved with genetic genealogy.https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/11/us/great-falls-montana-2007-homicide-dna.htmlNext year's CrimeCon will be held April 29-May 1, 2022 in Las Vegas. We will both be there!Details: https://www.crimecon.com/cc22You can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase4 new episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlNew Colonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com New Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning. Please share!Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on Instagram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

Strong Words with Ian Strong
077 - Shot Glass Diaries Volume 026 - Williamsburg, Virginia

Strong Words with Ian Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 14:05


In today's volume of "Shot Glass Diaries," Ian pulls out one of (if not) his favorite shot glasses in his entire collection that he's had for almost 20 years and tells the story of visiting Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia with his then girlfriend's family. Along with providing some points of interests if you ever choose to go, Ian also shares a lot of the history of the area, including when the location was settled, how it was used, how it was named, and how it became the first capital of the American Colonies before the American Revolutionary War.Go to Rolling-Acre.com and use the promo code "StrongWords" to get $10 off your next order!Follow the show on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @IanStrongWords. You can also email the show at StrongWordsPodcast@gmail.com.Don't forget to like, follow, subscribe, leave a rating, write a review, and share the social media posts and spread the strong words! Please and thank you!

Restless The Podcast

Portrait of GodThis is Steve and welcome back to another segment of Press On. This called Portrait Take a look at some of pictures hanging on the walls of your house...why are they there, what to they communicate to you or who do they represent?When my wife and I go to colonial Williamsburg the historical actors will sometimes say “would you like to have a quick portrait done with me”? Its their way of saying want to get a picture with me? What are pictures or portraits really…Hear the words of the writer of Colossians 1 (Paul)Colossians 1:15-19He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation: for by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones, or dominions, or rulers, or authorities—all things have been created through Him and for Him.The Greek word eikon (image) meaning perfect-representation, the very substance or essential embodiment of something or someone.The same word is used in Greek to describe a portrait or more familiar to us, the word “photograph.”Typically they are representations of a moment in time...nothing else. They are two dimensional only and do not capture the whole context of meaning and it importance to you.That's not what Paul is talking about... we see that in verse 19 “For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him,”You see Jesus was not merely a “sketch of God or a lifeless portrait He is the full revelation of God...nothing was left out. Theres much more to the story but for today think about this:In the gospel Matthew 6 tells us that if we seek him we will find Him. When you do so God it's like adding a brush stroke to a cosmic portrait...in time the face of Jesus emerges.This is Steve, be of good courage and Press ON See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in Jewish Studies
Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper, "A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 67:28


The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of the neighborhood. In A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg (Yale University Press, 2021), Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a group of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely opposed the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. Interviewee: Nathaniel Deutsch is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper, "A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 67:28


The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of the neighborhood. In A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg (Yale University Press, 2021), Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a group of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely opposed the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. Interviewee: Nathaniel Deutsch is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper, "A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 67:28


The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of the neighborhood. In A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg (Yale University Press, 2021), Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a group of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely opposed the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. Interviewee: Nathaniel Deutsch is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper, "A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg" (Yale UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 67:28


The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of the neighborhood. In A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg (Yale University Press, 2021), Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a group of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely opposed the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. Interviewee: Nathaniel Deutsch is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Mike Safo
Mike Safo with Pat Lynch, NYPD PBA President

Mike Safo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:00


Joined today by NYPD PBA President, Police Officer Patrick Lynch. Pat and I talk about his childhood growing up in Queens, and how being a city worker was a route he knew he wanted to take. We hear about why Officer Lynch decided to raise his right hand and join the NYPD. Pat shares about graduating the police academy, getting stationed in Williamsburg in the 90th Precinct and how different it was back then to now. He describes the day to day battles and responsibilities the PBA has, from petitioning against the release of cop killers to making sure the NYC police officers are represented rightfully and fair. We talk about the current state of policing in this climate with a war on police officers, from bail reform to the protests. Morale seems to be at an all-time low and Pat and I talk about why that is, how that can be changed and if there is a glimmer of hope. Pat shared his experience meeting with President Trump, why it's so important for cops to vote and how he was feeling before addressing the nation during the RNC. He beams with pride about his 2 son's raising their right hand and joining the police department, and confesses what his biggest fear is for them. From meeting Joe Frazier to responding to the Miracle on the Hudson, Officer Pat Lynch shows why he deserves to be the head of the most powerful police union in the United States.   **Sponsor:  https://www.instagram.com/Henry_daverin/ **

Mind Over Murder
BONUS: Solving Cases with DNA, David Mittelman of Othram (Encore Part 3)

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 54:21


Join Mind Over Murder co-hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley for a bonus episode as we present an encore of an interview with David Mittelman, CEO of Othram, the Houston DNA lab that is breaking cold cases across the United States and Canada. This is Part 3.Othram's DNAsolves.com website featuring their newest cases:https://dnasolves.com/New Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature Colonial Parkway Murders article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer"https://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCheck out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" clothing and other good stuff!https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/New Story on Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasThe next CrimeCon will be held April 29-May 1, 2022 in Las Vegas. We will be there! Join us!Details: https://www.crimecon.com/cc22You can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 13,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase4 new episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning. Please share!Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

When a person makes plans and things don't end up going according to plan, it's only natural to get frustrated. But fortunately for us, we know everything always goes according to Hashem's plan and that is the best possible plan for us. The pasuk says, “מה' מצעדי גבר” – every step that we take is governed by the hashgacha of Hashem. If we are able to accept plans not working out with emunah, we can turn a potentially frustrating experience into a great avodat Hashem. Most of the time, we don't see the benefits of our plans not working out, but sometimes we do and we should use those times to give us chizuk to realize we are always being guided to the places that Hashem knows are best for us to be in. Rabbi Biderman told a story about a man named R' Hershel from Ashdod. A year and a half ago he was marrying off his daughter, and he went to America to try and raise some money to help pay for his expenses. He stayed in Borough Park in Brooklyn, and on his first day he had plans to leave there at 5:30 AM and go to Williamsburg to the different shuls there and collect. He hired a driver to take him there but when 5:30 came, the driver was nowhere to be found. R' Hershel waited and waited. He knew the bigger the delay, the more potential money he was going to lose, but R' Hershel did not get flustered. He decided to walk to the nearest Bet Midrash and say Tehillim and ask Hashem for help. Just a few minutes after he began Tehillim , a man approached him and gave him a $500 donation. A short while later, this man came back and told R' Hershel he needed a big yeshua that day. He gave him his name and his mother's name and asked if he could have him in mind while saying Tehillim and he'll let him know later if he got the salvation he was hoping for. R' Hershel said, “No problem. I'm going to stay right here and read until you call me.” Many hours later, this man called R' Hershel and said he was coming to tell him the good news in person. When he arrived, he explained that he had a court case that day in Manhattan, with a lot at stake. When he arrived he didn't see his lawyer there. He called and called but there was no answer. Usually, the way it worked was, if the judge saw there was no lawyer, he would get offended that the litigant was not taking the court seriously. When it came his turn, he had no choice but to represent himself. The judge asked him for a statement to make in his defense and he gave it. Then the judge said, “The fact that this man is coming without a lawyer must be that he is speaking the truth and doesn't need any outside help.” Amazingly, the judge ruled in his favor. The man said, “At best, I was hoping for a settlement and now I won the case outright.” After he left, the lawyer called him apologizing that he overslept. He said in the forty years that he has been working as a lawyer, this has never happened to him before. Then, when the lawyer was told by the client that he won, he couldn't believe what he was hearing. This man then gave R' Hershel the $5000 he was going to pay the lawyer that day and said, “Thank you for saying Tehillim for me.” They spoke at length and R' Hershel thanked him and told him what he was collecting for – his daughter's wedding. The man took his information and said he would send him more when the wedding came, and he did. Later that day, the driver called R' Hershel, apologizing for not coming, saying that this has never happened to him in all his years working, just like the lawyer said. He offered to take R' Hershel the next day free of charge. Look how Hashem determined the steps of each person here, helping this man on trial and helping R' Hershel collect the money he needed for his daughter's wedding. Our plans might not always go according to schedule, but we must remember, everything always goes according to Hashem's plan.

Mike Safo
Mike Safo with Pat Lynch, NYPD PBA President

Mike Safo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:00


Joined today by NYPD PBA President, Police Officer Patrick Lynch. Pat and I talk about his childhood growing up in Queens, and how being a city worker was a route he knew he wanted to take. We hear about why Officer Lynch decided to raise his right hand and join the NYPD. Pat shares about graduating the police academy, getting stationed in Williamsburg in the 90th Precinct and how different it was back then to now. He describes the day to day battles and responsibilities the PBA has, from petitioning against the release of cop killers to making sure the NYC police officers are represented rightfully and fair. We talk about the current state of policing in this climate with a war on police officers, from bail reform to the protests. Morale seems to be at an all-time low and Pat and I talk about why that is, how that can be changed and if there is a glimmer of hope. Pat shared his experience meeting with President Trump, why it's so important for cops to vote and how he was feeling before addressing the nation during the RNC. He beams with pride about his 2 son's raising their right hand and joining the police department, and confesses what his biggest fear is for them. From meeting Joe Frazier to responding to the Miracle on the Hudson, Officer Pat Lynch shows why he deserves to be the head of the most powerful police union in the United States.  

The Radio Vagabond
213 NEW YORK: Close to Home with Scott Gurian

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:18


Hey from The Big Apple I started my adventure in the Big Apple sitting in a park in Brooklyn on a Saturday morning watching small kids and grown-ups playing football – yes, as a European, this is what I call the game where someone kicks a round ball with their feet.  I'm waiting to meet up with my friend Scott Gurian. Even though we'd never met prior, we do consider each other friends.  Scott is a fellow veteran travel podcaster and one of the best in the business. He's the guy from the Far from Home podcast you must have heard me talk about many times here on the Radio Vagabond travel podcast. Scott planned to spend his Saturday with me in Brooklyn, Queens, and New York showing me around some interesting places in his hood while we chatted and got to know each other. Scott lives in nearby Jersey, just across the Hudson River, so we're Close to Home for Scott today. As we walked over to Scott's car — a nice big new Toyota — I immediately joked that it was very different from the small, old car that played a big part in the first season of his podcast. FAR FROM HOME Scott participated in the Mongol Rally and drove a tiny, beaten out Nissan Micra stick shift across Europe and Asia about five years ago for an epic 18,000 mile (29,000 km). He did this crazy adventure from the UK to Mongolia with his brother and two friends – and after that, he decided to drive back in the same car. The first season of Far from Home is outstanding and got me hooked on the podcast long before we knew each other. I highly recommend listening to it if you haven't already. Also, watch a few clips of his journey to experience the trials and tribulations first-hand. Naturally, he has so many memorable stories and anecdotes from that trip, so I wanted to find out which stand out most in his memory. "Oh, so many. Driving across Iran with my brother and two friends (as Americans and Brits) was amazing; the friendliness of the people was memorable. Also, travelling through 'untouched' countries in central Asia like Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, etc., was excellent. Seeing Cappadocia in Turkey with its hot air balloons was also amazing. And, of course, Mongolia is incredible with its vast open spaces and extraordinary scenery. It took us about seven weeks to travel from the UK to Mongolia, so as you can imagine, I have many incredible memories from that trip." Scott wanted to see more of the world, so instead of flying back to Europe (like any sane human would), he decided to drive back to explore more countries and regions, like Siberia in Russia. THROAT SINGING IN SIBERIA In one of the episodes of Season 2, Scott visits the remote south Siberian Republic of Tuva to learn about the traditional instruments and the ancient art of throat singing. He even attempts to throat sing himself! Read more about this visit and see photos and videos here. "Russia is such an enormous country with so many different regions home to vastly different cultures. Tuva was a 12 hour journey out the way to visit and it is so unique. It is close to Mongolia so the Tuvans look very similar to Mongolians." HALLUCINATING ON AYAHUASCA IN PERU In another episode, he meets a medicine man who invited him to attend a hallucinogenic healing ceremony where he drank ayahuasca. All while holding his microphone. Have a listen to the episode by clicking here. CLOSE TO HOME Due to the pandemic, Scott hasn't been able to travel overseas. But he is content as he tells me that living in Jersey, there is a lot of adventure that awaits in and around New York. He started cooking and even home-brewing to keep his itchy travel feet scratched. Scott was due to meet me at AfricaBurn – the South African Burning Man just outside Cape Town when lockdown hit. Scott stayed in Jersey, and I was stuck in Cape Town for a while (so be sure to listen to my Radio Vagabond South African travel adventures). We were supposed to travel a bit of South Africa together, but alas, it was not meant to be. SCOTT GURIAN'S NEW YORK TRAVEL GUIDE One of the cool things about making friends worldwide is that they can show you places you usually wouldn't visit. Because I had visited New York several times before, Scott wanted to take me to places few tourists would know about. Here is a list of Scott's unusual but must-visit places in New York Scott took me to: DUMBO A part of Brooklyn is called DUMBO aka "Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass" is a trendy neighbourhood to walk through Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT MUSEUM In an old subway station, you can visit the New York City Transit Museum. Move further down and see some 100-year-old subway cars. WILLIAMSBURG Williamsburg is a hipster neighbourhood that is cool to stroll through. QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART Next to where they hosted the World Fair, you find Queens Museum of Art, where the Panorama is now housed – a scaled model of every borough in the greater New York area in the 1960's. THE CITY RELIQUARY The City Reliquary is a not-for-profit community museum and civic organization located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It's really cool and weird – and connects visitors to both the past and present of New York. We walked around Brooklyn for a bit and found the iconic Instagram spot with the bridge in the background. You might remember it from the gangster movie 'Once Upon a Time in America' poster. Then visited a place with a lot of food trucks called Smorgesburg. As far as I know, this word comes from the Danish smørrebrød, and then Americans started saying it like the Swedish Chef from Muppet Show. Unfortunately, we didn't find any Danish smørrebrød at Smorgesburg. Another thing we couldn't find after that was… Scott's car. After a slight ordeal trying to locate his car, we eventually found it after getting help from the police. Even locals can get lost in New York. Go figure :) TAJIKISTAN POLICE Our polite encounter with the NYPD reminded me of Scott's experience with the local police in Tajikistan on his trip. I asked him to talk about his experience. "There is a lot of corruption in central Asian countries like Tajikistan. Our British friends in another Nissan Micra got pulled over by some traffic cops who actually aimed their radar gun at another car, and then tried to say it was them who was speeding. My brother's and I stopped too and heard that they demanded $100 which was a month salary here and crazy. Specially since they weren't speeding. It was clearly a scam, and we didn't want to give in to the bribe/corruption stigma. After a long time, we eventually settled on handing over a bottle of vodka, and we were back on the road." Scott secretly recorded the entire encounter that you can listen to in its entirety in Episode 16 of Far from Home, Season 1. Scott tells about more traffic cop encounters he had in central Asia. Most of the time, the cops were polite and never gave them any unnecessary issues. We exchanged stories about the amazing people we get to meet on the road. Scott paid particular mention to the wonderful Iranian popularity he experienced. Thanks to Scott for taking me around the New York area on a beautiful Saturday. I hope to team up with him soon to do some travelling together and collaborate on future episodes of both our podcasts. My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving.   NEW YORK FLASHBACKS If you want to listen to more of my travels through New York from previous visits, simply follow the link: The Radio Vagabond Travel Podcast in New York. COVID-19 TRAVEL and TOURISM RULES FOR NEW YORK (OCT 2021) This episode was from the end of August 2021, when New York was open for travel if you (like me) didn't travel to the country from Europe. Please visit New York City's official website for the latest COVID-19 travel restrictions and tourist regulations. Make sure New York is open for tourism before booking your trip.    

Quilt Buzz
Episode 040: Jennifer Swope of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:27


Show Notes:0:57 - David and Roberta Logie Department of Textile and Fashion Arts1:01 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston1:07 - Boston 3:08 - Winterthur Program, American Material Culture 5:29 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)5:36 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories5:46 - Grab tickets to visit the Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 5:48 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)6:14 - Logan International Airport7:30 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection 7:40 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection catalogue 7:52 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)7:57 - Quilts of Gee's Bend8:26 and 8:44 - The Pilgrim / Roy collection 8:47, 8:51 and 9:33 - Gerald Roy8:48, 8:56 and 9:38 - Paul Pilgrim9:06 - Josef Albers9:48 - Brimfield10:02 and 10:05 - Amish12:11- Quilt and craft revival 12:23 - Studio craft movement14:24 - Carla Hemlock14:26 - Kahnawake Mohawk14:33 - Beading work 15:39 - Ivy league school17:46 - The Ann and Graham Gund Gallery19:17 - Foam core galleries19:29 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection 19:44 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 20:09 - Foam core galleries20:15 - Kyla Hygysician22:48 - Poston Internment Camp22:50 - Arizona22:52 - World War II22:52 - Masako Hirata22:53 - Quilt by Japanese American kids in the Poston Internment Camp22:56 - Masako Hirata's fourth grade class 23:04 - National Japanese American Historical Society 23:05 - San Francisco23:35 - Harriet Powers's Bible Quilt23:39 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)23:40 - Harriet Powers's Pictorial quilt23:49 - Harriet Powers24:30 - Michael Thorpe (@iversonsdurag)24:21 - New York 24:23 - Newton, Massachusetts24:31 - Longarm quilting machine 24:37 - George Floyd24:46 - Michael Thorpe's quilt and poem 25:00 - Applique26:48 - Poston Internment Camp fourth grade class quilt 26:56 - World War II27:03 - Civil War27:10 - Applique 28:12 - Civil War29:10 - Harriet Powers29:53 - Harriet Powers's Pictorial quilt29:55 - Memphis World Fair of 189731:07 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston32:43 - Steely Dead32:46 - Denver33:24 - John and Hank Green 33:34 - Indiana33:47 - Quilt Buzz34:10 - Log Cabin traditional quilt block 34:14 - Four-Patch traditional quilt block 34:16 - Nine-Patch traditional quilt block34:30 - Gerald Roy34:34 - Paul Pilgrim34:57 - Resist-dyed textile techniques 36:22 - Wholecloth quilts 36:23 - Victorian Crazy quilts 36:25 - Traditional sampler quilts 36:53 - Harriet Powers36:59 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 37:05 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection exhibition 37:11 - Faith Ringgold's quilt, Dream 2: King of the Sisterhood (1988)37:36 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 37:38 - Applique37:47 - Tie dye37:53 - Faith Ringgold37:54 - Sharpie28:05 - Dr Martin Luther King 38:09 - Fannie Lou Hamer38L10 - Rosa Parks38:16 - Civil Rights movement38:25 - Sylvia Hernández38:26 - Williamsburg, Brooklyn38:44 and 38:54 - Connecticut 39:42 - Faith Ringgold39:45 - Harriet Powers39:55 - Susan Hoffman 40:02 - Bisa Butler 40:08 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 40:56 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston website41:21 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)Click here for more information on Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories and how to visit the museumFollow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

The Megyn Kelly Show
Sexual Harassment Allegation Against Chris Cuomo, and a Woke Push To Eliminate Biological Sex, with Shelley Ross and Katie Herzog | Ep. 173

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 94:53


Megyn Kelly is joined by Shelley Ross, longtime ABC and CBS News executive, to talk about her allegation of sexual harassment against Chris Cuomo, the enablers of Chris and his brother Gov. Andrew Cuomo, sexual harassment widely in the media industry, why she doesn't want to see Chris Cuomo fired, and more. Also joining the show is Katie Herzog, journalist and co-host of the "Blocked and Reported" podcast, to talk about the woke push in the medical community to eliminate biological sex, the increase in trans identity, the real story about the Williamsburg dog park "racism" incident, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition
331 w/ Katie Herzog "Once Upon A Time In Williamsburg, Wizard of Ozy"

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 118:15


w/ Katie Herzog, Host @ "Blocked and Reported"Stay in Your HoodSo Many SourcesDog Run ConfidentialWhat Emma KnewKatie's NightmareHow Did You Get This NumberCool OffDenzel Was DrinkingMore ShaftVery Heavily RedactedEven More Heavily RedactedTwo SpiritsWizard of OzyRecorded: 9/30/21Published: 10/2/21 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition
331 w/ Katie Herzog "Once Upon A Time In Williamsburg, Wizard of Ozy"

The Fifth Column - Analysis, Commentary, Sedition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 118:15


w/ Katie Herzog, Host @ "Blocked and Reported"Stay in Your HoodSo Many SourcesDog Run ConfidentialWhat Emma KnewKatie's NightmareHow Did You Get This NumberCool OffDenzel Was DrinkingMore ShaftVery Heavily RedactedEven More Heavily RedactedTwo SpiritsWizard of OzyRecorded: 9/30/21Published: 10/2/21 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Please Kill this Bug

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:21


In the midst of a crisis in pollinator populations, we're being asked to kill spotted lanternflies -- to prevent damage to trees and their spread to agricultural areas upstate. Entomologist Jessica Ware, associate curator in invertebrate zoology at the American Museum of Natural History and president-elect of the Entomological Society of America, talks about this unwanted species and how to help sustain the bugs we need. →NYC Parks information on the Spotted Lanternfly infestation, including how to identify them and what to do if you see them. @BrianLehrer to squish lantern flies attack them from the front, they take off by jumping forward — Jean Haggas (@HaggasJean) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer you could give out the Spotted Lanternfly Hotline 1-888-422-3359. — Sami Plotkin (@samiplotkin) September 22 @BrianLehrer #spottedlanternflies all over Jersey City, so far I've only seen adults. I Squish them when I can pic.twitter.com/HstOMLXo5p — Eileen ferara (@EileenFerara) September 22, 2021 , 2021 Contains info on how to report in several states. https://t.co/ToJKe1F0hN — Bettty (@BetttyBarrr) September 22, 2021 tree of heaven looks like this: pic.twitter.com/NSaxxJz3Ew — Hee Jin Kang (@heejola) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer Saw a spotted fly in a Park Slope west rooftop last week. After admiring it briefly, we stomped it. — Eric Hipp (@eroyhipp) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer I found one on my car at the Short Hills Mall parking lot and squished it, then another one flew on my car and I killed it. Feeling pretty good about getting rid of two I noticed 2 dozen on the tree next to me. Is stomping really effective enough? — Jill Hammarberg (@Hammarspeak) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer join @inaturalist and report spotted lantern fly photos — Paul Cavalconte (@PaulCavalconte) September 22, 2021 I just camped in the DE water Gap. The spotted lantern fly has already become predominant insect in that area. We saw at least 4 per square meter. We killed at least 100. — Babin (@Babin69406647) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer I'm a crane operator at port Newark, and I've seen them all over the piers. Clusters of them. We've had to keep our windows closed although we're 14 stories in the air. I've killed at least 30 lol. — OPUSXTRAVELXART (@MauricePorcher) September 22, 2021 My 10 year old son taught me that Trees of Heaven can be ID'ed by smooshing their leaves and smelling them - the leaves smell of burnt peanut butter. We've found & squashed many Lanternflies all over Williamsburg by locating the trees first. — Hee Jin Kang (@heejola) September 22, 2021 I squished one while waiting for the M15 bus on Saturday and felt like an environmental hero for a second — Patrick says “You cant bully a billionaire” 🌹☀️🦷 (@PatrickForNYC) September 22, 2021