Podcasts about Williamsburg

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  • 1,126PODCASTS
  • 2,104EPISODES
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  • May 25, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Williamsburg

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Latest podcast episodes about Williamsburg

Awkward Sex And The City with Natalie Wall
Just Come with Pamela Anderson

Awkward Sex And The City with Natalie Wall

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 58:29


In this episode Natalie talks to Comedian Pamela Anderson about Sex, death, grief, where you need to be mentally to be in a relationship, great sex, not great sex and what she's looking for when dating.  Go check out her show Just Come every tuesday at The Graham in east Williamsburg! Buy tickets here!

Names on Taps
The Virginia Beer Company

Names on Taps

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 40:32


William and Jeff talk with Co-Founder , Robby Willey (Chris Smith was there too but had to do real work) at The Virginia Beer Company in Williamsburg, Virginia.  Robby shares how he and Chris met and came to start a brewery in the town of their alma mater.   Check out how they landed on not only their brewery name but the names of their house brews and many others.  Robby and Chris have a passion for great beer as well as giving back to the college community.  Listen to hear just how they do that and what "Beer People Purpose" means to them.@namesontaps@virginiabeerco

Nuzzle House audiobooks
E310 Gestating the Curious Mind CH 3 - Bragging to the fellas

Nuzzle House audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 47:18


Episode Notes Where John gets to tell the guys ALL about a hot chick who works at the hot dog stand . . We learn: Gertrude admits going to colonial Williamsburg for spring break You don't have to actually listen to someone to fall in love with them Glen has 'get-away-sticks' . . Listen anywhere: https://nuzzlehouse.start.page Support Nuzzle House by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/nuzzle-house

Big Time Talker with Burke Allen — by SpeakerMatch
Graduating High School with America's Got Talent Winner Landau Eugene Murphy Jr.

Big Time Talker with Burke Allen — by SpeakerMatch

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 54:00


Season 6 America's Got Talent Winner, Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. speaks with Burke about his life before and after winning big in front of the world over a decade ago. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Landau sat down and decided to work towards getting his high school diploma, an accolade he's been missing throughout most of his life. With the pandemic finally on its way out the door, Landau will be celebrating his high school graduation in Logan, West Virginia today! Having spent his youth in both Logan, West Virginia, and Detroit, Michigan Landau learned a lot about the kind of person he wants to be and the kind of example he wants to set for all of his fans. In the decade since Landau won America's Got Talent, he's worked to raise millions of dollars for charity throughout West Virginia and has produced 4 albums.  As a West Virginia favorite, this Summer Landau will be performing a show for the return of Charleston, West Virginia's famous Sternweheel Reghatta concert series. This July, Landau will be spending an entire week in Williamsburg's Busch Gardens Amusement Park, performing several times throughout the day for all guests. For more information about Landay, visit his website You can also listen to all of Landau's music on Spotify, Apple Music, Youtube Music, and more! The Big Time Talker is sponsored by Speakermatch.com

Intersections in Public Service
Bookmobiles to Hotspots: Libraries as Public Service

Intersections in Public Service

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 22:57


In this episode of Intersections in Public Service, we take a close look at how libraries function as a public service. Williamsburg's Regional Library Director Betsy Fowler, provides insight into the many unique ways libraries meet the needs of their communities. Along with a historical overview of how public libraries came to be in Virginia, we also dive into the evolution of library technologies. To stay up to date with the most recent happenings across libraries in America, check out the American Library Association's website. To support libraries in your area, donate or volunteer. Host, Editor, & Writer: Bea Webster Guests: Betsy Fowler & Nancy Webster Producer & Project Manager: Claire Downey Episode Presentation by Larry Terry, Executive Director of the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service. Music: Borough by Blue Dot Sessions Watermarks by Blue Dot Sessions Sculptor by Blue Dot Sessions Game Hens by Blue Dot Sessions Cello Drone A · Musician's Practice Partner Cello Drones for Tuning and Improvisation ℗ 2003 Marcia Sloane Released on: 2003-01-01 app.sessions.blueapp.sessions.blue Blue Dot Sessions Minimalist Acoustic Music for Film and Media app.sessions.blueapp.sessions.blue Blue Dot Sessions Minimalist Acoustic Music for Film and Media app.sessions.blueapp.sessions.blue Blue Dot Sessions Minimalist Acoustic Music for Film and Media app.sessions.blueapp.sessions.blue Blue Dot Sessions Minimalist Acoustic Music for Film and Media Air Hockey Saloon by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under and Attribution License. Licensing | Chris Zabriskie

FG Chic mix by Aquarium
FG INVITE : LE WILLIAMSBURG AVEC DYLTS?

FG Chic mix by Aquarium

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 60:07


Revivez le podcast du FG Invite le Williamsburg Hotel de New-York avec Do You Like That Song ? du mardi 10 mai 2022 

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Birth of America and Beautiful Virginia

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 57:11


DrRon and Linda discuss their visit to our nation's birthplace in Jamestown, Virginia, and the American Revolution battlefields of Williamsburg and Yorktown, where British Gen. Cornwallis surrendered to Gen. George Washington in 1781. Celebrate the bravery of America's first settlers and be amazed by their hardships and triumphs to final victory and independence...

TALKING WHILE MARRIED
Birth of America and Beautiful Virginia

TALKING WHILE MARRIED

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 57:11


DrRon and Linda discuss their visit to our nation's birthplace in Jamestown, Virginia, and the American Revolution battlefields of Williamsburg and Yorktown, where British Gen. Cornwallis surrendered to Gen. George Washington in 1781. Celebrate the bravery of America's first settlers and be amazed by their hardships and triumphs to final victory and independence...

Meat + Three
Magical Worlds and Mythical Foods: From Butterbeer to Dragon Gyoza

Meat + Three

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 22:33


Enjoy a meal in different magical worlds this week on Meat and Three. We discuss some of the fictional foods that populate the books and movies we grew up with and ignite the curiosity of your inner child. We drop in on a dinner series inspired by literature, recreate the butterbeer that Hogwarts students and teachers love to sip on, and learn how to recreate edible creatures found in video games. Further Readings and Listening: To hear more about Kate Young's thoughts on food and fiction, listen to episode 48 of Meant to Be Eaten to learn more.Keep up with Chef Evan Hanscor and his dinner series here!To learn more about Victoria Rosenthal and her recipes, visit her blog Pixelated Provisions or reach her at pixelatedprovisions@gmail.com. Additionally, find out about her cookbooks and purchase them here!Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate.Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

WHRO Reports
Virginia health official discusses new Williamsburg radon research

WHRO Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022


Ryan Paris, radon expert with the Va. Department of Health, has known about the issue for years. But he says there's nothing particularly alarming in the new data. See April 26's episode for Part 1.

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast
EPISODE # 36 WILLIAMSBURG WINERY/PATRICK DUFFELER;FOUNDER & MATTHEW MEYER;WINEMAKER

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 61:46


Patrick Duffeler purchased his tract of land called Wessex Hundred just outside of Williamsburg, Virginia in 1983 and would start to plant his vineyard in 1985.  Patrick was born in Belgium and after gaining his degree in Economics & Finance from the University of Rochester, New York he started his professional career with Eastman Kodak. He would go on to work in the International Division of Philip Morris in Switzerland as the Director of Marketing and ultimately become President of Fragrances Selective. It was in 1983 that his wife Peggy had convinced them that he needed to slow down and after an exhaustive search they landed in Williamsburg, Virginia.  Along with producing world quality wine Patrick Duffeler has an amazing country Inn called Wedmore Place and several restaurants on the Estate at Wessex Hundred.His winemaker Matthew Meyer came to Williamsburg via California where he earned a degree at UC Davis in both Oenology and Viticulture and after a short stint at Grigich Hills Wine Cellars was recruited by Heitz Wine Cellars and learned directly from Joe Heitz.  Matthew moved to Virginia and took the position as Winemaker in 2002 and has been producing some of Virginia's highest quality wines ever since.HIGHLIGHTS OF THE INTERVIEW: a). Matthew recounts his introduction to wine as a young boy when he father was a Burgundian wine drinker vs Claret even though they were from Englandb). He talked about what a gift it was to work for Joe Heitz early in his career.c). He relays his father who was a big Burgundy aficionado would send him bottles of Burgundy because he said he would ruin his palette drinking all that California wine.d). When I ask Matthew about Climate Change he points to the continued issue with late frosts in the Spring and how they are getting later and later.e). Patrick brought an interesting perspective to the art of tasting wine and how when he learned to be a Perfumer when he was running an Internation Fragrance company the professionals told him that they couldn't smell and sniff fragrances and remember more than 18 before they got fatigued. He said the same for wine at the most.  Tasting a 100 wines in one sitting you only remember maybe 3 or 4 at the most.f). Matthew surprised me with his answer to my question about what was that one bottle of wine you had that made you go, that's it, now I get it.  Wine can be that ethereal.  g). Patrick's answer to that question was quite different as he tells the story of his Father taking them to a great restaurant in Perigord and he was served Foie Gras with Monbazillac.h). Matthew shares his theory about why Ca wine is so much higher in Alcohol than it was several decades ago.  he ties it to the new Rootstocks since AXR1 has been replaced.i). Patrick has a thought provoking story about what he calls "the Miracle after Midnight" part of winemaking in France.Much, Much more.  this interview is packed with stories and interesting opinions.  Listen below or read the transcript.

From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast
A Conversation with Jami Attenberg

From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 34:29


You're listening to From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy, a food and culture podcast. I'm Alicia Kennedy, a food writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every week on Wednesdays, I'll be talking to different people in food and culture about their lives, careers and how it all fits together and where food comes in. Today, I'm talking to Jami Attenberg, the author of seven novels, including the best-selling The Middlesteins. Her latest book is a memoir called I Came All This Way to Meet You, which grapples with ideas of success and living a nontraditional life. We talk about the ups and downs of the writing life, along with her move from New York to New Orleans, why she chose to write a memoir right now, and how the pandemic has shifted her relationship to travel.You're listening to From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy, a food and culture podcast. I'm Alicia Kennedy, a food writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every week on Wednesdays, I'll be talking to different people in food and culture about their lives, careers and how it all fits together and where food comes in. Today, I'm talking to Jami Attenberg, the author of seven novels, including the best-selling The Middlesteins. Her latest book is a memoir called I Came All This Way to Meet You, which grapples with ideas of success and living a non-traditional life. We talk about the ups and downs of the writing life, along with her move from New York to New Orleans, why she chose to write a memoir right now, and how the pandemic has shifted her relationship to travel. Alicia: Hi, Jami. Thank you so much for being here. Jami: Hi. It's so nice to meet you.Alicia: Can you tell me about where you grew up and what you ate?Jami: Yeah, I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. I’m 50, so I grew up in the ’70s. And I'm Jewish, and so there was an emphasis on deli when we could get it. There wasn't a lot of deli going on out there where I grew up. I grew up in Buffalo Grove. So closer to Skokie is where they, where you can get deli. And then, a lot of Italian food. A lot of pizza. I don't know if you've ever heard of Portillo's before. That is an amazing Chicago chain, and the Italian—Oh. I want it right now, just thinking about it. They had this croissant sandwich with Italian beef that was really delicious. My mother would be upset to hear me say this, I do not recall having a lot of emphasis on healthy food in my household growing up. We were also latchkey kids. You come home and you sort of scramble for what you could find in the house, that kind of thing. I mean, there was food there.So, I don't know. When I look back at it now, I just think it was that there was not a clear path to, not a clear aesthetic necessarily. It was a lot of what was around.Alicia: Yeah.Well, it's interesting that you say your mom wouldn't like that. In your memoir, you write about her making chicken noodle soup from scratch and insisting she'd done it. And it's interesting, because it brings up obviously—memoir, where your memories don't match up with other people's memories and the question of that. How was it to reconstruct those kinds of things? I liked that in the book, that you enacted the problem of memoir in the memoir with this kind of like, ‘Whose memory actually is the memory that's the memory?’ [Laughs.]Jami: Well, I have a brother. So I think he would back me up on certain things. And he's a wonderful cook, and he’s very health focused and really into the farmers’ markets and has a big tomato festival in his house every year. It was like a goal of his to kind of learn how to cook and be connected with food in a different way. I mean, I'm not blaming my parents for it. They had, of course, a million jobs and things going on. So I mean, I tried to be as honest about it as I could. I mean, I think my mother genuinely wants to have cooked, made chicken noodle soup for me from scratch. I do not recall it at all. I don't think that happened. So when that did happen, it felt kind of special. I mean, she probably hadn't cooked for me as an adult and in a really long time. That story where she is looking after me and making chicken noodle soup, for me, probably happened when I was in my late 30s. I don't know how much you go home to see your family or what that looks like for you. But for me, I had lived in New York a long time and my parents lived in Chicago. And I went back maybe once a year, and when we would see each other we could go out to eat. Big going-out-to-eat family.Alicia: Well, you write in the—that you're not a great cook, but you are a superb dinner party guest. And food and drink are present in the memoir of course, but they're also present in your fiction. So, how would you kind of characterize food in your life now that you're an adult, fully formed and all that?Jami: I mean, sadly, unlike my brother, I don't, I'm not—Yeah, I didn't take on the challenge like he did. Yeah, I don't have much of a repertoire. Yeah, I make a lasagna every so often. It’s winter and I'll be like, ‘Alright, I'm gonna make lasagna, veggie lasagna, and I'm gonna drop some at friends.’ This year for Christmas. I just made a ton of spiced nuts for everyone. And like, so once a year I get excited about doing—I throw a lot of parties though. I do that. I had, right after everybody got booster shots for the first time, I had a big oyster festival in my backyard. And it was really wonderful. I mean, it's just definitely a way for me to commune with my friends. It's just really important to me to connect with people. Everyone's happy. We like to sit down for long meals. I live in a city that's got a great food culture. I lived in New York City for a long time. And I have a great food culture. I just was there last week and had dinner with some girlfriends at Ernesto’s, which was wonderful. Every part of the dinner was wonderful. But then at the very last minute, we got dessert too. And there was this fried brioche. I don't even know how to explain it. We were talking about it, still this morning. But the fried brioche, it was kind of creamy in the center. It was kind of french toast, but something at—something else. It was so good. And we’re probably going to remember that fried brioche for the rest of our lives. It was really special. Alicia: Well, and so much of the memoir is about success and how it's difficult to define. And you can publish books and have no money. It was important for me to read, I think, at this juncture in my life, where I was like, ‘Nothing means anything, necessarily, until it means something.’ I don't know. [Laughter.]How do you define success? How do you feel about success as a concept as a writer?Jami: Well, first of all, let me say that, I have told you this before that I'm a fan of your newsletter. So I'm sort of following along your kind of existential crisis that you, that is sort of rolling out, in particular, the last couple of newsletters. And I don't want to be that person who's like, ‘It gets better,’ but I think it does get better. I don't know how old you are. And it's fine however old you are, but I think—Alicia: I'm 36, yeah.Jami: I think it gets better in your 40s. I hate to say it. But I have given that advice to so many people in their, in that age, where you're like, ‘I've been doing this for so long. When does it just get a little bit easier?’And I think the answer is, as a writer is it got easier for me after I'd written four books, which is like when I was 40, 41, something like that, was when I'd had that moment where I was able to—and also there's just like this catch-up period where you're constantly waiting for somebody to pay for something that you've written. And it's like, ‘How do you ever get ahead of that?’ And at some point, you sort of do get ahead of that. Hopefully. I'd make no guarantees or promises to anyone. And so to me, I think that your question was notion of success. To me, right now, because I have a book contract, and I have—I can spend the next year writing that book, that I feel safe for now. And you're always kind of leapfrogging to the next, whatever the next project is. I mean, someday I might run out. And I might be s**t out of luck. And I don't know, if you ever really get to take—it's the only thing I envy about an academic existence, is that they get to take sabbaticals. Yeah. And I mean, I guess it's for us, on our own, I think it would be about applying for grants or something like that. I don't actually, don't think residencies are really a sabbatical. The only thing that gives you, that buys you time, is money. Which is, then you have to do more. I know. I get it, I get it. It’s hard. And then I feel bad. But then it's like double I know, I know. It's really tricky. I think it slowed down a little bit for me, or got a little bit easier. I mean, part of that was that I moved to a city that was more affordable. Yeah, I had looked around when I was 45. So I've been down here for six years, I looked around and was like, ‘I can't work any harder than I am. I can't do any more than what I'm doing. I'm not really gonna make any more money than this unless something magical happens, like somebody makes one of my books into a TV show. I'm operating at a pretty good level. I'm still not saving any money. And I'm still not getting ahead. So what's the problem here?’ And it was New York City. So no, I love you, New York. But it’s bringing me down. We have to sort of start making certain decisions as we go, get older about it. And you can always go visit New York. Or wherever.Alicia: Well, New York is also my home, so yeah. But I get to go because that's where my family is. So I get to go back. But it feels so weird now, not living there anymore. I don't know how it feels for you to go back. The visiting is strange to me, to visit a place you lived for so long. Jami: Well, I don't go to Williamsburg where I lived for a zillion years. I just don't go there because—I do sometimes, because my dear friends own St. Mazie’s, a bar—restaurant there. So I'll go over there and say hi to them. But I don't go to the old apartment building that I used to live in. I know it's very different there now. I just go to see the people that I love, wherever that might happen to be. I just feel like such a country mouse when I go there now, too, because the buildings are so tall and it's so annoying and there's—it’s so expensive. It's all the things that you can work around if you live there. But when you visit, it's harder to avoid those things. And I'm not even complaining when I say any of those things at all. I had a great time there last week. It's just a sharp contrast to my existence. So I don't know if I could ever go back there. I mean, maybe you could ’cause your family's there. But I don't I wouldn't be able to take that step back, ’cause my life is maybe too quiet now. Alicia: Yeah, no. It feels very different now, life in general [Laughs.] having moved to a smaller quieter city, yeah. Jami: Do you feel happier now in that, in—with that?Alicia: Oh, yeah. Yeah, a lot happier. I didn't know it was possible. Grew up on Long Island, moved to the city. The big thing you're supposed to do is move to the city. And then, I didn't think I'd ever leave or live anywhere else. And now, I just have such a more relaxed life. I can think more, I think. I think there's a reason I've had not success, but more success as a writer leaving New York, because I—I'm not constantly, especially as a food writer, going to different restaurants and stupid things. And then, feeling I have to eat the things that everyone's eating. [Laughs.] I'm free. I'm free from having to go to whatever new place people are going to, like Bernie's, I think it's called. [Laughs.] [Note: I meant Bonnie’s!]Jami: But even as a non-food writer, I used to feel I had to go to all those places. And now I don't feel that. I don't feel that way anymore. I still have really good friends in New York who are really intuitive, or culture writers. And so, I can sort of keep track of where I might want to go through them. There's no reflection on me. It’s nice.Alicia: It’s great to be free of that. [Laughter.]Jami: Yeah, I don't know what I miss. I keep trying to figure out what I miss exactly. The only thing I've ever missed is the people.Alicia: Yeah, the people, the culture. Going to a museum. There’s museums here, but they're not those museums. I miss public transportation. We don't have public transportation here. And that's what I miss, I think. Jami: I just want to do one more thing, which is it's just about—I just think we, as writers or as creative people, I'm trying to—I'm starting to write this talk about how to carve out a creative life. I think as we get older and our priorities change, we really just have to go—we have to go all in on something. We have to if we want to really make it as an artist. And you can sort of see the people who—and this is not a criticism of them—but the people who say, ‘Alright, I'm actually not going all in as an artist. I decided I wanted to have a house in the Hamptons, or I've got three kids now.’ You can also, by the way, be an artist and have three kids. You know what you're choosing. There's no wrong answer. It's what is right for you, whatever works for you.Alicia: Yeah. It's interesting you’re writing a talk on creativity—I've been thinking about this and wanting to write an essay, because I've been listen, listening to a lot of podcasts. My dog is afraid of these birds, these local birds that kind of swoop in, so we've had to not go to the dog park while they're nesting. And so, I've just done these really long walks with the dog listening to On Being. I've never listened On Being before. But like everyone says, you realize when all these patterns of things that people say about creativity and how to make it happen, and it's—there's these patterns of like, ‘It is work, it is labor to be creative, and you have to make these choices to do it.’ Whereas when I think, when we're—When I was growing up, I always was like, ‘Oh, to be creative has to have this magical quality. And it has to strike you like lightning, and it's not work and you don't sit down and do it every day.’ [Laughter.]Jami: I just was on some panel where we were talking about this. It is a magical quality. But you have to show up in the first place to receive the magic. And that's the work part of it.Alicia: Yeah. Yeah. No, and I love the line in I came, I Came All This Way to Meet You where you say, ‘I had to be a good writer. And I had to be a good salesperson.’ And it's interesting, because you just kind of plainly said the thing that I think we're not supposed to say about being a writer and the tension of selling and writing and creativity and how these—How are you feeling now about those things as a relationship?Jami: I'm looking down as we're talking, ’cause I'm looking at my notes, ’cause I was thinking about it a little bit this morning. So I would say there's two things. One is that having been in the publishing industry for—My first book came out in 2006. So 16 years of it. I recognize that when you put out a book, it's more than just you. There's a marketing team. There's a book designer, there's an editor, salespeople. There's the assistants. There's everybody who does it. And so to me, them and also coming from a place where my dad was a traveling salesman, and my parents owned a retail store as well. I'm probably the perfect person for that to be sympathetic to this. Although frankly, I'm not a team player. I'm really about other people succeeding at their jobs. I appreciate it when people succeed at what they're trying to do. So I don't have a problem with doing certain things that are sales oriented in order to support my work, because I feel it's not—Me writing it is one piece. That's the art part of it. But once I sell it, then it's a product. That's a really seamless clear transition to me. When it's done, it's done. And now, what can I do to help you? And hopefully, you're gonna do things to help me. And so, we all have to work on it together. And I think that that has been beneficial to my career in a lot of ways. And I think it makes it, ensures that I continue to get published, because people know that I understand what the game is. Yeah, at this point in my life, through trial and error, I figured out things I don't want to do and things that I’m willing to do. And then also, the things that I'm good at doing. And I've been public facing for a long time. You had that thing in your newsletter recently about being public facing and reels, which is—I can't tell you how many people I know who are like, ‘F****n’ reels!’ And I'm not doing them. I just sort of refuse to do that. But I don't think I have to do that. But anyway, I've been public facing for a long time. And I've given too much of myself, certainly online. And then I've walked it back, meaning not, meaning I've regretted that, what I've done. And also my life is way less interesting than it used to be when I was 29, writing about my sex life online or whatever it was I was doing then.But basically, I would say actually, summer 2020 was the kind of a turning point for me, where I was like, ‘I do so much stuff online.’ I have this, the 1000 Words of Summer that I do, which is I have my own newsletter, obviously. And then I do 1000 Words of Summer thing, where it's 15,000 people. Everybody's writing. And I was doing Zoom teaching sessions and things like that. I was really, like everybody else summer of 2020, just losing their mind. And I really had to sit down and reassess what I was doing, what I wanted the internet to do for me. I was just saying this morning on Twitter that my goal is always to get more out of the internet from the internet gets out of me. So I had to really sit down and figure out what I was, what information I was willing to put out there, what I wanted to accomplish, all this kind of stuff, especially because we were really living—we had been living online. And now, we're really living online. And so, I made a list of things I was, topics that I wanted to put out there. And I talked about, to myself, about how, what kind of help I can provide? Because that's really up to me. I mean this in a non-cynical way. But I think that if you can figure out ways to be positive online, and be helpful to other people, then it is beneficial to your career, or the—think of it as a project, right? The project of my life more than career, because there's plenty of things that I do that I don't make a dime off of. But they are all part of this huge art project of my life. Ok, I think that's all I wanted to say about it. [Laughs.] We can talk about it. But do you know what I mean? It's really about, yeah, wrestling control of it and say, and not looking at what anyone else is doing. But looking at what your skill set is and what makes you feel good. And I like entertaining people. My dog makes me feel good. I know it’s a total dopamine rush. But people like my dog. And that's fine., that's yeah. I just would rather be positive online than not positive online.Alicia: No, yeah. I think I'm learning this too. That doesn't help anybody to be s**t talking or negative. And it's hard for me [laughter] as a mostly negative person. Jami: Yeah, and you’re a truth teller. I'm a truth teller, too. It's not that I'm not ever negative. I think you have to be honest about it. And especially as a thinker, a participant in culture, that kind of thing. But where you focus, you really choose to focus your energy. I sound very hippy dippy. [Laughs.]Alicia: No, you don't ’cause it's real. And yeah, we've been on the internet for so long now, at this point, everyone, I think. But it's so different now. And I think that's the tension that I'm always teasing out, is that I used to have a relationship with the internet, like you were saying, where I got so much more out of it than it got out of me. And now that definitely changed. Considering how to reassemble a positive relationship with the internet, where it doesn't feel like a vampire to just open an app, is really important. I mean, I guess, or people who weren't on the internet all the time are here. And they have a voice, and they think that they need to—the way people are and be nasty and think that that’s ok. And that sort of thing.Jami: It's out of control, but it's also it's too—it's so far gone that it doesn't even matter. It’s beyond me. So I'm just like, ‘Whatever.’ I'm just gonna do the thing that I do, and that's fine. And they can do what they're gonna do. And I can't save the world. And I can only just put out what I can put out because it's too—I'm not their mom. Or whatever. Alicia: But there are a lot of people looking for moms on Twitter. [Laughs.] Well, why did you want to write a memoir now after so many novels? I heard you talking about this on The Maris Review a little bit.Jami: I don't know why I did it. No, I know why I did. I'm very shut down about it, I have to admit. So it came out on January 11th. It's April 4. So it's been out for a little bit. I basically put it out, did everything I was supposed to do for the month that I came out. It's also two months beforehand. So I do interviews and all this other stuff. So it's really two to three months. It used to be, in the old days, that you would have a book, you would do a bunch of stuff a month before it came out. And then, you really would talk about it for 2, 3, 4 months. And now, the cycle is everything happens before and then one month after. And then, the next thing steps in. Even the biggest sellers in the world. Hanya Yanagihara’s book was massive. And I think after a month, it was like, ‘Ok, she did everything she was supposed to do. Right, who's next? Who's next on the list?’So yeah, so anyway, I put in a lot of effort around that time. And then, I immediately went offline for the month of February and worked, which was delightful. I wasn't on Twitter. I wasn't totally screen free. It felt real, real good. Now I'm back on a little bit. And I'm not really answering your question. I'm gonna answer your question, eventually. So now I'm back. And I'm going to start doing some touring again and think—this summer, I’m gonna do some stuff. And I have some speaking engagements and things like that. So I think I'm sort of back in the game. And I thought I would have perspective on it. I couldn't write another novel, because I had written seven. I needed a break from writing novels. So my way of taking a break, we don't get to take a sabbatical, was just to write a memoir. Fortunately, I had sold the book before that right before the pandemic hit. So I at least had that project to work on, and it was really poor—I thought I was gonna be writing it here and there. I'd be traveling, whatever. I just had a book come back. And instead, I was just really living with myself at home, really no escaping me while I was writing a memoir. I was a lot. I definitely think, because I was about to turn 50, that was part of it. I had some perspective, finally. It was really kind of spanning maybe 20 years of my life, my writing career, mostly focused on my writing career more than anything else. Left a little bit to childhood here and there, a little bit to the modern day here and there. I thought I had only been writing part of the truth the entire time that I have been reading nonfiction, 20 years of nonfiction, alongside 20 years of writing novels. And I thought that it would be worth it to try and explore these essays that I wrote that were 1200 words for the back of New York Times Magazine. What does it look like if they get expanded? How do they all fit next to each other? A lot of these chapters were like five essays that were not chopped up but had a very kaleidoscopic effect in the writing of the book. And then there were things that I thought were really important that I would have sworn would have been l huge focal points in the book, essays I'd written that ended up being just like a paragraph. And then I was done with it. It was really an interesting experience in that way. The process of it was actually, I learned so much from the process of it. I learned new things about my writing. I really just thought I needed to try something different, a different genre, and I thought I was ready to write about myself. I don't ever want to look at this book again. And right now that's how I feel. Yeah, I don't even know how to respond to it. I think I get that way with all my books. And then I look back a couple years later, and I'm like, ‘I knew a big word,’ or whatever. That’s a really fancy word that I put in there. How did I even come up with that? I don't know what it means now.Yeah, I don't know. I can't wait to see. I will say that I'm getting really positive responses to it from people. I'm sure there are people who hate it. But I have been getting really nice emails that are different than the emails that I usually get for my fiction. Because it's me, so they're responding to me personally. Please do send me a nice email about my work. I'm happy for it to have meant something. You don't sort of, don't know how to respond to it. I really thought I was not particularly likable in that book. And I am fascinated that people emailed me and were like, ‘I'm pretty sure we would be friends.’ I’m like, ‘Are ya? I'm not that good. Did you read the same book? I’m kind of shitty. Are you sure?’ Anyway.Alicia: I didn't come away thinking you were shitty. So I don't know. [Laughs.]Jami: I suppose we all are. Alicia: Do you think it would have been different if you weren't writing it during the pandemic? Did you anticipate it being different? Jami: For sure. Because there's the present tense of the book became—I thought I would be writing it while I was traveling. Because I had had six months of touring planned out, because in my old life, it was—that's what I did. I had a book come out, and then I toured for the next year, with little breaks here and there. And then, I'd write here and there. And so I thought, 'I'm gonna be writing this while I'm traveling.' And that's gonna be part of the process. And instead, I was writing it from a, I think, a wistful or more full place where I might have—If I were traveling and exhausted and had written it, I might even have been more critical. Instead, I was like, 'Remember that time? I was so happy there, wasn't I?' that I think that was different. I think everyone had—Not everyone. Can't speak for everyone. I think a lot of people that I know had some come to Jesus moments over the last couple of years about who you are, what you're doing with your life? What kind of person you are? What you can handle? How are you a part of your community? How do you feel about your community? All that kind of stuff. And so that, I think, played into it in a way that I wouldn't have had to think about if I were still on the road running around. I'm certain it would have been a different book. I'm certain of it. And so then, you write the book that you can write.Alicia: Well, has this time changed your relationship to traveling? Because you are moving in the book. Also in life, of course. You're traveling so much. Do you feel differently about travel now?Jami: I will say, maybe it was my sabbatical. Even though I wasn't traveling. If you'd asked me six months ago, I would have been like, 'Great. I don't ever want to travel again. It's fine.' I feel I needed the break. And now, I'm so hungry for it. I can't wait to get out in the world. I'm doing a European tour in two weeks. And I just kept adding vacation time in there. I'm gone for three weeks. And I think I have seven events in three weeks, which means there's a couple cities I'm going to that are just kind of for fun. That's just for me. And I will be super broke at the end of it. But I don't, kind of don't care. I don't know. I will have to write a little bit more than I want to. The only thing is that I write a lot in the book about how—There's a big chapter about my flight anxiety, and I had really pushed past it. And have found now that I'm flying again enmasked that it has returned. I'm doing a whole layer of work on that that I hadn't anticipated having to do. I thought it was fine. And then I had set up meetings, all these systems into place when you have anxiety. A lot of those systems aren't really available to you when you're wearing a mask. And when other people are wearing masks. And so, that's my only challenge.I think I'm gonna spend way too much money in my life on upgrading my seats. I just had this whole Twitter thing where I posted about aisle seats versus window seats. 20,000 people responded to it. Because I'm such an aisle person. But window people are super window people. Actually window people have their own form of anxiety, too. And that means to them, it feels like it's a cocoon and it's safe and everything like that. And it ended up being kind of exposure therapy for me in this weird way of seeing all these people talking about their feelings about where they sit on an airplane. Twitter was helpful for me in that way.But I still don't know, those middle-row people.Alicia: Very, very, very odd to me. I have to be in the aisle. I don't like to have to bother someone to get up. I would rather be bothered by someone than to be the botherer. I think that's the question really, is would you rather ask or be asked [laughs] to get up? I don't know what psychological meaning that has really, but it seems like something.We talked about this though, yeah. How has New Orleans changed your life other than it being an easier place to live as a writer?Jami: I now have a little house here. So I like that when you own a house, your life changes in certain ways. You have certain kinds of responsibilities. It makes me feel safe to have a mortgage, because I rented for so long. So I think being a homeowner means something to me.I would say, I see people more. I see friends more. I really appreciate now that I have the opportunity to see people in my community all the time. I miss a little bit maybe of the anonymity in New York, where you could walk out your door and not see people and just go out about your day and make the choices that you want to make. And here, it's you walk out your front door, you're gonna run into three people you know. Especially with the dog. All the dog people know each other. Everyone lives in houses versus large apartment buildings, and things like that. It's just different. It's a much tighter and closer community. The weather's better. It really doesn't mean a lot to me to have better weather. New Orleans has many, many problems as a city, but I still love it here. I definitely feel happier here. Definitely feel happier here.Alicia: Well, how do you define abundance? Jami: Well, I'm looking out my window, and there's just a huge loquat tree that is just full of orange. And I can walk out there right now and pull the fruit from the tree. And that feels like abundance to me.Alicia: Well, for you is writing a political act? Jami: Yes, of course. Of course. What else are we doing here? Alicia: Usually asking people cooking, is cooking a political act? I want to be fair. They usually say yes, or no. But people, they'll say that 'me being in the kitchen isn't political.' Speaking of academics, I did a conversation with a professor, an English professor who has a novel out. And we were talking about this, and she was saying how there's so much labor involved in cooking. And I think that when people talk about cooking not being political when they're in the kitchen, and I think that they're doing a disservice to their own work.Jami: I was thinking about how earlier you were talking about writing being labor, and there actually has been an internet discussion as of late about being a novelist being unpaid labor. I just have to say, no one's making you write a novel. No one's making you do any of this. You're choosing to do it because you want to. You chose it. You chose a hard path. We chose a hard path. But there are other paths that are even harder. And the fact that you even have a choice is amazing to do it. Sorry. I was just being a mom there. I was like, 'Oh, my gosh. I sound like such a mom.'Alicia: Yeah, no, but thank you. Thank you for being here.Jami: Yeah, sure. My pleasure.Alicia: Thanks so much to everyone for listening to this week's edition of From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy. Read more at www.aliciakennedy.news. Or follow me on Instagram, @aliciadkennedy, or on Twitter at @aliciakennedy. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.aliciakennedy.news/subscribe

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 626 (4-25-22): A Sampler of Trees Inhabiting Soggy Virginia Sites

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-22-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of April 25 and May 2, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Baldcypress Swamp,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., sets the stage for exploring some of Virginia's tree species found in or near water, along with some of the water places those trees inhabit.  We start with a series of guest voices calling out 16 native Virginia tree species that can be found around watery habitats.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds. VOICES and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC - ~27 sec - “American Sycamore.  Atlantic White-cedar.  Baldcypress.  Black Gum.  Black Willow.  Boxelder.  Eastern Hemlock.  Hackberry.  Overcup Oak.  Red Maple.  Red Spruce.  River Birch.  Silver Maple.  Swamp Tupelo.  Water Hickory.  Water Tupelo.” Those 16 and other tree species can be found in a wide variety of water-related habitats in Virginia.  The Virginia Department of Conservation's 2021 report, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” lists over 30 community types associated with aquatic habitats.  Tree species are a characteristic of the vegetation in over 15 of those community types, ranging from Piedmont/Mountain Small-stream Alluvial Forests, to Coastal Plain/Piedmont Bottomland Forests, to Coastal Plain Depression Swamps and Ponds, to Maritime Swamps.  More generally speaking, you can find native Virginia trees beside small streams in uplands, for example, Eastern Hemlock; beside large rivers in the mountains or Piedmont, for example, American Sycamore and Silver Maple; beside large Coastal Plain rivers, for example, Overcup Oak and Water Hickory; and in a variety of swamps and other wetlands, for example, Baldcypress, Atlantic White-cedar, and Swamp Tupelo. Here's to Virginia's many tree species, its many water habitats, and the many combinations of those two groups of natural resources.  Thanks to seven Virginia Tech colleagues for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Baldcypress Swamp.” MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Baldcypress Swamp,” from the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  The “Virginia Wildlife” album was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources).  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 479, 7-1-19, on the Dismal Swamp.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/. Virginia Water Radio thanks the seven Virginia Tech colleagues who recorded tree names on April 21, 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) River Birch photographed at Fredericksburg, Va., April 13, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user pfirth, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309642(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Swamp Tupelo photographed at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach, Va., July 9, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user karliemarina, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86317064(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Black Willow trees along Toms Creek in Montgomery County, Va., August 18, 2011. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TREE SPECIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Following are the scientific names (in parentheses) of the tree species mentioned in this episode, in alphabetical order according to the species' common names. Atlantic White-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)Black Gum (Nyssa syvatica)Black Willow (Salix nigra)Boxelder (Acer negundo)Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata)Red Maple (Acer rubrum)Red Spruce (Picearubens)River Birch (Betula nigra)Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)Swamp Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) – a variety of Black GumWater Hickory (Carya aquatica)Water Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Common Native Trees of Virginia,” Charlottesville, Va., 2016.  (The 2020 edition is available online [as a PDF] at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf.) A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” October 22, 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject categoryFollowing are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.

music new york university game texas earth education college water state zoom land living tech research government benefits foundation search north america environment dark press normal web natural tree va rain disease ocean climate change voices snow citizens status trees agency stream priority richmond plants environmental bay images ash grade conservation copyright index charlottesville sites processes penn mid pond fort worth signature ludwig virginia tech asheville gothic scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources virginia beach adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry times new roman ls sampler sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms montgomery county chesapeake piedmont acer soggy seaman policymakers ponds forest service fredericksburg photosynthesis shrubs new standard acknowledgment cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr live oak latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable stormwater centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub dispdef lmargin smallfrac rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim allowpng virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat instrumental music lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused sols latentstyles table normal inhabiting inaturalist bmp quercus name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading forest management cripple creek living systems grades k name e biotic space systems wildlife resources light accent dark accent colorful accent box elder name list rhododendrons name plain text name date name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table cumberland gap name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d salix relyonvml penn state extension betula atlantic region inland fisheries forest resources hackberry dismal swamp audio notes celtis 20image stormwater runoff tmdl water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Locked On Hawkeyes
Iowa Football: How is Iowa's offense going to hold up against B1G defenses?

Locked On Hawkeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 29:40


The major question going around Iowa football right not is whether or not their offense is going to be able to perform against all of these top 10 defenses in the B1G. With Iowa's extremely tough schedule this year including games against the likes of Penn State, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, they are definitely going to have their work cut out for them when it comes to moving the ball. The offensive line and the running backs units are going to have to step up their game if Iowa thinks they are going to have a shot at the B1G West, let alone the B1G Championship. Derek Weisskopf is officially a HAWKEYE!! We talked about his a few episodes back and I noted that he would be able to play a major role on Iowa's defense when his time came to step on the field. Now that it's official, Weisskopf can stop focusing on the pressures of playing college ball and re-center his focus on becoming an all-state line backer for his 3A Iowa highschool, Williamsburg. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/COLLEGE. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

STARK REALITY with Jim Dier aka $mall ¢hange
STARK REALITY Episode 45 Guest Honeychild Coleman

STARK REALITY with Jim Dier aka $mall ¢hange

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 78:46


Episode 45 of STARK REALITY features James Dier aka $mall ¢hange's in-depth interview with Honeychild Coleman, a longtime friend in NYC we met in the mid 90s at a loft party in Williamsburg.  She is an OG afro punk, rude girl, DJ, musician, an original. One of those ppl that keeps New York still New York, despite the yuppification of this town. Forward thinking politics and dope fashion. Top top ppls. And she keeps very busy. Originally from Kentucky, Carolyn / Honeychild fronts blues-punk outfit The 1865 (Mass Appeal Records) on vocals/baritone guitar, and spins records under DJ Sugarfree BK. plays on bass/sings in Post Punk trio Bachslider. Collaborators/ Projects: GKA, Heavensbee, Gracefully, Mad Professor, Apollo Heights, Death Comet Crew, Burnt Sugar, DJ Olive, Raz Mesinai's Badawi, etc etc In this interview we discuss black women's contribution to rock and roll, mixing politics and music, her various projects and the different playing styles for each group, the general stereotypes on black ppl, and the folks pushing beyond those parameters, gatekeepers/snobs in underground scenes, meeting Ari Up from the Slits and going on tour with them, her DJing and how her style has evolved. For more info about Honeychild go to www.honeychildcoleman.com and follow her on Instagram @hccoleman Honeychild also gives us a nice set of local / newer underground and punk sounds, featuring tracks from Simi, Mother Goddess, Tamar-Kali, Suffrajett and her own band The 1865.  To hear this exclusive Stark Reality Playlist, go to Episode 46 of STARK REALITY or on Apple Podcasts' STARK REALITY PLAYLISTS Episode 46. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nymphet Alumni
Ep. 22: Mass Bushwick

Nymphet Alumni

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 63:03


In this episode, we reflect on our days at warehouse raves, zine fairs, and house shows to bring you a categorical history of Mass Bushwick, a cultural movement that has expanded far beyond its namesake locale. We chronicle its infectious rise through avant-pop stars, meme pages, and fashion editorials; we discuss the methodology of "turning looks" and the high stakes of club kid nightlife; and we offer our advice to those undergoing the transformative effects of the bleached brow/mullet combo.  ‿︵‿︵ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ・❉・ ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ‿︵‿︵‿︵‿︵ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ・❉・ ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ‿︵‿︵‿︵‿︵ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ・❉・ ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ‿︵‿︵ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ・❉・ ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ‿︵‿︵‿︵‿︵ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ・❉・ ʚ˚̣̣̣͙ɞ‿︵‿︵‿Image Board:https://www.pinterest.com/nymphetalumni/ep-22-mass-bushwick/ Links: Rihanna's 2017 PAPER cover shoot: https://www.papermag.com/rihanna-paper-2293524292.html?rebelltitem=6#rebelltitem6Luke Blovad's TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lukeblovad?lang=enSpinal Fluid Fits: https://www.instagram.com/spinalfluid.fits/Biz's blog post on turning looks: https://sherbert.biz/2016-2017

Your Most Obedient & Humble Servant
Episode 33: Any Dandridge That Ever Wore An Head

Your Most Obedient & Humble Servant

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 23:04


The Testimony of Anne Moody Part the last of Martha Washington's In-Laws! In which Anne Moody explains how she came to own so much silver plate with engravings of parrots. Also featuring: John Custis IV, and this time, he's REAL cranky. Further Reading: "an answer (incomplete) n.d., of Mrs. Anne Moody and Matthew Moody to a bill of complaint of Daniel Parke Custis in an unidentified court in Virginia." http://librarycatalog.virginiahistory.org/final/portal.aspx?lang=en-US My book: https://www.upress.virginia.edu/title/5473 John Custis to William Byrd II, 20 July 1724, ; John Custis to [Thomas Dunbar] 15 January 1724/25, in Custis, John, and Josephine Little Zuppan. The Letterbook of John Custis IV of Williamsburg, 1717-1742. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005, pg. 64, 68. John Custis IV Encyclopedia Virginia: https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/custis-john-1678-1749/ Daniel Parke Custis in Encyclopedia Virginia: https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/custis-daniel-parke-1711-1757/

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott
Betches Mom, Aleen Dreksler, talks Adjusting to Motherhood

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 34:56


For some real, non-sugarcoated advice on the messiness of motherhood, we chat with Aleen Dreksler, co-founder and CEO of Betches Media!Betches is a multi-platform media and entertainment company for millennial women. Aleen hosts the popular Betches podcast, Diet Starts Tomorrow. She was named to the 2019 Forbes 30 Under 30 list; facilitated the growing dating app Ship in partnership with Match Group; has spoken at events such as Create & Cultivate and BlogHer has interviewed notable figures such as Mindy Kaling, Gary Vaynerchuck, Daymond John, and Olivia Wilde. She holds a degree in Biology from Cornell University in 2011, where Betches Media was created. She currently resides in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with her husband, Rusty and their dog Lady Sansa. In her free time Aleen enjoys cooking, working out, and discussing the shows Sopranos and Succession at length. Connect with Aleen IG: @Aleenhttps://www.instagram.com/aleenBetches Momshttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/betches-moms/id1556129919They're expensive, sometimes annoying and the best thing that's ever happened to us. But there's so much more to being a mom that no one really talks about. Betches Moms is a podcast that deals with all the real sh*t that happens.Diet Starts Tomorrowhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/diet-starts-tomorrow/id1374942074Featuring all things wellness, body image, mental health, nutrition and fitness from the no-bullsh*t perspective of people who totally understand the struggle. In a world where “wellness” looks perfect on Instagram but feels anything but in real life, this podcast explores the psychological and emotional side of health and wellbeing as a whole. Check out their new cocktail, Faux Pas! https://www.instagram.com/drinkfauxpashttps://www.fauxpascocktails.comDonate to the International Rescue Committee to help Ukraine: https://help.rescue.org/donate/ukraine-web?initialms=ws_ftr_fy22_ukraine&ms=ws_ftr_fy22_ukraineLINKS N' THINGS: Thanks to our friends at ADT for making it possible for us to share these stories in a safe and secure place, At Home. https://www.adt.com/AtHomeText 310-496-8667 with your questions for #AtHomePodcast !If you've enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, rate and share with a friend! Thank you for being a part of the At Home community! Connect with Linda & Drew: instagram.com/athomeinstagram.com/imlindorkinstagram.com/mrdrewscott#AtHomePodcastTHEME SONG BY: Victoria Shawwww.instagram.com/VictoriaShawMusic Chad Carlsonwww.instagram.com/ChadCarlsonMusic MUSIC COMPOSED AND PRODUCED BY:Rick Russohttps://www.instagram.com/rickrussomusicSpecial thanks to all our At Home homies: PRODUCERS:Brandon AngelenoHanna PhanPOST AUDIO ENGINEER:Chris CobainNicole SchacterWEBSITE:Wesley FriendSERIES PHOTOGRAPHER: Dennys Ilicwww.instagram.com/dennydennSponsored by:ADT: It's important to have not just a beautiful home -- but a smart and safer home.https://www.adt.com/AtHomeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Virginia Public Radio
Va. News: Mystery Busch Gardens project, Civil War battlefield preserved for now

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022


Something new – and big – is in the works at Busch Gardens in Williamsburg. And a significant Civil War battlefield will not become a new housing development, at least not now. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project’s Va. News link. More now […]

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 153 Part 1: How NYC's 92Y Developed the Largest Jewelry Program in the Country

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:20


What you'll learn in this episode: How Jonathan moved from sculpture to jewelry to drawing, and why he explores different ideas with each medium How the relationship between craft and fine art has evolved over the years Why people became more interested in jewelry during the pandemic Why jewelers working in any style benefit from strong technical skills How you can take advantage of the 92nd Street Y's jewelry programming and virtual talks About Jonathan Wahl Jonathan Wahl joined 92nd Street Y in July 1999 as director of the jewelry and metalsmithing program in 92Y's School of the Arts, the largest program of its kind in the nation. He is responsible for developing and overseeing the curriculum, which offers more than 60 classes weekly and 15 visiting artists annually. Jonathan is also responsible for hiring and supervising 25 faculty members, maintaining four state-of-the-art jewelry and metalsmithing studios, and promoting the department locally and nationally as a jewelry resource center. Named one of the top 10 jewelers to watch by W Jewelry in 2006, Jonathan is an accomplished artist who, from 1994 to 1995, served as artist-in-residence at Hochschule Der Kunst in Berlin, Germany. He has shown his work in the exhibitions Day Job (The Drawing Center), Liquid Lines (Museum of Fine Arts Houston), The Jet Drawings (Sienna Gallery, Lenox MA, and SOFA New York), Formed to Function (John Michael Kohler Arts Center), Defining Craft (American Craft Museum), Markers in Contemporary Metal (Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art), Transfigurations: 9 Contemporary Metalsmiths (University of Akron and tour), and Contemporary Craft (New York State Museum). Jonathan was awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Emerging Artist Fellowship from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, two New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships in recognition of "Outstanding Artwork," and the Pennsylvania Society of Goldsmiths Award for "Outstanding Achievement." As part of the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, TX, and The Museum of Arts and Design in New York, his work has been reviewed by Art in America (June, 2000), The New York Times (June 2005), and Metalsmith Magazine (1996, 1999, 2000 2002, 2005, 2009); his work was also featured in Metalsmith Magazine's prestigious "Exhibition in Print" (1994 and 1999). Jonathan's art work can be seen at Sienna Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts, which specializes in contemporary American and European art work, and De Vera in Soho, New York. His work can also be seen in the publications The Jet Drawings (Sienna Press, 2008), and in three collections by Lark Books: 1,000 Rings, 500 Enameled Objects and 500 Metal Vessels. Before joining 92Y, Jonathan was, first, director of the jewelry and metalsmithing department at the YMCA's Craft Students League, and later assistant director of the League itself. Mr. Wahl holds a B.F.A. in jewelry and metalsmithing from Temple University's Tyler School of Art and an M.F.A. in metalsmithing and fine arts from the State University of New York at New Paltz. He is a member of the Society of North America Goldsmiths. Additional Resources: Website: www.jonathanwahl.com Website: www.92y.org/jewelry LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jonathancwahl Instagram: @jonathancwahl/   Photos: Available at TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: With more than 60 jewelry classes offered weekly, the 92nd Street Y's Jewelry Center is by far the largest program of its kind in the country—and it's all run by award-winning sculptor, jeweler and artist Jonathan Wahl. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the different relationships he has with jewelry and sculpture; why craftsmanship should be embraced by the art world; and what he has planned for 92Y in 2022. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Here at the Jewelry Journey, we're about all things jewelry. With that in mind, I wanted to let you know about an upcoming jewelry conference, which is “Beyond Boundaries: Jewelry of the Americas.” It's sponsored by the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts, or, as it's otherwise known, ASJRA. The conference takes place virtually on Saturday and Sunday May 21 and May 22, which is around the corner. For details on the program and the speakers, go to www.jewelryconference.com. Non-members are welcome. I have to say that I attended this conference in person for several years, and it's one of my favorite conferences. It's a real treat to be able to sit in your pajamas or in comfies in your living room and listen to some extraordinary speakers. So, check it out. Register at www.jewelryconference.com. See you there.   This is a two-part Jewelry Journey podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week. Today, my guest is Jonathan Wahl, Director of the Jewelry Center at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. The program is the largest of its kind in the country. In addition to his life in jewelry, Jonathan is an award-winning artist whose work is in the permanent collections of prestigious museums. It has been exhibited nationally and internationally. We'll hear more about his jewelry journey today and how art fits into that. Jonathan, welcome to the program.   Jonathan: Thank you, Sharon. It's a pleasure to be here. It's a pleasure to see you.   Sharon: It's nice to see you. Hopefully next time, it'll be in person.    Jonathan: I would love that.   Sharon: Jonathan, tell us about your jewelry journey. How did you get to jewelry? Was that where you originally started out?   Jonathan: Recently I've been doing a lot of interviews myself with artists around the world—virtually since the pandemic—as Director of the Jewelry Center, and one of the questions I always ask them is “How did you find your way to jewelry?” It's one of the questions I love to be asked because, at least for myself, it was interesting. I think all of us start out as artists, unless we're born into a jewelry family. Everyone learns how to draw. Everyone paints on their own. Maybe they have classes in high school. If you're lucky, you have a jewelry class in high school. I didn't, so like many people, I discovered jewelry in college at Tyler School of Art, which has one of the best jewelry programs in the country, but I didn't know jewelry existed until I went to art school.    When I went to art school, I thought I was going to be a graphic designer. Being the son of a banker and coming from a prep school, I figured I was going to be an artist, but I had to make a living. I wasn't going to be a painter, so I was thinking I was going to be a graphic designer when I grew up. At the college, I discovered jewelry in my sophomore year. Stanley Lechtzin said to me—I'll never forget it—“After you graduate you could design, if you wanted, costume jewelry in New York City,” and I thought, “That sounds kind of exotic and fun in New York City.” That's how my jewelry journey really began, in an elective class as a sophomore at Tyler School of Art.   Sharon: Where is Tyler? I'm not familiar with it.   Jonathan: In Philadelphia. It's part of Temple University.   Sharon: And Stanley Lechtzin, is he one of the professors there? I don't know that name.   Jonathan: Stanley Lechtzin really put the program on the map. He's in collections internationally. He pioneered the use of electroforming in individual objects. Electroforming was a commercial process used throughout the country for many different industrial applications, but Stanley figured out how to finetune it for the individual artist. His work has recently had some new-found appreciation because of the aesthetics from the 60s and 70s that are also coming back into vogue. His pieces are extraordinary.   Sharon: Before you came to the Y, did you design jewelry? Did you do art? Did you come home from your banking job and work on that stuff?   Jonathan: My father was a banker. I was not a banker. The closest I got to banking was working at a casino in Atlantic City one summer. My family has a house in Ocean City, New Jersey, so I could get to Atlantic City. I had to count a bank of anywhere between $30,000 and $70,000 a night. That's the closest I got to being a banker.    I quickly then moved to London. This was the summer of my senior year after Tyler. After I graduated from Tyler, I moved to London briefly and worked for a crafts gallery in northern London. Then I decided I wanted to go to graduate school. I came back for about a year to work towards applying to graduate school, which ultimately became SUNY New Paltz. I graduated Tyler in 1990, so most of my undergraduate years were in the 80s. If you're familiar with 80s jewelry, it was no holds barred. It was any kind of jewelry you wanted. My work—or at least my practice—quickly started to veer away from jewelry and towards objects and what I would call small sculpture. My choice to go SUNY New Paltz was specific because I didn't really want to make jewelry, but I was interested in the field and decorative arts, the material culture of jewelry and metalsmithing. That's what I pursued while I was in graduate school. I was recreating early American tinware about my experience as a gay American at that time. I wish there were visuals included, but that's what I was doing at SUNY New Paltz.    Sharon: How did you find that material?   Jonathan: The tinware was a metaphor for America, for traditionalism. The pieces were metaphors for the function or dysfunction of America. These objects were a little perverse, a little sublime and really honest about how frustrated I felt about being an American and growing up in Philadelphia during the bicentennial. I thought life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness was for everybody, but I found myself not really able to access the full extent of that saying, like many people in our country even today. But I'm happy to report that a piece from that era was just acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. I'm thrilled that the older work is getting some interest. There's some interest from the New York Historical Society, which is not finalized yet, but it's interesting to see that work with new eyes 20-some years later.   Sharon: Congratulations!   Jonathan: When I was in Germany, my partner at the time was finishing his master's degree, and I was an artist in residence there at the Hochschule der Künste, which is now the Academy of Art, I think it's called. That was an interesting experience because Europeans in general, and Germans in particular, approach craft differently. They have a much longer and supportive tradition of craft of all kinds, so when they saw my tinware, it was a little confusing to them. I ended up in a program called small sculpture as an artist in residence because there was no jewelry program at this art university. It was interesting. It was curious.   Sharon: Tell us how you came to jewelry.   Jonathan: Jewelry eventually gets into my story. After leaving Berlin, I moved to New York. I knew I wanted to be a New York artist. That's the place I had to go. That's the place I had to find my destiny. I was walking around looking for positions in a gallery, which was what I thought I was supposed to do. I walked into one gallery and the director there said, “I don't have any gallery work for you, but I'm on the board of a not-for-profit gallery at the YWCA. That's the home of the Craft Students League. They are looking for a program associate, which pays a ridiculously low hourly wage but has health benefits.” I thought, “O.K., I can do that.”    That's when I found myself in the not-for-profit arts administration position that was developed into what I do now, at least part time. I was the program coordinator for the Craft Students League, which is unfortunately gone now, but had a wonderful ceramics, jewelry, painting, and book arts department. I ultimately became director of the jewelry studio and metalsmithing studio there, and then I became the assistant director of the whole program before I moved to the 92nd Street Y to become the director of the Jewelry Center here.   Sharon: Did they have an opening? How did you enter the 92nd Street Y?   Jonathan: Yes, there was an opening. There was John Cogswell. The Jewelry Center has some wonderful previous directors. It was Thomas Gentile from the late 60s to mid-70s, who really put this program on the map. He was followed by John Cogswell until the early 90s. Then briefly Shana Kroiz took over. She was between Baltimore and New York, and when she left the department, there was a call for a new director. That's when I joined the program here.   Sharon: Wow! I didn't know that Thomas Gentile was one of the—I don't know if you want to call it the founders, but one of the names that launched it.    Jonathan: Yeah. The program began in 1930 in its earliest form as a class in metalworking and slowly evolved into a few more classes. It became part of the one of the largest WPA programs in the country here at the 92nd Street Y, but it kind of floated along until Thomas came—and Thomas, forgive me if I get this wrong—in the mid-60s, I think, maybe later. He came in and really started to formulate a program of study here. He was the one who really created the Jewelry Center as a center.   Sharon: Was he emphasizing art jewelry or all jewelry?   Jonathan: There was a great book put out by the Museum of Modern Art in the 50s about how to make modern jewelry. Now, I don't know if the MOMA realized that they put out a book on how to make jewelry, but my point is in New York, I think there was still this idea of the modernist aesthetic and the artist as jeweler or jeweler as artist. I would say that Thomas was focused more on artist-made jewelry, the handmade, the one-of-a-kind object. It was still not looking in any way towards traditional or commercial jewelry.   Sharon: Jonathan, tell us what the 92nd Street Y is, because people may not know.   Jonathan: The 92nd Street Y is a 140-year-old institution here on the Upper East Side of New York City. It is one of New York City's most important cultural anchors. It has many different facets. We have a renowned lecture series. The November before the pandemic, I remember we had back-to-back Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Lizzo. Wednesday night it was Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Thursday night it was Lizzo. Last night we had Outlander here, and I think we had a full house of 900 people plus 2,000 people online. We also have a world-renowned dance center that has a long history with Martha Graham and Bill T. Jones. In many ways, modern dance coalesced at the 92nd Street Y. The Jewelry Center has had a presence here at the Y since 1930. We have a wonderful ceramic center. We also have one of the most prestigious nursery schools in New York City. You name it.    The 92nd Street Y is a Jewish cultural center. It's part of the UJA Association, but it's kind of its own thing. It's a whole other story about what Ys are and the difference between YWCAs, YMCAs and YM-WHAs, which is what we are, but the 92nd Street Y is really a cultural center.   Sharon: When are you opening your West Coast branch in Los Angeles? Because you have such an incredible number of speakers and programs.   Jonathan: Many of them come from the West Coast. We had Andrew Garfield here the week before last to talk about his amazing performance for a Reel Pieces program with Annette Insdorf. I think that was a full house of 900 people for a performance from “Tick Tick Boom,” which was great. I don't know when we're coming to LA. We're just reemerging from the pandemic here in New York.   Sharon: This is not related to jewelry, but do you think that without the pandemic, you would have gone online to such an extent? Would it have been possible for people around the world, including on the West Coast, to see what's going on?   Jonathan: The pandemic was the catalyst to do something we'd always thought about, but yes, the pandemic definitely forced us to do it. On March 13, New York City shut down. That Monday, we flipped all of our classes, every single one of our classes in the Art Center, which is about 200 classes, to be virtual. That worked for some classes better than others, obviously for painting and drawing. It was fine for jewelry. It's tough if you don't have a studio. What we did through the summer is offer online classes. We still offer online classes to some extent, but my focus is on building back our in-person class schedule, which we're doing. We're over about half enrollment now from the pandemic and moving quickly towards three-quarters.   Sharon: Did the people who enrolled in hands-on jewelry classes, did that just stop with the pandemic?   Jonathan: Yes, it stopped from March 2020 until September 2020. In September, we actually opened back up for in-person classes. We wore masks. We were socially distanced. We were unvaccinated. I was taking the subway and it worked. It was slow at first, but I think this process is a part of many people's lives and this program is so meaningful for so many people. Being in New York, access to a studio is important, and very few people have studios at home. This is not only an important part emotionally of their lives, it's also literally, physically, an important part of making jewelry their practice.   Sharon: Since you started as director of the program, I know you've been responsible for growing it tremendously. Was that one of your goals? Did you have that vision, or there was just so much opportunity? What happened?   Jonathan: All of the above. There was a lot of opportunity. Unfortunately, the Crafts Students League closed shortly after I left. Parsons closed their department. There were a number of continuing education programs that left Manhattan, and this is before the country of Brooklyn was discovered, even though I lived there. There were no schools in Brooklyn, really. The 92nd Street Y became one of the few places to study when I came on.    Also, to my point about studying jewelry in art school, you're studying to be an artist generally in art school; you're not really studying to be a jeweler in the way most people understand jewelers to be. Although certainly at Tyler, it was a great technical education and I learned a lot of hard skills, many people, including myself, were not adept at those hard skills. We're not taught at a trade school, and I found that most of the people who were looking for jewelry classes wanted to make more traditional jewelry than the classes we were offering. Most of our faculty came from art school. There were some amazing people, Bob Ebendorf and Lisa Grounick(?) to name just a few, but as the 90s wore on and the aesthetic changed, I found that people really wanted to learn how to work in gold, how to set a stone. The aesthetics of jewelry shifted. You probably know yourself that the art jewelry world shifted a little bit too. For myself, I wanted to learn more hard skills, and I basically started creating classes that reflected my interests in how to make better wax carvings, how to set a brilliant-cut stone. I can then make that into what I want: studio jewelry, art jewelry, whatever, but those hard skills were lacking.    I've said this many times: I don't know that this program would exist in another city other than New York because there was so much talent here. There were people from the industry here. There were artists who were studio jewelers and art jewelers all at my fingertips. I think that was one of the ways it grew, not because I reduced the perspective of what was being made here, but because I enlarged the perspective of what was being made here or taught here.   Sharon: How did you do that? Did you do that by identifying potential teachers and attracting them? What did you do?   Jonathan: I was lucky to have some wonderful people in New York City at that time. We had a wonderful faculty to begin with, but we also were able to expand the faculty with incredible people who had recently resigned. Pamela Farland, who was a master goldsmith and was the goldsmith at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for many years, was on our stuff. Klaus Burgel, who was trained at the Academy of Munich, was here in New York and came to us as a faculty member. Tovaback Winnick(?), who was a master wax carver and worked for Kieselstein-Cord for many years, came on as well. Some people work here for a shorter period of my time. My good friend, Lola Brooks, was here and taught stone setting. There was some really stellar talent around that helped me build this program.   Sharon: That's quite a lineup you're mentioning.   Jonathan: And a really diverse lineup.   Sharon: Diverse in what sense?   Jonathan: Klaus' work is pure art jewelry: the iconic object, incredibly crafted, but what one would consider as art jewelry in its most essential sense. Lola Brooks, her work crosses the lines of both art and jewelry, and she's got a beautiful studio jewelry line. Then there are people like Pamela Farland, who made very classical, Greco-Roman, high-carat granulated stones, classical goldsmithing. Then there was Tovaback Winnick who teaches carving, which is how the majority of commercial jewelry is made. We had real range as well as your regular Jewelry 1, Jewelry 2, Jewelry 3 classes where we're teaching the basics of sawing, forming and soldering.   Sharon: You answered my question in part, but if somebody says, “I'm tired of working as a banker; I want to be a jeweler,” can you come to the Y and do that? Can you go through Jewelry 1, Jewelry 2, Jewelry 3 and then graduate into granulation? I don't know if there's a direct line.   Jonathan: Absolutely. We don't have a course of study. We don't have a certificate, but you can definitely come here and put your own skillset together. That's also what I found strong about the program, that it gave people access to put their skillsets together without going through art school or going through college. You're able to learn those hard skills in an environment where it's no frills.   Sharon: Are they mostly younger people, older people, people of all ages?   Jonathan: It's people of all ages. When I joked about the country of Brooklyn not being discovered yet, I lived in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for my whole New York life, so I'm speaking the truth. There really wasn't anything out there. If you were young and hip and cool when I lived in Brooklyn, you had to come here. So, for a long time, we had a much younger population that was cool, hip. Now, everybody has moved to the country called Brooklyn. That demographic has aged a little bit for us.    We have three classes during the day. We have a morning class, an afternoon class, a late afternoon class and then an evening class. If you're a younger person, it's most likely that you have a job, so you're going to come at night for our classes. That's only one-quarter of the population that can take a class here, because there's only one slot of night classes. There could be four classes happening at the same time, but all from 7:00-9:30. So, in general our population skews old because those are the people who are generally available during the day.    That being said, it's New York City. There are lots of different ways to make a living here. There are definitely people who are actors or bartenders or artists or what have you who do have time during the day and come here. It really depends on what class, but absolutely; we have all ages for sure. We also have kids' classes in the afternoon from 4:00-6:30.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 624 (4-11-22): Sycamores are Sizable and Scenic at Streamsides

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:57).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-8-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 11, 2022.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, we feature a musical selection inspired in part by one of Virginia's largest and most distinctive riverside plants.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 34 sec – instrumental.You've been listening to part of “Sycamore Rapids,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va., on a 2002 album also called “Sycamore Rapids.”  The album was inspired by the trees of Virginia's state parks and forests, and the “Sycamore Rapids' tune honors particularly James River and Shenandoah River state parks.  According to the composer, the tune's progressions are meant to signify changes a paddler might experience from small riffles to larger rapids to smooth water. At any of those water features throughout the eastern United States, part of a paddler's scenery is often the American Sycamore tree.  Of the three sycamore species native to North America, the American Sycamore is the most familiar and by far the most widespread, ranging from New England to the Midwest and down to Texas, including all of Virginia.  Common in floodplain areas along rivers and streams, the sycamore's distinctive features are large, often hollow trunks; peeling, patterned bark; crooked limbs; large root masses visible along stream banks; and spherical fruits persisting on leafless twigs long into winter. Virginia riversides are of course commonly home to other tree species, too, such as Black Willow, Silver Maple, and Eastern Cottonwood.  But with its large size and distinctive bark, the American Sycamore is perhaps the Commonwealth's most noticeable waterway marker. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Sycamore Rapids.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 176, 8-26-13. “Sycamore Rapids,” from the 2002 album of the same name, is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Fruit on an American Sycamore beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), March 19, 2022.American Sycamore beside Sinking Creek in Newport, Va., (Giles County), April 10, 2022.American Sycamore roots along the James River near Wingina, Va., along the Nelson-Buckingham county line, July 12, 2009.Hollow trunk of American Sycamore beside the New River in Radford, Va., October 4, 2009.American Sycamores beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., November 5, 2016.SOURCES Used for Audio eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1.  The American Sycamore entry is online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200010589. William C. Grimm, The Book of Trees, Hawthorn Books, New York, N.Y., 1962. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. University of Texas at Austin/Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ‘Plant Database: Platanus occidentalis,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ploc. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home.  The American Sycamore entry is online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PLOC. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia State Parks,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/.  The James River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/james-river; the Shenandoah River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/shenandoah-river. Virginia Department of Forestry, Common Native Trees of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2016. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/.) Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 407, 2-12-18

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Locked On Hawkeyes
Iowa Football: Score predictions for the 1st half of the 2022 season w/LeShun Daniels

Locked On Hawkeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 34:39


Join me and former Iowa football player, LeShun Daniels as we talk about how we think Iowa football is going to preform in the first half of the season. We talk score predictions and possible problems that the Hawkeyes may have in their first 6 games. Tomorrow LeShun and I will sit down again and talk about the back half of the season and how it is going to be much tougher than the first half. With opponents such as Ohio State, Purdue, and Wisconsin, there is sure to be some hot takes regarding the back half of the season. In today's "Story of The Day" LeShun and I discuss Iowa's newest young recruit, Derick Weisskopf, a stand out Sophomore Linebacker at Williamsburg High School here in Iowa. Not only being a stellar defensive player, Weisskopf has been a key part of Williamsburg's offensive gameplay over the last 2 seasons. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/COLLEGE.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ghosthropology
37. Interview With Dr. Alena Pirok

Ghosthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 71:08


Matt interviews Dr. Alena Pirok, author of The Spirit of Colonial Williamsburg about the very special relationship Virginians have with their ghosts and how these stories and first-person interpretations serve to link modern Williamsburg to historic Williamsburg. Full sources and show notes at https://kmmamedia.com/podcasts/ghosthropology-podcast/ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ghosthropology Find us on Fa