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Best podcasts about Northern

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Latest podcast episodes about Northern

Island
Episode 4 - Obsession: 1609

Island

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 40:25


What is driving Henry Hudson? What does he think he is doing? The further north he goes, the more he becomes obsessed to find the elusive Northern passage. But at some point the arctic cold and scarce provisions will take their toll. Is Hudson pushing his exhausted crew just a bit too far? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork Hour
Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork Hour:Hoodoo in Northern Climes w/ Doc Murphy 11/28/21

Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 91:00


The Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork Hour is a real, live call-in show where the general public gets a chance to ask about actual problems with love, career, and spiritual protection, and we recommend and fully describe hoodoo rootwork spells to address, ameliorate, and remediate their issues. We begin this show with a Discussion Panel focussed on the topic of Southern Hoodoo in Northern Climes. You will learn a lot just by listening -- but if you sign up at the Lucky Mojo Forum and call in and your call is selected, you will get a free consultation from three of the finest workers in the field, cat yronwode, ConjureMan, and a special guest, Doc Murphy. Sign up before the show to appear as a client! Post at the Lucky Mojo Forum at: https://forum.luckymojo.com/lmhrhour-free-readings-november-28-2021-southern-hoodoo-in-northern-climes-t95688.html Then call in at 818-394-8535 and dial '1' to flag our Studio Board Operator that you want to be on the air! We select new client sign-ups first and then call-back sign-ups. Call in right when the show begins and listen via your phone. Message the Announcer or the Studio Board Operator ("Lucky Mojo Curio Company") in chat to let them know you're available. The link above will also be the location of the show's CHAT LOG once it is posted, so you can follow along as you listen.

Top Flight Time Machine
Top Flight Tune Machine - 12/11/1995 Part 2

Top Flight Time Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 29:48


Northern chippiness, the origin of the James Bond theme, Simply Red, and not much else. (Rec: 28/2/21)Join the Iron Filings Society: https://www.patreon.com/topflighttimemachine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Simply Stories Podcast
Episode 108 :: Becky Keife :: Stories of The Simple Difference of Kindness

Simply Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 68:00


Today I am sharing my conversation with the absolutely wonderful Becky Keife. Becky is wife, a Mom to 3 boys, an author and the community manager of the online (in)courage community. Today, Becky and I are talking about the topic of her latest book The Simple Difference: How Every Small Kindness Makes a Big Impact. Kindness is something we desperately need and is a powerful gift that is underutilized and underestimated, and Becky lays out beautifully in her book and in this conversation the power of it, and how it ultimately reflects the heart of God.  The idea of this book came from a small act of kindness years ago, but this book was written while watching the LACK of kindness in the world, the challenge of being kind quarantined at home with her family, and its just really beautiful and authentic. God knows we're going to struggle with this. He knows the world is broken, and I especially wanted to share this now because so many people are smack in the middle of navigating the holidays and in the current environment of the world and even in the Church, it feels really really difficult to just even know how to people, and for many, what to make of God in the midst of it. So we're going to talk about that.  We also share some thoughts and suggestions for how to go into the holidays with a heart that asks questions first such as can I give this image bearer the dignity of compassion and kindness regardless of how we agree or disagree? On the other hand, we also want to hold proper space for asking good questions about necessary boundaries because those are real and important and healthy where appropriate.  This is hard and holy work, y'all. I know the weariness is palpable in so many that I know, including myself. I hope this ministers to you, encourages you, challenges you, and equips you right where you are today. I really believe, the Lord is making Himself known in so many dark places, and as we transition into a season of the darkest part of the year, and we usher in space for Immanuel, God with us, I just wonder how we could powerfully proclaim His with-ness on this Earth with acts of compassion and kindness? No matter how big, or how small, I hope that wherever you try this out in your life, that is transforms YOU and makes the Lord feel closer and kinder in your own life. Because we all need that. We need to encounter God's kindness, and to see His presence in our lives and in the lives of those around us because it has the power to transform all of us. He's not finished here, friends. This is not how the story ends. Just remember: you matter, your story matters. Connecting with Becky:  Books Facebook Instagram Twitter Website   Episode Sponsor: Tony Crabtree of Crabtree Homes with Exit Realty  Home buyer guide: http://bit.ly/buyersguidecrabtreehomes Seller guide: http://bit.ly/sellerguidecrabtreehomes Facebook Instagram Website YouTube   References: (in)courage  Dayspring  Lisa Jo Baker  Courageous Kindness: Live the Simple Difference Right Where You Are (bible study Becky wrote to accompany The Simple Difference:How Every Small Kindness Makes a Big Impact.) Great article from Bible Study tool on : Neighbor was a more general term for person. Neighbor and non neighbor would be synonymous with Jew and Gentile (non-Jew) Who are the Samaritans?  (in)courage walking through kindness    Scripture References: -Psalm 100:5, Galatians 5:22-23, Titus 3:4-6 (to name a few)- Our God is kind  -Psalm 25:3, 2 Timothy 1:7- He does not speak to us through shame -Hebrews 12:6, Revelation 3:19 (to name a couple!)- He disciplines, corrects and encourages us to repentance -Genesis 16:13- The first person who ever names Hagar and calls Him “El Roi”- “The God who sees me” Full story is Genesis 16 and also Genesis 21:8-20-- I mixed these 2 stories together when I talked about it. So sorry! -Romans 2:4- The kindness of God leads us to repentance -Luke 10:25-37- The Good Samaritan  -Matthew 22:36-40- Second greatest commandment- love your neighbor -Leviticus 26:1, Deuteronomy 12:4, and then THIS is a list of so many of the times that share a loaded history of trying to get the Jews to stop worshiping idols of other cultures -Hagar (see above), Rahab, Ruth, A Cannanite woman, the Samaritan woman, An Ethiopian Eunuch, THE EARLY CHURCH- (etc, etc) -We see God fold in people from other cultures -1 Kings 12- The division of Northern and Southern Kingdom  -Matthew 9:10-17,Mark 2:15-22,Luke 5:29-39- Jesus eats with “sinners” -Matthew 9:35-38, John 21:15-25, Acts 1:8, Acts 2, Acts 4:23-37- God invites us to show His care out of the overflow of the Holy Spirit  -Romans 12:18-Inasmuch as it depends on you live peaceably with everyone  -Genesis 1:27- We are made in God's image -Isaiah 6, 2 Corinthians 5:20, 1 Thessalonians 2:4, - Christ's ambassadors  -Matthew 5:13-16-We are Christ's Light bearers -Luke 16:10- Being faithful with little Connecting with Emily and Simply Stories Podcast:Instagram (Em life // Podcast Life)FacebookTwitterBlog  *Intro and Outro music is from audionautix.com

The Face Radio
The Northern Coal Experience with Smoove and Turrell // 26/11/21

The Face Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 119:45


This show was first broadcast on the 26th of November, 2021For more info and tracklisting, visit: https://thefaceradio.com/the-northern-coal-experience/Tune into new broadcasts of The Northern Coal Experience, Friday from 8 – 10 PM EST / 1 - 3 AM GMT (Saturday).Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smooveandturrellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/smooveturrell/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmooveTurrellEmail: thenortherncoalexperience@thefaceradio.com Support The Face Radio with PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thefaceradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
Tube strikes and the TfL Crisis

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:19


A 24-hour strike has caused travel chaos for London commuters wanting to travel on the Victoria, Central, Northern, Jubilee and Piccadilly tube lines. Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union have walked out in a dispute over new shift patterns and the disruption looks set to continue each weekend in the run-up to Christmas.It comes as Transport for London faces an ongoing financial crisis. The Evening Standard's City Hall Editor - Ross Lydall - explains the details and what London commuters can expect moving forward. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Locations Unknown
EP. #51: Floyd Roberts - Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument - Arizona

Locations Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 58:15


June 17th, 2016 - Floyd, his best friend and his daughter set out on a 9 day backcountry hike on the Northern edge of the Grand Canyon. Late that day, the group briefly split up for no more than 30 minutes, to navigate around a small hill, before reaching the trailhead to start their hike.  When his friends got to the other side of the hill, Floyd had vanished into thin air.  Join us this week as we investigate the disappearance of Floyd Roberts.   New Patreon supporter shout-outs: Anastasia Hamilton, Bozena Hagen, Jordan Haber, Robert Meyers, & Kassidy Myers.   Want to help the show out and get even more Locations Unknown content!  For as little as $1 a month, you can become a Patron of Locations Unknown and get access to special Patreon only episode, free swag, swag contests, your picture on our supporter wall of fame, our Patreon only Discord Server, and discounts to our upcoming Locations Unknown Store!  Become a Patron of the Locations Unknown Podcast by visiting our Patreon page.   Want to call into the show and leave us a message?  Now you can!  Call 208-391-6913 and leave Locations Unknown a voice message and we may air it on a future message!   View live recordings of the show on our YouTube channel: Locations Unknown - YouTube   Want to advertise on the podcast?  Visit the following link to learn more.  Advertise on Locations Unknown   Learn about other unsolved missing persons cases in America's wilderness at Locations Unknown.   Follow us on Facebook & Instagram.  Also check us out on two new platforms - Pocketnet & Rumble.  

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
THE NEW CONFEDERACY

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:10


In this episode, Dinesh examines Victor Davis Hanson's argument that the Northern progressive states now make up a "new confederacy."  As the University of California system gets rid of standardized testing for being racially biased, Dinesh reveals how, both historically and now, these tests provide the true measure of merit that enable talent to rise to the top. Dinesh explores the illogic of Biden opening up the strategic oil reserve in order to bring down the oil prices that his policies drove up. Finally, Dinesh investigates why Muslims are, perhaps for the first time in history, converting in large numbers to Christianity. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ladies Fright
Episode 82: Thanksgiving Special 2021- Wendigo

Ladies Fright

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 59:26


The Ladies celebrate Thanksgiving discussing a very hungry cryptid in Northern native American lore. Like what you are hearing? Consider donating to our show. We love making this and would love to just keep getting better. Donations can help us with that venture.https://linktr.ee/ladiesfrightSpecial thanks to Alex Price for our theme music and mixing. Josh for additional music. Joe for our lovely logo, and our mysterious editor.Sources::https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wendigohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wechuge

The Rugby Pod
Episode 11 - Raffi Quirke, JDV and a Northern Clean Sweep

The Rugby Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 74:48


After a record-breaking weekend for the Northern Hemisphere, we take you through all the action from the final weekend of the Autumn Nations Series. Goodey and Jim chat with England Scrum Half Raffi Quirke about his match-winning try on Saturday against the Springboks, and find out a little more about life inside Eddie Jones' "New England" camp. We also get a South African perspective from former Springbok captain Jean De Villiers. We round things off with our 3 standout players from the Autumn Internationals and of course The Goode, The Bad and The Ugly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RNZ: Morning Report
Surf Life Saving has its busiest weekend in a year

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 5:22


Surf lifesavers have clocked their busiest weekend since the the peak of last summer in Auckland, Northland and Raglan. Lifeguards were forced to break social distancing to rescue swimmers thanks to 52 rescues. This included two mass rescues - one at Muriwai bringing 13 people to shore - and another at Raglan saving 14 people. Surf lifesavers are expected to wear masks where practical while on duty. Northern operations manager James Lea joins spoke to Morning Report's Susie Ferguson.

Real Estate Espresso
Special Guest Ken Gee

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 19:02


Ken Gee is based in Cleveland Ohio. But his business today is focused in Northern and Central Florida where he buys and repositions apartments. Over the past several years, he has amassed a portfolio of approximately 2,000 units. On today's show we're talking about strategies that work in today's environment. You can connect with Ken at kripartners.com. Download a copy of his free e-book on value add investing at kripartners.com/ebook -------------- host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

Thoth-Hermes Podcast
Season 7-Episode 13 – Chinese Magic(k)-Jason Read

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 103:45


In today's episode I have the great pleasure to talk to UK based author of two books and more to follow soon, teacher, martial artist and specialist on Daoist witchcraft, alchemy and magic, Jason Read. Jason's path started like probably a lot of ours out there with visiting a local bookstore. Getting his hands on Dion Fortunes ‘Psychic Self Defence' was just the first step in embarking on a journey of long and serious studies of Western Esotericism where he became familiar with the Golden Dawn's system as well as with Aleister Crowley's writings and a lot more important cornerstones in Western Esoteric Tradition. However, after some time Jason felt that he had to go back to some of the more original sources of Western Esotericism such as the writings of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa and after embracing a Neoplatonic path he finally found himself to be attracted by references to Chinese magic made in Kenneth Grant's works. Fascinated by the Chinese traditions Jason decided to live and work in Asia for some time and learned Mandarin fluently. Soon he felt the need to look into forbidden occult Chinese practices in depth but something seemed to be missing to him personally so he relocated to Malaysia where he not only met his future wife but also came across his teacher and entered a 12 years long apprenticeship in the Maoshan tradition, a specific branch of Daoist practice. Find those book to buy HERE In this episode of the show we talk about all those common things that Daoism and Western magic share, point out one often enough overlooked key to magical systems in general and discuss the Western idea of Daoism as an invention.  Jason sheds some light on the various branches of Daoism and explains the differences between the Northern and the Southern branch in great detail as well as a lot of parallels to Western magical ideas. We'll go into detail about certain shamanistic practices as the base of an original Chinese magical system and Jason will explain the practice of Qi Gong versus Neigong and the aim of the latter which is quite in harmony with a lot of Western alchemical and spiritual practices. We also touch on the importance of the landscape surrounding the magician and the inclusion of ancestors for his workings. Of course, Jason's two books ‘Thunder Magic' and ‘Fox Magic' that have already been published with Mandrake will be an important topic and he will open up on his motivation using a certain terminology in his writings. Both books are highly recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about Chinese magical concepts in a profound yet quick and accessible way and the next book in his series will be ‘Practical Chinese Magic' which should be out soon, also published by Mandrake. In this most recent book Jason aims for covering the fundamentals that a skilled Western magician can take out and apply to his practice. Music played in this episode Exist Trace (イグジストトレイス, Iguzisuto Toreisu, stylized as exist†trace) is a Japanese visual kei rock band, consisting entirely of female members. The members originate from Tokyo, and initially formed in June 2003. The founding members are Jyou, Naoto, and Mally, who met Miko and Omi after placing an advertisement for guitarists. To date, Exist Trace has released four albums, eight EPs, and nine singles.In addition, the band has appeared on eleven compilation albums and three omnibus DVDs, plus their self-released 2012 concert DVD Just Like a Virgin. Exist Trace made their U.S. debut at Sakura-Con 2011 in Seattle, Washington. On June 15, 2011, they made their major label debut on Tokuma Japan Communications with the EP True. Their song "I Feel You" was featured in Nadeshiko Japan's official 2012 guidebook DVD...

The Face Radio
The Northern Coal Experience with Smoove and Turrell // 19/11/21

The Face Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 119:44


This show was first broadcast on the 19th of November, 2021For more info and tracklisting, visit: https://thefaceradio.com/the-northern-coal-experience/Tune into new broadcasts of The Northern Coal Experience, Friday from 8 – 10 PM EST / 1 - 3 AM GMT (Saturday).Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smooveandturrellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/smooveturrell/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmooveTurrellEmail: thenortherncoalexperience@thefaceradio.com Support The Face Radio with PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thefaceradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Anime Podcast
Legend of the Northern Blade is absolute flames Best Manhwa out right now | Mini review of chapter 108 | The Anime Podcast

The Anime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:41


Legend of the Northern Blade is absolute flames Best Manhwa out right now | Mini review of chapter 108 | The Anime Podcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theanimepodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theanimepodcast/support

Good Noise Podcast
Northern Weather talks about Neal Says He's a Viking

Good Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:35


We were very fortunate to have Northern Weather on the podcast to talk about their new single, "Neal Says He's a Viking". Enjoy! Northern Weather Socials: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NrthrnWthr Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/northernweather/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/northernweatheroh Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/4UpUepEeVPA57OX5YyVSoB Bandcamp: https://northernweather.bandcamp.com/ Good Noise Podcast Socials: Twitter: https://twitter.com/good_noise_cast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goodnoisepodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/goodnoisepod Discord: https://discord.gg/nDAQKwT YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFHKPdUxxe1MaGNWoFtjoJA Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/04IMtdIrCIvbIr7g6ttZHi All other streaming platforms: http://hyperurl.co/GoodNoisePodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/goodnoisepodcast Bandcamp: https://goodnoiserecords.bandcamp.com/

The Destination Angler Podcast
Living Atlantic Salmon in Newfoundland with David Hartlin

The Destination Angler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:35


Our destination is the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland and our guest is expert guide and fly angler, David Hartlin, of David  Hartlin Guiding.   Few gamefish species have attracted the attention of the Atlantic Salmon which are known through the ages for their enormous strength and acrobatics. Lee Wulff established his Atlantic Salmon Fishing camp in this area in the 1930's and today, over 60% of the world's top Atlantic Salmon streams are right here.    Newfoundland is THE place to go if you are looking for some head-shaking, hard running, tail-walking trophies.  And David is just the guy to tell us about em.  He's been guiding hunting and fishing trips in these parts since 1998.  In fact, he grew up in this area, caught his first Atlantic Salmon when he was 8 years old,  and used to skip school just to chase Atlantic Salmon.  David also has a YouTube channel and his own podcast called The Guide Shack Chronicles.  So take a deep breath as David tells us how to live and breathe Atlantic Salmon in Newfoundland!    With Host, Steve Haigh About David Hartlin David's top fly patterns and pictures of Newfoundland @DestinationAnglerPodcast on Instagram and Facebook Contact David:   David Hartlin Guiding:  http://www.davidhartlinguiding.com/  Follow David:  @davidhartlinguiding on Instagram and Facebook:   Phone: 902 817 5440 David's YouTube Channel:  https://youtube.com/channel/UChrCOOJEnD0FDR6MkgoMyLg  Our Sponsors: JP Ross Fly Rods & Company - specializing in small stream rods:   https://www.jprossflyrods.com/  Facebook @jprossandcompany   Instagram @jprossflyrods.  Use Happyfish for $50 off any rod purchase. Catchflo artist crafted fly-fishing themed footware:  https://catchflo.com/    @catchflo.  Use coupon code DAPOD10 for 10% off your first order. Destination Angler: The Destination Angler Website and Show Notes:   http://destinationangler.libsyn.com/ Get updates and pictures of destinations covered on each podcast: @DestinationAnglerPodcast on Instagram and Facebook Join in the conversation with the @DestinationAnglerConnection group on Facebook: Comments & Suggestions:  host, Steve Haigh, email shaigh50@gmail.com Available on Apple, Spotify, or where ever you get your podcasts Recorded Oct 14, 2021.  Episode 52. Music on the show by A Brother's Fountain, “Hitch Hike-Man”.    Podcast edited by Podcast Volume  https://www.podcastvolume.com/

GetStuckOnSports.com
Get Stuck on Sports Podcasts #179 - Football Semi Final Preview and Hockey Season has Officially Started

GetStuckOnSports.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 63:22


Dennis and Brady preview both the Marine City vs Portland and Ubly vs Beal City semi final matchups in football, and hockey season is now officially underway with Northern kicking it off last night!

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Oroville City Council declares itself ‘Constitutional Republic' | Documentary ‘Sharing Butte Creek' explores environmental change in Northern Sacramento Valley | Blues artist Katie Knipp performs live in Placerville

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Oroville City Council declares itself a “Constitutional Republic” in response to COVID-19 health orders. KVIE documentary “Sharing Butte Creek” explores the environmental change in the Northern Sacramento Valley. Blues artist Katie Knipp performs in Placerville. Today's Guests Leslie Jacobs, Anthony Kennedy Professor of Law at McGeorge School of Law, on the constitutional legalities following the Oroville City Council's resolution to declare itself a “constitutional republic” and not enforce COVID-19 health orders issued by Governor Newsom or the federal government.  Lisa Pruitt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Professor of Law at UC Davis, on this tension between rural and urban California — and its relationship with the State of Jefferson movement. Documentary filmmaker Kit Tyler, on his new film “Sharing Butte Creek,” exploring environmental change in the Northern Sacramento Valley, which premieres on KVIE's ViewFinder series Wednesday 11/17 at 7 p.m.  Blues artist, Katie Knipp, on her new record "The Well" ahead of her live performance at The Green Room Social Club for the recording of her live album in Placerville on November 19th at 8pm.

The Brion McClanahan Show
Ep. 548: Northern Slavery

The Brion McClanahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:50


The "treasury of virtue" self-righteous Northerner who constantly sneers at the South needs some self-reflection and some honest history. https://mcclanahanacademy.com https://brionmcclanahan.com/support http://learntruehistory.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brion-mcclanahan/support

One More Thing Before You Go
That Thing About Anxiety in a Foreign Country-Waybback Wednesday

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:49


In this episode we have a conversation with a woman who suffers from anxiety, a guilt complex, loneliness, and panic attacks, all while being a solo world traveler and podcaster. We talk life as an Expat during COVID-19, and the challenges of being a small travel business owner during a pandemic. Since 2016, Allison Green has hitchhiked through the Balkans, rode camels through the Sahara, boarded down an active volcano, slept atop other volcanoes, gone scuba diving on 3 continents, climbed the highest mountain in Montenegro, gone dogsledding in the Arctic, seen the Northern lights in Sweden, rode a train through Switzerland and gawked at the Matterhorn, swam with sharks in Belize, caved in Guatemala, canyoned in Nicaragua, helicoptered over the Grand Canyon, and hot air ballooned in Cappadocia. You can more about her and her services on my website Beforeyougopodcast.com or on her websites at https://eternalarrival.com/ (Eternal Arrival)https://travelmassive.com/ (Travel Massive)https://imanxiousabout.podbean.com/ (I'm Anxious About)  or Sophia adventures

Transforming Trauma
Trauma Healing in the Black Community Through Play Therapy with Althea Simpson

Transforming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:03


Althea Simpson, founder of Brighter Day Therapeutic Solutions, Unicorn Life Training and the Black Play Therapy Society, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker specializing in Trauma Recovery, a Registered Play Therapist, and a Certified Lego Serious Play Facilitator. Althea shares that she would like for listeners to learn that play therapy is not just for children, but that it is a trauma-informed treatment. She was drawn to play therapy early in her career, which is a therapeutic modality that supports clients to express themselves in ways other than just verbal communication. She discusses a play therapy intervention that is aligned with NARM, which is using inquiry in the play therapy process. “It's not for us [as therapists] to give meaning to [the client's experience], that's for the client,” she says. Similar to the NARM approach, Althea invites curiosity which supports clients to connect more deeply to themselves.  Althea reflects on the importance of deconstructing the stigma around mental health with black families. She explains that many black families believe that the answer to their mental health problems is through church. She challenges this notion through addressing the intersectionality of spirituality, religion, and mental health. She also started the Black Play Therapy Society to address the disparities for black therapists not being able to showcase their work, as well as the inconsistencies and information that was being talked about in the black communities.   Althea details many important aspects that therapists need to understand in order to work with black families. She states, “We need more black therapists.” She also asks an important question for non-black therapists who are working with black families, which is, “Are black clients allowed to show up in their authentic self with all their pain, and can they express what they need to express?” Althea acknowledges that utilizing play therapy helped her to also address her own healing. Althea's lived experiences of trauma, as well as healing from her trauma, has supported her in her capacity to help her clients. She explains, “I'm a great therapist because I understand [the work] both personally and professionally.” About Althea: Althea is the founder of Brighter Day Therapeutic Solutions and Unicorn Life Training. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker specialized in trauma recovery, Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor, and Certified LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® Facilitator. She has an active psychotherapy private practice in Northern, VA and has experience treating children, adolescents, and adults with diverse backgrounds and ranges of concerns, including anger, substance use/abuse, domestic violence, anxiety, and depression. Her approach to treatment is tailored to the unique needs of her clients and she brings a range of educational, professional and life experiences to her work as a therapist, clinical supervisor, and mental health consultant. Learn more: https://unicornlifetraining.net To read the full show notes and discover more resources visit http://www.narmtraining.com/podcast *** NARM Training Institute http://www.NARMtraining.com View upcoming trainings: https://narmtraining.com/schedule Join the Inner Circle: https://narmtraining.com/online-learning/inner-circle *** The NARM Training Institute provides tools for transforming complex trauma through: in-person and online trainings for mental health care professionals; in-person and online workshops on complex trauma and how it interplays with areas like addiction, parenting, and cultural trauma; an online self-paced learning program, the NARM Inner Circle; and other trauma-informed learning resources.   We want to connect with you! Facebook @NARMtraining Twitter @NARMtraining YouTube Instagram @thenarmtraininginstitute

Northern Community Radio presents Phenology
Conservation Conversations: Partnerships Between Northern Waters Land Trust and Initiative Foundation

Northern Community Radio presents Phenology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 16:48


exploring funding clean water, air and forests

Control the Controllables
Episode 142: Francesca Jones - Northern Grit

Control the Controllables

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:26


Francesca Jones is a British tennis player who is currently ranked 153 in the world. Originally from Bradford, the 21-year-old moved to Spain at age 10 to train at the Sanchez Casal Tennis Academy. She reached number 31 in the junior world rankings, before qualifying for her first Grand Slam at the Australian Open in January. Francesca was born with Ectrodactyly Ectodermal Dysplasia (EED) syndrome, which is a rare genetic condition that has required her to have more than 10 surgeries. She is missing a finger on each hand and 3 toes, something which doctors told her parents would prevent her from playing tennis. Instead, she has risen up the rankings and played at all 4 Grand Slams this year. In today´s episode, CTC Host Dan Kiernan chats to Francesca about: Her unusual introduction to tennis. Her reflections on her achievements in 2021. How her physical differences affect her training and how she´s overcome them. The influence training at Spanish Academies has had on her tennis game. The expectations she put on herself after qualifying for the 2021 Australian Open. Why she took the decision to end her season in September. Let us know your thoughts on this episode! Email us at ctc.podcast@sototennis.com or you can find us on instagram, @ctc.podcast

The Leading Voices in Food
Weight Loss Study Drives New Insight in Role of Carbohydrates in Overeating

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:26


For nearly 70 years now, Americans have been bombarded with advice on how to lose weight. Countless diet books have become bestsellers. Some diets like Atkins keep coming back in sort of a recycled way. And there really hasn't been agreement, even among nutrition scientists, about which approach is best. Lots of attention has focused in recent years on carbohydrates, but over the years, protein and fat have had plenty of attention. In this podcast, our guest, Dr. David Ludwig of Harvard University, discusses this history and the reason for re-envisioning how best to lose weight – and for people to maintain the weight loss, perhaps the most important issue of all. Ludwig recently published a landmark, exquisitely designed and controlled study that tests whether limiting carbohydrates actually makes sense. This study, published in the "American Journal "of Clinical Nutrition 2021," has been generating lots of attention.   Interview Summary   Access the study: https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab287     I'll begin by asking a question fundamental to this work. Why care so much about carbohydrates?   Great question, Kelly. Carbohydrates amount to at least half the calories in a typical diet today, which is interesting from a historical and evolutionary perspective. Because of the three major nutrients we eat, protein, fat, and carbohydrate, carbohydrate is the only one for which humans have virtually no requirement. Think of Northern populations, especially in the Ice Ages but also up to recently, such as the Inuit, that had access to only animal products and could eat plant products like berries maybe one or two or three months a year at most. So for nine months a year, they were eating only fat and protein. And yet, those populations were healthy. The women were fertile; they could breastfeed. And children grew normally. So recognizing that there's no absolute requirement for carbohydrates, the question then becomes: How much carbohydrate and what kind would be optimal for health and allow for the greatest flexibility, diversity and enjoyment in our diets?   So David, if the body doesn't have an innate need for these, presumably there's no biological driver to go out and seek these, why in the heck are people eating so much of this?   Well, carbohydrates are delicious. And the food industry certainly knows that and has taken advantage of that. In fact, when you step back and ask: What are the foods that we tend to binge on? They may have a combination of key flavors and nutrients. Oftentimes, we hear sugar, salt and fat. But I'll argue that there are virtually no binge foods that are just fat. Do people actually binge on butter? I mean, butter is very tasty. You might enjoy an initial bite. But very few people, perhaps with the exception of a major eating disorder, would sit down and eat a quarter pound, a stick of butter. But there are all sorts of high-carbohydrate binge foods. Sugary beverages are 100% sugar. Bread, baked potato chips, popcorn, especially the low-fat versions, these are easy to binge. And from one perspective, the key difference is the hormone insulin. Fat does not raise insulin. And so fat is digested slowly, and doesn't get directly stored in large amounts into body tissue. It has to be metabolized more slowly. Whereas carbohydrates, especially the processed ones, when eaten in large amounts, raise insulin to high levels. That insulin directs those incoming calories into storage. And a few hours later, blood sugar crashes and we get hungry again and are ready to have another blood sugar surge by indulging the next time in those foods.   So what question specifically was your study designed to address?   We conducted a large feeding study that had two parts. The parent study had 164 young and middle-aged adults, who were at least a little bit overweight, ranging from overweight to having obesity. And the first thing we did was bring their weight down by providing them all of their foods, delivered foods to their home, in a calorie-restricted way. You know, you cut back calories, and of course you're going to lose weight for a while. It doesn't address why people get hungry, and why they regain weight. But in the short term, we cut their calories, and they lost 10% to 12% of their weight. Then we stabilized them at their new, lower body weight, and then randomly assigned them to one of three groups: low, moderate or high-carbohydrate diets. And we kept them on these three different diets for another five months. And during this time, we were again delivering all of the meals to the participants. This was over 100,000 prepared meals throughout this time, so it was a really major effort. And during this low, moderate, and high-carbohydrate diet period, we adjusted calories to keep their weight the same. We wanted to keep them at that weight-loss anchor, 10% to 12% below where they started. The first study looked at what happened to their metabolism and their energy expenditure. And we found that when people were on the low-carb diet at the same weight as the other groups, they were burning about 200 calories a day more. So the study raised an interesting possibility, that the kind of calories you eat can affect the number of calories you burn. That from a biological perspective, all calories are not alike to the body.   David, this is fascinating work. I'd like to ask a strategy question. So this was an extremely intensive study of 164 people. And you mentioned the people were provided all their meals, very careful measurement and things like that. So the same amount of money, you could have studied many more people but just done a less intensive study with less supervision and fewer measurements of outcome. So why do the study in such an intensive way?   Right, there's always going to be a trade-off in design considerations. And you've identified a classic trade-off. You can study fewer people more intensively, or more people less intensively. Most weight loss trials have chosen the second route. They take a lot of people, and they try to study them for a long period of time, or at least some of them do: a year or ideally two years or longer. The problem is that without an intensive intervention, so what are we talking about? These studies would oftentimes have participants meet with a nutritionist once a month. They would get written educational materials, and maybe other kinds of behavioral support. But that's about it. And without greater levels of support and intervention, people characteristically can't stick to these diets over the long term. Maybe they make changes for two, three or four months. But by six months or a year, they're largely back to eating what they were originally. And the different diet groups don't look much different. So if the groups didn't eat in much of a different way throughout most of the study, why would we expect to see any differences in outcomes, such as weight or energy expenditure, or cardiovascular disease risk factors? So these studies don't test a dietary hypothesis very well. It leads to the mistaken conclusion that all diets are alike. Really, what the conclusion of these studies has to mean is that we need more intensive intervention in our modern toxic environment, if you will, to promote long-term change. And it's only when we get that long-term change can we actually figure out which diet is better and for whom.   So you've explained how the study was done and why you did it. What did you find?   So the first leg of the study, which was published in "BMJ" late in 2018, so just before the pandemic, showed that the kinds of calories you're eating can affect the number of calories you burn. And, that by cutting back on the total and processed carbohydrates, you can increase your metabolic rate. And that could be a big help in the long-term management of a weight problem. You know, you want your body on your side rather than fighting you when you're trying to maintain weight loss. And a faster metabolism would be a tremendous help if this is a reproducible finding and applies to the general population. We recently published in the September "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," a second part of the study. And that asks: How do these different diets, low, moderate and high carbohydrate, affect cardiovascular disease risk factors? It's one thing to lose weight. Maybe a low carbohydrate diet helps you lose weight. But if your cardiovascular disease risk factors go up, that might not be such a good trade-off. So that's the aim of the second study. Because low-carbohydrate diets are often very high in saturated fat. So we wanted to find out what were the effects of this low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat on a range of risk factors.   So tell us specifically some of the cardiovascular risk factors that changed. And if you would, place the changes that you found in your participants in a context. Like are these big-deal changes? Are they small changes? Or put it in context, if you would?   The big problem with saturated fat is that it clearly raises LDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which is a classic cardiovascular disease risk factor. It's the main one that's targeted by many of the drugs, such as statins. Yeah, I think there's no question that on a conventional high-carbohydrate diet, a lot of saturated fat is harmful. So the combination of bread and butter is not a good one. But the question we wanted to ask was: What happens when you get rid of a lot of that bread? Does the saturated fat still comprise a major risk factor? And so our low-carbohydrate diet was exceptionally high in saturated fat, as is characteristic of how these low-carb diets are usually consumed. It had 21% saturated fat, which compares to the 7% saturated fat on the high-carb, low-fat diet that's oftentimes recommended to people at risk for heart disease.   So what did we find? Well, the first thing we found was that LDL cholesterol was not adversely affected at all. There was no difference in LDL cholesterol between those getting 21% versus 7% saturated fat. Suggesting that when you substitute saturated fat for processed carbohydrates, from the standpoint of this key risk factor, it's pretty much a wash. However, the low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat diet benefited a range of other risk factors that go along with what we call the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome. Specifically, we saw strongly significant, from a statistical perspective, improvements in triglycerides, that's the total amount of fat in the bloodstream; HDL cholesterol, that's the good cholesterol that you want to be higher; and other lipids that indicate overall levels of insulin resistance. Suggesting that insulin resistance was improving. And we know that low-carbohydrate diets show promise for diabetes in other studies, in part because they do tend to improve insulin resistance and lower blood sugar. And so our study suggests that if you are pursuing a low-carbohydrate diet, and we can talk about the different degrees of restriction of carbohydrate, and at the same time you're reducing the processed carbohydrates, then the saturated fat might not really be such a problem.   So then if you take all this information in this, as I said, exquisitely designed intensive study and distill it into what dietary recommendations would be, what do you think is a reasonable proportion of fat, carbohydrate and protein in the diet? And what sort of things should people think about as they want to lose weight and keep the weight off?   One key qualification I need to mention is even though this was an intensive study with a relatively large number of people for a feeding study of this magnitude, we still don't know how generalizable these findings are to people at different ages, different body weights, different levels of susceptibility. So no one study can inform a change of clinical practice like this, especially in the world of nutrition where there's so many complicated and interacting factors. I will also venture to say that there's no one diet that's going to be right for everybody. We know that some people can do perfectly well on a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet. I mean, think of the classic Asian agrarian societies where rates of obesity and diabetes are very low. But those societies tend to be highly physically active and the people insulin-sensitive. America is characterized by high levels of overweight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle. And these create insulin resistance as a highly prevalent problem. For societies such as ours, we think that high-carbohydrate diets that are raising insulin levels on the background of insulin resistance is a recipe for metabolic problems. And so for Americans, especially those struggling with weight, pre-diabetes, and even more so diabetes, a reasonable first step is to cut back on the processed carbohydrates. And I think that's an intervention that increasingly few experts would argue with. We're talking about concentrated sugars and refined grains. Where we start to get into the controversy is whether carbohydrates should be further reduced down to say 20% as in our study, which still leaves room for some unprocessed grains, beans, and a couple of servings of whole fruit a day, or even lower to what's called the ketogenic diet that's less than 10%. And that's where you really have to give up most carbohydrates and focus just on the proteins and fats. I think for people with diabetes, such a strict approach looks appealing in preliminary research studies. But again, this is going to need more research. And I would caution anybody with diabetes or anybody who's thinking about a ketogenic diet to discuss these kinds of dietary changes with their healthcare provider.   I realize your study wasn't meant to address this issue that I'm about to raise, but I'd appreciate hearing your instincts. One key, of course, to any recommended nutrition plan or diet, if you'd like to call it that, is whether people will stick to it. What do your instincts tell you, or data if you have it, on how readily people can adhere to this sort of an approach over the long term compared to other kinds of approaches?   Great question. And I'll approach that by saying: We all understand that if diet is a problem that's contributing to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, other chronic health problems, then we have to change our diet in one way or another regardless of what the mechanisms are. So I'll return the question to you by saying: Which do you think is going to be easier for most people over the long term: cutting back calories, getting hungry and trying to ignore that very intense drive to eat, or getting rid of certain kinds of foods that may be triggering hunger and making it so much harder to stick to a lower calorie intake?   As a doctor, as a pediatrician, and as a researcher, and also myself, I try to do N of 1 experiments on myself with any kind of a nutrition approach I might use with patients or with research participants. I've found that it's so much easier to just give up the processed carbohydrates and enjoy a range of other very satisfying, delicious, higher fat foods. And oftentimes, in my experience personally and I hear as reported by patients that the cravings for these highly processed carbohydrates go down. And lastly, I'll just say, it's not that these processed carbohydrates are inherently so irresistibly delicious. I mean, white bread, these common binge foods, white bread, unbuttered popcorn, baked potato chips, even though these are almost 100% carbohydrate yet they're commonly binged on not because they're so incredibly tasty. But I would argue because they're producing changes in our body that are driving overeating. So it's not that they're so tasty and we're getting so much enjoyment. We're eating these foods because we're driven to metabolically. And once you come off that blood sugar rollercoaster, it becomes much easier to say no.   When you mentioned before that with one approach, you're kind of fighting your body; and another approach, your body is becoming your ally in this process, I thought of going to the beach and, you know, you can go out and try to swim against the waves coming in, or you can ride the waves toward the beach. And one, of course, is a lot easier than the other. And it sounds that's kind of what you're talking about, isn't it?   When you line up biology and behavior, and clearly behavior, psychology, and our food environment are all factors that are going to have to be addressed. We don't want to make it much harder for people. So we do need to think in systems dynamics: the food supply, the environment. But on a strictly individual level, when you line up biology with your behavior, the effort required to accomplish your goals becomes less. You know, this is characteristic of so many areas of medicine and research. This is why we aim to identify the cause of a problem when you treat a cause. So let's use the example of fever. Fever you could say is a problem of heat balance: too much heat in the body, not enough heat out. And so from that perspective, you could treat any fever by getting into an ice bath. Couldn't you, right? The ice would pull the excess heat out of your body. But is that an effective treatment for fever? No, of course not. Because your body's going to fight back violently with severe shivering, blood vessel constriction. And you're going to feel miserable and you're going to get out of that ice bath quickly. In the case of obesity, the timeframe is much longer, but similar kinds of responses occur. The body fights back against calorie restriction because calorie restriction, according to this way of thinking, is an effect. It's not the cause. If the cause is the body's been triggered to store too much fat, then we have to address that problem by lowering insulin levels and producing a more stable blood sugar pattern after eating. If that happens, then the effort that you put into cutting back calories goes a lot further.   Bio:   David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Tent Theology
Scot McKnight and Laura Barringer on forming a goodness culture in A Church Called Tov

Tent Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:03


New Testament scholar Scot McKnight and his daughter Laura Barringer join the Tent to discuss their book A Church Called Tov. Though it initially focuses on toxic church environments, abusive church leaders, and the people who enable them, the book is primarily a call for our communities to be transformed into families devoted to goodness as we seek—to use McKnight's word—Christoformity together. There is no quick fix to developing a "goodness culture" as Barringer and McKnight recommend. Instead, they offer an invitation to a conversation—many conversations—between church leaders and every Christ follower about how we can begin to make those "one inch a week" changes to our personal relationships and overall leadership cultures.You can find out more about A Church Called Tov, including group study guides and numerous other resources at their website. Scot McKnight's newsletter can be found here, his Jesus Creed blog can be found here, and you can find a way to go study with him at Northern seminary by looking into their website.  Has anything we make been interesting, useful or fruitful for you? You can support us by becoming a Fellow Traveller on our Patreon page HERE.

Evolve with Pete Evans
Ben Mitchell : Free the Nation

Evolve with Pete Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:10


Ben Mitchell: Free the NationAustralian singer-songwriter, Ben Mitchell writes folk, country, blues and garage-pop-rock. A genre-hoping troubadour at heart, Mitchell's music blends the heartfelt simplicity and story-telling of country and blues with the authenticity and romance of classic 70s singer-songwriters.https://www.ben-mitchell.com/The Evolve Network is now live at evolvenetwork.tvDue to extreme censorship and shadow banning, we have created a platform challenging the mainstream paradigm,to create a space to share vision and views, to create long term sustainable health solutions.To express without censorship and restriction. To allow freedom of speech and interest in ideas that will allow humanity to Evolve…Become part of the solution.We hope you've enjoyed the first half of this podcast - if you'd like to listen to the rest, please visit the Evolve Network. Watch in full here https://evolvenetwork.tv/channel/ben-mitchell-free-the-nationI'd love to know your thoughts and experiences - join the conversation on my Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/evolvenetworktvInstagram @evolvenetworktvhttps://www.instagram.com/evolvenetworktv/Follow Pete Evans accounts here https://linktr.ee/peteevans

KQED's The California Report
Kaiser, Employees Reach Tentative Contract Agreement

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 16:39


Kaiser Permanente has reached a tentative deal with thousands of healthcare workers in Northern and Southern California, who were prepared to go on strike on Monday. They are still negotiating with a group of engineers, who have been off the job for two months. Reporter: Jackie Fortier, KPCC President Biden will sign his administration's $1.2 trillion infrastructure package into law on Monday. California will get tens of billions of dollars in new federal spending, but will it come quick enough to fix roads, bridges and other transit issues facing the state? Guest: David Kim, Secretary of California's State Transportation Agency While much of the focus has been on the massive backlog at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, residents in nearby communities are also expressing major concerns about pollution from those cargo ships. But a new queuing system being launched this week at the ports could help improve air quality and safety. Reporter: Keith Mizuguchi, The California Report  The San Joaquin Valley ranks worst in the nation when it comes to particulate air pollution, and environmental organizations say the Environmental Protection Agency is failing to do something about it. The groups have filed a lawsuit hoping to force the EPA to act. Reporter: Soreath Hok, Valley Public Radio Some 6,000 lecturers across the University of California system are planning to strike this week. The union representing lecturers has been in negotiations for more than two years and says the UC is refusing to negotiate issues like paid family leave and reimbursement for remote teaching expenses.  Reporter: Annelise Finney, KQED  The public comment period will close Monday on proposed new regulations requiring passenger sportfishing and whale watching boats to upgrade to cleaner engines. California's charter boat operators say the proposed new rules will jeopardize their livelihoods. Reporter: Greta Mart, KRCB

Successful Farming Daily
3 Big Things Today, November 15, 2021

Successful Farming Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 6:08


1. Wheat Futures Rise in Overnight Trading; 1. That's down from 288 million metric tons a year earlier.; 2. Export Sales of Grains, Beans Decline Week-to-Week; 3. Winds Create Dry Conditions in Northern and Southern Plains

The Prepper Broadcasting Network
Matter of Facts: Kyle Rittenhouse Shooting from a Use of Force Perspective

The Prepper Broadcasting Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 93:49


http://www.mofpodcast.com/https://prepperbroadcasting.com/https://prepperbroadcasting.com/https://www.facebook.com/matteroffactspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/groups/mofpodcastgroup/www.youtube.com/user/philrabhttps://www.instagram.com/mofpodcastSponsored by SecureIt Gun Storagehttp://www.secureitgunstorage.com/ Promo code MOF10 for $10 off your orderSupport the showShop at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2ora9riPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/mofpodcastPurchase American Insurgent by Phil Rabalais: https://amzn.to/2FvSLMLShop at MantisX: http://www.mantisx.com/ref?id=173*The views and opinions of guests do not reflect the opinions of Phil Rabalais, Andrew Bobo, or the Matter of Facts Podcast*Phil, Andrew, and Trek tear into the events pertaining to the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, the rules and laws governing appropriate use of force, and other considerations that influence how we deal with violent, potentially lethal, threats. How do we stay on the right side of the law?https://trainmdfi.com/https://northernwoodstraining.com/Intro and Outro Music by Phil RabalaisAll rights reserved, no commercial or non-commercial use without permission of creator

The Face Radio
The Northern Coal Experience with Smoove and Turrell // 13/11/21

The Face Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 119:45


This show was first broadcast on the 13th of November, 2021For more info and tracklisting, visit: https://thefaceradio.com/the-northern-coal-experience/Tune into new broadcasts of The Northern Coal Experience, Friday from 8 – 10 PM EST / 1 - 3 AM GMT (Saturday).Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smooveandturrellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/smooveturrell/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmooveTurrellEmail: thenortherncoalexperience@thefaceradio.com Support The Face Radio with PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thefaceradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Book Review
Alan Cumming Talks About ‘Baggage'

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 75:47


The actor and author Alan Cumming was happily surprised that his best-selling first memoir, “Not My Father's Son,” inspired many readers who had suffered their own childhood traumas. But he was disappointed, he says on this week's podcast, when people characterized him as having “triumphed” or “overcome” his adversity. “I haven't, I haven't, I absolutely haven't,” he says. And he stresses that point in his new memoir, “Baggage.”“We all have baggage, we all have trauma, we all have something,” he says. “But the worst thing to do is to pretend it hasn't happened. to deny it or to think that you're over it. And that's what I felt was in danger of happening with the way that my first book was reacted to. So in this I'm trying to say: You never get over it, it's with you all the time.” He adds: “You have to be very vigilant about your trauma. If you deny it, it will come back and bite you in the bum.”Allen C. Guelzo visits the podcast to discuss “Robert E. Lee: A Life,” his new biography of the Confederate leader.“Since it had been at least 25 years since another serious biography of Lee had been published — this was by Emory Thomas, in 1995 — it seemed to me that the time was right to begin a re-evaluation of Lee, and especially to ask questions about Lee from someone like myself coming from what was, quite frankly, a Northern perspective,” Guelzo says. “After all, all the books I've written up to this point have been about Abraham Lincoln and the Union cause in the war, and I thought it might be productive to look at Robert E. Lee through the other end of the telescope.”Also on this week's episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Alexandra Jacobs and Molly Young talk about books they've recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.Here are the books discussed by the Times's critics this week:“Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart“Solid Ivory” by James Ivory

Fat Man Beyond
349: FMB Presents: Blackman Beyond from Northern Fancon

Fat Man Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 118:56


Join Marc Bernardin and special guest Ming Chen as they recount some Kevin Smith stories before taking Q&A from the audience. Taped at Northern Fancon in BC, Canada on Saturday, September 25, 2021. SPONSOR: Thank you SHEATH for 'supporting' FatMan Beyond! Use code FATMAN at checkout or go to https://sheathunderwear.com/fatman for 20% off SPONSOR: Thanks to Shaker & Spoon for sponsoring tonight's episode! Go to https://shakerandspoon.com/fatman ​to save $20 off your first box

The Current
Climate change's effects on northern hunting and fishing

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 7:51


We speak to Billy Archie in Aklavik, Northwest Territories. He's an Inuvialuit Elder-in-training who hunts and fishes. He highlights how climate change is affecting hunting and fishing in his community.

Theology on Mission
S7: E4 Jesus, the Justice of God

Theology on Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 26:36


Fitch and Moore explore three ways that Jesus gets de-centered from the work of justice. There is a temptation to make justice separate from the church, so how do we recover the centrality of Jesus for the work of justice? Come explore Northern's Master's in Theology & Mission, or Doctorate in Contextual Theology alongside Fitch, Nijay Gupta, Beth Jones, Lynn Cohick and visiting professors like Greg Boyd, Drew Hart, Michael Gorman and more. www.seminary.edu

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Triggering of Article 16 looking more and more likely

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:04


Vincent Kearney, Northern Editor, reports on businesses who see the Northern protocol as an opportunity for them and Mujtaba Rahman, MD and analyst with the EurAsia group, discusses the rising tensions between the EU and Britain over the Protocol.

Homemade
Poppy O'Toole and Chitra Agrawal on Potatoes, Pickles, and Everything in Between

Homemade

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 55:14


On this week's episode of Homemade, host Sabrina Medora chats with two women who are blazing trails for home cooks everywhere! First, UK TikTok sensation and Michelin-trained entrepreneur Poppy O'Toole discusses her fast rise to fame as the self-proclaimed “potato queen,” and how losing a job turned into gaining worldwide acclaim within the food space. Then, chef and cookbook author Chitra Agrawal talks about the differences between Northern and Southern Indian cuisine, and how her Brooklyn Dehli condiment line has been flying off the shelves. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KUOW Newsroom
Many families, and Canadian snowbirds, are celebrating the re-opening of the northern border

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 0:56


But as Correspondent Tom Banse explains, some border businesses in Washington say they're concerned that the rules will still discourage Canadians from making brief trips into the U.S.

The Joe Marler Show
About Geography

The Joe Marler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 44:13


Geography isn't Joe's favourite subject... so we've gone and done a whole episode about it. Joe and Tom meet Tim Marshall, author of the bestselling book 'Prisoners of Geography'.They ask him important questions like, 'Where is Skipton? How sure is he that the earth is round? And is South Africa in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere?'You might think you know that answer to that last one, but do you? Prepare to have you mind blown, or melted. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 696 Alberto Martinez Interiano | Voices

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 22:46


Episode 696 Rebecca Lawrence interviews Alberto Martinez Interiano in this episode of Voices on the Italian Wine Podcast. Before telling you more about our great episode we want to give a shout out to our new Sponsor Vivino! the world's largest online wine marketplace - The Vivino app makes it easy to choose wine. Enjoy expert team support, door to door delivery and honest wine reviews to help you choose the perfect wine for every occassion. Vivino - Download the app on Apple or Android and discover an easier way to choose wine! Find out more about by visiting: https://www.vivino.com/IT/en/ or download the app: https://www.vivino.com/app About today's guest: Alberto Martinez Interiano is a wine educator and writer based in Seattle, WA. He currently works as an instructor at The Cellar Muse Wine School in Seattle, and also teaches Italian and Spanish wine courses at the Wine & Spirit Archive in Portland, OR. His passion for wine started when he lived in Tuscany as a student, where he fell in love with Chianti and rustic Italian food. After being bitten by the wine bug, his curiosity led him to read all the wine books he could get his hands on, join multiple tasting groups, and later pursue a formal wine education in San Francisco and Seattle. Alberto is a big fan of Italian wines, in particular old-school Barolo & Barbaresco, Etna (Rosso & Bianco) and Campanian whites. He's traveled extensively throughout Northern and Central Italy and next on his travel wish list are trips to Sicily and Sardinia. He's an VIA Italian Wine Ambassador, holds the WSET Diploma (with Honors) and has an MBA in Marketing and International Business. He speaks Spanish, Italian and is now working on his French. He writes for his blog www.vinointeriano.com and is a contributing blogger at the Vintner Project: www.vintnerproject.com If you want to learn more about today's guest, you can by visiting: Website: wwwvinointeriano.com Instagram: @vinointeriano Twitter: @vinointeriano More about the host Rebecca Lawrence: Future voice of the BBC and English Language voice of Professor Attilio Scienza, Rebecca Lawrence has stepped in to host special this series on the Italian Wine Podcast. An esteemed wine educator, writer, and all-around polymath Rebecca is adding a fresh voice to the Italian Wine Podcast lineup. Her show Voices focuses on diversity and allyship in the wine sector, often interviewing guests that are doing their part to enact positive changes within the wine industry all over the world. To find out more about Rebecca visit: https://www.rosmarinoevino.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Strenuous Life Podcast with Stephan Kesting
342 - Exploring the Remote Northern Wilderness with Adam Shoalts

The Strenuous Life Podcast with Stephan Kesting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 65:18


Canadian explorer Adam Shoalts is back to talk about some of his recent expeditions, including a search for a mythical beast in the wilds of Northern Labrador.  We also discussed balancing family and adventure, the early explorers, his approach to selecting gear, food and travelling companions, and much more!   Find out more about Adam at https://adamshoalts.com/, follow him on Instagram at @adam_shoalts, and check out his latest book 'The Whisper on the Night Wind' anywhere books are sold!   Check out previous podcast episodes at  https://www.grapplearts.com/tag/podcasts/  

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - Reopening the Northern border

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 38:16


What's Trending: Sawant challenges hiring bonuses offered to new SPD officers, a local college student was one of the eight people dead following the stampede at AstroWorld, and the sports media continues to rag on Aaron Rodgers for lying.  Big Local: Washington welcomes Canadians back across the border, and voters in Mukilteo push back against high density housing.  Orting has a great housing program for the homeless. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke
Northern Red-Bellied Snake

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 1:20


The northern redbelly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata) is a nonvenomous snake in the family Colubridae, a subspecies of Storeria occipitomaculata. It is sometimes referred to as a fire snake. It is endemic, North America and The Caribbean in some parts in Jamaica, and Saskatchewan to Nova Scotia in the north and south to Florida and Texas.Adults and young have known dorsal colorations of solid olive-brown, tan-brown, chestnut-brown, grey-brown, grey or even black. They have three yellow spots posterior to the head shields, to which the specific name occipitomaculata (meaning spotted back of the head) refers. Adults grow to about 31 cm (12 in) in total length.

a ModelersLife
All-Star Variety Hour #34

a ModelersLife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 121:31


Yes, we were wondering the same thing… What's “Snookums” up to now??  This podcast spans the globe as we teach an Aussie how to end each segment, Don and Mark stop by to tell us about HO scale derails and we find out about all the progress that's been taking place on the Greenville and Northern. We even get a guided tour of the workshop with our very own Seth Gartner.  We also learn about the South-East Narrow Gauge Museum and everything you'd ever want to know about Hickory, South Carolina. So, grab yourself of a big bowl of shredded paperwork, a steaming hot mug of scenery goop and enjoy.

Stories of our times
'Soldier X': What we know so far about the killing of Agnes Wanjiru

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:41


For the past six weeks, The Sunday Times has been reporting on the unsolved murder of Agnes Wanjiru, a young mother living near a British Army base in Kenya. She was last seen alive with a British soldier: 'Soldier X'.Today: the latest on the investigation, as members of Soldier X's regiment name the accused killer, and as one former soldier speaks to the police.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guests: - David Collins, Northern editor, The Sunday Times.- Hannah Al-Othman, news reporter, The Sunday Times.Host: Manveen Rana.Clips: KTN News, NTV Kenya, Parliament TV, BBC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bug in a Rug
Ep. 104 Michael C. Rockefeller

Bug in a Rug

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:36


Drowning, saltwater crocodiles, cannibals out for revenge... all totally reasonable ways for the heir to the Rockefeller legacy and fortune to have died. But the question we are all left with is... where exactly is the Chesapeake Bay?   Twitter and Instagram - @biarpodcast Facebook - Bug in a Rug Email us your ideas at biarpodcast@gmail.com   Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catamaran https://historyofyesterday.com/michael-rockefeller-ba42d5f245f https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_river_shark https://www.sfzoo.org/salt-water-crocodile/#:~:text=The%20saltwater%20crocodile%20is%20the,years%20old%20in%20the%20wild. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Rockefeller https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/collection-areas/the-michael-c-rockefeller-wing

The Face Radio
The Northern Coal Experience with Smoove and Turrell // 05/11/21

The Face Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 119:45


This show was first broadcast on the 5th of November, 2021For more info and tracklisting, visit: https://thefaceradio.com/the-northern-coal-experience/Tune into new broadcasts of The Northern Coal Experience, Friday from 8 – 10 PM EST / 1 - 3 AM GMT (Saturday).Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smooveandturrellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/smooveturrell/Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmooveTurrellEmail: thenortherncoalexperience@thefaceradio.com Support The Face Radio with PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thefaceradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ridiculous History
Modern Thanksgiving, Part Two: Sarah Josepha Hale Finally Gets Her Wish

Ridiculous History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:28


As the Civil War broke out, Sarah Josepha Hale found politicians were, understandably, more occupied with country-wide chaos than the creation of a national, unified Thanksgiving. After the close of the war, Thanksgiving became, to Northern politicians, a way to bring the once-divided population together -- and, still, some Southerners disagreed. Tune in to learn more in part two of this two-part series. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Throwing Fits
Bob's Your Uncle with Nigel Cabourn

Throwing Fits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 96:14


This episode is made possible by C.P. Company in celebration of their 50th anniversary. Check out all their collaborations and special products: https://50.cpcompany.com Yeah, baby! Smashing, baby! This week, the boys are back on road, continuing their UK tour in Newcastle where they are joined by the legendary designer Nigel Cabourn. Big Nige was kind enough play host in his amazing office/archive/library to banter about the ideal pant width, white whale grails, his thoughts on the state of vintage, the most he's ever spent on a garment, his popularity in Japan, randomly meeting Lorenzo Osti on the train, Italian sportswear's place in UK culture, 50 years worth of dizzying highs and terrifying lows in the fashion biz, his favorite collaborators, more Northern slang, living and partying during the Swinging Sixties, how to pull a proper bird and much more on this groovy and far-out episode of The Only Podcast That Matters™. For more Throwing Fits, check us out on Patreon: www.patreon.com/throwingfits --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app