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Making sense of the world, one story at a time. Every Friday, host Malika Bilal and journalists from Al Jazeera's international bureaus share their take on the news.

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    • Sep 17, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 20m AVG DURATION
    • 304 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from The Take

    Trying to heal Afghanistan without international aid

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 22:13

    Forty million Afghans still in the country live under the fear of their hospitals and healthcare system falling apart. Without international aid, medical supplies are running short. Since the Taliban took control of the country, the United States has led the way for other countries -  plus the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank - to stop necessary assistance from flowing into Afghanistan. As a result, doctors are left in the heartbreaking situation of doing their best to keep patients alive without proper resources. In this episode, we hear from those doctors who implore the international community to help heal Afghans rather than leaving them to die. In this episode:  Dr Najmussama Shefajo: Ob/Gyn specialist, founder of Shefajo Group of Laboratories, and president of the Afghanistan Society of Obstetricians & Gynecologists Dr Tankred Stoebe, President of MSF Germany (@MSF) Dr Ashuq Urrahman, physician in Kabul Dr Muhammad Mustafa Sahibzada, physician in Kabul Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The Course of the Forever Wars: The future

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:11


    This is the final episode of a three-part series looking at the past, present, and future of the so-called ‘war on terror'.  For an idea of the next phase of the US's war on terror, we look to East Africa, where a different version of the war has been unfolding for the past 20 years. American soldiers may not patrolling the streets of Kenya, but the US's counterterrorism presence is very much there. In this episode: Fauziya Hussein (@diamamyn4zi1), Sister of disappeared Kenyan man Samar Al-Bulushi (@samar42), Political Anthropologist at University of California Irvine Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)


    The Course of the Forever Wars: Amnesia

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 27:49


    This is the second episode of a three-part series looking at the past, present, and future of the so-called ‘war on terror'.  Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison was once a front-page headline in the "war on terror". Today, public knowledge of the torture that made it infamous is starting to fade – but 17 years later, one US lawsuit for its victims is still going on. It centers on private contractors: companies that became an integral part of the US military efforts post-9/11 attacks, which changed the way war is fought – and accountability is sought. In this episode:  Rafael Shimunov (@rafaelshimunov), human rights activist  Katherine Gallagher (@katherga1), Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights  Majid, Abu Ghraib plaintiffs' legal team member in Iraq Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)


    The Course of the Forever Wars: After 9/11

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 27:52

    September 11, 2001, marked a milestone in a new chapter of warfare: after the 9/11 attacks, the US began not only the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, but a so-called “global war on terror". That meant building a new war infrastructure that is fully global in nature, massively profitable in scale, and now, after 20 years, part of the fabric of our lives. So how did we get here? In the first episode of our three-part series looking at the past, present, and future of the so-called 'war on terror'  - we look at the US political climate after 9/11 and walk through the sweeping policy changes that would come to define the forever wars. In this episode:  Kevin Harrington, former MTA train operator Hina Shamsi (@HinaShamsi), Director of the National Security Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (@ACLU) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    How hot is too hot? Extreme heat in the Middle East

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 20:13

    For most people, climate change boils down to the simple fact that it's just a lot hotter than it used to be. And for people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), those temperatures have been rising too fast. Today, the Levant allows us to take a look at what the future might look like with global warming. In the Jordan Valley, farmers struggle with water scarcity. While in other parts of MENA outdoor air conditioner is the new normal. In this episode:  Karim Elgendy (@NomadandSettler), Associate Fellow at Chatham House and Founder of Carboun Cities (@CarbounCities) Anwar AlAdwan, farmer in the Jordan Valley Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Amazon's Carbon Crisis: How fire could accelerate climate change

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 21:07


    As the world tries to keep global temperatures from rising above 1.5 or even 2 degrees celsius, one of the biggest resources to slow global warming may be changing sides.  The Amazon rainforest has always been hailed for its ability to absorb the world's carbon. Now, a new study is showing fires and deforestation are causing parts of the rainforest to expel more carbon than they absorb. This is changing the global warming equation and making it that much easier for the planet to heat up. In this episode: Dr John Miller, Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)


    Life Below Sea Level: Bangladesh and our climate future

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 22:08

    In August, the UN climate panel issued a “code red for humanity”. The latest IPCC report warned of a catastrophic planetary future if global emissions don't reach net-zero within the next few decades. But in Bangladesh, there's no code red needed. The country's residents have been watching the seas rise and the glaciers melt, right in front of their eyes. And they have lessons - and warnings - for the rest of the world. In this episode:  Saleemul Huq (@SaleemulHuq), Director of the International Center for Climate Change and Development (@ICCCAD) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Continuing the fight for US police reform

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 20:27

    Chicago community organiser and artist Rami Nashashibi started writing the song Mama Please in tribute to the memory of George Floyd. Over time, and with the help of musicians Drea d'Nur and Jecorey Arthur it evolved into a song about injustice in the United States and abroad. This song is dedicated to a former New York State police officer who was fired when she intervened to stop another officer's chokehold. We're bringing you an update on that former officer, Cariol Horne, and her fight for justice. In this episode: Singer and music producer, Drea d'Nur; artist and executive director of Inner-City Muslim Action Network, Rami Nashashibi; and former police officer and current activist, Cariol Horne. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The Delta variant continues to spread

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 21:31

    The number of cases from the Delta variant of COVID-19 continue to rise, even in countries like Israel that vaccinated most of their populations. In the US, more children are coming down with the virus and the number of cases for adults under 50 is the highest it's ever been. Now, the US is announcing it plans to offer booster shots, but the World Health Organization (WHO) is arguing the rest of the world needs those vaccines first. In this episode, we're bringing you an update and a reminder of what the Delta variant is and why it's so concerning, particularly for the unvaccinated. In this episode:  Dr Syra Madad (@syramadad), Epidemiologist, Senior Director for Special Pathogens with the New York City Health System and a member of the Federation of American Scientists COVID task force Dr Salam Gueye (@SalamGueye), Director of Regional Emergencies in Africa for the World Health Organization Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Chile's continuing water crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 22:23

    Chile is in the midst of rewriting its constitution, a process that will affect every aspect of Chilean life - even down to its water. The country has been battling a mega drought for over a decade, and rivers and reservoirs in Chile have dried to dust. This year could match 2019 for the driest year on record. With the current constitution, access to water goes to the highest bidder. But all that could be changing this year. In this episode, we're updating a story from May 2020, about the man-made roots of Chile's water crisis. In this episode: Lucia Newman (@lucianewman), Al Jazeera correspondent for Latin America Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    How sugarcane burning is making people sick

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 21:01

    For many of us, morning doesn't begin until we've had that first cup of caffeine. But the spoonful of sugar some Americans are pouring into their coffee or tea could be making communities in Palm Beach County, Florida sick. In a lawsuit filed in 2019, the plaintiffs claim the smoke and ash that fills the air during harvest season may be linked to several serious health problems, including respiratory issues. A group of journalists and scientists teamed up for a one-year investigation into the consequences of sugar cane burning. In this episode we hear from one of them.  In this episode:  Lulu Ramadan (@luluramadan), Investigative reporter at the Palm Beach Post (@pbpost) Robert Mitchell and Christine Louis-Jeune, Palm Beach County residents Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The secret cameras recording women in Spain

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 19:30

    Every August, in a small town called San Cibrao, in the northern region of Galicia, Spain, people gather to celebrate a local yearly festival: the A Maruxaina. Finding a bathroom during the event, which brings together thousands of people, can be challenging - forcing many to go to discreet alleys instead. In 2019, a group of women were secretly recorded while doing it. The videos were posted on porn websites. Now, the women are seeking justice. In this episode:  Sonia Visozo, El País' correspondent in Galicia Paloma Maseda and Alba Álvarez, victims Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    What can we expect from Taliban 2.0?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 21:49

    After two decades, Taliban rule is starting to look like the new normal in Afghanistan again. It's a reality that has tens of thousands of Afghans running for their lives. But the new leadership is assuring Afghans that they are safe in Afghanistan. Will this be a softer, gentler version Taliban rule? Or are the end of women's rights and public executions ahead? To find out, we talk to one of our correspondents who has followed the Taliban for twenty years and watched them enter the room where deals were signed. In this episode:  Ali Latifi (@alibomaye), Al Jazeera Digital's Kabul correspondent  Osama Bin Javaid (@osamabinjavaid), Al Jazeera correspondent  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Watching the Taliban takeover, one woman's story

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 20:39

    On August 15, the Taliban took over the Afghan capital of Kabul, entered the presidential palace, and declared an end to the 20-year war. But before that declaration, as the armed group rapidly advanced throughout the country, we spoke with Pashtana Durrani. She's an Afghan activist who was witnessing it all first-hand. In this episode of The Take, we hear her story. In this episode:  Pashtana Durrani (@BarakPashtana), founder and executive director of LEARN Afghanistan (@LEARNAfg) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    A first-hand account of police brutality in Eswatini

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 18:35

    Eswatini security forces have killed 70 protesters and arrested more than 600 in the past few months, but it's likely you've heard little to nothing about it. The internet in the small, Southern African country has been regularly shut down over the past few weeks, and journalists intimidated, arrested, and beaten. In this episode, we talk to one of them. In this episode: Cebelihle Mbuyisa (@CebelihleM), reporter at New Frame Vito Laterza (@vitolaterza09), associate professor of development studies at the University of Agder Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Can a lawsuit stop Mexico's ‘iron river' of guns?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 21:01

    In Mexico, American guns are a fact of life. The Mexican government estimates nearly 70 percent of guns trafficked into the country come from the United States. And in the US, gun trafficking is not a federal crime. Now, the Mexican government is taking an unusual tack to try to stop the flow of arms: it's filed a lawsuit. With no sign of the cartel violence slowing, can a lawsuit stem the flow of guns to Mexico? In this episode:  John Holman (@johnholman100), Al Jazeera correspondent Eugenio Weigend Vargas (@eugenioweigend), Center for American Progress (@amprog) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    You can run from Belarus but can you hide?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 23:40

    One year after a contested election and many protests, the movement to free Belarus from President Alexander Lukashenko has boiled over its borders into neighboring states. This also means Belarusians around the world might fear the long arm of Lukashenko's rule. Olympic sprinter, Krystsina Tsimanouskaya was quick to escape but others faced a tragic end. What is happening in Belarus and how much power does Lukashenko hold in Belarus and beyond its borders?  In this episode:  Krystsina Tsimanouskaya, Belarusian Olympic sprinter Step Vassen, Al Jazeera correspondent Hanna Liubakova (@HannaLiubakova), freelance journalist, non-resident fellow at the Atlantic Council (@AtlanticCouncil) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The Olympic host city hangover

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 20:27

    Another Olympics has come and gone. And as the athletes and sponsors leave town, Tokyo could be left to deal with the debt, gentrification, and displacement that can come from hosting the games. In this episode, we look at the social cost of hosting sporting events and the activists fighting to keep the Olympics out of their hometowns. In this episode: Christopher Gaffney (@geostadia), associate professor at New York UniversityTheresa Williamson (@greencities), executive director of Catalytic Communities (@CatComm)Jonny Coleman of @NOlympicsLA Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    What will happen to Afghanistan's CIA-backed militias?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 19:33

    Since the American-led invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, the US has trained thousands of Afghan security forces. Among them are militias that were backed by the US Central Intelligence Agency. For years, activists and journalists have documented civilian killings that took place by their hand. How will that legacy affect the current fight ahead for the country?In this episode:Emran Feroz (@Emran_Feroz), journalistPatricia Gossman (@pagossman), Associate Asia Director for Human Rights WatchConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    A year after the blast, Lebanon fights for its future

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 21:37

    What is left in Lebanon, after 12 months of almost indescribable crisis, is the fight to hold someone – anyone – accountable. There has been a yearlong fight to do just that, but with the economic freefall only getting worse, the paralysis seems to be deepening. Lebanon is no stranger to proxy conflicts, and now the investigation into the blast has become a surrogate fight for the future of Lebanon itself.In this episode: Timour Azhari (@timourazhari), Lebanon correspondent at Thomson Reuters FoundationConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The UAE's illegal influence over the United States

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 22:16

    Last week, one more name was added to the list of Donald Trump advisors indicted after serving the former president of the United States. Thomas Barrack is charged with facilitating illegal influence by the United Arab Emirates on the US. How much influence did the UAE have and what is the US doing about it? In this episode: Ben Freeman (@BenFreemanDC), Director of the Foreign Influence Transparency Initiative (@InfluenceWatch) at the Center for International Policy (@CIPolicy) and author of The Foreign Policy AuctionConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The political crisis unfolding in Tunisia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 21:12

    Tunisia's president is on a firing spree. Kais Saied sacked the prime minister, froze parliament, and dismissed several senior officials in the span of a week, all in the name of anti-corruption. The political turmoil has many Tunisians wondering — should they view these latest developments with hope? Or skepticism?In this episode: Ouiem Chettaoui (@ouiemch), a Tunisian public policy specialistConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Did the Gates Foundation's program to feed Africa fail?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 23:37


    With the recent announcement of Bill and Melinda Gates' divorce, many people are asking questions about the Foundation's future. But this is not the first time questions about the foundation have been asked. One development expert we spoke with claims AGRA, Bill Gates' two decade old program to feed Africa through agriculture, failed in its goals. On this episode of The Take we look at the Gates Foundation, and at AGRA and what went wrong.In this episode: Timothy Schwab (@TimothyWSchwab), investigative journalist and author of the upcoming book, The Good Billionaire on Bill Gates and The Gates FoundationTimothy Wise (@TimothyAWise), researcher and international development expert, also author of “Eating Tomorrow”David Otieno Ciddi, small scale farmer, leader of Kenya's peasants' league and member of Via CampesinaConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.


    Why are China's billionaires writing big checks to charity?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 20:16

    The biggest threat to China's future prosperity may not come from the US, but from within as it wrestles with falling birthrates and rising inequality. How concerned is China about the widening gap between the country's haves and have nots? Look no further than its billionaires, who've suddenly become very generous.In this episode: Michael Standaert (@mstandaert), journalist Einar Tangen (@ehtangen), commentator on economics and political affairsConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    COVID, protest, racism: The 'no-fun Olympics'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 21:45

    COVID-19, racism, anti-semitism and a crackdown on protest — all dark clouds hanging over this year's Olympic games in Tokyo. The International Olympic Committee made a huge gamble in postponing the event to 2021. Has it paid off?In this episode: Jules Boykoff (@julesboykoff), political scientist, former Olympian, and author of ‘Activism and the Olympics'Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Jobless, hungry, fed-up: Why South Africans rioted

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 20:15

    As many as 75% of young South Africans are unemployed. In any other country that would be cause for a revolution according to one South African economist. Why did rioting and looting sweep the country last week? And could violence erupt again? This week The Take explores the vast inequality and economic hardships behind South Africa's latest unrest.In this episode: Bonginkosi Mchunu, 24 year old resident of Greytown Township in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, Influencer for Youth Capital South Africa and Corporate Specialist Duma Gqubule (@DumaGqubule), South African economist and financial journalistConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    What the billionaire space race means for the rest of us

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 22:05


    The world's richest man, Jeff Bezos, is heading to space on his own spaceship on July 20th – though he's already been upstaged by another billionaire space tour. Where the global space race was once decided by the wealth of nations, now its future is increasingly determined by ultra-wealthy individuals worth more than many countries. Their pursuit of space could put new resources in reach, and it's reshaping the laws of outer space – at least, the ones made by humans.In this episode: • Lucianne Walkowicz (@RocketToLulu), astronomer at the Adler Planetarium and co-founder of Just Space Alliance (@JustSpaceOrg)• Lisa Ruth Rand (@orbital_decay), assistant professor at the California Institute of TechnologyConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.


    The killing of Samuel Luiz outrages Spain's LGBTQ community

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 22:45

    Samuel Luiz, a 24-year-old nursing assistant, was beaten to death in early July in A Coruña, a city in northwest Spain. Witnesses say his aggressors reportedly used homophobic slurs while attacking him. But the police have not deemed it a hate crime yet. The killing has shocked the LGBTQ community, and many have started a conversation online about their own experiences with attacks. Others are questioning how progressive the European country really is.In this episode: Begoña Gómez Urzaiz (@begogomezurzaiz), freelance journalist in BarcelonaMateo Sancho (@mateosancho), journalist and sociologistEnrique Aparicio (@esnorquel), journalistRubén Serrano (@RubenSerranoM), journalist and authorConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Haiti, after Jovenel Moise's assassination

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 20:18

    Jovenel Moise's assassination has thrown Haiti into a fog of political confusion. But with gangs running the streets, and extreme poverty across the country, Haiti was in a state of crisis long before his killing.In this episode: Jetry Dumont (@_jetry_), director of the Haitian media company AyibopostMonique Clesca (@moniclesca), democracy activistJohnny Celestin (@johnnycelestin), Haitian-American Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    The US is leaving. What's next for Afghanistan?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 21:51

    After 20 years the United States is ending its occupation of Afghanistan. A lot has changed but many Afghans like journalist Ali Latifi are concerned about how many things are still the same. Roads remain unpaved, the electricity is spotty and a newly energized Taliban is threatening to take back the Afghan state. Many Afghans are now left wondering what happened to the US promises and why the Afghan people have been left behind.In this episode: Ali Laitifi (@alibomaye), Afghan journalist covering AfghanistanOsama Bin Javaid (@osamabinjavaid), Al Jazeera correspondent covering the TalibanConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Euro 2020: The politics of the game

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 21:29

    For the last few weeks, people around the world have been tuning in to Euro 2020, one of the biggest sporting events since the start of the pandemic. And like most international tournaments, there's a conversation to be had about nationalism, whether it's teams butting heads, or the ethnic and racial makeup of those teams. So what can Euro 2020, and this sport, tell us about the politics of Europe?In this episode: Tony Karon (@tonykaron), editorial lead at AJ+ (@ajplus)Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Daniel Ortega cracks down on his opposition in Nicaragua

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 20:07

    Since June, at least 27 people have been detained in the Central American country. Among them are presidential hopefuls, journalists, opposition leaders, farmer activists, student leaders, businessmen and even figureheads of the Sandinista revolution that once freed Daniel Ortega from jail.The crackdown has sparked international outrage, with the country's opposition saying President Daniel Ortega is trying to eliminate any possible challengers ahead of the November presidential election.In this episode: Lucia Newman (@lucianewman), Al Jazeera's Latin America editorConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Unpacking the mystery around China's roaming elephants

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 20:33

    Videos of the mysterious migrating herd of elephants in China have become an internet sensation. But no one knows why they're on the move. The fact that they are points to a deeper environmental problem. Human-elephant conflict is on the rise pretty much everywhere the gentle giants live, and without concrete action, the problem will only get worse.In this episode: Dr Josh Plotnik (@CCCAnimals), assistant professor of psychology at Hunter College of City University of New York (CUNY)Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    A critic's death turns eyes on the Palestinian Authority

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 22:03

    There was an unusual target for protests in the Occupied West Bank this week: the Palestinian Authority. Protesters were angry after the death of a well-known critic named Nizar Banat, who was killed in a violent arrest. With elections called off earlier this year and a crackdown on the protests, the demands for accountability in Palestine are growing louder.In this episode: Nida Ibrahim (@nida_journo), Al Jazeera correspondent in the West BankStefanie Dekker (@StefanieDekker), Al Jazeera correspondentListen to our story about the other major Palestinian party Hamas here: The past, present and future of HamasConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    The Delta variant catches the world unmasked

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 21:38

    We've been hearing concerns about COVID variants since the outbreak began but none are as worrying as the Delta strain. At least, so far. From Asia to Africa to South America the vaccinated, under vaccinated and unvaccinated are all reaching for their masks. Why does this variant seem so much more alarming than the rest? Could it disrupt Euro 2020? And how does vaccine inequality play a role? That's this episode of The Take. In this episode: Dr Syra Madad (@syramadad), Epidemiologist, Senior Director for Special Pathogens with the New York City Health System and a member of the Federation of American Scientists COVID task forceDr Salam Gueye (@SalamGueye), World Health Organization Africa's regional emergencies directorConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    How activists are targeting an Israeli shipping line

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 17:44

    For the past few weeks, protesters along the Western coast of North America have been attempting to block ships operated by the Israeli company ZIM from unloading cargo. They're trying to pressure Israel into ending its military occupation and complying with international law. In this episode, we talk to a blockade organizer and an historian about why targeting ships is an activist tactic. In this episode: Lara Kiswani, Executive Director of the Arab Resource and Organizing Center (@AROCBayArea); Peter Cole (@ProfPeterCole), professor of history and author of Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area.Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    Discovery of graves reopens wound for Indigenous people in Canada

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 21:14

    For over a century, Indigenous children were forcibly taken away from their families to residential schools created by the Canadian government and administered by churches. Survivors have reported that all kinds of abuse happened there.Last May, the first mass burial site was discovered with the remains of 215 children on the grounds of a former residential school. This week, less than a month later, a First Nations official announced the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves at the site of another former residential school.Even when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has publicly apologized for Canada's history with its Indigenous people, many say his government's actions when it comes to reparations do not reflect his words.In this episode: Josie Nepinak, residential school survivorBrandi Morin (@Songstress28), Cree/Iroquois/French JournalistCindy Blackstock (@cblackst), Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring SocietyConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    How China is censoring Hong Kong's schools

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 20:49

    It's been just about one year since Beijing's National Security Law for Hong Kong took effect. It criminalizes secession, sedition and collusion with foreign forces. Dozens of activists and journalists have been arrested under the decree, and now, changes in the schools mean teachers' jobs and students' learning are also at risk.In this episode: “Steve,” a secondary school teacher in Hong KongConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

    The sounds of Mexico's last rainforest

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 21:26

    Scientists say that two-thirds of the biggest rainforest in Mexico, the Lancandon Jungle, has been lost. With only 10% of virgin territory to protect, environmental groups and indigenous people are fighting to curb deforestation, illegal logging, and trade with protected species.To help us celebrate World Rainforest Day, we talked to Al Jazeera's correspondent in Mexico, Manuel Rapalo, about his excursion to the jungle and the protected species he met there.In this episode: Manuel Rapalo (@Manuel_Rapalo), Al Jazeera correspondent in MexicoConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Iran is voting. Why the apathy?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 21:00

    It's election day in Iran and for many, the question is not who to vote for, but whether to vote at all. Strong candidates were disqualified from running, and conservative Ebrahim Raisi is a clear frontrunner. The stakes are high: the winner of this election will lead Iran through a pandemic, intense economic sanctions, runaway inflation, and the ongoing negotiations to restore the nuclear deal. So how much does this election mean for the future of Iran?In this episode: Maziar Motamedi (@MotamediMaziar), Al Jazeera Iran correspondent Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    What will come from the Biden-Putin summit?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 20:45

    All eyes are on Geneva for a summit between Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden. It's just the latest in a long line of high-profile meetings between US and Russian leaders. And while it's the first time the two are meeting since Biden took office, they have a history of their own. In this episode, we take a look at the past, present, and future of US-Russian relations. In this episode: Journalist Mansur Mirovalev (@mirovalev); Alicia Sanders-Zakre (@azakre), Policy and Research Coordinator at the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (@nuclearban) Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The past, present, and future of Hamas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 21:43

    The Palestinian group Hamas doesn't fit neatly into the labels some try to fit it into — terrorist, freedom fighter, armed group, political party. On the anniversary of Hamas's takeover of the Gaza Strip, we're looking at the context that made the group what it is, and most importantly, how it has affected Palestinians living in Gaza.In this episode: Khaled Al Hroub, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Northwestern University Qatar and author of two books about Hamas; Mohammad Alsaafin (@malsaafin), Senior Producer at AJ+Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    How Netanyahu shaped Israel

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 21:42


    Ousting Benjamin Netanyahu would take a political earthquake and the alliance of parties who've banded against him is unprecedented. After four elections in two years, the end of his 12 years in office may have arrived. As internal tensions rise, how likely is a new political era for Israel?In this episode: Haggai Matar ( (@Ha_Matar), journalist and executive director for +974 Magazine (@972mag) Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)


    Naomi Osaka's battle for mental health on the tennis court

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 18:33

    The highest-paid female athlete in the world, tennis superstar Naomi Osaka, decided to leave the French Open at the end of May citing her battle with depression and anxiety. Her withdrawal from the tournament created a media frenzy, and divided journalists and fans. But it has also started a conversation about athletes and mental health that for many is long overdue.In this episode: Rennae Stubbs (@rennaestubbs), former world #1 in doubles, host of @racqetmagazine podcast, and ESPN commentator Caitlin Thompson (@caitlin_thomps), journalist, publisher and co-founder of @racqetmagazine Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Is Germany's genocide apology to Namibia enough?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 19:17

    From 1904 to 1908, German colonizers waged a brutal extermination campaign against the Herero and Nama people in present-day Namibia. Now, more than a century later, the German government has officially recognized the genocide and has offered Namibia an aid package. But many Herero and Nama people say Germany's announcement doesn't come close to providing justice. In this episode: Nandiuasora "Nandi" Mazeingo, Chairperson of the Ovaherero Genocide Foundation (@OGF_Namibia)Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    Is Ireland changing the consensus on Israel-Palestine?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 22:04

    Ireland is the first EU country to condemn “de facto annexation” of Palestinian land. The two-state solution has been conventional wisdom for a generation. As the Israeli political landscape shifts, does Ireland’s move show that reality is intruding on the international consensus?In this episode: Shelley Deane (@shelleydeane), Irish political analyst; Omar Baddar (@OmarBaddar), Palestinian American political analyst Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    A Uighur love story, derailed by China's crackdown

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 22:28

    Mehray Mezensof's husband is one of an estimated million Uighurs being detained in China. Several countries accuse China of committing crimes against humanity, including genocide. Starting Friday, a people's tribunal in the UK will meet to decide if that's true.In this episode: Mehray Mezensof (@Mehray_T), wife of a detained Uighur man; Sir Geoffrey Nice, chairman of the Uyghur Tribunal (@TribunalUyghur)Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    No normalcy for kids who’ve lost parents to COVID

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 23:47

    New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics estimates that as many as 43,000 children have lost a parent to COVID-19 in the United States. And, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Native Americans, Black Americans, and Latino Americans have been disproportionately affected by coronavirus deaths in the country. With the US so far ahead in its vaccination rollout, many are looking toward getting back to normal. But, for the families of those affected by the almost 600,000 coronavirus deaths in the country, there’s no way back to normal without their loved ones. They’re struggling with grief, but also financial burdens.In this episode: Kaelyn Forde, @kaelynfordeRachel Kidman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Stony Brook Medicine.Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    What’s behind Colombia’s month of mass protest?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 20:13

    What began as a strike against a tax proposal in Colombia has now escalated into a nationwide protest movement over some of Colombia’s most deep-seated issues. Protesters are demanding structural changes to ease inequality and end police violence. After a month of demonstrations, President Ivan Duque’s popularity has hit record lows, and protesters are staying out in the streets. So what’s behind Colombia’s month of unrest?In this episode: Al Jazeera correspondent Alessandro Rampietti @Rampietti; Cam Aaron Lopez Duarte @depresssioncherry of @TembloresONG.Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

    The life and death of one Palestinian child

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 20:54

    Obaida Akram Jawabra grew up outside of Hebron in the occupied West Bank and dreamed of growing up to be a chef. When he was 15 his dreams were put on pause for the first time when he was arrested and imprisoned by the Israeli military. He was later acquitted but spent two months in jail. On May17th, as many Palestinians were protesting Israeli air strikes on Gaza and Israelis taking over Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem, Obaida, at 17 years old, was shot and killed by Israeli forces. More than 60 other Palestinian children were also killed by Israeli forces in the past a month. Today, we take a look at the life of one Palestinian child.In this episode: Farah Bayadsi, Human Rights Attorney

    The rise of Black-Palestinian solidarity

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 20:41

    Outreach between Black Lives Matter activists and Palestinians has become more widespread. But the foundation of solidarity between them dates long before Black Lives Matter became a movement. Today, we examine how the Black-Palestinian solidarity came to be and what parallels each side draws from the other.In this episode: Khury Peterson-Smith (@kpYES), co-founder of Black for Palestine and the Michael Ratner Middle East fellow at the Institute for Policy StudiesSandra Tamari (@SandraTamari1), Executive Director for the Adalah Justice ProjectConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

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