Podcasts about Amsterdam

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Capital and largest city of the Netherlands

  • 8,794PODCASTS
  • 21,276EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 25, 2022LATEST
Amsterdam

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Best podcasts about Amsterdam

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Latest podcast episodes about Amsterdam

Adam Beyer presents Drumcode
DCR616 – Drumcode Radio Live – Adam Beyer live from Awakenings Festival, Amsterdam

Adam Beyer presents Drumcode

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 106:23


This week on Drumcode Radio we have a live mix by Adam Beyer from Awakenings Festival in Amsterdam, Netherlands

Get With The Programming
Programming Recap of WEEK 1 CrossFit Semifinals

Get With The Programming

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 95:19


Chase has a case of the "Grundler's" on all his flights to and from Amsterdam, Bill celebrates another trip around the sun and the guys sink their teeth into Week 1's Progrmaming for all CrossFit Semfinals. 

Capital City Soccer Show
Statement Win at LAFC, Insane Draw Against Orlando, How to Beat 9 Men, and more

Capital City Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 82:16


This week, Landon and Jeremiah cover Austin FC's big win away at LAFC and the wild draw against Orlando City. Other topics include:- Baby's first yellow card- Roadtrip to Amsterdam?- Austin beat LAFC away to take 1st place (6:17)- Was LAFC the biggest win in Austin FC history?- Austin FC come back to draw Orlando 2-2 (43:18)- Were the red cards fair?- Owen "Teen" Wolff gets his first starts- LA Galaxy Preview- Join the Patreon- Free Ticket Giveaway brought to you by Sage Wilson Property GroupYou can find more detailed show notes at The Striker Texas. Remember to rate, review, and subscribe to the show at moontowersoccer.com or via your favorite podcasting app.This episode is brought to you by FVF Law

Michael Oldroyd - Comedy Podcast

Mike forgets to talk about Elon Musk's recent poop emoji tweet, but he does talk about Obi Wan Kenobi and gives a huge shout out to the Netherlands and specifically Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Just listen to the freaking podcast. Descriptions are over-rated!

Bi' Gidene Soralım | Türkçe Podcast
4.20 Panama'dan Hollanda'ya Bir Göç Hikayesi | İpek Evci @aradiginizkisigeziyor

Bi' Gidene Soralım | Türkçe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 53:06


İstanbul'da eşi Eren ile beyaz yakalı bir hayat sürerken eşine gelen bir teklif ile 2016'da eşi ve çocuğu ile Panama'ya yerleşen İpek Evci, orada geçen 3 senenin ardından 2019'da yine başka bir iş teklifi ile Amsterdam'a yerleşiyor. 10 yıllık kurumsal hayatını Panama'ya yerleşmesiyle bırakan İpek, yurtdışı deneyimini ve gezilerini Aradığınız Kişi Geziyor ismiyle sosyal medyada ve blogunda paylaşmaya başlıyor. İpek ile Panama ve Hollanda gibi iki farklı yerdeki apayrı deneyimlerini, nasıl iki yeri de evi haline getirdiğini, adaptasyon konusundaki güzel tavsiyelerini ve Hollanda eğitim sistemi gibi farklı konuları konuştuğumuz, enerjisi yüksek bir sohbet oldu. Panama'yı merak ediyorsanız ayrıca 2. sezon 22. bölümde Emre Rüşvanlı ile olan bölümü de dinleyebilirsiniz. Uygun kur ve düşük gönderim ücretiyle yurt dışı para transferlerinizi kolayca yapabileceğiniz TransferGo uygulamasını http://bit.ly/bigidenesoralim'dan indirip inceleyebilirsiniz

NDR - Hör mal 'n beten to
USA - so as dat mutt

NDR - Hör mal 'n beten to

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 1:49


Gerd Spiekermann hat sein Mikro eingepackt und berichtet aktuell aus Amerika. Erstes Ziel: New Orleans. USA – so as dat mutt Hi guys– oder Moin, Moin ut New Orleans, wo mien Fro un ick to Tiets op Tour sünd. Ick as olen Jazzer mööt doch eenmol de Stadt beleevt hebben, wo de Jazz in de Welt komen is, Wat di glieks opfallt, wenn du in de USA inreisen deist, hier löppt allens so af as dat mutt. Avers jümmers fründlich. Denn wenn dat mol hokeln deit – biˋt Instiegen in den Fleger t.b., denn heet dat Sorry! Excuse me! Deit mi leed. As wi von Hamborg över Amsterdam in Atlanta ankemen, denn güng´t ja dör den Toll. Hier wardˋt eernst: du betrettst amerikoonschen Bodden. Nu heet dat upmol: This way, please. Pass vörwiesen, Fingerafdrücke. Cash? Borgeld? 500 Dollar. Welcome in the USA. Nu overs gau wieder, denn wi mööt den Fleger no New Orleans noch kriegen. Endlich: Gate number 12. Dat Schild blinkt: boarding. Vör us noch een Keerl, denn sünd wi an de Reeg. Hier, our boarding pass, please. Doch de Fro von Delta Airlines mookt eenfach vör us de Dör no de Gangway dicht. Wat is los? You are too late. Wat, wi sünd to loot komen? Man de Mann vör us is doch ook noch … Too late! Sorry. Wi sünd von Hamburg över Amsterdam hierher flogen, 11 S un nu fehlt us ene Minuut? De Fro kickt mi an: Sorry. As ick al sä, in de USA löppt dat so as as dat mutt, un fründlich. Ja! Sorry! Man keen Bang: wi hefft den neegsten Fleger nohmen un twee Stunnen loter weern wi in New Orleans. Dor vertell ick bold mehr von. Bye! Hier gibt es mehr Plattdeutsch: Podcast: Die plattdeutsche Morgenplauderei "Hör mal 'n beten to" als als kostenloses Audio-Abo für Ihren PC: https://www.ndr.de/wellenord/podcast3096.html Die Welt snackt Platt: Alles rund um das Thema Plattdeutsch: https://www.ndr.de/plattdeutsch

Bowel Sounds: The Pediatric GI Podcast
Marc Benninga - Intractable Constipation: The Dutch Perspective

Bowel Sounds: The Pediatric GI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 57:41


In our first international episode, Dr. Peter Lu and Dr. Temara Hajjat cross the Atlantic (virtually) to talk to the illustrious Dr. Marc Benninga from Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Dr. Benninga is not only our first guest from our sister society ESPGHAN, but also the first Olympian and perhaps the first with a Wikipedia page.We bring in the European authority on pediatric constipation to talk about how he evaluates and treats children with constipation that has persisted despite our usual treatment with oral medications.  We compare and contrast the practices in the United States and the Netherlands.Learning Objectives1) To understand different approaches to the evaluation of a child with constipation refractory to oral laxatives.2) To understand the role of rectal irrigation in the treatment of a child with constipation refractory to oral laxatives.3) To review the evidence on pelvic floor biofeedback therapy in children with suspected pelvic floor dyssynergia4) To recognize the differences in practice among pediatric gastroenterologists in the evaluation and management of children with intractable constipationCME for NASPGHAN members is available here!As always, the discussion, views, and recommendations in this podcast are the sole responsibility of the hosts and guests and are subject to change over time with advances in the field.Produced by: Peter LuSupport the show

The Conversation
Female collectives and neighbourhood feminists

The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 27:38


Collectives offer opportunities for like-minded individuals to unite over a common goal, approaching issues with a shared vision and democratic mindset. They can range in size from just a handful of people to thousands, and they have the ability to disrupt the status quo and be vessels for remarkable change. But what's it like to start one? Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who have founded female collectives making a difference. Aya Chebbi is a Tunisian diplomat and a pan-African and feminist activist. Named in Forbes Africa's 50 Most Powerful Women, she rose to global prominence as a political blogger during Tunisia's Revolution in 2010/2011. In November 2018 she became the first appointed African Union Envoy on Youth, and was the youngest senior official in the history of the African Union. In 2021, Aya established the Nala Feminist Collective, which brings together 17 acclaimed African feminists to unite behind Africa's agenda nationally and globally. Camila Montecinos Díaz is a Psychologist and therapist from Chile. She moved to the Netherlands four years ago where she co-founded Neighborhood Feminists, a collective based in Amsterdam which helps combat period poverty. They provide Dignity Kits with menstrual products and basic toiletries. Currently, they help over one hundred people each month and in total have distributed over 80,000 tampons. Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia (Image: (L), Aya Chebbi, courtesy Aya Chebbi. (R), Camila Montecinos Diaz, courtesy Camila Montecinos Diaz.)

Deep Focus
2013.08.26 Eric Person on Wayne Shorter - 2 of 3

Deep Focus

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 71:18


Oh, the riches!  Not only a Deep Focus on Wayne Shorter's then-recent work with his Quartet, not only the inspired and inspiring Eric Person as Mitch Goldman's guest, not only never-before-heard, studio-quality recordings of Wayne, but also a twenty-minute pop-in from Phil Schaap. And this was on the occasion of Wayne's 80th birthday in 2013-- wow.   It's on WKCR 89.9FM, WKCR HD-1 and wkcr.org this Monday from 6pm to 9pm NYC time.  Tuesday morning it goes up on the Deep Focus podcast on your favorite podcasting app or at https://mitchgoldman.podbean.com/   #WKCR #JazzAlternatives #DeepFocus #WayneShorter #EricPerson #MitchGoldman #JazzRadio #JazzPodcast #PhilSchaap   Photo credit: Wayne-Shorter_in_Amsterdam_1980 Chris Hakkens CC BY 2.0 creativecommons.org-licenses-by- 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Thriving Women Artists
Should Artists Work For Free ?

Thriving Women Artists

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 27:43


When you're starting out as an artist, you're going to get people asking you to do work for free for “exposure”. But is that the right thing to do? How do you know if working for free will actually help you in the long run, or if someone is just taking advantage of you? This week on Thriving Women Artists, Ping, Sarah, and Dorien will help you navigate those tricky questions and make sure you know when you should be getting paid for your time.    KEY TAKEAWAYS Ping, Sarah, and Dorien are working for free on this podcast, but see it as investing. Investing their knowledge in you and in themselves. There may be a time when they can make money from it, but right now it's something designed to help you.  It feels like a catch 22 situation sometimes. You feel you need to be published already for other publishers to actually publish you.   It can be a little awkward doing work for free for friends and family. We want to help them out but when they come to you with feedback it can be so frustrating and leave a sour taste.  If someone does want you to do work for free, it's worthwhile getting a contract anyway. Make sure you're getting what you need out of it, for example have it in writing where your art will appear and how many times. That way you know what the gain will be from your time.  Your enjoyment and desire to work on your art can diminish quicker if you're not getting any reward for your time.  If you are doing some work for someone for free, you need to make sure they know the value of the work you're doing. For example you can send them an invoice with the regular price displayed but with a 100% discount applied.  BEST MOMENTS ‘Exposure is not going to pay your bills'  ‘It's that she doesn't value my time, it's disrespectful I think'  ‘As a creative it is important that you invest'  ‘You have the power to say yes and say no'   EPISODE RESOURCES  Article on Julia Child Julia Child - “Julia” on HBO max  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/julia-child-hbo-cast-the-french-chef-obama-netflix-our-great-national- parkshttps://juliachildfoundation.org/   ABOUT THE PODCAST  A serious and fun podcast for female creatives hosted by Ping, Dorien and Sarah, three happy artists from Amsterdam.  This podcast will inspire you to make a living out of your art. We welcome you to be part of this community of like-minded people. www.thrivingwomenartists.com www.instagram.com/twapodcast   ABOUT THE HOSTS Ping He  Ping is a watercolor artist. Her work is inspired by nature and her motherhood experience. She develops her greeting cards brand and teaches Botanical Illustration courses online and offline.  www.pinghe.art info@pinghe.art www.instagram.com/pinghe.art   Sarah van Dongen  Sarah is a children's book illustrator and visual artist. She takes her sketchbooks and art supplies everywhere, which results in illustrations based on observation and daily life. www.sarahvandongen.com sarahvandongenillustration@gmail.com www.instagram.com/sarahvandongenillustrations   Dorien Bellaar: Dorien is an illustration artist. Her work is mainly focused on illustration for children, editorial/food illustration, hand lettering, and she likes to combine those into both traditional and digital art.  www.dorienbellaar.nl hello@dorienbellaar.nl  www.instagram.com/dorienbellaar See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Turtle Recall
Turtle Recall #092 – April Gets in Dutch

Turtle Recall

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 105:54


This week we break down the episode “April Gets in Dutch”. The Turtles are in Amsterdam, where they only talk about wooden shoes, windmills, and cheese. We got an interesting plot where Krang wants the Duchess Diamond and 2 thieves which we only see in […]

REZD.tv Network
Turtle Recall #092 – April Gets in Dutch

REZD.tv Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 105:54


This week we break down the episode “April Gets in Dutch”. The Turtles are in Amsterdam, where they only talk about wooden shoes, windmills, and cheese. We got an interesting plot where Krang wants the Duchess Diamond and 2 thieves which we only see in […]

Antritt – detektor.fm
Mobilitätsbildung und Elterntaxi, Fahrrad ist krank mit Reifen, Licht und Bremsscheibe

Antritt – detektor.fm

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 68:17


Wir sprechen über Mobilitätsbildung mit Anika Meenken vom VCD und über Reifen, Lichtanlage und Bremsscheiben mit Werkstattmeisterin Christiane Lang. [00:00:00] Begrüßung [00:02:01] Themenübersicht [00:02:58] Mobilitätsbildung und Elterntaxi [00:06:11] Breite Facetten [00:10:49] Problematik: Elterntaxi [00:15:16] Angst und Bequemlichkeit [00:20:06] Die positiven Aspekte [00:28:32] Fahrrad ist krank mit Reifen, Licht und Bremsscheibe [00:34:10] Qualität von Kinderrädern [00:40:36] Flackernder Scheinwerfer [00:43:02] Rubbelnde Scheibenbremse [00:49:20] Geschmeidige Hände, aber wie?! [01:04:00] Arcade Fire – Unconditional II (Race and Religion) Hier entlang geht's zu den Links unserer Werbepartner: https://detektor.fm/werbepartner/antrit >> Artikel zum Nachlesen: https://detektor.fm/gesellschaft/antritt-mobilitaetsbildung-elterntaxi-fahrrad-licht-und-bremsscheibe

Eeuw van de Amateur
Meerkoet Revisited

Eeuw van de Amateur

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 79:42


Deze week een re-run van onze meerkoet-aflevering, die we maakten met bioloog en meerkoetkenner Auke-Florian Hiemstra. Met hem liepen we door Amsterdam, en bekeken we verschillende nesten van deze bijzondere vogels, die zich comfortabel bedienen van plastic afval als nestmateriaal.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
What's Happening in Payments Ep. 7: Adyen's Brian Dammeir on the shifting payments landscape

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 20:52


Welcome back to What's Happening in Payments. I'm your host Ismail Umar, and in today's episode, I'm joined by Brian Dammeir, president of North America at Adyen. Adyen is an Amsterdam-based firm that allows businesses to globally accept, process, and settle ecommerce, mobile, and point-of-sale payments. It acts as a payment processor for some of the biggest brands across tech, retail, travel, restaurants, and more, including Spotify, Uber, Facebook, LinkedIn, McDonald's, eBay, and L'Oréal. Brian has been with Adyen for the past seven years, and prior to that, he held a variety of product roles at Google and Airbnb. Brian and I discuss a number of topics, including his experiences at Adyen, how he's seeing a shift in consumer culture and expectations across generations, the potential long-term effects of Covid on consumer behavior, and the role that Adyen wants to play in the future of payments.

Composers Datebook
Alfons Diepenbrock

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 2:00


Synopsis It was the fashion in the late 19th century to decorate concert halls with the names of famous composers like Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms. Of course, over time some composers once very popular fell out of favor, and many old concert hall walls included names like Cherubini and Meyerbeer, composers who nowadays are performed only on rare occasions. In Amsterdam, the main hall of the acoustically famous Concertgebouw boats a pantheon of over two dozen composers' names as part of its interior decoration, and, not surprisingly, a few Dutch composers are included in the mix. Most of the native sons so honored are probably unfamiliar outside of the Netherlands, however. Take for example Alfons Diepenbrock, a self-taught composer and conductor born in Amsterdam who lived from 1862 to 1921. Diepenbrock composed a small body of big orchestral works in the late Romantic style of Gustav Mahler, who was a close friend. In Amsterdam on today's date in 1906, the Concertgebouw Orchestra and conductor Willem Mengelberg premiered a work of Diepenbrock's entitled “In Great Silence – a Mood Poem based on an Aphorism of Friedrich Nietzsche.” This music sounds a little like a lost movement from some big Mahler symphony, and while these days the name Diepenbrock might not be as familiar as Mahler, maybe that's something we should work on correcting! Music Played in Today's Program Alfons Diepenbrock (1862 - 1921) — In Great Silence (A Mood Poem based on an Aphorism of Friedrich Nietzsche) (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra; Riccardo Chailly, cond (live recording)) Royal Concertgebouw Recordings 97033

Jong Beleggen, de podcast
101. Kapitaalallocatie | € 250.100

Jong Beleggen, de podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 56:03


Het belangrijkste punt om het management van een bedrijf op te beoordelen is wat ze doen met geld dat over is. Oftewel: kapitaalallocatie. Investeren ze in organische groei? Kopen ze eigen aandelen in? Gaat het naar een overname? Als kapitaal goed gealloceerd wordt, gaat het negen van de tien keer een goede belegging zijn. Pim legt uit waaraan je kunt zien of CEO's en CFO's de kunst van het alloceren beheersen.► Uitgebreide show notes en achtergrondinformatie: https://jongbeleggendepodcast.nl/101-kapitaalallocatie► Word Vriend: https://portfoliodividendtracker.com► Updates via Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jongbeleggen► Mijn volledige portfolio: https://beta.portfoliodividendtracker.com/p/jongbeleggenDoor de toenemende populariteit van de podcast blijkt het echter onmogelijk om alle berichten te beantwoorden; hoe graag ik dat ook zou willen. Veel vragen die gemaild worden krijgen een antwoord in de podcast. De kans is heel groot dat jouw vraag al besproken is in één van alle afleveringen. Voor veelgestelde vragen verwijs ik je graag door naar de website, waar een pagina hiervoor is ingericht. Klik hier voor alle veelgestelde vragen.Deze podcast is 100% expertise-vrij en alleen geschikt voor amusementsdoeleinden. De inhoud mag niet worden beschouwd als financieel advies.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Decarb Connect
Focusing on the U of CCUS – how CarbonCure reuses co2 in the concrete sector

Decarb Connect

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:47


CarbonCure has been a favourite of investors and a winner of the XPrize – for ten years they have worked hard to help the concrete sector reduce co2 footprints by working specifically on reuse of co2 within the product mix. Sean Monkman joins Alex Cameron to talk about permanent co2 removals, how to scale as a disruptor in the decarbonisation space and talks about why customers will accept green premiums when positioned effectively. We talk about the next for stackable solutions to tackle decarbonisation and also explore CarbonCure's own 500 megaton roadmap which is their “motivating north star” for all the work they do.  Show Links:  Learn more about CarbonCure here: https://www.carboncure.com/Explore some of their key projects: https://www.carboncure.com/projects/Decarb Connect focuses on the acceleration of industrial decarbonization around the globe. We do this by facilitating collaborations across the emerging decarbonization ecosystem - bringing together industrials (cement, metals and mining, glass, ceramics, chemicals, O&G), technology disruptors, investors and advisors. Through our membership platform, the Decarbonization Leaders Network (DLN), we gather a cross sector gathering of energy-intensive industries to share insights and experiences from those leading industrial decarbonization. If you enjoyed this conversation, take a look at what we have coming up in Amsterdam in June: https://decarbconnect.com/events/decarb-connect-eu-2022/ Many thanks to Sassy at Janno Media for her support of this series.  

New Books in History
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in South Asian Studies
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in Archaeology
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books in Archaeology

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/archaeology

New Books in Religion
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Hindu Studies
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books in Hindu Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-religions

New Books Network
Emma Natalya Stein, "Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples" (Amsterdam UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:24


Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensive picture of historical Kanchi, locating the city and its more than 100 spectacular Hindu temples at the heart of commercial and artistic exchange that spanned India, Southeast Asia, and China. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, online educator, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Learning Bayesian Statistics
#61 Why we still use non-Bayesian methods, with EJ Wagenmakers

Learning Bayesian Statistics

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 76:45


The big problems with classic hypothesis testing are well-known. And yet, a huge majority of statistical analyses are still conducted this way. Why is it? Why are things so hard to change? Can you even do (and should you do) hypothesis testing in the Bayesian framework? I guess if you wanted to name this episode in a very Marvelian way, it would be “Bayes factors against the p-values of madness” — but we won't do that, it wouldn't be appropriate, would it? Anyways, in this episode, I'll talk about all these very light and consensual topics with Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, a professor at the Psychological Methods Unit of the University of Amsterdam. For almost two decades, EJ has staunchly advocated the use of Bayesian inference in psychology. In order to lower the bar for the adoption of Bayesian methods, he is coordinating the development of JASP, an open-source software program that allows practitioners to conduct state-of-the-art Bayesian analyses with their mouse — the one from the computer, not the one from Disney. EJ has also written a children's book on Bayesian inference with the title “Bayesian thinking for toddlers”. Rumor has it that he is also working on a multi-volume series for adults — but shhh, that's a secret! EJ's lab publishes regularly on a host of Bayesian topics, so check out his website, particularly when you are interested in Bayesian hypothesis testing. The same goes for his blog by the way, “BayesianSpectacles”. Wait, what's that? EJ is telling me that he plays chess, squash, and that, most importantly, he enjoys watching arm wrestling videos on YouTube — yet another proof that, yes, you can find everything on YouTube. Our theme music is « Good Bayesian », by Baba Brinkman (feat MC Lars and Mega Ran). Check out his awesome work at https://bababrinkman.com/ (https://bababrinkman.com/) ! Thank you to my Patrons for making this episode possible! Yusuke Saito, Avi Bryant, Ero Carrera, Giuliano Cruz, Tim Gasser, James Wade, Tradd Salvo, Adam Bartonicek, William Benton, Alan O'Donnell, Mark Ormsby, James Ahloy, Robin Taylor, Thomas Wiecki, Chad Scherrer, Nathaniel Neitzke, Zwelithini Tunyiswa, Elea McDonnell Feit, Bertrand Wilden, James Thompson, Stephen Oates, Gian Luca Di Tanna, Jack Wells, Matthew Maldonado, Ian Costley, Ally Salim, Larry Gill, Joshua Duncan, Ian Moran, Paul Oreto, Colin Caprani, George Ho, Colin Carroll, Nathaniel Burbank, Michael Osthege, Rémi Louf, Clive Edelsten, Henri Wallen, Hugo Botha, Vinh Nguyen, Raul Maldonado, Marcin Elantkowski, Adam C. Smith, Will Kurt, Andrew Moskowitz, Hector Munoz, Marco Gorelli, Simon Kessell, Bradley Rode, Patrick Kelley, Rick Anderson, Casper de Bruin, Philippe Labonde, Matthew McAnear, Michael Hankin, Cameron Smith, Luis Iberico, Tomáš Frýda, Ryan Wesslen, Andreas Netti, Riley King, Aaron Jones, Yoshiyuki Hamajima, Sven De Maeyer, Michael DeCrescenzo, Fergal M, Mason Yahr, Naoya Kanai, Steven Rowland and Aubrey Clayton. Visit https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats (https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats) to unlock exclusive Bayesian swag ;) Links from the show: EJ's website: http://ejwagenmakers.com/ (http://ejwagenmakers.com/) EJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/EJWagenmakers (https://twitter.com/EJWagenmakers) “Bayesian Cognitive Modeling” book website: https://bayesmodels.com/ (https://bayesmodels.com/) Port of “Bayesian Cognitive Modeling” to PyMC: https://github.com/pymc-devs/pymc-resources/tree/main/BCM (https://github.com/pymc-devs/pymc-resources/tree/main/BCM) EJ's blog: http://www.bayesianspectacles.org/ (http://www.bayesianspectacles.org/) JASP software website: https://jasp-stats.org/ (https://jasp-stats.org/) Bayesian Thinking for Toddlers: https://psyarxiv.com/w5vbp/ (https://psyarxiv.com/w5vbp/) LBS #31, Bayesian Cognitive Modeling & Decision-Making with Michael Lee: https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/31-bayesian-cognitive-modeling-michael-lee...

Echt Gebeurd
Afl. 355 Te water: Julia Jansen

Echt Gebeurd

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 7:51


Julia Jansen zoekt als student een bijbaantje en vindt de vacature waar ze als kind al van droomde.Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Joris Voorn presents: Spectrum Radio

Joris Voorn live from Kings Night at Het Sieraad, Amsterdam

The Guy and Harley Podcast
Episode 246: Da Bye Bye

The Guy and Harley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 127:03


Harley's film 'Da Bai' had its cast and crew premiere and the men discuss their (hopefully) upcoming trip to Amsterdam for an Acting award. Guy has updates about I Survived a Zombie Holocaust and the men have a fight about the value of film school. We also take some listener feedback and discuss intermittent fasting. The Guy & Harley Podcast is a show about love, life and loss in the pursuit of filmmaking glory. Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/PigvillePatreon Make a one-off donation: http://bit.ly/BuyUsABeer Podcast links: https://linktr.ee/TheGuyandHarleyPodcast Watch Older: https://bit.ly/WatchOlderTheMovie​ Watch Immi The Vegan here: https://linktr.ee/ImmiTheVegan Watch No Caller ID here: https://bit.ly/NCID Invest with Stake: https://bit.ly/JoinStake Invest with Sharesies: http://bit.ly/SharesiesNZ ~ Guy and Harley

New Books in Gender Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Critical Theory
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Latin American Studies
Irune del Rio Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Native American Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in Environmental Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

Always Better than Yesterday
Ep 176 Interview Sessions with Alina Grenier-Arellano

Always Better than Yesterday

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 38:15


Friends, we have a new website! Please visit www.abty.co.uk to connect with us at a heart level and see whether our heartwork may serve you better. On episode 176 I am joined by Alina Grenier-Arellano, founder of Alegoria Game. Alina began her journey into social innovation with her studies of international development and economics at McGill University. She there discovered the potential for social entrepreneurship to solve the world's most urgent issues and pursued her Master's of Science in Entrepreneurship at the University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit to research collaborative creation. Alina specialises on identifying, promoting, and implementing the necessary conditions and culture that make people shine through, thrive and create together for the greater good. Since then, Alina founded Alegoria Game, the trilingual board game for connection and belonging, published her research on Maker Ventures twice, and led international Open Source Pharma collaborative initiatives. Alina co-founded Alegoria Game to support groups suffering from social stress and disconnect among groups in the mission towards a world where connection isn't so scary and each person can feel like they can belong and thrive. In this episode you will hear: 01:30 social entrepreneurship and collaborative creation 03:00 helping people become unburdened and connection no longer scary 04:00 why people find connection scary 07:00 the courage to be seen, heard and understood 09:30 adopting a totally different mind frame in the workplace 13:30 the Alegoria game 19:00 the ripple effect of team connection 24:00 invention is a by product of collaboration 26:00 a safe space without judgment 27:00 willingness comes from a regulated nervous system 28:45 Alina asks Ryan a question from the Alegoria game 31:00 it's us who makes sense and meaning of things 33:00 a new dawn, a new day I hope this interview inspires your leadership and the connections you create. Please do subscribe, leave a little review and share it with someone you wish to inspire too. Always love Ryan Connect with Alina Website: https://www.alegoriagame.com/ IG: https://instagram.com/alegoriagame Connect with Always Better than Yesterday Come to our 5 Year Celebration Event! You can buy tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/abty-community-celebration-tickets-269908863677 Website: www.abty.co.uk Instagram: www.instagram.com/alwaysbetterthanyesterdayuk TikTok: www.tiktok.com/@abty_uk LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/abty Discord: https://discord.gg/Apm3Ja465j Facebook Community: www.facebook.com/groups/weareABTY Thank you to our friends at Elevate OM, proud supporters of the Always Better than Yesterday Interview Sessions. Head to www.elevateom.com for Online Marketing & Web Design services that are affordable, bespoke & awesome. Please email your questions and comments to podcast@abty.co.uk

Adam Beyer presents Drumcode
DCR615 – Drumcode Radio Live – Close Relative studio mix from Amsterdam, Netherlands

Adam Beyer presents Drumcode

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 60:42


This week on Drumcode Radio Live we have a studio mix from Close Relative recorded in Amsterdam

Sixteen:Nine
Jeremy Jacobs, Enlighten

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 38:42


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT The cannabis retailing industry is interesting in a whole bunch of ways. It is a unique vertical market with an absolutely screaming need for digital signage and interactive technologies. While longtime recreational users may know their stuff, as US states and Canadian provinces have legalized, there's a whole bunch of new users coming in with needs that have more to do with sleep problems or arthritic joints. They walk into dispensaries and are confronted with products and options that are somewhat or entirely unfamiliar, so screens that promote and explain are very helpful and relevant. The dispensary business is also interesting because the industry has its own overcrowded ecosystem of payments and management systems that need to somehow be tied together. The largest player in cannabis digital signage is the Bowling Green, Kentucky firm Enlighten, which is in some 1,200 dispensaries in the United States, I had a fun conversation with Enlighten founder Jeremy Jacobs, who found his way into digital signage when the clean energy business he was running went south in the late 2000s recession. He pivoted into screens in businesses, and menu displays for restaurants led to an opportunity to branch into cannabis retail. He's a super-smart, interesting guy more signage people should know about. Enjoy. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Jeremy, thank you for joining me. Can you give me the rundown on what your company does?  Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, absolutely, Dave. Enlighten is the only real omni-channel company within the cannabis vertical particularly, and by omni-channel, we affect the customer journey throughout that entire customer journey. We have a product real quickly called AdSuite that targets people in a digital environment, whether it be mobile, Roku or even desktop computers based upon audience segmentation data we have, to know those are known cannabis consumers. And then we have our SmartHub product, which is an in-store product which is why we're here today, digital signage, kiosk related, and that product helps to upscale the customers that were brought in from the marketing from AdSuite. And this could be on menu boards, this can be on information displays, this can be on tablets, any number of things, right? Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, so SmartHub is really unique. Even if you zoom out of the cannabis vertical and just look broadly at the digital signage industry, SmartHub is an extremely unique product that we created. It manages kiosks, it manages digital signage, all sorts of menus, feature boards, order queue systems, break room TVs, where the audience has shifted from a consumer to the actual employee. It uses extremely advanced logic and filtering with the point of sale data that it's consuming to make these things and even has an e-commerce component to it. So really the way to think about it is that SmartHub is an extremely robust merchandising platform that manages all of your consumer facing surfaces, whether that surface is a passive screen, an interactive screen, like a kiosk or even the webpage where someone would come to purchase and make an order on your website. And the cannabis industry is its own unique ecosystem, right? There's POS companies that only do cannabis business, and so on?  Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, I would say there's no true word than cannabis is its own individual ecosystem. So as a veteran, not been in the industry quite as long as you but since 2008, I've seen a lot of things and cannabis extremely unique. So it does have all of its own tech stack companies for the most part. There are a few companies, Microsoft Dynamics makes a sort of a POS system that's been modified for cannabis. But outside, I'll see a Square every now and then, but for the most part 99.99% of all point of sales systems at a digital signage company would integrate with are extremely cannabis specific and they all compete for what is roughly 8,500 retail clients across just short of 40 states, and so to talk about the uniqueness, even in more depth, not only are the stacks different in cannabis than they would be outside of that, but all the individual laws and rules that apply very literally from state to state. So you even have state variances.  Why would so many companies decide, “I want to be in a space that's changing constantly and not all that big and in the grand scheme of what retail is”? Jeremy Jacobs: That's a great question. I think what your question was alluding to, there's the TAM, the total addressable market. You look at restaurants and there's literally hundreds of thousands of them, and I would argue there's barely as many POS companies in restaurants as there is inside of cannabis. And I think it's a couple of things. From an emotional standpoint, this is “the green rush” right? Any cannabis advocate that for the last hundred years that it's been illegal has felt violated by the error, has seensocial injustice from that. I believe there's an emotional component why a lot of these companies are there, a lot of these leaders are there. Second, there's a power vacuum that gets field when no one wants to go somewhere. So when you take a look at the cannabis industry, none of these major POS companies that we're referring to, none of them had any interest at all whatsoever in getting involved in cannabis. So the result of that is someone has to, and then the third prong, I think of this little fork here is that there is a green rush. The Anheuser Bushes of the world are about to be made of cannabis. There's very unique transactions, very unique audiences, and there's a lot of money to be made there. There's a lot of value and you can see companies that are in the space that make tech.  If you look on the internet, Weed Maps is probably the largest one, listed on the NASDAQ billion plus dollar company, recently Dutchie has made some announcements for billion plus dollar companies as well. So fortunes are being made even though the total addressable market is small. Yeah, I've always thought that the cannabis dispensary business was a particularly interesting one for digital signage, because unlike most retail where you walk into an apparel retailer, you know what you're looking for, clothes, I need a shirt or whatever. It's pretty obvious.  But if I walk into a cannabis dispensary, I'm pretty much lost. I don't know what I'm even looking at and all these different strains of flowers and buds and this and that. It is like Mars to me. But, and I suspect a lot of people walk in like that who maybe aren't recreational users, but want it to help them sleep or calm them down or whatever purpose they have for it? Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, and so to drill into that observation you've made is really there's two kinds of consumers that very quickly develop in cannabis. There's the customer that you just described, which is a new customer, and there's a lot of those, because again, cannabis was technically illegal for about a hundred years. And so there's a huge amount of new customers that don't know anything, and so there's a massive educational vacuum there, and that's actually, Enlighten really started as we recognize that, and so we created an in-store digital out of home, a television network that runs ads for brands and things of that nature, endemic or non-endemic. We've got clients like Door Dash or Vans shoes or FX networks and their cannabis shows, but the content that's on that network is educationally driven specifically to satisfy that lack of education that you just talked about, and then on the other end of that spectrum, there are these clients that very much know what they want and precisely what they're looking for and those particular clients aren't looking for that same experience. They're looking for, digital menus that can be sorted based upon terpenes are based upon cannabinoid profiles so the highest THC value, they're looking for is express checkout kiosks, so they don't have to have an interaction.  So uniqueness of the cannabis dispensary from a digital signage perspective is you have to create digital environments that satisfy both of those polar opposites.  I gather when you were talking about omni-channel that it's really important or helpful to a company playing in this space to be able to serve multiple needs and to integrate with the other technologies that are part of the ecosystem. If you just did digital signage, it's a walled garden thing where you're going to get much better reception for many users, whereas you can provide multiple components, right? Jeremy Jacobs: Oh, absolutely. I've been in a lot of industries. The restaurant space was the first one. I was really into digital signage. Sysco Foods started slinging my digital menus for me, and like things 2009 and their 30 different offices and so I got to see a lot of things there. But in the first week in cannabis, eight years ago, the word integrate came up like 40 different times within an hour, and so I've never seen an industry that's so demanding of integrations. Like for example, you walk into a restaurant and any number of restaurants and you look over by the hostess stand and there's the DoorDash tablet, and there's a GrubHub tablet, and there's a Postmates tablet and there's all these tablets. And so the hostess is watching these orders come in and then they're putting them in their POS system. That would never fly in the cannabis industry, like it's a demanded integration by these people, and so if you're going to create an integration engine, you're going to want to make it have more points of influence than just a TV menu, you're going to need to provide that e-commerce plug and you're going to need to provide those kiosks. You're going to want to link up with their customer data for targeting those customers, on their mobile devices. You're exactly right, if you're going to be relevant in cannabis, your stack better be serious because they're trying to reduce that vendor set to if they could just one, nobody does all of it, but they want to reduce that number to the smallest possible. Is that in part, because it's a younger buyer audience who understands technology more and didn't grow up in kind of old style restaurants or whatever, where there were all these different systems?  Jeremy Jacobs: Interesting thing you said there,t because it's a younger buyer, so that was very true eight years ago. But at this point, that is not the truth at this juncture. So just a few years ago, I think it was two and a half years ago, the fastest growing segment of users shifted from 20 year olds to middle-aged mothers and it was the fastest growing audience, and then over the last few years, what has really been the fastest growing audience has actually been elderly people. It seems like they're starting to come to grips with, “Hey, I have pains and aches and cannabis is actually the solution”, and so it's a big growing segment.  But I think the answer to the question that you did ask is why is there this desire for a consolidation of a tech stack more than anything.  Yeah, I was thinking more of the operators that tend to be younger. Maybe that's not the case?  Jeremy Jacobs: Same thing at this point, it's not the case now, it's weird. So it was the case before, a hundred percent because who was willing to take that risk to get in the weed business, and so a hundred percent, but now I'm sitting in meetings with digital officers and marketing officers from Abercrombie and Apple, and they came from big organizations and so it's a very changing landscape.  But at the end of the day, I think that some of them are young, so yes, to your answer, very good observation. Second is the ones that aren't young are professionals, and they're used to dealing with that. But thirdly, I think for both of them, the demand of tech stack is necessary because the regulations and the data that they have to send back to the state agencies and authorities and all of those sorts of things and the compliance they have to undergo is worse than any other industry ever. Like they're under so much scrutiny and you could lose your license at the drop of a hat, and so they want less to deal with so they can focus more on staying in business.  Does that touch on your platform and what you do? Do you have to have a Nevada version of it and a Colorado version and I forget where else it's legal, California, obviously. But do you have to pass them out state by state or is it pretty uniform? Jeremy Jacobs: Great question. So the technology itself is the same across all the states. AdSuite is AdSuite and SmartHub is SmartHub, but there are definitely nuances. So let me give you a couple of interesting examples in the state of Pennsylvania, you're not allowed to put anything up on a screen from a digital signage perspective, unless absolutely it has been medically proven. And so it needs to come from a doctor or some position, a medical authority, and in Alaska, for example, they don't believe anything has ever been proven by a doctor or medical authority and so you can't put anything up that even closely resembles a recommendation. So there's two polar opposites. So from a content perspective, I gotta watch those things. From an advertising perspective. Some states, even though it's cannabis, won't let you show pictures of weed in the advertisements. Go figure that out. How do you advertise weed without showing weed? You can't show people consuming the product in a lot of states with advertisements. So there's another nuance, and then a third nuance is like in Pennsylvania, what I'm able to put on a digital menu is very specific and I cannot put any imagery into one thing, and I have to, I'm required to put certain testing results, similar to the way in the restaurant industry. Now everybody went digital whenever they were required to put the calorie count for these items, and that's when you saw this massive uprising in digital cause they got to replace all this stuff anyway, might as well go to the screen, and in Pennsylvania, I got to put things like that, testing results.  What's the content that seems to be required across all the different dispensaries, kind of the money messages that need to be there, and the operators want to have up there? Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, so from a TV menu perspective. We'll start with our that's the most largely adopted digital signage product ever and so the TV menu, what's necessary is the name of the products, the type of the product, the weight of the product, the price, the product, but really importantly, people want to know about cannabinoid profiles, is this high or low in THC? The psychoactive ingredient that gives you the feeling of a high, is it higher, lower in CBD, which is the non-psychoactive ingredient that really focuses a lot on pain, arthritis and inflammation and things of that nature, muscle pain. So consumers sort of demand that, operators want to provide that. And from an educational perspective, if you're talking about a different digital signage product and just more like digital signage, we're producing educational videos, the demand really is around education of what are these different terpenes, what are these different cannabinoids, these little things inside of the cannabis that creates different effect for each strain, like this one makes me sleepy, this one makes me energetic, this one's great for back pain, and so that's the demand from a regulatory standpoint of pretty much the only uniform thing that I can't really do is show anything that's cartoonish that might want to lure children into the store.  There was a big problem with packaging for edibles for a while there, right? Jeremy Jacobs: It was, they've got sour patch kids on the box, and the first versions of edibles were very kid friendly because they took kids candies and made them, and now that's pretty much been regulated out. So the same thing, that same sort of concern with the packaging that you pointed out with edibles is also a concern in digital signage and even digital advertising. So if I'm targeting a mobile phone, even though I'm targeting a known cannabis consumer, just stay away from anything that might be alluring to children. So if I'm a customer of Enlighten, is it a SaaS platform that I am using?.  Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, so the two products are different. The SmartHub is the in-store signage, kiosk, kind of technology that manages all of that and talks to your POS system. That is definitely a SaaS product. As far as pricing models, there's been a lot of those in digital signage, our kiosk system is one price for your entire store and use as many as you want. Our signage model is the same as anyone else's, per node. SaaS model on our AdSuite product, though that is a SaaS product, if you will, it's a piece of software that gains you access to those audiences on our DOH network and in stores, as well as, digital Roku devices, mobile devices, desktop computers but that's driven just like any other digital advertising model would be external on a cost per impression basis. What's the footprint for your company at this point? Jeremy Jacobs: So we've reached a really interesting crossroads, very few companies in cannabis have ever got over that thousand mark. Right now, I would estimate we're in probably roughly 1200 dispensaries, somewhere thereabouts and then have several hundred other clients that are brands and so forth so our footprint reaches to about 1500 or so clients, big number and a TAM of 8,500, if you look at it that way.  And this is an industry that like more and more states seem to be coming on stream, or at least there's a push to bring them on stream. So it's not like it's a finite market right now? Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah. So that's part of the growth. When we're assessing growth, there's a couple ways to look at it. One is how we can get more money out of the existing customers and that's to offer premium versions of our products, additional services that might be out there that we could focus on. But also there's just the overall growth of the entire market itself, and there's a couple of phases of that. The first phase is for the state to go medical. So now, they can be a client of ours. But typically, we find the greatest traction in the states once they go recreational because what happens is their revenue growth is astronomical.  People don't appear to want to go to get a medical license nearly as easily as just walking in a dispensary. So whenever they go recreational, they buy a lot of other products from us and really focus on that retail environment and creating a magical experience for those recreational customers. So really there's two phases, medical, and then recreational. But right now you're looking at cannabis in almost 40 states at a medical level roughly 10 or so at a recreational level. I'm averaging there, the number changes. I haven't kept track of it in a minute, but to give you an idea of growth, there's about 10-12 to go to medical and then there's the vast majority or 80 plus percent that are not yet recreational. So a lot of growth in them.  Are you up in Canada as well?  Jeremy Jacobs: We are. So it's a lot of challenges working inside cannabis, anybody's ever nailed internationally. You have to have your own bank accounts, your incorporations, your teams up there. It's hard to import hardware products, and as a company, we do also provide the hardware. So that has its own challenges, but we do operate in Canada. We've got some systems in Puerto Rico, which is a US territory.  Jamaica, we send some things too. We have some plans we're brewing up. Spain has a pretty good sized cannabis market and so we're looking internationally there because the challenge is the same. People don't understand cannabis, they need education. That's the same worldwide. It's been illegal globally, for a hundred years.  How did you get into it? You mentioned that your first foray into digital signage was restaurants for Sysco, how did you end up in this?  Jeremy Jacobs: So in 2008, I started a company called IconicTV, and it's had many offshoots with verticals. I've been one of those guys when I see a vertical, I'd make a very precise product. We helped build a C-store DOH network called C-store TV. We had a school product called, school menu guru. We had a lobby product called lobby Fox, it does visitor management and so one of those products we noticed early on was digital TV menus, and so in 2009, I formed a deal with Sysco foods and they have 30 offices across the country that would distribute my digital signage, digital TV menu products to their restaurant tours. And so I hired these vice presidents in each of those areas to partner with those offices as Sysco calls an opco, and so Sysco would have reps and my reps would go do ride alongs, and so they would ride along with these representatives and go in and meet these restaurant tours at work and stuff. One of them, the guy in Denver, Colorado, Ted Tilton's name? So Ted called me one day and this is right before cannabis goes legal in Colorado, which was the first state to legalize recreational cannabis, Washington and Colorado voted on it basically at the same time. But Colorado was the first actually who implemented, and he calls me, he says, Hey man, I got this idea and I said, what is it? He goes, these TV menus we're selling through Sysco. I said, yeah, he goes, what do you think about making some for marijuana? I said, what are you talking about? And he says I've got these buddies opening this dispensary called DANK, and it'll be the closest dispensary to Denver International airport and I got this feeling as soon as weed was legal in Colorado, a lot of people are going to be coming into DIA and this place is going to be really busy since it's the closest one, and he says, and I was like, what would be the difference? And he said, essentially we put up marijuana buds instead of chicken sandwiches. And I said, I'm in. I've been a big advocate of cannabis for a long time. At one point, I was even the executive director of Kentucky NORMAL, the division of the national organization for marijuana legalization. It's the Kentucky chapter. I've been a big advocate of it. I've been a self prescribed patient for many years. It was an interesting opportunity to take a couple of things I was very passionate about both cannabis and digital signage and went to do some real work on two things I care about. So we dove in.  Has the profile of the operator changed?  I remember talking to another person who's involved in this space and actually being out in Denver and he was saying that there's two types of operators. There's a business people who see this as a growth opportunity, and they've already had some experience in retail or in investing or whatever, and then there's growers and growers who are turning into retailers and he said the challenge with the growers as they're growers, they're not business people and they don't really understand retail, and I'm curious if in the early days you saw a lot of them stories of dispensaries that would start up and then drop off because they didn't really know what they were doing?  Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, and I'll take that example. Your friend gave you a pretty good insight there, but to expand on that, I don't even think it's just growers though. It's I think just very weed passionate people, like they're very passionate about it. Whether it's consuming it or making concentrates or growing it or whatever. So I would just call them plant passionate people versus business people, and it very much exists, and it doesn't today to the degree that it used to. In the beginning, someone that's a senior executive vice president of Abercrombie is not going to go start a dispensary, like during the first couple of years, we were all wondering if everybody opened these things, were all gonna go to jail. I'm sure everybody in America is going everybody in Denver is going to do it, just wait, and if all my friends at open dispensaries were sitting around, I would have conversations with the night and they're like, I'm just wondering if tonight, the DEA raids my house, and so nobody wanted to be under that scrutiny except plant passionate people. But as time got on and the federal government sorta started to take a position, even if the position was, “we don't have a position”, that's still a position, and so they're not taking an aggressive stance on it then you began to see real business people start to come into the environment and at this point, you have organizations like Cresco who just bought Columbia Care, and these operators have over a hundred stores and they're doing hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars in retail cannabis sales. These are not the type of marijuana dispensary that I think most people have in their mind. These people have entire floors of IT teams. They have entire floors and marketing teams. They do in-depth customer insight studies, and that influences every tiny nuance of their packaging and their store layouts. These are real operations, but I can still take you to Oregon right now and  walk into the shop or Nancy and Megan who are best friends and they have tie-died things up on the wall and they're very whimsical people that are just very passionate and who also have a successful sotry. Now they're not going to sell hundreds of millions of dollars to cannabis, but they're also successfully operating.  Think of it like liquor, for example, Liquor Barn exists and that's a big corporation. But, in the town I live in, everybody wants to go to Chuck's Liquors when Chuck was alive, because Chuck was just the coolest guy ever. So you went to Chuck, so they both have a place.  Yeah, I've certainly seen the same thing. I remember being an Amsterdam for ISE and, you'd stick your head into one of these coffee shops, and it was just a hole in the wall and weird but out by the hotel where I was staying, there was a dispensary that looked like an Apple store, like it was very slick.  Jeremy Jacobs: Interesting you say that. So there's this place called Euflora and Jamie Perino was one of the owners at the time and it's at the 16th street walking district in downtown Denver. This is the big street with the old piano outside and everybody wandering around a very touristy area and so we did the first project for them that I remember getting a call from them and they're like, “Hey, we open in 11 days and we've got this crazy idea where there'll be a touchscreen kiosk and it's sitting next to a jar of marijuana, and this kiosk has all this interactive stuff on it with everything about that strain of marijuana. We needed in our stores in 11 days. Can you guys do it?” And they said, oh yeah, and our budget is X, and I just laughed, and I said X is missing a couple of zeros, especially for 11 days, what are you talking about? And they're like, can you do it or not? And I said I can, but I shouldn't but I'm going to, and so we did, because we wanted to be part of the exposing of this whole thing. And so we took it on, and so when you would first walk on your floor, you can dig up some old video files from the news channels from eight years ago, it very much looked like an Apple store cause we had Apple iPads on every table next to a jar of marijuana and you can scroll up and down and see what the euphoric effects would be and does it make you sleepy, happy, hungry, horny, what's it going to do? And, in what genetics, where did it come from? And just all this interesting stuff, and people would come into that store fascinated, and so it was very Apple-esque.  How did you end up in digital signage? Cause I was looking at your bio and you've got patents in Magneto, hydrodynamics for energy exploration, drilling and everything. How did you get here?  Jeremy Jacobs: What the hell happened? Early in life I realized I didn't really like formal education. So I think I'm like nine hours from a college degree, but I dropped out and became entrepreneurial. So I became an investment broker and I worked on several different fundraising deals, most of them were driven around biodiesel. That was very active at the time when I dropped out of college, nearly two thousand, biodiesel was a thing, a lot of different technologies. And very quickly I got interested in alternative energy technologies and energy efficiency technologies, and just anything that was energy related, and technology related, and so I had an operation with about 20,000 acres of natural gas wells in Eastern Kentucky that were clean natural gas wells using advanced technologies like hydraulic fracturing. I started inventing Magneto hydrodynamic technologies that's used by Chevron and Exxon and people that. It goes down in oil wells. It's used to eliminate paraffin and that technology has now been adopted by the DoD to make airlines, to make fighter jets fly farther because the fluid systems flow better and a lot of different things, and then 2008 came, so I own a quarry, that's mine and silica for Silicon to make marker processors, and I got a bunch of natural gas, wells and magnetic technologies, and 2008 comes, 2007 comes, the housing crisis collapses, everything and natural gas went from about $14 in MCF, which was a vast majority of the revenue that we were driving to like a dollar and a half in MCF, which is the unit that you produce and sell for, it stands for thousand cubic feet, and I needed $3 to make that make sense, right? And now it's at a dollar and a half. So I went from really cash flow positive to a hundred percent cash flow negative and just a matter of months. And on top of that, when you own a bunch of quarries, nobody's buying any materials, and so I look up and literally everything I'm involved in just all of a sudden is collapsing and I don't have the payroll to make payroll for this massive bunch of employees. We had several offices in different parts across the country. And surely it was excruciatingly painful fast. Everything had to close, and so here's, here's the reality. I'm at home depressed out of my mind. I've just had to lay everyone off. I've had to shut in all these gas wells. I've had to lock the gates on all these quarries and nobody wants to talk about anything, everybody's going broke and my wife comes to me and she says, you've got to do something. We have kids we have to feed, we have bills we have to pay. You cannot sit here and be depressed, and I had seen somewhere I think it was in a mall. A friend of mine had built a TV screen, turned sideways, and it had Adobe Flash player on it, and it was playing some animated motion graphics that he controlled on a desktop PC inside this big kiosk and I thought I could do something similar to that, and so I literally grabbed a 32 inch Vizio TV out of my living room. My wife goes, where are you going with my TV? I said, I'll bring it back to you. I'll see you in a week, and she goes, you are leaving with the TV for a week? I said, yeah, and you'll get a bigger one, I promise, and I grabbed the Toshiba laptop that my field hands that would go around, they had to log what parts they use and how long they were on job sites and stuff, and I grabbed one of these old stinky laptops that smells like crude oil and hung it in a friend of mine's restaurant in Clarkson, Kentucky. It was called K's cafe and it was political season, and so I'm going to tell a story about myself here, Dave, and so I go around and build these very animated PowerPoints and I'm changing the files out via LogMeIn at the time. I didn't even have any software, digital signage software. I didn't even know about the digital signage thing. And so I'm like, I gotta sell ads on this thing, so I go to this guy that's running for sheriff, and I told a little white lie. I was like, Hey man, the other guy that's running for sheriff, he's buying in on my screens. It's in the most high traffic restaurant, and apparently legally, I've got to offer you the same opportunity at the same price. He goes, why what's he paying? And I told him, he goes, I'll take it, and so then I went to the guy that I just told a white lie and said, this other guy is buying. It was, which was actually true the second time. That's how I got started, I had to feed my kids. I had a 32-inch Vizio TV and a busted up laptop and I sold some people aspiring to be politicians, some ads and some real estate agents, and it just grew from there. I look up and I'm in hundreds of restaurants and fitness centers with the DOH network and six months later, a friend of mine says, Hey, can you use one of those silly ad TVs and make a menu on it because the price of salmon keeps fluctuating so much. I got to put these mailbox letters, and so we made, which was one of the early digital menus. I think we'd both agree, 2009-2009 was not the dawning moment of digital menus. It wasn't the precipice of it. That was very early. And so we started using those and saw opportunities to replace those little black felt directories with the letters you run out of the M, and so you flip the W upside down, it's all bow legged looking, on the little felt boards. We started making digital directories integrated with Google sheets, so you could change it easily and the rest was history, man. I dove in and needless to say, the kids are fed now. The wife is happy. She got a bigger TV. I think it's 70 inch now. So everyone's cool.  That's a hell of a pivot.  Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, buddy. Necessity is the mother of invention.  All right. This was terrific. I really enjoyed our conversation. Jeremy Jacobs: Yeah, man. I was going to start off this morning saying longtime listener, first time caller. I've been watching your website, your blog, your podcast for as long as I can remember. So it's been an honor to finally get to be a part of it, and I really appreciate it.  Thank you for taking the time with me. Jeremy Jacobs: I thank you, Dave.

Light Culture
Jefferson Osei of Daily Paper – From Blog to Global Fashion Brand

Light Culture

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:43


Daily Paper is an unlikely name for a fashion brand founded as a blog by three childhood friends from Ghana, Morocco and Somalia who met while living in Amsterdam. But there you have it. My guest today is Jefferson Osei, who along with his childhood friends Abderrahmane Trabsini and Hussein Suleiman, first started a blog – hence the name Daily Paper – that focused on their shared love for music, art, fashion, and culture. All that changed when they released a small collection of t-shirts that went viral. Today Daily Paper is a growing luxury fashion brand Inspired by African heritage –as well music, art, fashion and culture – translated toward a more western narrative. With retail stores in Amsterdam, New York and London – and fans like F1 driver Lewis Hamilton – it's full steam ahead for this forward thinking brand. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talking Elite Fitness
Torian Pro and Lowlands Throwdown Preview

Talking Elite Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 74:10


There's semifinals action in Australia and Amsterdam this weekend.  Sean and Tommy break down the Torian Pro and Lowlands Throwdown. What are the top storylines and who do they think will be moving on to the CrossFit Games.  Plus, another round of PRs and No Reps including a really fit detective and a 700 pound deadlift.

The Franciska Show
Music Is My Shlichus - with Esther Freeman

The Franciska Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:49


Join the discussion group: https://chat.whatsapp.com/Lj6a5VZhRnBKCumXLE43QK     Going back to our routes with an interview of a singer/songwriter- Esther Freeman. We talk about the challenging aspects of being one of the first "kol isha" superstars and the challenges that came with that. How social media changed the game and how unhealthy it can be for someone who just wants to do sing and not focus on the "influencing" in the SM way.   About Our Guest: Esther Freeman is an accomplished performer who brings incredible energy, a beautiful voice, powerful stage presence, creative song-writing and true meaning to the stage. Born and raised in Miami Florida as the 5th child to a lubavitch family of 7, Esther displayed musical ability at a young age and portrayed a real desire to inspire. Having refused an option to become a singer on the radio at 14, Esther was not dettered from her musical aspirations and decided to use it as a means to bringing others closer to Judaism. She began composing music and writing her own lyrics, accompanying herself on guitar and piano over 15 years ago. Since then, Esther has electrified audiences across the globe, in Amsterdam, London, Sweden, throughout the United States and has performed at the international Kinus Hashluchos twice. Esther's music ranges from slow soulful ballads to high-energy songs and are accompanied by personal stories and deep Jewish and chassidic concepts bound to capture, inspire and warm the hearts of her audience. What unites all of her songs are the meaningful lyrics that reflect her desire to share the beauty of Judaism with the world. Follow Esther on Instgram: https://www.instagram.com/esthersmusic/ This interview is released just in time for Lag B'omer as we renintroduce music back into our lives.   The link to Franciska's new single: https://youtu.be/KsF_7CKSqBc   To contact Franciska: franciskakay@gmail.com

Rejected Religion Podcast
Spotlight Ninian Nijhuis - Western Sidereal Astrology

Rejected Religion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:24


Ninian Nijhuis holds a Research Master in Religious Studies (University of Amsterdam); a BA in Law and an LL.M. in International Public Law (University of Utrecht). Her main focus is on Western Esotericism and her key fields of interest are Jungian psychology, sidereal astrology, mysticism, spirituality and its connections to science. Additionally, she is Head of Social Media at the Centre for History of Hermetic Philosophy and Related Currents (HHP Centre) and the University of Amsterdam, and currently works as a sidereal astrologer and coach.   In this interview, Ninian and I discuss sidereal astrology, and how it differs from tropical astrology (the system that most people in the West are familiar with). Ninian shares the history of astrology and of these two systems; why these systems became separated (with tropical astrology the most popular form in the West, and sidereal astrology in the East); and how sidereal astrology made a 'comeback' in the West via Cyril Fagan and others.   Ninian also shares her personal journey and views with regard to astrology, her research interest on an academic level, and how she uses sidereal astrology together with Jungian psychology in her own work.RESOURCESYou can find Ninian at https://niniansiderealastrology.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/niniannijhuis/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ninian.nijhuisAcademia.edu: https://uva.academia.edu/NinianNijhuisNinian's article about Western sidereal astrology: https://www.academia.edu/50008714/Western_Sidereal_Astrology_From_Ancient_Babylonia_to_the_Modern_WestFrom her website:https://niniansiderealastrology.com/2021/11/19/what-is-western-sidereal-astrology/  If you are interested in the academic study of Western Esotericism, and would like to be kept up-to-date on current lectures, courses, conferences, books, podcasts, etc., please check out -https://www.instagram.com/amsterdamhermetica/or https://www.amsterdamhermetica.nl/or https://www.facebook.com/amsterdamhermetica  Theme Music: Stephanie Shea

Pantelic Podcast
Pantelic Podcast S04E83: Schreuder maakt zich niet druk

Pantelic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 46:32


Er komt nog een special aan dit jaar, maar dit is toch al echt weer de laatste reguliere Pantelic Podcast van dit Ajax-seizoen. Resley en Lars bespreken de speler van het jaar, Tadic en Suárez, de transferzomer, het afscheid van Ten Hag en we bellen met Club Brugge-watcher David Van den Broeck van Het Nieuwsblad over Alfred Schreuder.(0:00) Intro en bezoek aan Vitesse - Ajax(7:08) Timber dé man van dit jaar, genoten van Antony, Onana de dissonant(9:40) Quote van de week: Arnold Bruggink benoemt Tadic tot Ajax-speler van het jaar. Bron: ESPN/Dit Was Het Weekend(11:08) Een spits nodig, maar geen Suárez(13:44) Club Brugge-watcher David van den Broeck over Alfred Schreuder(20:54) Helpt Schreuder nog bij Bring Back Ziyech?(25:52) Ten Hag ziet Overmars wel terugkeren(30:50) Transferzomer, de transformatie na Ten Hag(36:01) Het wensenlijstje voor volgend seizoen en hopen op Ihattaren(37:43) Winactie I Am Zlatan, over welke Ajacied een film?(41:49) Afsluiting en de vakantieplannenZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ellie and Anna Have Issues
Quickie: The handjob workshop

Ellie and Anna Have Issues

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 11:41


The news you've been waiting for! We are launching an extra weekly bonus episode: the Dirty Mother Pukka Quick & Dirty. Every week we'll be testing all the things you might be too scared to: think sessions with a divorce coach and what it's like to attend a sex party. But first we bring you the handjob workshop; Anna shares the top tips she received while attending the workshop in Amsterdam. We're finally putting the dirty in Dirty Mother Pukka. Original music by Matt J Brown at WeAreOK.com.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Business Leadership Under Fire with Pepyn Dinandt and Richard Westley

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 47:16


Our very special guests are global business guru Pepyn Dinandt and Military Cross holder, ex-army Colonel, Richard Westley OBE. They teamed up and wrote the book Business Leadership Under Fire. This is such a compelling show, packed full of hacks and lessons including: Why establishing leadership can stop your platform burning The “Who Dares Wins” approach to strategy and tactics Building and managing an excellent leadership team Team and organization structure to maximize business impact Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services Find out more about Pepyn and Richard below: Website: https://businessleadershipunderfire.com Pepyn on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pepyn-dinandt/ Richard on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-westley-obe-mc-66875216/   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as The Leadership Hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   What do you get when you smudge one of the world's global business leaders and one of the UK's top Army Colonels? The answer, Business Leadership Under Fire, our special guest today are Pepyn Dinandt and Richard Westley OBE, and they wrote the book, Business Leadership Under Fire, but before we dive in with Pepyn and Richard, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: Have you ever heard, focus takes you where it takes you? Inspired by a blog by Seth Godin many years ago, he had a focus of depth of field, and I'll share a story with you around how and why focus is so important. Picture the scene. There are two runners, both have exactly the same capability, exactly the same pace and the same injury, an injured left toe. The runner who's concentrating on how much their left toe hurts will be left in a dust by the one who's focused on winning. Even if the winner's toe hurts just as much. Hurt of course is a matter of perception. Most of what we think about is, we had a choice about where to aim that focus, aim that lens of our attention. We can relieve past injustices, settled old grudges, nurse festering sorts. We can imagine failure build up its potential for destruction and calculate its odds. Or we can imagine generous outcomes that we're working on. Feel gratitude, feel compassion for those that got us here and revel in the possibilities of what's next, we have an automatic focus are instinctive and cultural choices, and that focus isn't the only ones that are available to us. Of course, those are somewhat difficult to change, which is why so few people manage to do so, but there's no work that pays off better in the long run than focusing on positive and progressive outcomes. Remember the stories that you tell yourself, your story is your story, but you don't have to keep reminding yourself of the story you've told yourself before. If that story doesn't help you change positively for the future, it's probably not the right story in the first place. So, focus on the future stories that you want to tell yourself, and guess what? Those stories become a reality. That's been The Leadership Hacker New. Really looking forward to our conversation with Richard and with Pepyn. Let's dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: I'm joined by two very special guests on today's show. Pepyn Dinandt is a business executive with 30 years' experience successfully leading and restructuring companies in challenging situations as CEO and Chairman. Or in Amsterdam, Pepyn has lived in a number of countries over the years, including Turkey, Ireland, Switzerland, South America, and UK, where he attended University and now lives with his family in Germany. And he's joined by Richard Westley, a military cross holder, who's commanded soldiers and operations at every rank from Lieutenant through to Colonel and environments of desperate situations, including Albania, Afghanistan, Balkans. He retired from the army in 2010, having been responsible for pre-deployment training for forces bound for Iraq and Afghanistan. Between them, they teamed up and wrote the book Business Leadership Under Fire: Nine Steps to Rescue and Transform Organizations, Pepyn and Richard, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Pepyn Dinandt: Hi Steve. Yeah, good morning. Happy to be with you. Steve Rush: Me too. Hi Richard. Ricard Westley: Hi Steve. Steve Rush: So, a little bit about your backstory independently, and then we maybe find out how you kind of collided to come together to write the book. So, Pepyn, a little bit about your backstory? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, after leaving University, I somehow ended up in Germany and after spending three years at McKinsey, which was my paid business school, as I like to say, I landed my first CEO role in Eastern Germany, which was then just, you know, unified with Western Germany. And I ran a company which had a revenue of 50 million euros, but also losses of 50 million euros. So that was my first contact with the challenge of rescuing and transforming businesses and challenging situations. And I had so much fun. I mean, obviously it was very tough at the time, but I had so much fun doing that, that I have kind of never left that type of challenge. Steve Rush: Brilliant. And I guess it's the thrive of being able to rescue those firms that has kept you in that space, right? Pepyn Dinandt: That, plus the fact that you know, these are environments where you need to learn, because if you're not willing to listen and learn, you know, you're going to fail. These are always very, let's say complex situations, they're fast moving, they're fluid. And you know, it really kind of sharpens your skills and obviously, you know, some cases have been more successful than others. You never have only just big successes, but I thoroughly enjoy helping teams be the best version of themselves and you know, rescue these companies, rescue these organizations. Steve Rush: Yeah, and Richard, before what you do now, have you always been a military man? Ricard Westley: Yes, I joined the military pretty much straight after school and spent 25 years as an infantry officer serving around the world. Almost exclusively in operations and training roles. I managed to avoid the major staff roles and the ministry of defense for my 25 years. And then I left earlier than I, perhaps needed to, but I was ready to move. And I spent the last 12 years working in a number of appointments in commercial companies and now run my own consulting business. Steve Rush: Great. So, when did the stars align for you to both meet? Pepyn Dinandt: Well, I have been always interested in the application of military best practices in business. And I had met about four years ago, a gentleman called Tim Collins. The famous Tim Collins and you know, I had been discussing these ideas that I had about this crossover between the military and business. And he introduced me to Richard, that's how the two of us met. Steve Rush: And then Richard, from your perspective, what was the moment you thought, how we are going to do some business together, we're going to write a book. How did that come about? Ricard Westley: Yeah, so Tim. I was working with Tim at the time, and he mentioned Pepyn. So, he would you be interested in a conversation. I said, well, I'm always interested in conversations, and I generally like meeting new and successful people. So, you know, Pepyn and I had initial discussions and then some supplementary conversations and started looking at some sort of solution for